Tag Archives: Diane Brossart

Diane Brossart -Describes Her First Step In The Industry, 2008

Arizona Forward, Univ. of Phoenix offer teachers scholarships

Diane Brossart, Valley Forward, BIG Green Conference 2011 Speaker

Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Arizona Forward.

In an effort to strengthen and expand environmental education opportunities for Arizona teachers, Arizona Forward has joined with University of Phoenix to offer three full-tuition scholarships to deserving Arizona K-12 teachers. The scholarship program will grant three teachers from across the state the opportunity to complete either an undergraduate or master’s degree program at University of Phoenix.

The scholarship program provides educational opportunities to local educators who have demonstrated sustainable practices in their classrooms and want to continue to make a difference in their communities.

“Educating and mentoring the youth of today — leaders of tomorrow — on becoming stewards of our unique desert environment and conserving natural resources is critically important,” said Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Arizona Forward. “It’s through the support of University of Phoenix that we are able to present educational opportunities of this magnitude.”

The scholarship program was announced in conjunction with Arizona Forward’s tenth annual EarthFest Educators Night on Oct. 28 at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix. Nearly 400 Arizona teachers attended EarthFest to enjoy nearly 50 exhibits, activities and environmental education resources to aid them in mentoring the next generation of environmental stewards.

“Arizona Forward and University of Phoenix share a commitment to teacher education and sustainability,” said Dan Litteral, incoming chair of the board for Arizona Forward, and vice president and deputy general counsel for Apollo Education Group, parent company of University of Phoenix. “University of Phoenix College of Education has been educating teachers for more than 30 years, and is proud to once again partner with Arizona Forward to empower teachers with environmental education to bring to the next generation of students.”

University of Phoenix is dedicated to addressing education and workforce needs in the communities it serves. The University’s College of Education provides associate, bachelor’s and master’s degree programs for individuals who want to become teachers or current educators and administrators seeking advanced degrees. For more information about University of Phoenix® College of Education degree programs, visit www.phoenix.edu/education.

Educators across Arizona are encouraged to apply for the University of Phoenix Arizona Forward Scholarship by December 9, 2014, and recipients will be selected by January 19, 2015. Arizona teachers can visit www.phoenix.edu/azforwardscholar for the scholarship application.

Teachers who want to bring environmental and sustainable education opportunities into the classroom can find additional resources in the Arizona Forward’s online Environmental Education Directory. It features a comprehensive list of field trip opportunities, curriculum, classroom speakers and related materials.

Diane Brossart - Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane Brossart – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane BrossartPresident and CEO, Arizona Forward

Brossart joined the nonprofit civic group — which aims to move Arizona forward environmentally, economically and socially — as a member 30 years ago. She was appointed to her leadership role in 1991, when Valley Forward focused exclusively on Maricopa County. Rebranded as Arizona Forward is 2012, its expanded statewide sustainability agenda includes: land use, transportation, air quality, energy, water and environmental education.

Surprising fact: “I believe my mother who passed away nearly 10 years ago lives as a rabbit in my backyard.”

Biggest challenge: “Taking Valley Forward statewide after 43 years as the Valley’s voice for balance. I’m bringing the best and brightest talent around Arizona together to help make the Grand Canyon State the greatest place in America to live.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

federal transportation bill

Arizona Forward hopes to guide Arizona’s transportation systems

As Valley Forward transitions to Arizona Forward to encompass a statewide focus, it’s only fitting that the association with a 43-year history of success tackling environmental issues — including land use, water management, air quality and energy — turns its attention to an issue that impacts every resident and every business in Arizona.
Transportation.

“Valley Forward has always valued transportation as one of the organization’s key areas of interest,” says John Godec, president of Godec, Randall & Associates Inc., which helps governments and businesses solve public and stakeholder challenges. “The Phoenix and Tucson metros have seen radical transportation changes and improvements in the past decade, so we’re asking, ‘What’s next? Are we good to go now?’”

Just as it did last year with parks and open spaces, Valley Forward hopes to answer those questions as it unveils its stance on transportation, covering topics such as transportation planning, how it impacts the quality of life in the Sun Corridor and how transportation affects Arizona’s economy.

One issue that Valley Forward wanted to address in its Transportation Primer is one on the minds of every Arizona: traffic congestion and how to better connect cities with each other. According to a policy report written by Byron Schlomach for The Goldwater Institute, the average Phoenix commuter spends an average of 38 hours a year in traffic, while a commuter in Tucson spends roughly 42 hours in traffic.

In an attempt to remedy traffic congestion in Phoenix, voters adopted Proposition 400 in November of 2004, which allowed for the renovating and extending of current freeways and the addition of more public transportation, such as the Valley Metro Light Rail, all of which connect small communities with larger cities. In Tucson, Pima County voters approved the $2.1 billion Regional Transportation Plan, which saw the construction of a modern streetcar project throughout the city, giving more people a chance to get around, while getting cars off the highways.

However, the question that has been asked by Valley Forward is, is it enough, especially since Arizona only seems to be growing in size?

“At least half the transportation systems that the state will need in 2050 have yet to be built,” says Sally Stewart, deputy communications director at the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and Valley Forward member. “Despite the recent economic downturn, Arizona’s growth is not over. It is not a question of whether the Sun Corridor — one of the emerging megapolitan regions in the country — will be a reality; it is simply a matter of when.”

According to a study published in March 2010 by ADOT, it is expected that Arizona’s population will more than double, from 6.4 million to about 16 million people in the next 30 years. Maricopa County’s population is expected to increase by 90 percent, from 4 million people to about 7.6 million. The study suggests that because of this population explosion, travel times for various destinations in the Sun Corridor could increase by about 100 percent by 2050. This could mean that a trip between Phoenix and Tucson, which currently is about a 95-minute drive, could take up to 5.5 hours in 2050 (assuming that the Interstate-10 freeway is widened to about 10 lanes).

Valley Forward experts say that Arizona must plan ahead to improve this possible transportation dilemma, especially if the state wants to see more business activity and economic improvement.

“Transportation is key for economic development,” says said Eric Anderson, transportation director at the Maricopa Association of Governments. “The ability of a company’s workforce to commute on a predictable basis is critical. The movement of freight in and out of the region is also important. Companies looking to locate in the region always look at the adequacy of the transportation system in providing mobility and travel options.”

According to the American Public Transportation Association, every $1 billion invested in public transportation supports and creates 36,000 jobs. Despite the fact that policies, such as Proposition 400, have created and funded transportation projects, Valley Forward says that there is still not enough money allocated for Arizona’s travel needs.

“Arizona’s future economic development will be tied closely to the state’s willingness to commit funding and resources to improving and expanding its statewide transportation system,” says Craig Hughes, CEO and founder of Total Transit, the parent company of Discount Cab in Phoenix and Tucson. “Without a firm commitment to building and maintaining an efficient, integrated transportation network, the future could be one of congested freeways, inadequate rural highways, gridlocked city streets and under-funded and under-utilized mass transit.”

Valley Forward hopes that its stance and data findings will help create a dialogue not only among Phoenix and Tucson residents, but also policymakers.

“Arizona’s business community is a vital participant in guiding policymakers regarding the infrastructure challenges facing the state,” Stewart says. “If Arizonans want to enjoy a better quality of life based on a vibrant economy, then the business community must work closely with policymakers to make the difficult, but necessary decisions regarding transportation infrastructure.”

Adds Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, “We want to bring together the public and private sectors. Valley Forward’s goal is to try and drive the conversation to the middle and take the politics out. We want to drive up solutions so that Arizona, as a whole, can advance and can sustain itself.”

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

valley forward receives grant

Valley Forward Receives $80K Grant

A coalition to foster a statewide sustainability agenda for Arizona has been propelled by a major grant, two new high-level prominent Charter members, its first public sector recruit and two more utilities joining the diverse business-based group.

Valley Forward Association recently received an $80,000 grant from the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust with the opportunity to renew funding for an additional two years to grow its Arizona Forward initiative, launched last year to promote a healthy environment while encouraging economic vitality. As part of its annual grant program, the Trust awarded more than $1.8 million to 22 Arizona nonprofit organizations.

The University of Arizona and Cox Communications are the newest Charter members, joining nine other high-level entities represented on the Arizona Forward Advisory Board. Other new recruits include Pima County, Unisource Energy Corporation and Southwest Gas Corp., bringing the total roster to 41.

“This generous financial support from the Trust will allow us to continue our education, outreach and advocacy aimed at enhancing the livability and sustainability of communities throughout Arizona,” said Diane Brossart, acting director for Arizona Forward. “Our ultimate goal is to encourage more coordinated regional efforts through an exchange of ideas and information statewide that bolster our overall economic growth and environmental quality.”

Arizona Forward is leveraging the resources of the 43-year-old Valley Forward to bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide sustainability issues. The group’s basic agenda focuses on land use and open space planning, protecting public lands, parks and monuments, as well as transportation, air quality, water and energy.

“We have experienced impressive growth of public and private sector members in a relatively short time, coupled with an initial grant from a private foundation in 2011 and the one we just received from the Trust,” said Kurt Wadlington, Tucson building group leader for Sundt Construction and chairman of Arizona Forward. “It demonstrates the need for what we are providing and encourages corporate stewardship.

ABOUT NINA MASON PULLIAM CHARITABLE TRUST ORGANIZATION

Since the Trust began its grant making in 1998, it has awarded more than $99.2 million to 422 Arizona nonprofit organizations. The Trust also makes grants in Indiana and as of March 31, 2012, had assets of approximately $350 million. Visit ninapulliamtrust.org for more information about the Trust and its programs.

ABOUT ARIZONA FORWARD

Arizona Forward is an initiative that brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue and advocacy on statewide sustainability issues. Charter Members include: Arizona Community Foundation, Cox Communications, First Solar, Freeport McMoran Copper and Gold, National Bank of Arizona, Solon Corporation, Sundt Construction, The Nature Conservancy, Total Transit, University of Arizona and Wells Fargo.

For more information on Valley Forward and the Arizona Forward initiative, visit arizonaforward.org or call (602) 240-2408.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Centennial Series - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Centennial Series: Looking Ahead At The State’s Next Century

Arizona Centennial — Forward thinking: Algae, solar, personalized medicine or none of the above? Some of Arizona’s greatest minds look ahead at the state’s next century

A century ago, Arizonans with an entrepreneurial spirit ventured deep into the deserts and mountains in search of gold and copper. Today, as Arizona celebrates its 100th birthday, their counterparts are exploring the unknown frontiers of biotechnology and renewable energy.

“Imagine the technologies of 100 years ago,” says Steven Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “Now, think about how far we have come. Only a very few science fiction writers even envisioned the technologies that are now a part of our everyday lives. It is very likely that (100 years from now), the mix of industries and companies will be very different. There will be subsectors that don’t even exist yet. One thing is sure, there will be more technology than ever to drive our economy and improve our quality of life.”

So with 100 years in the history books, what’s in store for Arizona’s next century? One expert says algae will be Arizona’s 21st-century gold rush. Will Arizona’s yet-to-be-written history prove him to be right?

As part of the Arizona Centennial Series, Arizona Business Magazine asks some of the state’s greatest minds how they see Arizona taking shape over the next decade and beyond.


Economy

Lee McPheters, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University

The next 5 years will be a period of agonizingly slow recovery from the Great Recession. Arizona employment will return to post-recession levels within two to three years, but new, more frugal spending habits will put a damper on growth. The next 25 years has the potential to be a period of strong growth. Under historical growth assumptions, Arizona’s population will almost double within 25 years, as the state grows to more than 10 million residents.  Phoenix will have a population between 7 and 8 million, larger than the entire state today.  Immigration will exceed 125,000 every year by 2030.  Over the next 25 years, to accommodate growth, more than 1 million single-family homes will be needed, a seemingly impossible pace of building compared to conditions today.In the next 100 years, the gap between those with education, training and skills and those without will grow even greater as technology will benefit those who develop, control and use it.

Lee Vikre, senior vice president, organizational development and consulting, BestCompaniesAZ, LLC

In the next 10 years, the Arizona workforce will be more diverse than ever before, with wide spans in age ranges of workers and greater cultural diversity. White males may become the minority. Entrepreneurship will be ingrained in workers of all ages who were affected by the recession. This entrepreneurial, independent atmosphere will continue to define Arizona. Homegrown, innovative businesses in the fields of technology, manufacturing, healthcare, and sustainable energy will prosper. The movement towards creating great workplaces will move from a novelty to mainstream as both workers and management discover the competitive advantage of a culture of trust.

Patricia Ternes, financial advisor, RBC Wealth Management, Scottsdale

For the next 100 years, we need to address the concept that the world is flat.  Right now, we have multiple currencies and multiple stock markets. The financial services industry needs to better integrate the products and services we offer our clients worldwide. In 100 years, there will probably be huge, world-wide investment markets that are available to everyone 24/7.  This will increase the complexity of planning one’s financial future.


Technology

Steven Zylstra, president and CEO, Arizona Technology Council

In the next 10 years, the biosciences and renewable energy (and even the broader clean tech) sectors will become significant components of our economy.  Aerospace and defense, semiconductor and electronics, ITC, and optics will continue to grow.  The technology sector will be an ever-increasing component of our economic landscape, leading to more diversity.

Mark Edwards, PhD., vice president of corporate development and marketing, Algae Biosciences, Inc., Scottsdale

Arizona has the critical elements for algae production including lots of sunshine, waste and brine water for nutrients, CO2, and cheap land.  The state has a competitive advantage for algae production and will become the algae capital world. Arizona will go from two firms producing algae in 2011 to 200 algae firms in 2020. Arizona producers will cultivate algae for food, feed, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals, functional foods, medicines and advance compounds. In the next 100 years, Algae will become the leading industry in Arizona, eclipsing tourism; more than 80 percent of all medicines, vaccines and pharmaceuticals will be made predominately from advanced compounds derived from algae; our fossil-based transportation system will transform to a sustainable algae-based transportation system.

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO, Microchip Technology Inc., Chandler

Given this expansion and the number of semiconductor players that have operations in Arizona, the semiconductor industry is likely to have a significant impact in this state over the next 10 years. This expansion will lead to a sharp increase in the growth of well-paying, high-tech jobs in our state. Take the case of medical advancements.  Over the next 10 years, we will see a significant expansion in the use of semiconductors for surgical and analysis equipment; in portable, wearable and implantable medical devices; and in the cost-cutting use of remote medicine, where patients will be monitored by medical professionals in lower-cost regions.

I will, however, add one cautionary note to the optimistic picture I have just painted.  The formation of new start-up companies is driven by the availability of venture-capital funding. Arizona continues to be plagued by a scarcity of risk capital, as most venture-capital firms are located in California, Texas and Massachusetts. The result is that those states continue to attract the bulk of VC-backed startups.  While Arizona has been a technology hotbed in recent years, we must fix this problem if we are to remain the “Silicon Desert.”


Environment

Diane Brossart, president, Valley Forward Association

In the next 10 years, Arizona will diversify its economy through green jobs and technology. Renewable energy sectors will proliferate with solar leading the way. In the next 100 years, we will become the solar capitol of the world. Light rail connects Valley cities. Commuter rail takes us across the nation. Arizona is a burgeoning hub of economic activity. Parks and open space dot the landscape. Innovation and technology abound. Our legislature is enlightened and the green revolution leads to new water sources in our vibrant desert oasis, now free of particulate pollution.

Kelly Mott Lacroix, graduate research associate, Water Resources Research Center, Tucson

Over the next 100 years, our water management will need to be flexible and progressive enough to allow us to prosper in the face of supply uncertainty from changes in climate and the continuing growth of our economy.  Arizonans will have to make decisions about what we value most about this state and those decisions will dictate how the water issue changes Arizona.

Larry Howell, CEO and president of KEBAWK Response Technologies, a Scottsdale-based engineering company that responds immediately to hazardous or catastrophic disasters

Environmentally-conscious companies like KEBAWK are going to continue to grow and have a much more pivotal role in growing the economy in the next 10 years as businesses strive to be as sustainable as possible. What was once a trendy, cottage industry is now a must for businesses.


Health

Dr. Grace Caputo, director, Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

I see medical education as a dominant force in Arizona, especially with the growth of the University of Arizona campus downtown. Innovative pediatric care will continue to be a highlight at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, but healthcare overall will continue to improve our community as birth to age 5 is the fastest growing population in Arizona.

Catherine Niemiec, president, Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

In the future, acupuncture and oriental medicine (AOM) will fill the gaps created by high insurance rates, fewer primary care physicians, and seemingly incurable or chronic conditions. Acupuncture can be available for the same cost as a co-payment, supporting the need of those who have no insurance or who need to seek different care beyond what their insurance will cover. A report on “Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States” cites widespread use of CAM, with more future visits to CAM providers than to primary care physicians (with most of these visits paid out-of-pocket).

Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D., radiation oncologist, Arizona Oncology

Long-term changes for the use of radiation in cancer care will involve a combination of treatment directed at the molecular level and immense precision with external radiation. Targeting cancer with radiation at the molecular level has been developed for only a handful of cancers to date. The struggle to find and develop cures at the molecular level will be one of the determining factors in how the people of Arizona will receive cancer treatment for the next hundred years.

Mahesh Seetharam, M.D., medical oncologist and hematologist, Arizona Oncology

In the next decade, electronic medical records will continue to evolve to help coordinate care between the various providers to optimize outcomes. It is very difficult to predict given the current labile healthcare environment.  The concept of universal healthcare is very possible, but with that comes the need for additional providers and resources to provide the necessary care.  Personalized medicine could be a reality in the next decade or two, and this will certainly improve outcomes.


Banking

Lynn Crane, executive vice president, bank operations and services, Mutual of Omaha Bank in Arizona

Mobile devices will replace plastic cards.  This will completely change the “check out” experience at retailers. Arizona shoppers will be able to scan merchandise as they pick it up off the shelf and make payment without stopping at a checkout counter when they leave the store. On the negative side, this transition to non-traditional delivery channels will make bank branches less relevant. Online financial consultants will replace branch employees and a trip to the bank will become a thing of the past for Arizonans. Some branches will close and the industry will require a smaller workforce. The future value of currency will not rely on paper, but on digital data, so heightened security concerns and demand for data protection will prevail.  As a trusted source of security, banks will play a much larger role in helping Arizonans secure their valuables and their future.

Craig Doyle, Arizona market president, Comerica Bank

Some of the industry segments critical to our future are aerospace and defense, semi-conductor manufacturing, business services technology, health care and renewable energy.  Effectively supporting their growth requires a deep understanding of supply chains and related capital markets.  It will take time, but the Arizona banking industry should help facilitate the appropriate capital markets so that Arizona is competitive with other major economic regions in helping companies, form, grow and mature.


Education

Michael M. Crow, president, Arizona State University

Within 10 years, ASU will be America’s finest example of a widely accessible research intensive public university and in this mode it will be capable of operating at a very rapid and large scale for educational competitiveness for Arizona.  In this mode, the university will have deployed its assets to maximize the competitive position of Arizona through its role as a comprehensive knowledge enterprise producing fantastic graduates, ideas and new technologies. ASU will be a critical asset for Arizona going forward over the next 100 years as the knowledge based economy or at least knowledge driven adaptation and innovation to the uncertainties and the complexities that lie ahead in the areas of global finance, economic competitiveness, environmental sustainability and so forth will be such that what universities like ASU do will be more important than ever.  This is true specifically for ASU in the context of Arizona as Arizona in the next 100 years grows and matures into America’s preeminent example of a free enterprise driven innovation catalyzed state.

Bill Hubert, president and founder of Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc., which helps lenders enter the student loan market

At some point, the cost of education is going to have to “normalize” within the overall economy.  For decades, cost of attendance, whether private or public, traditional or trade-based, has increased at much higher than normal rate.  Our business of providing financial services that connect students and families with a broad spectrum of relationship based funding sources will certainly help increase access and drive down overall costs – of program administration, funding sources, and even institutional administrative costs.

Deanna Salazar, senior vice president and general counsel of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

I believe that by supporting community outreach efforts similar to the Green Schoolhouse Series, which makes schools healthy and green “inside and out” through the development of an integrated health and wellness curriculum and green gardens to promote nutrition and wellness in disadvantaged schools, BCBSAZ will continue to be positioned as a leader who is genuinely taking care of the health of Arizonans, in both traditional and non-traditional ways that create a better future for all. For years to come, it’s BCBSAZ’s hope for the green gardens to teach children about healthy eating and physical activity by allowing them to use and maintain the garden.


Marketing

Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president, general manager, Cramer-Krasselt

As I look into a crystal ball, the marketing world as we know it will change dramatically in the next 100 years. It will be forever changed even in the next 10 years. However, brands will not go away. In fact, they will be even more valuable both in the next decade and in the next century if they can evolve as we evolve, as our technology evolves. Those brands that increase in value over time will have very different ways of communicating with consumers. Everything will be personalized. Everything will happen in real time. There’s a good chance that 100 years from now, as far as commercial messaging and targeting goes, “Minority Report” will be seen as an amazingly accurate forward-looking documentary rather than a work of fiction.

Rob Davidson, co-owner of Phoenix-based Advertising firm Davidson & Belluso

Think of how social media has drastically impacted communications with customers and prospects in recent years. Marketing and advertising will keep changing at an even faster rate as new technology becomes available. Smart phones and tablets have already become standard channels of any marketing plan. Companies who stay on top of the latest marketing tools and learn about their customers changing behaviors are the ones who will be successful in reaching their target markets.


Energy

Mark Bonsall, general manager and CEO, SRP

In the next decade, the growth in wind and solar will continue to be strong, but will still provide a relatively small portion of the needed energy just because the scale of what is needed is so large. It is likely most of the new baseload resources will be fueled by natural gas.  New drilling and recovery technology is providing access to vast quantities of natural gas within the U.S. at relatively low costs, at least so far.  This provides a good bridge to develop systems that can improve the efficiency of solar systems, address the intermittent nature of most renewable resources, find safe and more cost-effective ways to deploy nuclear power, and provide the time for innovative new ideas we aren’t even aware of now.

John Lefebvre, president, Suntech America

With supportive policies, the solar industry will continue to grow and flourish, creating a major employment sector for the state. Additionally, every year the cost of solar is driven down, getting closer and closer to achieving grid parity in the U.S. As solar becomes a market-driven industry, Arizona is poised to be a major global solar industry hub, particularly with the continued development of large-scale solar projects. Ultimately, I hope to see energy generated from solar grow to a significant percent of the U.S. energy supply portfolio and eliminate our dependence on foreign oil, providing a low-cost solution to power our homes and cars. With solar, the sky’s the limit.


Housing

Rachel Lang and Marcy Briggs, loan officers for the Briggs-Lang team of Cobalt Mortgage

The rental market will continue to strengthen with long-term renters. We also see a stabilization within the Arizona real estate market due to the mortgage underwriting guidelines remaining more conservative than they were five years ago, and slightly less conservative five years from now.

Alan Boughton, director of commercial operations, W.J. Maloney Plumbing

As the population in the West increases and the demand for water intensifies by a seemingly unpredictable water supply and snow pack, innovation in low-flow plumbing fixtures could be our industry’s greatest impact on Arizona as more people are forced to live with less water.

CR Herro, vice president, environmental affairs, Meritage Homes

Homes will be built to work better, use fewer resources, be healthier, and adjust to the needs of owners. On the fringe of the market today are homes that can adjust the transparency of windows, extend and retract solar shades, turn on lights, change thermostat settings over a smart phone, and achieve net-zero energy demand. These changes allow homes to adapt to the unique needs of its occupants, offer more control, and waste less energy and resources (money) in their operation.


Transportation

Danny Murphy, Airport director, Sky Harbor International Airport

The biggest evolution our industry will experience is a transformation of the entire national air transportation system to avoid gridlock in air travel, called “NextGen.” This means moving from ground-based technologies to a new and more dynamic satellite-based technology.  While airport delays are minimal in Arizona, our passengers are impacted most when traveling to and from other locations and this technology will greatly improve that. Over the next 100 years, continental investment and enhancements to the state’s main airports will be critical to serve the needs of Arizona’s growing population.


Entertainment

Brad Casper, president, Phoenix Suns

In continuing to operate at the forefront of innovation, the Suns will offer fans the most technologically advanced atmosphere in professional sports, while emerging as the most winning franchise in NBA history. Through strategic partnerships, the Suns will act as a catalyst towards creating a sustainable entertainment and business environment, unmatched by any NBA/WNBA organization.

Catherine Anaya, chief journalist, KPHO CBS 5 News

I think in the next 100 years the marriage between television and computers will be such that we will be doing everything we do on a computer. There will still be a place for television news. However, I don’t think we’ll see it in the studio format we’ve been accustomed to seeing. I think we’ll end up shooting and broadcasting our news via our smart phones or whatever those evolve into in time. As a result, I think it will create more intimacy and interaction among Arizonans. That may or may not be a good thing as familiarity lines will get blurred.

Teri Agosta, general manager, Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort

The hospitality industry will continue to drive revenue into the Arizona market through increased travelers, due to the aging demographic, who will have more leisure time and money to spend. Also business travel will continue to grow as corporations realize people need direct contact with team members and clients to build a successful business, and webinars and teleconferencing do not meet these needs.  Also, our consistent weather will become more valuable to travelers, who will scrutinize their travel spending even more.

Melody Hudson, public relations manager, Gila River Gaming Enterprises

The opportunity for new job creation will become more prevalent than ever before with potential capital expansion opportunities which could result in not only new construction positions, but new positions within the Enterprises’ casinos as well. This potential growth could also result in an increase of revenues for both local and national businesses that supply goods and services to the Enterprise. Additionally, potential growth from not only Gila River Gaming  Enterprises, but the gaming industry in general in Arizona,  would result in larger amounts of funding going to the state for education, tourism, wildlife conservation and emergency services.

Carey Pena, co-anchor, 3TV News at 10 p.m.

There is a generally accepted theory of human knowledge that says:  today, we know 5 percent of what we will know in 50 years. In other words, in 50 years, 95 percent of what we will know will have been discovered in the past 50 years.  That makes it hard to imagine what 100 years will look like.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

Sustainability Discussions at the GoGreen Conference

GoGreen Conference ’11 Sustainability Panel Discussions (Part II)

In the first part of the GoGreen Conference ’11 coverage, we reported that sustainability education and patience were the buzzwords of many of the panel discussions. Here’s why:

The panel discussion titled “Green Your Workplace: High Impact Change at Your Business,” moderated by Ed Fox, chief sustainability officer for APS, focused on how to turn the idea of going green and sustainability into governance. This challenge small and large businesses face was the topic of discussion among the panel, which included:

  • Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of Adolfson & Peterson Construction;
  • Jonce Walker, sustainability manager of Maricopa County;
  • Anthony Floyd, LEED AP, green building program manager of the City of Scottsdale;
  • and Leslie Lindo, president and co-founder of IKOLOJI.

Fox began the discussion asking the panelists how one would convince the leaders of companies to pursue incorporating green elements into the workplace.

Floyd suggested offering incentives and marketing materials and free literature to spur interest. Lindo agreed providing incentives to employees will help encourage them to make the changes second nature. She also suggested owners become educated themselves and have a strong advocate in the office.

Walker took a different approach and said reducing consumption to afford sustainability is one step a business can consider taking. The company must be efficient and through this efficiency, it will convince others that the extra cost will be worth it.

Walker continued to say that it helps to know all the benefits of turning your particular business green — environmental, economical, etc. — and know your audience.

“Ninety percent of clients are bottom-line driven,” Dunn said. They want to save energy and save money, he added. Two ways companies can do this is by making their own operations more efficient (switching your lighting to LED, for example) while also anticipating changes in the marketplace.

Dunn also said behavioral modifications must take place. You can switch to LED, but the appropriate actions must be taken by the staff, i.e. remembering to turn off the lights.

But what was stressed was the acceptance of risk. While making your business more environmentally friendly and sustainable will help you save money in the long run, it will take some time to get there with few obvious returns. Or, as Fox put it, the few “low hanging fruit.”

In the following discussion, “Applying Sustainabilty Best Practices to Impact Community Equity and Diversity,” moderated by Dr. George Brooks, owner of Southwest Green and NxT Horizon Group and including Greg Peterson, founder of Urban Farm; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; and Rosanne Albright, Brownfields Project Manager of the City of Phoenix, regenerative sustainability was the hot topic as well as education.

“Nature regenerates itself, not just sustains itself,” Peterson said. “Education is the key piece to sustainability.

Urban farming (or growing and sharing food), recycling land via the Brownfields Land Recycling Project, and the importance of parks and open space in the state were all covered in this discussion.

“Energy, food, health, poverty — they are all connected,” Brooks said. “Local sourcing and urban farms can help offset the costs of energy.”

Peterson’s final thoughts?

“It’s really a grassroots movement,” he said. “For those of you in the government, get out of our way.”

Visit the GoGreen Conference website at gogreenconference.net.

 

Valley Forward's Crescordia Awards Winners

Crescordia Awards Spotlight Those Making A Difference In Our Communities

Crescordia Awards spotlight those making a difference in our communities

The U.S. 60 Gonzales Pass widening project has earned the coveted President’s Award (Best of Show) in Valley Forward’s 31st annual Environmental Excellence Awards program, held in partnership with SRP for the tenth consecutive year. Designated the Pinal-Gila Scenic Road, the 10-mile scenic stretch of highway is the Valley’s eastern gateway to the Superstition Wilderness and the Tonto National Forest, which plays host to 5.8 million visitors each year.

While freeways are inherently considered detrimental to environmental quality, this significant project was recognized for exemplifying sensitivity and responsiveness to site conditions, balancing human-made elements with the natural desert landscape to conserve and protect precious resources. The project team made environmental sensitivity a key priority in efforts to improve safety and capacity of the narrow, two-lane roadway by widening it to a four-lane facility.

More than 130 entries were received in Arizona’s oldest and most prestigious awards competition focusing exclusively on environmental initiatives. Winners were announced Sept. 17, at Valley Forward’s awards gala attended by more than 600 community leaders at The Westin Kierland Resort in Scottsdale.

Valley Forward and SRP presented 19 first-place Crescordia winners and 30 Awards of Merit. The awards set standards for achieving a balance between the built and natural environment in the region’s physical, technical, social and aesthetic development.

In presenting the top award, Valley Forward recognized three civil engineering companies and two landscape architectural firms that teamed with the USDA Forest Service and Arizona Department of Transportation. The project was lauded for reducing environmental impacts, conserving and protecting natural resources and integrating engineering and aesthetic considerations into each phase of the development process.

In addition to the President’s Award, the U.S. Gonzales Pass won a first-place Crescordia Award in the Site Development and Landscape (Public Sector) category. Crescordia is a Greek term meaning, “to grow in harmony,” and the President’s Award is selected from among all Crescordia recipients.

This year Valley Forward unveiled a newly designed Crescordia award created by Vernon Swaback and Nicholas Markwardt of Two Worlds Community Foundation. The prestigious award’s glass, copper and wood design exemplifies a balance between the natural and built environment, incorporating natural materials and local resources.

The breadth and depth of entries in this year’s program spotlights the high priority sustainability has in our growing metropolex,” said Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward. “These awards have become powerful vehicles in advocating for the preservation of natural resources – air, water, open space and our unique desert environment.”

Two projects received two Crescordia awards each this year – Soleri Bridge and Plaza in Scottsdale and the Intel Ocotillo Campus. The Soleri Bridge and Plaza by renowned artist and architect Paolo Soleri was awarded first-place honors in the Site Development and Landscape (Trails) and Art in Public Places categories. A pedestrian passage, solar calendar and gathering space along the Scottsdale Waterfront, the striking bridge provides a scenic viewpoint over the 60-foot-wide water conveyance channel and includes a 22,000-square-foot plaza, providing a pleasing natural environment within the high-energy atmosphere of downtown Scottsdale.

Intel Corporation’s Ocotillo Semiconductor Manufacturing Campus in Chandler received the Crescordia for Buildings and Structures (Industrial & Public Works) along with the Environmental Stewardship – SRP Award. The four-million-square-foot campus is the first of its kind in the world to receive Silver Certification under the LEED Existing Building: Operations & Maintenance green building rating system. The impressive facility minimizes energy and water use, conserving natural resources and reducing its environmental impact.

“It’s inspiring to see the corporate sector leading the way in environmental stewardship,” said Richard Hayslip, associate general manager of Environmental Management, Policy and Compliance at SRP. “Working with the City of Chandler to achieve aggressive water reuse results, Intel Corporation has significantly reduced its environmental impact in the manufacturing process, demonstrating the potential of public/private partnerships.”

Christine Ten Eyck, founder and principal of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, served as lead judge for the program. Other jurists include: Kristin Bloomquist, general manager, Cramer-Krasselt; Robert Booker, executive director, Arizona Commission on the Arts; Tamara Caraway, principal project development, Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; Eddie Jones, principal, Jones Studio Inc., Jerry Meek, president, Desert Star Construction; Marty Sedler, director of Global Utilities and Infrastructure, Intel; Victor Vidales, board member, National and Arizona Audubon; and Dave Wilson, senior landscape architect, EPG.

Valley Forward is a non-profit public interest organization that brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. The organization operates with the belief that business must take a leadership role in solving the complex and sometimes controversial problems that confront growing population centers.

In addition to the U.S. Gonzales Pass, Soleri Bridge and Plaza and Intel’s Ocotillo Campus, Crescordia winners include:

Meritage Homes Launches Net-Zero Revolution (Meritage Homes)

Arizona-based Meritage Homes not only builds homes that cut energy usage by up to 80 percent but introduced the first “net-zero” production home in the state – one that could ultimately produce as much energy as it consumes.

Chandler City Hall (SmithGroup)

This modern, environmentally efficient building seeking LEED Gold Certification is located in the city’s historic downtown and encompasses 137,700 square feet of office space, a public TV studio, art gallery and 330-space parking structure, as well as Council Chambers. Open space and shaded walkways welcome visitors to the complex, which features an array of sustainable design elements.

Santa Fe Freight Depot (Arrington Watkins Architects)

Originally opened in 1929, this historic Phoenix building sat vacant for more than 50 years before being revived in a sensitive and thoughtful preservation project that now serves as headquarters for the Maricopa County Assessor’s Office and is currently seeking LEED Gold Certification.

U-Haul Contributions to Phoenix Metro Area Built Environment (U-Haul International)

Demonstrating a longstanding and strong commitment to sustainability, U-Haul routinely implements building and site improvements that benefit the environment from energy-efficient practices and water-saving techniques to permeable ground cover initiatives and adaptive reuse building conversions.

Paradise Valley Community College – Life Sciences Building (Marlene Imirzian & Associates LLC, Architects)

The innovative Paradise Valley Community College Life Sciences Building uses a diverse pallet of sustainable materials, including concrete floors and masonry, high recycle-content carpet and tack boards, bamboo doors and millwork, providing an environmentally friendly home for its growing anatomy, physiology and biology programs.

Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care In the Desert Southwest (Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association)

The Arizona Landscape Contractors’ Association has taken important steps to promote higher industry standards by adopting best recommended practices published in “Sustainable Landscape Management: Standards for Landscape Care in the Desert Southwest.”

Downtown Chandler Redevelopment (City of Chandler)

City officials and private partners joined forces to redevelop downtown Chandler, which had fallen into disrepair with boarded up buildings and high crime rates, into a walkable, lively core utilizing principles of environmental and economic sustainability.

Arcadia Residence (colwell:shelor Landscape Architecture)

This one-acre site in Arcadia features a home and landscape renovation that honors the historic essence of the unique neighborhood, creating a seamless transition between interior and exterior living spaces that take advantage of existing lush citrus groves and maximizes views to the mountains.

W.L. Gore & Associates Phoenix Campus (LVA Urban Design Studio)

Situated in the commercial core of the Sonoran Foothills Master Planned Community in North Phoenix, W.L. Gore & Associates’ 40-acre campus is a model of responsible development, featuring only low-water use plants including many native species. Salvaging efforts saved 82 mature trees and 158 specimen cacti, all of which were replanted on site.

White Tank Branch Library and Nature Center (Maricopa County Library District)

Surrounded entirely by desert, the 29,000-square-foot library and nature center is located at the entrance to White Tank Mountain Regional Park and is only the third library in the U.S. to earn LEED Platinum Certification. Energy efficiency, water conservation, passive solar design and returning the site to its native appearance were cornerstone to the project.

Ikea Tempe Solar Energy Project (IKEA Tempe)

IKEA has installed a 75,000-square-foot solar array at its store in Tempe consisting of two 300-kilowatt systems, each built with approximately 1,300 panels. The solar program will produce approximately one million kWh of electricity annually, the equivalent of reducing at least 760 tons of carbon dioxide (equal to the emissions of 133 cars or powering 84 homes yearly).

Conservation and Sustainable Living Programs (City of Glendale)

The newly created office of Conservation and Sustainable Living for the City of Glendale is educating residents, businesses and neighborhoods on sound environmental practices, giving away energy saving devices, providing teaching materials to schools and promoting sustainable landscaping.

Sonoran Sustainable Building Advisor Program (Sonoran SBAP, Inc.)

Designed to advance education and expertise in sustainable solutions for the built environment in Arizona, this nine-month program for professionals teaches best practices in sustainability sciences. It does not require the commitment of an advanced degree but provides more depth than short courses or online programs.

Valley Permaculture Alliance’s Education Program (Valley Permaculture Alliance)

The Valley Permaculture Alliance inspires sustainable urban living through education, community involvement and creative cooperation. Its programs include weekly sustainable living classes, monthly tours of local sustainable homes, ongoing hands-on training opportunities and special events.

[stextbox id=”grey”]For a complete list of 2011 Environmental Excellence Award Winners and categories, visit 2011 Environmental Excellence Awards Winners.[/stextbox]

 

BIG Green Expo

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

The 2011 BIG Green Expo & Conference took place on April 15 & 16, 2011 at the Phoenix Convention Center.


About BIG Green


The greening of business, development, government and consumer products is at an all time high and growing exponentially. Rising energy costs, new laws, and growing demand for environmentally friendly consumer products continue to drive the green marketplace. In 2010, the BIG Green Expo & Conference took place at the Phoenix Convention Center in Downtown Phoenix. It is Arizona’s largest green conference — with 200 exhibitors and more than 10,000 individuals participating in the event. The BIG Green Expo & Conference targets both the commercial and residential industries. The expo showcases sustainable products and services impacting every area of life. Those attending the conference will hear from prominent industry voices on both a local and national level, who will share their insight and knowledge of an environmental-friendly future. Some speakers in attendance were Colin Tetreault (Topic: LEED is DEAD, The Next Evolution of Business), Loretta Hall (Topic: Earth Sheltering for Sustainable Public Buildings), Adam Robbins (Topic: The LED Revolution: Learn about LED technology) and Diane Brossart (Topic: Sustainable & How You Can Be Part of the Solution). Whether you’re a savvy homeowner looking to create a more sustainable home, or a business owner looking to create a greener space for employees — the BIG Green Expo & Conference has something for everyone.


Topics covered:

Green Awareness Solar Power Water Efficiency Sustainability LEED Certification Green Return on Investment Existing Building Retrofitting Sustainable Product Use & Design Green Government Programs Sustainable Building Practices Greening your home & business

Attendees of BIG are:

Architects, builders, contractors, and engineers (commercial and residential) Government, institutional and corporate purchasing/supply chain managers CEO’s, senior management and purchasing managers Corporate planners, business leaders Facility & Property managers Homeowners

Exhibitors are suppliers of:

Building and construction products and services Architectural and engineering services: (commercial, residential, government and institutional) Local, state, federal, non-profit and private green programs Waste management Renewable energy Transportation Furnishings and Appliances Landscaping Interior/Exterior design Consumer goods and services

Sponsored by:

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011 Sponsored by SRP


For more information or to reserve a booth for next year, please visit exposaz.com and contact

Phone: 602-277-6045 Fax: 480-361-8707 Email: exposaz@azbigmedia.com

 

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Feature Big Green 2011

Speaker: Diane Brossart ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Diane Brossart, Valley Forward

Diane Brossart, Valley Forward, BIG Green Conference 2011 SpeakerDiane Brossart has a longtime connection with Valley Forward Association, having first joined the non-profit public interest organization 20 years ago. Brossart served on the Valley Forward Board of Directors for several years and was named President of the association in 1991. As President, Brossart oversees a staff of four and manages a host of committees, which focus on such issues as land use planning and desert preservation, transportation and air quality, water concerns and environmental education.Under Brossart’s leadership, Valley Forward has received widespread recognition for its role in addressing environmental and quality of life issues in the Valley. Awards include an Outstanding Achievement Award from the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9; Award of Distinction from the Western Mountain Region of the American Institute of Architects; and first-place honors from the City of Phoenix Mayor’s Environmental Awards Program.

Brossart also received the Phoenix Award from the Public Relations Society of America’s Phoenix Chapter in 2008, in addition to the 2009 Champion of Sustainability Award through the Phoenix Business Journal’s Green Pioneers program. She is also involved as a member of several civic organizations, including the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, Valley Partnership, Friends of the West Valley Recreation Corridor and Phoenix Community Alliance.

Prior to her work with Valley Forward, Brossart was Vice President of one of the Valley’s largest public relations agencies, serving as a marketing consultant to Valley Forward and several commercial accounts. Brossart received her Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Wayne State University in 1979 and began her professional career as a reporter for a daily newspaper in metropolitan Detroit.


Topic: Sustainable & How You Can Be Part of the Solution: How people & organizations can personally get involved in the green movement.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 158

BIG Green Conference 2011


BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.



Sponsors:

livabilitysummit

Valley Forward Hosts 7th Annual Livability Summit

Valley ForwardAs the world celebrated the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, Valley residents also had a reason to celebrate.

To commemorate Earth Day, Valley Forward was once again at the forefront of the sustainability movement in the state — hosting their Seventh Annual Livability Summit at the Wyndham Phoenix.

The title of the program, “What Does the Future Hold for Sustainability?”, proved to be a launching pad for intelligent and interesting observations from speakers, panelists and attendees.

The event began with a welcome from Valley Forward president and Green Scene guest blogger, Diane Brossart, followed by Jeanne Forbis, Valley Forward Association Chair of the Board and Global Corporate Affairs Communication Manager at Intel Corporation. Ms. Forbis introduced the morning keynote speaker: James Charlier, an expert in smart growth strategies and sustainable transportation systems. Mr. Charlier gave a lively, informative presentation before turning to the morning’s panelists to continue the discussion.

The panel titled: “How to Ensure a Sustainable Future for our Region” was comprised of:
Sue Clark Johnson | ASU Morrison Institute for Public Policy
Paul Newman | Arizona Corporation Commisioner
Shannon Scutari | Arizona Department of Transportation
Mo Mukibi Jr., Ph.D. | CH2M Hill

Mayor Phil Gordon
Mayor Phil Gordon announced the City of Phoenix received a $25 million federal grant for its Green Rail Corridor project.

Each panelist offered their own unique perspective about the challenges Arizona faces in planning for a sustainable future. The lively debate then extended to the audience who asked some interesting questions.

For a complete list of all the speaker’s presentations visit Valley Forward’s website.

The summit was headlined by keynote speaker Jeremy Rifkin, renowned economic futurist and sustainability expert who wowed the audience with his incredible knowledge and experience. As president of the Foundation of Economic Trends and the author of 17 best-selling books on the impact and technological changes on the economy, workforce, society and environment, Rifkin is a seasoned voice in the field. Rifkin used his own experience as founder and chairperson of the Third Industrial Revolution Global CEO Business Roundtable to enlighten the crowd with some ideas about a possible sustainable future for Arizona. During his speech, Rifkin gave examples of several European countries that have already implemented astounding sustainable economic plans that can serve as a great example for the U.S. and for Arizona.

Rifkin’s compelling presentation got everyone thinking and emphasized the critical juncture we’re facing. He noted that we are at the turning point of our species or the “end of human civilization as we know it.” Rifkin further explained his reasoning by pointing out that we are living off 19th and 20th century ideas that are toxic to the biosphere challenges we face as a global society. The premise behind the Third Industrial Revolution is to harness smart technologies and global communication networks to create a renewable energy regime. Renewable energy and its growth is critical as well as harnessing this power by converting buildings into power plants. Lastly hydrogen storage, smartgrid and plug-in vehicles will maximize renewable energy and minimize cost.

Jeremy Rifkin
Author and economic futurist Jeremy Rifkin, president of the Foundation on Economic Trends delivered the luncheon keynote and signed copies of his book, “The Empathetic Civilization.”

Just hearing his thought-provoking ideas was incredibly inspiring. Implementing these ideas won’t be easy but Rifkin is optimistic that as more and more cities across the globe change their viewpoint and see the economic vitality sustainability can bring, a so-called “revolution” will take place.

Overall, the summit was an incredibly successful event. In addition, to the panel discussion, Valley Forward also hosted a resource area that spotlighted local initiatives for environmental concerns and sustainability issues. The organization was also proud to once again partner with the 2010 Future City Competition for 7th and 8th grade students, with winning students from Cochise Middle School attending the summit.

 

www.valleyforward.org

Water Consumption

Valley Forward’s Water Efficiency Leaders Program Showcases Water Management Efforts

In this unique desert environment, water is our lifeline to sustainability and growth. The Valley’s secure water future is the result of more than 100 years of visionary planning. It’s clear, however, that while our region leads the Southwest in managing water supplies, we need to do a better job of communicating our efforts.

Valley Forward’s Water Efficiency Leaders program is designed to showcase how business and industry are demonstrating innovation in managing water resources.

Holsum Bakery in Tolleson was named the environmental public interest organization’s inaugural Water Efficiency Leader, and earned the title for integrating more sustainable processes into its entire operation.

In addition to bestowing top honors on Holsum Bakery, Valley Forward has recognized Intel Corporation and CityCenter of CityNorth for exceeding water efficiency standards.

“These companies are integrating sustainability into their corporate culture and have included water conservation and efficiency in their overall operations,” says Gregg Capps, chair of Valley Forward’s water committee, which initiated the program. “By spotlighting their efforts, we’re encouraging other businesses to review their processes to improve environmental quality, while at the same time positively impacting their bottom line.”

Holsum’s team has converted its water-intensive sanitation practices to processes using much less water. Irrigation of desert landscaping has been optimized, reducing water usage by 57 percent in the summer months and saving an estimated 155,000 gallons of water annually. Waterless urinals are now in place, saving 40,000 gallons annually, and basket washer controls have been modified to ensure minimal water usage.

Other water efficient practices include:

  • Setting goals each year for the bakery to reduce water usage per pound of production and in absolute gallons.
  • Installing secondary water meters to monitor usage at key process points, such as ingredient water, cooling towers and swamp coolers.
  • Increasing the use of brooms and brushes in the place of water hoses to clean equipment and work areas.

Next year, Holsum plans to install a system to capture runoff water from cooling towers and swamp coolers to replace incoming water used for landscape irrigation.

These measures are making a difference. Through July of this year, Holsum’s improvement in usage rate has saved the equivalent of 613,997 gallons of water over 2008, despite an increase in bread production of 4.1 percent.

Intel’s Ocotillo campus has developed innovative water conservation approaches that offset up to 75 percent of fresh water usage in the manufacturing process. Its key water management strategies include aquifer recharge, reuse of wastewater and internal water recycling.

CityCenter is the 76 acre, mixed-use portion of CityNorth development of Desert Ridge. Its state-of-the-art water capture and management system is designed and constructed to reclaim approximately four-million gallons of water per year.

Diane Brossart is president of Valley Forward. For more information on Valley Forward’s Water Efficiency Leaders visit www.valleyforward.org

Teen Sustainability 2010

The Future Of Sustainability Is In The Hands Of Today’s Teens

I’ve lived half my life and never heard the word cotillion. So when I went to my first cotillion event this fall, I didn’t have any preconceived notions about what to expect. And I was blown away by the experience.

The Phoenix Cotillion was formed more than 50 years ago to give young men and women the opportunity to learn philanthropy, to be exposed to the fundamentals of etiquette and to become better acquainted with their peers by attending annual social events. This focus remains today, but membership is open only to young women of high school age throughout the Valley, and nearly 500 of them are currently members.

Another mission of The Phoenix Cotillion is to support a charitable organization at each event. Valley Forward Association, the 40-year-old, business-based environmental public interest group that I’ve managed for nearly two decades, was the charity of choice for the recent Mother-Daughter Fashion Show.

So, I found myself on the rooftop of the Wyndham Phoenix Hotel one Sunday night amid hundreds of gorgeous girls and their moms, all dressed to the nines. They lined up to give me cash and checks to support Valley Forward’s mission of environmental stewardship. They also clearly demonstrated the theme of their event, “Teens Looking Good and Going Green.” A few young men were invited to escort the models during the fashion show and stood out among the mostly female crowd.

In celebrating Valley Forward’s milestone anniversary this year, our leadership is looking ahead at what the next 40 years might look like as we continue to advocate for more livable and sustainable communities.

It occurred to me as I looked at these bright young faces with eyes full of promise — each of them brimming with poise and confidence — that they hold the future in their delicate and capable hands. And for that I’m grateful and somewhat relieved, because these incredible young people already are doing so much to give back to the communities in which they live. They belong to environmental clubs in their schools. They volunteer to help clean up neighborhoods, plant trees and support green projects around the Valley and state.

Valley Forward’s historic agenda has embraced such issues as land use and open-space planning, desert preservation, transportation and air quality, water management, and most recently, energy.

While these issues remain prevalent, our burgeoning Valley cities struggle with ways to grow smarter and in harmony with the pristine, natural desert environment that is unique to Arizona.

As the green movement now sweeping the nation, and indeed the world, touches all business and industry sectors, the quest for a more sustainable future appears within reach. Maybe one day, it won’t be a movement — it will be the lifestyle of choice.

Today’s youth are certainly making it that way. And the next 40 years really belongs to them.

Diane Brossart is president of Valley Forward Association, which brings business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues, and to improve the livability and sustainability of Valley communities, www.valleyforward.org

Promoting Smart Growth in Down Economy

Promoting Smart Growth In A Down Economy

Please welcome Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward Association, and guest blogger to the AZ Green Scene. This is the first blog of our exclusive monthly blog partnership series, where Diane will share her experience and insight regarding the state’s sustainable industry.

Freezing impact fees to stimulate economic development runs counter to the principles of smart growth.

There is no evidence that placing a moratorium on impact fees results in any increase in residential or non-residential construction, according to a number of authoritative studies, including the Brookings Institution. Yet with the hope of establishing momentum in the development industry our legislature recently imposed a freeze on acquisitions and increases until June 2010.

Not only won’t this stimulate growth but it places a huge burden on Valley cities when they can least afford it. Most communities are struggling with severe budget cuts, reductions in personnel and impending tax hikes. Now they’re facing yet another economic hit in the form of lost revenue from impact fees.

New development should pay for itself, period end of story. Impact fees implemented by local governments on new or proposed developments assist or pay for costs caused by growth and expansion. These fees help fund the construction of offsite capital improvements including infrastructure and public services such as road expansion and maintenance, expanded police and fire services and increased demand on schools.

In short, impact fees effectively eliminate the financial encumbrance on local jurisdictions that are trying to deal with population growth within the area. The capital required to fund new growth is simply the cost of doing business.

The widely held perception that development results in economic growth is not always the case, however. Badly planned growth creates vast burdens that are often subsidized with tax dollars.

The financial crisis our state is now facing has little to do with impact fees. It’s the result of poor and unscrupulous lending and borrowing decisions that led to a nationwide credit freeze.

Legislation should work to promote livable and sustainable communities by creating viable incentives for developers to undertake projects within urban areas rather than in greenfields on city edges. Our policies should facilitate a balance between economic growth and environmental quality.
The moratorium on impact fees undermines smart growth while shifting the cost of development from one sector to another.

Diane BrossartPresidentValley Forward Associationwww.valleyforward.org

Valley Metro Light Rail

Awarding Sustainable Excellence

On Saturday, September 12th Valley Forward held its 29th Annual Environmental Excellence Awards Gala. With Fox 10 News’ Troy Hayden as master of ceremonies for the event, there was never a dull moment.

Title sponsor SRP and Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward, put together another spectacular celebration of sustainability. More than 150 nominations came in for this year’s awards — more than any previous year — showing that despite difficult economic times, the public’s commitment to sustainability has not wavered.

METRO Light Rail was the 2009 President’s Award (Best of Show) recipient, further highlighting the achievements of the newest addition to the Valley’s transportation system. METRO Light Rail was also honored with a first-place Crescordia Award in the Livable Communities, Multi-modal Transportation & Connectivity category.

Crescordia is a Greek term that means “to grow in harmony,” and that’s the overall message that came across during this year’s awards. Each acceptance speech reiterated the importance of responsible economic growth, and keeping the environment in mind for a brighter future for our state.

Check out the full list of winners here.

It was a great experience to see all of the amazing projects, and the progress Arizona has made toward a more sustainable future. An added bonus was being able to mingle with a crowd of esteemed professionals, as well as community and business leaders.

Along with the award winners, Brossart announced AZ Big Media / Arizona Business Magazine’s blog partnership with Valley Forward. She will be a guest blogger on the AZ Green Scene once a month, so check back soon as we’ll have some great posts coming our way.

www.valleyforward.org

Photo Credit: www.valleymetro.org

Diane Brossart -Describes Her First Step In The Industry, 2008

Diane Brossart – Describes Her First Step In The Industry

Diane Brossart

President, Valley Forward Association

diane_brossart 2008

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My very first job was a part-time stint in high school at Jack in the Box. I learned to take people at their word. I was held up at gunpoint one afternoon when working the cash register and didn’t believe the perpetrator was serious. Another employee and I thought the guy was joking, so we refused to give him the money and chuckled at the idea of being robbed. It soon became apparent the heist was for real. I quit that job the next day.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first job as a journalism graduate from Wayne State University was as a reporter for a weekly newspaper in Gross Pointe Shores, Mich. I learned that no matter how thorough you think you are, you need to double and triple check your facts. In covering a political story that ran on the front page of the newspaper, I referenced one of the state’s legislators but mistakenly used his brother’s name. It turned out that both brothers held office, an honest error, but a major faux pas for a journalist.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I made minimum wage at Jack in the Box — a little over $2 an hour (I’m a dinosaur).
I turned down a trip to Europe with some of my college buddies to take the reporting job right out of school (big mistake) and earned about $10,000 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
After the journalism stint in Michigan, I moved to Phoenix and sold my soul (according to my journalism school friends) and went into public relations. I got a job as an account coordinator with one of the largest agencies in town (it no longer exists today). It was there that I met Bill Meek, president of WFC Public Relations and my biggest mentor. Bill was and still is a curmudgeon, but he’s a loveable one and among the smartest people I know. I used to sit across from him, on the other side of his expansive glass desk, and take notes as he pontificated on every subject under the sun. He’d peer at me with penetrating blue eyes that seemed to defy the bifocals, which rested at the end of his nose, creating an intimidating image that Bill undoubtedly enjoyed. I learned all about Arizona history and every issue of significance to the state, from water management and health care to transportation and economics. He taught me about politics, how to run a public affairs campaign and who the movers and shakers were that influenced decisions in our fast-growing region. He encouraged me to get involved in the community, and it was through his prodding that I joined Valley Forward Association in 1982, the environmental public interest organization that I later became president of and have now served for the past 17 years. Bill has played a huge role in my life and I continue to learn from him. We have lunch at least once a month, but he doesn’t intimidate anymore.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Be proactive, get experience (even if it means offering yourself for free as an intern) and follow your heart. Find something you like to do and it will never be work — it will become a passion and give you immense gratification.Always be nice and treat people with respect — you never know when you’ll need them on your side. Listen a lot and be open-minded. Network and build relationships. Articulate your goals, believe in yourself, work hard and always have fun.

cover_october_2008

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
Probably consulting with the ultimate goal of supporting world travel. After 17 years of managing a nonprofit organization, I can’t see myself in the corporate world. As the years go by, it’s about balance for me. Professionally, I advocate for a balance between economic growth and environmental quality. Personally, I strive to work hard and make a difference while balancing a busy family and maintaining an active social life. If I weren’t doing this, I’d find another way to collect great memories.