Tag Archives: doctors

challenge

Barrow docs conquer Ice Bucket Challenge

Nearly 30 doctors, researchers, residents and staff from the Gregory W. Fulton Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Neuromuscular Disease Center at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix joined the Strike Out ALS Ice Bucket Challenge on August 15 after being challenged by the staff at the ALS Clinic at SUNY. The doctors poured buckets of ice water over their heads and dared the Arizona Diamondbacks, other VIPs and doctors to join the awareness campaign or donate to the Barrow Neurological Foundation for ALS research. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease after the New York Yankee star was diagnosed with the disease in the 1930s.

The Strike Out ALS Ice Bucket Challenge started in July in Massachusetts with former Boston College baseball player Pete Frates, who hoped to raise awareness after being diagnosed with the disease in 2012. The Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disease Center at Barrow Neurological Institute is the state’s only comprehensive ALS center.

The Fulton ALS Center at Barrow was founded to improve both care and research for neuromuscular disorders and offers complete multidisciplinary care within a single center while providing access to advanced clinical trials and promising basic science research. The Fulton ALS Center’s physicians, allied health personnel, and research scientists work with and for patients to deliver the vanguard of therapy for neuromuscular diseases while simultaneously developing the treatments of the future.

health.education

Record number of physician residents at Banner Good Sam

A historic number of doctors are being trained now for the future of medicine at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. There are 291 doctors training in Banner Good Samaritan’s eight medical residency and nine fellowship programs for the 2014-2015 academic training year as part of the hospital’s Graduate Medical Education (GME) program which is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education.

“Training these physicians is an important investment in the quality health care for all Arizonans,” said Steve Narang, MD, Chief Executive Officer at Banner Good Samaritan. “Doctors are more inclined to practice medicine near to where they trained, so we’re obviously very pleased by the number of physicians who are training at Banner Good Samaritan.”

The GME program at Banner Good Samaritan is affiliated with the University of Arizona College of Medicine (UA-COM) and has been training physicians over the past 60 years. Recently, Banner and the University of Arizona Health Network (UAHN) in Tucson signed a Principles of Agreement document that is anticipated to lead to UAHN joining Banner Health and a 30 year affiliation commitment from Banner Health to support the UA-COMs in Tucson and Phoenix.

This affiliation will include the operation of academic medical centers connected to the COMs in both cities. Banner Good Samaritan will be established as the academic medical center in Phoenix, and UAHN – University and South campuses will continue serving in that role for the COM in Tucson. Third and Fourth year COM students in Tucson and Phoenix will rotate into clinical areas in Banner Health affiliated academic medical centers.

Much like the evolution of health care, the advancements in medical education are astounding, Narang said, adding that thanks to technology, today’s physician residents and fellows have a wealth of health information and training resources at their fingertips. From smartphones to simulation education, the digital age has transformed medical teaching, he added.

“While technology has most certainly changed the ways in which residents are taught, the core principles, values and standards that define academic medicine at Banner Good Samaritan remain constant,” Narang said. “Banner Good Samaritan’s superior teaching stems from the commitment by physician educators to the highest standards of patient safety and quality throughout the teaching process.”

Following is the list of Residency and Fellowship programs at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center:

Residency Programs:
· Family Medicine
· Internal Medicine
· Internal Medicine/Pediatrics
· Obstetrics & Gynecology
· Oral Maxillofacial Surgery
· Orthopedic Surgery
· Psychiatry
· Surgery

Fellowship Programs:
· Cardiology
· Interventional Cardiology
· Structural Cardiology
· Endocrinology
· Gastroenterology
· Geriatric Medicine
· Medical Toxicology
· Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine
· Sports Medicine

healthcare

ZocDoc will bring 600 jobs to Valley

A New York company that helps patients connect with doctors through an online service is opening a Scottsdale office and will hire more than 600 workers in the next three years.

ZocDoc is a free service for patients that also lets them book appointments online. Gov. Jan Brewer and Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane announced the office opening on Tuesday.

Brewer has made three other major jobs announcements in recent weeks, including a new General Motors information technology innovation center in Chandler that will have 1,000 high-tech employees.

All three are benefiting from incentives from the Arizona Commerce Authority.

The Commerce Authority also was involved in Tuesday’s announcement.

The company says it will hire nearly 70 people to staff the office by year’s end.

At your service 2008

At Your Service

By Kerry Duff

When Margret Thomas of Tucson was suffering from an agonizing headache in the middle of the night, her husband, Harold, called their primary care physician on his cell phone. The doctor met them at the hospital and an hour later she was in surgery having a brain aneurysm removed. Without the surgery, Margret would have died.

The Thomases were able to reach their doctor after hours because they contract directly with Dr. Steven D. Knope, an internist and sports medicine expert in Tucson, for concierge medical care. The couple pays him an annual out-of-pocket fee in exchange for personalized medical services such as 24/7 accessibility by beeper or cell phone and house calls.

“My wife and I can’t live without Dr. Knope,” says 76-year-old Harold. “Whether we’re at home in Tucson, Cincinnati or somewhere else, we can call him day or night and he gets back to us in 10 minutes or less. That’s worth a lot to us. A concierge doctor is like having insurance.”

your_service 2008

Knope has been a concierge physician in the Tucson area for eight years. He has 125 patients that pay $6,000, or $10,000 per couple for concierge care. The fee includes a two-hour comprehensive physical, stress test, full cancer screening, health and fitness consultation and a personalized exercise and nutrition program. The doctor also accompanies patients to see specialists, and if they are hospitalized, he is the attending physician at the hospital — not a hospitalist who is unfamiliar with their health care, he says.

“Concierge medicine is very much patient driven,” Knope says. “Patients want a different model of care today and they’re willing to pay for it. The difference between concierge medicine and fast-food medicine is that the concierge doctor has time to perform correctly. If a doctor only has seven minutes to deal with a complex patient, he can only do so much. Doctors need time with their patients to do a good job.”

Scottsdale internist and geriatric physician, Scott Bernstein, converted his 2,000-patient practice to concierge medicine in July. What pushed him in that direction, he says, were Medicare constraints and the rising costs of running his practice.

“I was being squeezed from both ends,” Bernstein admits. “Now my patients and I contract directly without the constraints of the Medicare program. I can see patients the same day they call and I have time to provide the type of care they need and I want to provide. I can also do house calls and telephone appointments, which are not covered by Medicare.”

Bernstein sent a letter to his patients in April to let them know he was converting to concierge medicine. Since then, more than 200 people have joined the practice and agreed to pay his $2,000 annual fee.

“It was very bold to make this kind of change after working so hard for 12 years to build my practice,” he says. “I had to say goodbye to 80 percent of my patients and that was scary. But now I couldn’t be more thrilled. I give my patients the time and care they need, and most nights I have dinner with my family, which never happened before.”

Douglas Liebman of Scottsdale, a longtime patient of Dr. Bernstein’s, says he fully supports this type of care, but had to carefully weigh the costs before making a decision.

“I had to think about this carefully because I already have a $2,500 annual payout to Blue Cross Blue Shield,” Liebman says. “But then I realized that staying with Dr. Bernstein was a quality decision at any cost because it concerns my health care. He is genuinely concerned about my well-being and that’s really important to me. I also like being able to reach him after hours and weekends. But what I like most is the house calls. In the world of medicine today, it’s amazing that a doctor will come to your house if you can’t make it to the office.”

Bernstein transitioned to concierge care with the help of Dr. Helene Wechsler, a family physician in Scottsdale, who after 15 years of being in private practice with four other doctors started her own concierge practice in 2004. Wechsler’s practice is limited to 300 patients who pay $2,000 ayear.Patients with children under 18 pay $1,000 annually per child.

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“When I first started practicing 19 years ago, I scheduled patients for 30-minute appointments,” Wechsler says. “But when the healthcare system moved to managed care, I could only see each person 15 minutes or less. In that amount of time you can only treat part of a person and I like to treat the whole person. As a traditional family physician, I also had mountains of paperwork and stress. But I eliminated both when I reduced my patient load and stopped accepting insurance and Medicare. “My concierge practice is peaceful and happy, and when patients walk in the door it’s a pleasant experience,” she adds.