Tag Archives: drink

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Navajo officials may expand casino alcohol use

Navajo gaming officials want to make it possible for people at the tribe’s Arizona casino to drink alcohol while they’re gambling.

Tribal law permits alcohol sales and consumption only in casino restaurants.

A bill moving through the Navajo Nation Council would allow drinks to be taken onto the casino floor.

Derrick Watchman is the chief executive of the Navajo Nation Gaming Enterprise. He says expanding areas where alcohol can be consumed would make the Twin Arrows casino near Flagstaff more competitive with other Arizona casinos.

The expansion wouldn’t carry over to the Navajo Nation’s casinos in New Mexico.

Alcohol is a touchy subject on the Navajo Nation, where the sale and consumption largely is banned.

Watchman expects the discussion over the bill to include the pervasive social ills of alcoholism.

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Public Market Café Hosts Extended Happy Hour This Summer

The Phoenix Public Market Café in downtown Phoenix now offers an extended happy hour that includes late evening hours, offering you a chance to escape the scorching weather. Every day day between 3 p.m. to close, customers can enjoy a choice of red and white wine, pitchers of premium draft beer or a hand-crafted cocktail — all for  $5 eachThe happy hour is available throughout the entire Café; in the main dining area, on the patio or at the bar.
Also offered all summer long, a special game day combo for fans of the D-Backs. For $8, guests will receive any sandwich or burger on the menu, as well as a premium draft beer. This offer is only available on days the D-Backs are playing at nearby Chase Field.
Phoenix Public Market Café Happy Hour Menu:
 
$5 Wines by-the-glass
Phoenix Market Cabernet Sauvignon (Monterey, CA)
Phoenix Market Chardonnay (Monterey, CA)
 
$5 Cocktails
Farmer’s Cup
Pimms, lemonade, basil, cucumber, lime
Margarita
Tequila, fresh-squeezed lemon & lime
Sangria
Brandy, red wine, orange juice, seasonal fruit
Lee Trevino
Vodka, St. Germain, lemon juice, ice tea, habernero syrup
Melon Mojito
Rum, lime juice, fresh melons, mint
$5 Draft Beer Pitchers
Deschutes Seasonal (Bend, OR)
Four Peaks Hefeweizen (Tempe, AZ)
Woodchuck Pear Cider (Middlebury, VT)
Dave’s Electric Brewing IPA (Bisbee, AZ)
Pouring-Soda

Church: Mormons can drink soda

Mormons are free to down a Coke or Pepsi.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has clarified its position on caffeinated soft drinks, noting the news media often incorrectly states that its members are forbidden to drink caffeine.

On Wednesday, the church posted a statement on its website saying it “does not prohibit the use of caffeine,” The Salt Lake Tribune reported.

A day later, the website wording was changed, saying only that “the church revelation spelling out health practices … does not mention the use of caffeine.”

Church spokesman Scott Trotter said the clarification was made to provide context to last week’s NBC News hour-long special on Mormonism that stated Mormons don’t drink caffeine.

But church leaders say that doesn’t mean they view caffeinated drinks as healthy. They just don’t bar members from drinking them.

Even LDS presidential nominee Mitt Romney has been seen drinking an occasional soft drink, and Mormon missionaries in France routinely drink them, too.

Several earlier LDS leaders considered drinking caffeinated soft drinks as a violation of the “spirit” of the Word of Wisdom.

It was dictated in 1833 by Mormon founder Joseph Smith, and bars consumption of wine, strong drinks with alcohol, tobacco and “hot drinks,” which have been defined by church authorities as tea and coffee.

The church’s Website posting Wednesday reaffirmed that the faith’s health-code reference to hot drinks “does not go beyond” tea and coffee.

The clarification on caffeine “is long overdue,” said Matthew Jorgensen, a Mormon and longtime Mountain Dew drinker.

Jorgensen, who is doing a two-year research fellowship in Germany, said he grew up in “a devout Mormon household, in a small, devout Mormon town,” where his neighbors and church leaders viewed “drinking Coca-Cola as so close to drinking coffee that it made your worthiness … questionable.”

In the end, he said, it’s up to individual church members to decide what to drink.

“I can understand why the church is cautious,” he wrote by email. “Saying that caffeine is OK might sound like saying that caffeine is healthy, maybe even an endorsement of caffeine.

“Plus, I think members need opportunities to work through questions of right and wrong for themselves. (Caffeine) is the perfect, low-risk testing ground for members to make decisions for themselves,” Jorgensen added.