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Arizona's Unemployment Rate Drops in October 2010

Arizona’s Unemployment Rate Drops in October 2010

The state’s unemployment rate dropped two-tenths of a percent to 9.5 percent in October, as the economy added 27,400 jobs. This is the largest October job gain since 2004. The Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA) reports today that the private sector generated 93 percent of those jobs, or 25,600.  Year-over-year, total non-farm employment was up 1.1 percent last month.


Oct. 2010Sept. 2010Oct. 2009
United States9.6%9.6%10.1%
Arizona9.5%9.7%9.3%

This is the third consecutive month of over-the-year gains in total nonfarm employment, and the rate of gains has been increasing each month. According to the ACA, Arizona now ranks 18th in the nation in over-the-year employment growth. The state was ranked 32nd in September. Significantly,  Arizona’s construction industry continued to show signs of improvement, and in October posted its first over-the-year increase since December 2006.

“Overall, Arizona’s employment situation is beginning to show indications of welcome improvements,” according to the ACA employment report.


Oct. 2010Sept. 2010Oct. 2009
Overall2,432.42,405.02,408.0
Monthly  Change1.1%0.7%0.7%
Annual  Change1.0%0.5%-7.2%

Over the month, 10 out of the state’s 11 major sectors saw job gains. The sector that had the most gains for the month was trade, transportation and utilities, with 7,100.

Gains were reported in: professional and business services (1,700); financial activities (600); educational and health services (6,400); natural resources and mining (100); construction (5,100); leisure and hospitality (3,300); government (1,800); other services (1,400); and manufacturing (200).

The only sector to lose jobs was information (-300).

The unemployment rates dropped in almost all of the state’s largest metro areas.


Oct. 2010Sept. 2010Oct.2009
Phoenix Metro8.5%8.7%8.8%
Tucson Metro8.3%8.6%8.6%
Yuma Metro25.8%23.9%21.9%
Flagstaff Metro7.9%8.1%8.4%
Prescott Metro9.7%10%9.9%
LHC-Kingman Metro10.9%10.8%10.8%
Cubicle

Jobs Grow Modestly; State’s Unemployment Rate Is Unchanged

The state added 16,000 jobs in September, mostly due to the start of the new school year. Despite the modest gains, the Arizona Department of Commerce reported today that the state’s unemployment rate remains at 9.7 percent


Sept. 2010Aug. 2010Sept. 2009
United States9.6%9.6%9.8%
Arizona9.7%9.7%9.4%

Year-over-year, total non-farm employment was up 0.5 percent last month. August’s year-over-year numbers were revised from a loss of 0.1 percent in total non-farm employment to a gain of 0.3 percent. The August gains broke a 30-month streak of over-the-year job losses for the state.

For the month, the state’s employment gain of 0.7 percent were below the 10-year average, but was better than the previous two years, when the economy generated job growth of 0.2 percent in September 2008 and 0.5 percent in September 2009. The private sector had an anemic net gain of 700 jobs last month. However, for the past three Septembers, the private sector has lost jobs.


Sept. 2010Aug. 2010Sept. 2009
Overall2,403.82,387.82,392.1
Monthly % Change0.7%1.6%0.5%
Annual % Change0.5%0.3%-8%



Over the month, six sectors gained jobs and five lost jobs. The sector that had the most gains for the month was government, with 15,300. But those jobs came primarily from local and state education, with losses in the federal government offsetting some of the gains.


Professional and business services added 2,900 jobs; financial activities gained 1,700; educational and health services rose by 1,200; natural resources and mining generated 200 jobs; and construction also saw job gains of 200 in September

The professional and business services sector boasts the highest over-the-year job gains with 13,800. Over the year, trade, transportation and utilities was up 10,100 jobs; educational and health services gained 8,800; leisure and hospitality had a 1,500-job gain; and natural resources and mining generated 1,200 positions.

Over-the year losses were recorded with government (-7,300); construction (-6,100); other services (-4,000); financial activities (-2,500); information (-2,000); and manufacturing (-1,800).

The unemployment rates in the state’s largest metro areas mostly held steady or dropped slightly in September.


Sept. 2010Aug. 2010Sept.2009
Phoenix Metro8.7%8.8%8.8%
Tucson Metro8.6%8.7%8.6%
Yuma Metro23.9%23.7%21%
Flagstaff Metro8%8%8.2%
Prescott Metro10.1%10.2%9.9%
LHC-Kingman Metro10.8%10.9%10.8%

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How Should Employers Respond To Social Media In The Workplace?

Virtual Networking:

According to some major news articles, the reign of e-mail as a primary tool for communication is coming to a close. This does not mean e-mail will no longer have a place in many people’s daily lives, but rather that its use will be minimized as new generations of communicators strive for instant feedback.

The Nielsen Company conducted a study that found that as of August, 276.9 million people used e-mail across the U.S. and other major countries. In contrast, the number of users on social networking sites was 301.5 million. What is staggering is that social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter have only been in existence for about five years or less. What does this mean for employers?

Currently, there are three major responses by employers regarding employee (and their own) use of social media. The first response is to completely ignore social media and deal with issues if and when they arise. In fact, according to Russell Herder and Ethos Business Law, more than one in three businesses have no policies concerning the use of social media sites in the workplace. The second response is to completely ban social media and even block social media sites so there is no potential for use. As of July 2009, the American Management Association found that approximately 71 percent of IT departments are blocking users from social networking. The third response is to allow employee use of social media within a defined setting.

While trying to weigh how to respond and considering the potential risks, such as security issues and low productivity, it is important for employers to consider that studies show that, although 61 percent of all employees access their Facebook profile at work, this may be a phenomenon to embrace. It is no secret that the delineation between work time and home time has blurred with the use of laptops and cell phones.

In August, the University of Melbourne reported the results of a study that showed people who use the Internet for personal reasons at work are about 9 percent more productive than those who do not. One possible theory according to Brent Colker, the Melbourne study author, was that “short and unobtrusive breaks, such as a quick surf of the Internet, enables the mind to rest itself, leading to a higher total net concentration for a day’s work, and as a result, increased productivity.”

Given these dynamics, most employers will want to choose the third approach and opt for a social media policy that will provide active social media users in the workplace with defined parameters. Much like Internet-use policies, the employer will want to advise its employees on the proper professional etiquette of social media while protecting its own interests. To do this, the employer should be mindful to consider the following when drafting its policy:

  • Encourage employees to use good judgment: Don’t write anything you wouldn’t say in person.
  • Advise them on how to preserve confidentiality and intellectual property: Do not disclose customer or proprietary information.
  • Require employees to disclose any work-related blogging to their supervisor: An employee should use a disclaimer on his blog clarifying where he works and that the opinions and views expressed are not necessarily those of the employer.
  • Mandate that social media use not interfere with getting the job done and that computer use will be monitored appropriately: Always stay productive.
  • Provide a reminder or training regarding the ethics code of the business or given profession: Respect copyright and fair use and do not risk harassment, discrimination or defamation.
  • Encourage employees to be courteous social media community members: Pay heed to mutuality, authenticity and timeliness; these concepts have special meaning in the social media sphere.
  • Clarify the place of social media within the overall business goals and communication plan: Workplace social media use should follow the employer’s goals.

As employers venture into this brave new world, they should be mindful that any policy implemented should work consistently with any Internet-use policy or disciplinary policy already in place.In addition, some employers may need to consider drafting more than one policy — one for hourly and one for salaried employees due to wage hour laws. Also, employers should remain aware of other legal issues that may arise, such as free speech rights and potential litigation and discovery issues. As such, it is always prudent for employers to have legal counsel review such a policy before it is implemented.