Tag Archives: eller mba

tucson airport

Study Puts Tucson Airport’s Economic Impact At $3.2 Billion

A new study shows Tucson International Airport (TIA) brings an annual economic impact of more than $3.2 billion to the region.

The study was commissioned by the Tucson Airport Authority (TAA) and conducted by MBA students from the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. It has been more than 10 years since TAA conducted such an analysis.

“These updated findings provide an accurate and current picture of the job creation and economic activity brought about by TAA’s ongoing operations, significant infrastructure investments and partnerships with more than 100 tenants. We take great pride in helping to improve the economic vitality and quality of life in southern Arizona,” said TAA President/CEO Bonnie Allin.

The airport’s direct, indirect and induced economic effects are included in the total. Direct impact is generated as a result of employment and operation of the airport and tenant businesses. The Eller MBA consulting team calculated a total annual direct impact of $1.7 billion stemming from payroll, goods and services purchased by the airport and airport businesses, expenditures on capital improvement projects and payment of local taxes from airport activity.

The remainder of the $3.2 billion total is attributed to indirect and induced impact.

Indirect impact includes money spent at the airport and in the community by airport patrons, plus revenue generated by businesses that chose to locate in the region because the airport is integral to their operations.

Induced impact, also known as the multiplier effect, is based on an economic principle that quantifies how revenue generated by airport activities grows as it cycles through the community. For example, when TAA hires a local construction company for a project, the company hires additional employees, who increase demand for goods and services in the region through spending their salaries. The businesses they patronize hire additional workers, and the process repeats.

Similarly, 13,000 workers are directly employed at TIA. Indirect and induced effects of airport employment bring the total to 35,000 local jobs supported as a result of the airport’s presence in the community.

The UA graduate students are part of the Eller MBA’s experiential learning program, which allows the students to participate in a strategic consulting project. TAA is one of the College’s 12 clients this year, including Raytheon, Microsoft and Intuit, said Eller College of Management Director for Experiential Learning Nannon Roosa.

“This program is the cornerstone of our MBA’s first year,” Roosa said. “Projects like these challenge students to apply core business skills to address a real-world business issue.

“Eller’s innovative curriculum, combined with pioneering research, distinguished faculty, excellence in entrepreneurship and social responsibility, has brought international recognition to the program,” she added.

The report helps to demonstrate the importance of TIA to a strong local economy, which is useful in regional business recruitment and retention efforts, as well as air service development initiatives. TAA will share the findings from this study for inclusion in an Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) study that will quantify the statewide impact of aviation, as well as other economic development groups such as TREO, the Arizona Commerce Authority, local chambers and the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau.

For more information on the Tucson International Airport, visit their website at flytucsonairport.com.

Accelerated MBA programs

Accelerated MBA Programs Increasingly Appeal To Out-Of-Work Professionals

Grad school has always been a safe haven for out-of-work professionals in a down economy. Now, as economic indicators suggest the economy has bottomed out and the long recovery has begun, those workers face a tough decision: try to stick it out in a brutal job market or invest in retooling their skills and re-enter the market on the upswing.

For many, the decision comes down to timing.

Accelerated MBA programs are an increasingly appealing option for professionals who want to earn an advanced degree quickly — and affordably — and time their returns to the work force to coincide with the economic recovery. Along with a two-year program for full-time students seeking an immersive experience, the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona has developed three accelerated MBA program options.

The 18-month evening MBA meets once a week and is aimed at working professionals.

The 14-month executive MBA is designed for high-level professionals with extensive work experience.

The newest program, a 12-month Accelerated MBA, is a full-time experience beginning in summer 2010. The program is designed for professionals with an undergraduate business degree and a few years of experience. After completing a summer boot camp experience, the students step into the second year of the full-time program and focus on elective coursework.

The 18-month and 14-month programs also are offered in Phoenix at Eller’s Scottsdale campus.

“Beyond timing, a traditional, two-year MBA program just isn’t the right fit for everyone,” says Trina Callie, assistant dean of Eller MBA programs. “Workers with significant professional experience will be more at home in an accelerated program, like our Executive MBA. Business professionals who are three to five years out of college will get the most out of our 12-month MBA, where they can focus on elective coursework.”

Hoon Choi, a student in the 14-month Eller Executive MBA program, spent months unsuccessfully looking for a job and networking before realizing that “most of the employers were looking for the total package: MBA plus experience. Now I am expanding my network through an opportunity to work on an innovative, exciting project with my peers, who are all experts in their fields.”

Katherine Tunsky entered the traditional, full-time program this fall and sees it as a way to build skills in industries she hasn’t yet explored.

“My passion is real estate finance, but while here at Eller, I plan on focusing on sustainability and I will be applying for the dual-degree program in hopes of earning a master’s in environmental planning,” she says.

The Eller MBA program also recently introduced new focus areas that help students build skills in specific growth industries, such as energy and health care.

“For example, all of our programs include an international component, which we believe is vitally important in today’s global business environment,” Callie says. “But we also offer students access to consulting projects and career services to help them build their resumes and better position themselves for their coming job searches.”

Liz Warren-Pederson is the marketing and communications manager at the University of Arizona, www.eller.arizona.edu.