Tag Archives: EMS

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Legislative Impact Award And Lifetime Achievement In Research Award

Legislative Impact Award

Honoree: Roy Ryals, Executive Director, Southwest Ambulance

Roy Ryals
Executive Director
Southwest Ambulance

Virtually every pre-hospital care related rule at the Arizona Department of Health Services, and every piece of related state legislation approved in the past 30 years, has something in common — Roy Ryals helped to write it.

Roy Ryals, Executive Director of Southwest Ambulance, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

Ryals, executive director for the Southwest region of Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, is considered the pre-hospital regulatory expert and reference point. His knowledge and memory of the history behind decisions, and the far-reaching effects of every word that’s written, has earned him the respect of both the industry and state regulators.

In effect, every patient in Arizona who has used an ambulance over the past 30 years has benefited from Ryals’ intellect and participation in the legislative and regulatory process, whether he’s at the state Capitol, in a board room, or in the back of an ambulance. Ryals has been appointed by four Arizona governors to the Emergency Medical Services Council and was named by three directors of Department of Health Services to the State Trauma Advisory Board.

He is president of the Arizona Ambulance Association and a registered lobbyist with the state. At Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, Ryals is responsible for all contracts, regulatory issues and legislative oversight. He indirectly oversees all field employees through his involvement in medical protocols and regulation for field crews of both companies. He also manages Southwest’s administrative leadership team and legislative consultants. Ryals began his career at Southwest Ambulance in 1987 as the executive director over Arizona medical transport.

Two years later, he was promoted to national director of EMS. In 1991, he became the regional chief operating officer overseeing system integration and regulatory compliance.

[stextbox id=”grey” image=”www.swambulance.com”]www.swambulance.com[/stextbox]




Lifetime Achievement Award

Honoree: Joseph Rodgers, PH.D.

Joseph Rodgers, PH.D., Founder and Senior Scientist
Banner Sun Health Research Institute

Joseph Rogers, Ph.D., the motivating force behind Banner Sun Health Research Institute in Sun City, has devoted three decades to finding the cause of and cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But the first work from researchers at the institute did not originate in multimillion-dollar labs or in high-tech facilities; they began their research at a card table with folding chairs.

Joseph Rodgers, Founder and Senior Scientist Banner Sun Health Research Institute, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

The institute, a tribute to Rogers’ tireless efforts in the field of Alzheimer’s research, has created opportunities for intensive research into other age-related illnesses, including Parkinson’s disease and arthritis. The discoveries already made at the institute, and those yet to come, promise to have significant benefits for millions around the world. Rogers, the institute’s founder and senior scientist, was recruited in 1986 to develop the research facility.

His qualifications for this breakthrough role include a doctorate from the University of California, San Diego; a postdoctoral fellowship and service as a staff scientist at the Salk Institute; and immediately prior to his arrival in Arizona, he was at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, serving as a principal investigator within the New England Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Harvard University. Rogers made the revolutionary discovery of the damage that inflammation causes to the Alzheimer’s-affected brain. Initially, other scientists scoffed because conventional wisdom precluded the inflammatory process from entering the brain, but Rogers’ discovery changed Alzheimer’s research.

Under Rogers’ leadership, the institute has attracted internationally recognized faculty and scientists, who have made their own compelling discoveries, including a direct linkage between Alzheimer’s and high cholesterol, and a compound of drugs that has promise for significant benefit to those with rheumatoid arthritis. Another key to the institute’s growth is its full-tissue repository, which Rogers initially developed as a brain bank soon after founding the institute.

[stextbox id=”grey” image=”www.bannerhealth.com”]www.bannerhealth.com[/stextbox]