Tag Archives: Enchantment Group

ATA Profile: Mark Grenoble

Mark Grenoble
President, Enchantment Group
www.enchantmentgroup.com

Not many professionals can say they grew up in their industry. Mark Grenoble is one of the few who can. He has worked in some capacity in the tourism industry since he was a teenager, and aside from a few years in real estate, he has never left the industry.

From humble beginnings as a hotel banquet waiter, Grenoble has risen to the ranks of president of the Scottsdale-based Enchantment Group, a company that provides spa and resort property development and luxury hotel management services. He founded the firm with senior executives of Enchantment Resort and Mii amo, a destination spa that has been ranked No. 1 in the world by Travel & Leisure. Yet, Grenoble doesn’t think his story is very unique.

“There are so many stories just like mine; started at 15, 16, 17 and have grown up in the business, have a passion for it and enjoy it,” he says. “I like the resort side of the hotel business even better. Everyone wants to be there. The business is fun in general. Most people in this business are very passionate about what they do.”

That passion has helped Grenoble etch out a successful career in an industry that has undergone many changes during his 25 years and counting. All his hard work and dedication has not gone unnoticed. Last year, Grenoble was named the Tourism Champion of the Year at the Arizona Governor’s Conference on Tourism.

Though he thoroughly enjoys the industry and his role within it, Grenoble is very frank about the future. Recent challenges have plagued this industry and Grenoble’s role in the Arizona Tourism Alliance is to educate the public on the value of tourism.

“Our leadership in the industry needs to be active and advocate. We need to educate business leaders and elected officials on the value,” he says. “We’re a major industry in the U.S. and the state. Millions are employed nationwide. It’s an industry that is an economic driver; it’s a career path and we need to educate people on the value of it.”

Tourism is a huge part of the state’s economy, especially in smaller, rural communities. Sedona is one example. The city does not have a property tax because tourism funds services for the town.

“Tourism drives the economy for the town and real estate values. It adds a quality of life. Sedona has a population between 10,000 and 15,000 people. All the activities, art galleries, etc. — as a resident you would never be able to do that without the tourism aspect of it,” Grenoble says.

One positive thing that has occurred as a result of this downturn, he adds, is that communities, and even some elected officials, are willing to invest in tourism dollars. They have begun to understand the value of it and the long-term benefit of the cities and the state as a whole.

Grenoble also was instrumental in adding a communications position to the Arizona Hotel & Lodging Association, a move that proved itself to be an excellent resource during last year’s trying times. The position bridged the gap between the industry and the public, and helped communicate the value of tourism.

“We’re trying to engage the public, elected officials and our membership, all the constituents of the tourism industry. We need to understand what we’re doing as an industry,” Grenoble says.

One way that Grenoble hopes to accomplish this is to include outside industries in tourism advocacy. The goals and missions for all industries is to bring economic stability to the state, and the best way to do so is to recognize the value of each industry and work together.

“We’re all intertwined, and that’s why we need to build alliances and bridges with those outside industries,” he says.

Another cause that Grenoble thinks could be helpful in aiding the tourism and travel industry in its recovery is a regulated school calendar that doesn’t begin until after Labor Day.

“It’s had a very positive uptick in taxes for states that have mandated school start after Labor Day,” Grenoble says.

He is currently lobbying supporters for this, but he remains focused on the main goal of tourism helping lead the state out of the economic downturn.

“I think the state has a lot going for it and I see the lights at the end of the tunnel,” Grenoble says.


Arizona Business Magazine

February 2010