Tag Archives: enrollment

college_students

Record 82,000 students choose ASU

While college enrollments may have slowed in recent years, Arizona State University continues to draw record numbers of academically qualified students who are eager to learn and embark on their journey to a better life.

As the fall 2014 semester gets under way Aug. 21, the university anticipates an enrollment of more than 82,000 undergraduate and graduate students – a new record for number of students enrolled and a nearly 8 percent increase from last year. Increases also are seen in number of transfer, international and veteran and veteran dependent students, and the student body is the most diverse ever.

“Students are choosing ASU because they know we are the right choice to help open their eyes to a new world filled with possibilities. They have come here to work hard and we are committed to teaching, guiding and mentoring them along the way,” said Kent Hopkins, ASU Vice Provost for Enrollment Services. “The Sun Devil family grows stronger every year and we are looking forward to seeing what our students envision and accomplish.”

Preliminary first-day enrollment shows records set across nearly all areas. Undergraduate enrollment grew to 66,309 and graduate school enrollment grew to 15,751 for a total of 82,060.

Getting ready to start the school year is Preston Adcock, from Glendale, a junior life sciences major in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences and a Barrett honors student. He has his dream set on going to medical school and working as an orthopedic surgeon or in emergency medicine. He is working in ASU Professor Carl Wagner’s organic chemistry lab.

“I like New College and West campus because it’s small enough to make friends on campus whether you live on or off campus,” Adcock said. “The professors are fantastic.”

Freshman enrollment this year grew to more than 11,000. Applications received were more than 46,000, a 25 percent increase over the previous academic year. The Fall 2014 freshman class is an academically strong group, with an average high school GPA 3.4 and average SAT score of 1113. More than half, 54 percent, are New American University Scholars at the Dean, Provost and President Scholarship levels, the most prestigious scholarships for first-time freshmen.

Transfer enrollment has grown to more than 8,800 – up nearly 13 percent from fall 2013. The transfer class is academically strong, with an average 3.1 transfer GPA.

Jonathan Williams transferred to ASU from Glendale Community College in Glendale (metro Los Angeles) California. He is currently studying communications, but plans to switch to journalism to pursue his career goal of becoming a sports journalist. He learned about the Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication from friends at a USC football game and decided to apply, because “it’s better than the state journalism schools in California.” He’ll be working as a news reporter at the State Press this semester.

“I’m looking forward to the resources at a major research university, and delving into writing and photography as part of my job at the State Press,” Williams said. “For me, writing is a passion, and I want to be a journalist because I want to be able to write about what’s important and going on in the world, and keep people informed.”

International campus-based enrollment increased 33.6 percent to 8,787 students. The top 10 countries for international enrollment at ASU are China, India, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Canada, Kuwait, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Mexico. In addition, some 600 Brazilian students are calling ASU their educational home for the next academic year through their government-sponsored Brazil Scientific Mobility Program.

Viswajith Hanasoge Nataraja, from Bangalore, India, is pursuing his master’s degree in mechanical engineering at the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering and his area of interest is fluid mechanics and energy. He is a student worker in the University Sustainability Practices office, is actively involved in the Zero Waste at ASU initiative, and is vice-president of the Indian Student Association at ASU.

“I spoke to many friends here in the U.S. and in India, and to my lecturers in India, and their top recommendation was ASU because of its infrastructure, attention to detail and quality of the faculty. It also has excellent research facilities,” he said. “I enjoy being a part of ASU’s sustainability efforts, and think that this will also give me an edge in my professional skill set.”

Other milestones: The ASU student body is the most diverse, 34 percent, ever; new graduate enrollment increased more than 10 percent; and more than 4,000 veterans and veteran dependents have enrolled– a 25 percent increase in overall enrollment and a 62 percent growth in new graduate enrollment since last year.

Patrick Harris, a senior airman in the Arizona National Guard out of Tucson, is majoring in music education with a minor in youth services leadership. A sophomore from Newport News, Va., who served in the Air Force for four-and-a-half years, he found through research that ASU is one of the top schools for supporting military veterans and for music education.

“The experience at ASU has been getting even better, especially as I take advantage of the opportunities to get involved in activities and organizations. I’m part of the Sigma Alpha Lambda fraternity, and am involved with the marching band at Marco de Niza High School in Tempe, Scottsdale and Mesa Community Colleges’ bands, and Sonic Brass Band,” said Harris. “I’ve always wanted to teach music, and knew that I needed a degree to do so. I wanted to put in the work to achieve my dream.”

college student

ASU freshman class breaks records for enrollment

Arizona State University is welcoming an academically strong and remarkably diverse freshman class that includes many students who have distinguished themselves both inside and outside the classroom.

The new class of Sun Devils rises from the largest pool of freshman applicants in the university’s history, and among its ranks are a 16-year-old with four associate’s degrees, a retired Marine Corps sergeant, a first-generation college student from the top of her high school class, and twin sisters who perform with the Thailand Youth Orchestra.

“The more than 46,000 applications we received from aspiring freshman is a testament to ASU’s reputation as a premier university, and the quality of the students who are joining our community of higher learning signals great things for ASU’s future,” said Provost Robert Page.

The number of students applying for admission as first-time freshmen represented a 25 percent increase over the previous academic year. The Fall 2014 freshman class is an academically strong group, with an average high school GPA 3.4 and average SAT score of 1113. More than half, 54 percent, are New American University Scholars at the Dean, Provost and President Scholarship levels, the most prestigious scholarships for first-time freshmen.

Kevin Davies, from Kingman, is a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Dean’s Scholar. A sergeant in the Marine Corp infantry who served in the Middle East and Asia, he is a psychology major who has his sights set on being a doctor.

Davies said he is looking forward to “being around people again and challenging myself in a different way.”

Among this year’s class are 6,236 Arizona residents – some 450 students more than last year’s in-state freshman class. 62 percent of these students graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class.

Barrett, the Honors College celebrates a new record of 1,647 high-achieving first-time freshmen. The majority, 1,206, are Arizona residents. Among these honors students is 16-year-old Alexander (AJ) Gilman from Paradise Valley. A business and legal studies major in W. P. Carey School of Business, he enters ASU with 111 college credits and associate’s degrees in business, arts, science and general studies.

Gilman comes from a Sun Devil family and his mom has an accounting degree from W. P. Carey and a law degree from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law. Hoping to follow in his mother’s foot steps, with his eyes set on law school, he chose Barrett “because it offered an individualized experience and a feeling of community,” which is important to him.

ASU continues to honor its longstanding commitment to socioeconomic diversity and access to education with more than 42 percent of enrolled Arizona residents reporting they will be the first in their family to go to a four-year college, and 39 percent coming from low-income families.

Sarah Rutkowski, from Chandler, is a first-generation college student who was awarded an APS scholarship. Also a first-generation immigrant whose parents came from Poland, Rutkowski overcame a challenging childhood and graduated in the top 4 percent of her class from Corona High School.

A record number of non-resident students also have made ASU their school of choice. 4,399 students representing all 50 states and 63 countries are members of this year’s class with the largest number – 1,173 – coming from California. ASU has increasingly becoming a school of choice for students from the Golden State.

Collectively, this year’s freshmen make up ASU’s most diverse class to date, in terms of their racial and ethnic backgrounds – 39.4 percent of the class.

Xochil Rina Goretsky, a Yaqui-Chicano-Jewish American from Mendocino, Calif., is a Barrett Honors student majoring in public health at the College of Health Solutions on the Downtown Phoenix campus. Her path to college has been a personal challenge after suffering a severe concussion in junior high school. She had to re-learn how to read, among other things, and said what kept her going was a desire to change the world.

After being accepted to ASU, the University of Arizona and Drexel University she chose ASU. “I felt ASU said, ‘We believe in you and are willing to invest in you because we know you are going to put in 110 percent,” said Goretsky. “I want to explore and I think this is the place to do it.”

More than 900 new international students will call ASU and the Phoenix-area home. Twin sisters Rittika and Ruchika Gambhir made a long journey from Bangkok, Thailand to attend ASU, and it was their only choice due to the “dedicated faculty,” “diversity of culture,” and “amazing atmosphere.”

Both students in the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts, Ruchika is a double major in oboe performance and music education and Rittika is a double major in bassoon and music education. Their goal is to become professional musicians working in a symphony orchestra in the U.S.

Many incoming freshmen have selected ASU due to the variety of academic environments it provides students across its five Arizona locations. Students choose from more than 300 academic majors and select the campus environment that is best fit for their academic, social and cultural needs. Students seeking a small campus experience with big university are part of the West campus environment with 385 new freshmen, the Polytechnic Campus with 579 new freshmen, or the ASU Colleges at Lake Havasu City with 33 new freshmen.

In addition, the Downtown Phoenix campus will welcome 1,318 new freshmen and Tempe Campus will be home for 8,320 first-time freshmen.

“No other university in the United States offers students these types of educational and campus environment experiences under one university name,” said Kent Hopkins, vice provost for enrollment services. “There is no place quite like Arizona State.”

ASU

More than 13,500 students moving into ASU

A strong demand for quality academic programs and the student experience at Arizona State University has led to a record number of students choosing to live on campus this year. More than 13,500 first-year and returning students move into residence halls this weekend.

Approximately 8,300 first-year students – an all-time record – will live in ASU’s residential colleges, while approximately 5,500 upper class students have chosen to live at Tempe, Downtown, Polytechnic and West campus residential locations.

First-year students at the Tempe, West and Downtown Phoenix campuses move in over the weekend on Saturday, Aug. 16, and Sunday, Aug. 17. First-year students at the Polytechnic campus move in on Monday, Aug. 18.

Cruise-ship or assisted move-in will be available on all four campuses. Student volunteers will be on-hand to answer questions and help ease the transition to living on campus.

Classes begin at all campuses on Aug. 21.

All first-year students will live in the university’s residential college housing model, which places students in specific halls based on their academic college enrollment. These residential facilities boast classrooms and multi-use rooms that offer space for tutoring, supplemental instruction, study groups, workshops and events. Residential colleges are essential to academic success and also help students quickly form social connections and build a community of peers and mentors.

“Living on campus supports student success,” said Jennifer Hightower, deputy vice president of student services. “Students have a greater sense of connection and involvement with their professors and peers and benefit from a more personalized experience at the university.”

Students representing all 50 states and more than 30 countries will enjoy assisted move-in and in-person help from a team of student volunteers.

Incoming Midwestern University students receive their white coats at a special ceremony just after the beginning of the fall semester. The University’s total enrollment in 14 graduate-level healthcare programs offered at its Glendale campus has surpassed 3,000 students for the first time this year.

Midwestern Glendale Enrollment Tops 3,000 for 1st time

Midwestern University, home to Arizona’s largest medical school and the state’s first College of Veterinary Medicine, announced the achievement of another milestone in the University’s history.

For the first time since the University’s Glendale campus was established in 1995, total enrollment in Midwestern’s 14 graduate degree programs exceeds 3,000 students. For comparison’s sake, only 136 students – 103 osteopathic medical students and 33 physician assistant students – were on campus during Midwestern’s first year of classes in the Fall of 1996.

“The mission of Midwestern University is to meet the healthcare needs of society by educating professionals who are committed to caring for others,” said Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwestern University.  “We have achieved and sustained our growth by offering quality healthcare education and by developing new academic programs for professions that are in demand, and through the clinical institutes that serve the health needs of our neighbors.”

More than 6,200 medical professionals have graduated from Midwestern University’s Glendale campus since its inception, with over 40% remaining in-state to practice.

education.business

Apollo quarterly profit beats predictions

For-profit education company Apollo Group Inc. said Monday its fiscal second-quarter net income tumbled 79 percent, hurt by a drop in enrollment, but the results beat Wall Street predictions and Apollo shares jumped 7 percent in premarket trading.

For the quarter ended Feb. 28, the University of Phoenix parent company earned $13.5 million, or 12 cents per share, down from $63.9 million, or 51 cents per share, in the same quarter last year. Excluding restructuring charges and other one-time items, the company said its adjusted profit was 34 cents per share.

Revenue dropped 13 percent to $838.4 million, from $962.7 million in the year-ago period.

Analysts, on average, expected a profit of 19 cents per share, on $824.9 million in revenue, according to FactSet.

Apollo attributed the drop in profit to lower enrollment and higher marketing costs, which were partially offset by lower restructuring and bad-debt costs. Enrollment at the University of Phoenix fell more than 15 percent to 300,800, while new degreed enrollment dropped 20 percent to 38,900.

Apollo projected fiscal 2013 revenue of $3.65 billion to $3.75 billion, while analysts expect $3.73 billion.

The for-profit education industry enjoyed a big boom when the recession first hit, but student demand has faded. In addition, increased criticism of the schools, new federal regulations and the still-struggling economy have weighed on enrollments.

The drop in enrollment has dented Apollo’s profits, and the company said in October that it was closing 115 of its smaller locations to cope with lower enrollment and plunging profits.

Apollo shares rose $1.22, or 7.2 percent, to $18.26 in premarket trading.

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U.S. colleges seek more foreign students

Want to see how quickly the look and business model of American public universities are changing? Visit a place like Indiana University. Five years ago, there were 87 undergraduates from China on its idyllic, All-American campus in Bloomington. This year: 2,224.

According to an Associated Press report, new figures out Monday show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest.

The numbers offer a snapshot of the transformation of America’s famous heartland public universities in an era of diminished state support. Of the 25 campuses with the most international students, a dozen have increased international enrollment more than 40 percent in just five years, according to data collected by the Institute of International Education. All but one are public, and a striking number come from the Big Ten: Indiana, Purdue, Michigan State, Ohio State and the Universities of Minnesota and Illinois. Indiana’s international enrollment now surpasses 6,000, or about 15 percent of the student body, and in Illinois, the flagship Urbana-Champaign campus has nearly 9,000 — second nationally only to the University of Southern California.

To be sure, such ambitious universities value the global vibe and perspectives international students bring to their Midwestern campuses. But there’s no doubt what else is driving the trend: International students typically pay full out-of-state tuition and aren’t awarded financial aid.

Public universities hit hard by state funding cuts “really are starting to realize the tuition from international students makes it possible for them to continue offering scholarships and financial aid to domestic students,” said Peggy Blumenthal, senior counselor at IIE, the private nonprofit that publishes the annual “Open Doors” study.

Nationally, there were 765,000 foreign students on U.S. campuses last year, with China (158,000) the top source, followed by India, South Korea and Saudi Arabia (the fastest growing thanks to an ambitious scholarship program by the Saudi government). Altogether, the Department of Commerce calculates they contribute $22.7 billion to the economy, and many stay after graduation. For the first time in a dozen years, according to IIE, there were more foreign undergraduates than graduate students.

Indiana charges in-state students $10,034 for tuition and non-residents $31,484, so the economic appeal is straightforward. Still, out-of-state recruiting — international or domestic — is always sensitive for public universities, fueling charges that kids of in-state taxpayers are denied available slots.

At one level, that’s true: About one-third of Indiana students come from outside the state, and for this year it rejected 4,164 in-state applicants. But while conceivably it could enroll more Indiana residents, without the out-of-staters’ tuition dollars they would likely have to pay more. Indiana and others figure more of their out-of-staters may as well be international, arguing you can’t prepare students for a global economy without exposing them to students from abroad.

David Zaret, Indiana’s vice president for international affairs, says the school’s interest in international students is educational, not “nakedly financial.” He says IU could fill its out-of-state slots domestically, and points out that unlike some schools IU doesn’t charge international students more than domestic non-residents, so there’s no extra financial incentive. He also says there’s been no particular effort to recruit Chinese students; he credits the extraordinary growth to hundreds of IU alumni now in China spreading the word. In fact, he said in a brief phone conversation from Argentina, “I’d like to see more balance,” with more students from places such as South America and Turkey.

While international students bring revenue, there are also costs, obliging universities to expand services like international advising, English instruction, and even targeted mental health services. There is growing concern about the isolation of international students on campus. Expanding numbers may not help, just making it easier to find a bubble. One recent study found 40 percent of international students reported no close American friends.

Kedao Wang, a Shanghai native and one of about 6,400 overseas students at the University of Michigan, said his experience has been excellent but agrees growing numbers don’t solve the isolation problem. Virtually all Chinese students struggle at least somewhat to fit in, due to language and cultural barriers. Wang, who goes by Keven, bought football season tickets all four years and loves the games, but rarely sees fellow Chinese students at Michigan Stadium. When he first arrived he tried not to hang out only with Chinese students, but his social life has since moved in that direction.

Still, he says, the shy students who once studied in the United States on Chinese government scholarships have been replaced by better-off Chinese who pay their own way and arrive more familiar and comfortable with Western culture.

Wang says Chinese students are under no illusions why they’re recruited: “It’s a market economy. There are people who want this who are willing to pay.” Still, he’d like to see schools award more financial aid to internationals. Michigan non-resident tuition and fees ($41,870 for upperclassmen) are hugely expensive even for prosperous Chinese families, but are high enough that the international students who come here aren’t socio-economically diverse (only a handful of U.S. colleges offer international students the same aid as domestic students).

“There are so many bright students in China,” he said. “If you can give just a few of them a scholarship, they would come and succeed.”

A U.S. education is still highly desired by Chinese students, but Wang says “10 years ago people only knew the top schools.” Now they’re looking beyond the Ivy League and learning more about the range of options (including, he said, the fact that some U.S. colleges are terrible).

“I think that’s important,” Blumenthal said of the trend of international students moving beyond the most famous schools and into state schools, community colleges and liberal arts colleges. “They need to know that America’s as diverse as we know it is.”

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SCNM sets enrollment record

A record number of students have enrolled for the Fall 2012 starting class at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences (SCNM), continuing a consistent growth trend showing a 60 percent increase since 2008.

Nearly new 100 students have been accepted into the medical college’s four-year naturopathic physician degree program, which begins Oct. 1 at 2140 E. Broadway Rd. in Tempe, bringing the total number of students to 412.  Students accepted into the program must have previously earned a bachelor’s degree and completed science, English and humanities prerequisite coursework.

“During the past five years, there has been a steady increase in interest in naturopathic medicine and careers as naturopathic physicians,” said Melissa Winquist, SCNM Vice President of Student Affairs.  “We receive more than 8,000 inquiries a year into our program.  Students graduating from SCNM are the highest-trained experts in natural medicine.”

In 2008, 60 students were accepted into the fall class.  The next year, the number increased to 70, to 81 in 2010, 86 in 2009 and 97 this year.   Students this fall represent 27 states and Canada, where eight students live.  There are 26 students from Arizona.

Winquist said students spend the first two years studying basic sciences complemented by clinical observations.  Students begin seeing patients in their third and fourth years.  One-year post-graduate residencies provide hands-on practical experience.

SCNM, one of only five naturopathic colleges in the nation, will celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2013.

The college’s faculty includes naturopathic physicians, medical doctors, osteopaths, PhDs, and acupuncturists who teach in disciplines that include physical medicine, homeopathy, botanical medicine, mind-body medicine and environmental medicine.

“We train physicians by combining the best of conventional and alternative therapies with an emphasis on prevention,” said SCNM President and CEO Paul Mittman, ND, EdD.  “Our integrated curriculum exposes students to a diversity of medical knowledge, clinical applications, lab work and patient care that concentrates on whole-patient wellness to find the underlying causes of a patient’s condition rather than focusing strictly on symptomatic treatment.”

The college holds two open houses each year, called Discovery Days, when individuals interested in attending SCNM can learn more about the programs and the public can learn more about naturopathic medicine. Doctors will discuss natural options for pain management, fatigue, thyroid issues and digestion, among other subjects, and free activities include blood pressure checks, herb tea and green protein drink tastings, pulse ear acupuncture and chair massages.

The next Discovery Day is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3 on the campus in Tempe.

For information, visit www.scnm.edu.

Flagstaff_NAU_Skydome

NAU poised to set enrollment records

Based on the first week of student registration, Northern Arizona University’s Mountain Campus appears to be on track for another year of record enrollment.

A university spokesman says the incoming freshman class totals about 4,100 and enrollment in Flagstaff is up by 700 to 18,200.

Both of those marks would be records.

Statewide, enrollment at NAU is expected to top 26,000 students.

The Arizona Daily Sun says the official count will come on the 21st day of classes at NAU.