Tag Archives: enrollment

Incoming Midwestern University students receive their white coats at a special ceremony just after the beginning of the fall semester. The University’s total enrollment in 14 graduate-level healthcare programs offered at its Glendale campus has surpassed 3,000 students for the first time this year.

Midwestern Glendale Enrollment Tops 3,000 for 1st time

Midwestern University, home to Arizona’s largest medical school and the state’s first College of Veterinary Medicine, announced the achievement of another milestone in the University’s history.

For the first time since the University’s Glendale campus was established in 1995, total enrollment in Midwestern’s 14 graduate degree programs exceeds 3,000 students. For comparison’s sake, only 136 students – 103 osteopathic medical students and 33 physician assistant students – were on campus during Midwestern’s first year of classes in the Fall of 1996.

“The mission of Midwestern University is to meet the healthcare needs of society by educating professionals who are committed to caring for others,” said Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwestern University.  “We have achieved and sustained our growth by offering quality healthcare education and by developing new academic programs for professions that are in demand, and through the clinical institutes that serve the health needs of our neighbors.”

More than 6,200 medical professionals have graduated from Midwestern University’s Glendale campus since its inception, with over 40% remaining in-state to practice.

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Apollo quarterly profit beats predictions

For-profit education company Apollo Group Inc. said Monday its fiscal second-quarter net income tumbled 79 percent, hurt by a drop in enrollment, but the results beat Wall Street predictions and Apollo shares jumped 7 percent in premarket trading.

For the quarter ended Feb. 28, the University of Phoenix parent company earned $13.5 million, or 12 cents per share, down from $63.9 million, or 51 cents per share, in the same quarter last year. Excluding restructuring charges and other one-time items, the company said its adjusted profit was 34 cents per share.

Revenue dropped 13 percent to $838.4 million, from $962.7 million in the year-ago period.

Analysts, on average, expected a profit of 19 cents per share, on $824.9 million in revenue, according to FactSet.

Apollo attributed the drop in profit to lower enrollment and higher marketing costs, which were partially offset by lower restructuring and bad-debt costs. Enrollment at the University of Phoenix fell more than 15 percent to 300,800, while new degreed enrollment dropped 20 percent to 38,900.

Apollo projected fiscal 2013 revenue of $3.65 billion to $3.75 billion, while analysts expect $3.73 billion.

The for-profit education industry enjoyed a big boom when the recession first hit, but student demand has faded. In addition, increased criticism of the schools, new federal regulations and the still-struggling economy have weighed on enrollments.

The drop in enrollment has dented Apollo’s profits, and the company said in October that it was closing 115 of its smaller locations to cope with lower enrollment and plunging profits.

Apollo shares rose $1.22, or 7.2 percent, to $18.26 in premarket trading.

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U.S. colleges seek more foreign students

Want to see how quickly the look and business model of American public universities are changing? Visit a place like Indiana University. Five years ago, there were 87 undergraduates from China on its idyllic, All-American campus in Bloomington. This year: 2,224.

According to an Associated Press report, new figures out Monday show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest.

The numbers offer a snapshot of the transformation of America’s famous heartland public universities in an era of diminished state support. Of the 25 campuses with the most international students, a dozen have increased international enrollment more than 40 percent in just five years, according to data collected by the Institute of International Education. All but one are public, and a striking number come from the Big Ten: Indiana, Purdue, Michigan State, Ohio State and the Universities of Minnesota and Illinois. Indiana’s international enrollment now surpasses 6,000, or about 15 percent of the student body, and in Illinois, the flagship Urbana-Champaign campus has nearly 9,000 — second nationally only to the University of Southern California.

To be sure, such ambitious universities value the global vibe and perspectives international students bring to their Midwestern campuses. But there’s no doubt what else is driving the trend: International students typically pay full out-of-state tuition and aren’t awarded financial aid.

Public universities hit hard by state funding cuts “really are starting to realize the tuition from international students makes it possible for them to continue offering scholarships and financial aid to domestic students,” said Peggy Blumenthal, senior counselor at IIE, the private nonprofit that publishes the annual “Open Doors” study.

Nationally, there were 765,000 foreign students on U.S. campuses last year, with China (158,000) the top source, followed by India, South Korea and Saudi Arabia (the fastest growing thanks to an ambitious scholarship program by the Saudi government). Altogether, the Department of Commerce calculates they contribute $22.7 billion to the economy, and many stay after graduation. For the first time in a dozen years, according to IIE, there were more foreign undergraduates than graduate students.

Indiana charges in-state students $10,034 for tuition and non-residents $31,484, so the economic appeal is straightforward. Still, out-of-state recruiting — international or domestic — is always sensitive for public universities, fueling charges that kids of in-state taxpayers are denied available slots.

At one level, that’s true: About one-third of Indiana students come from outside the state, and for this year it rejected 4,164 in-state applicants. But while conceivably it could enroll more Indiana residents, without the out-of-staters’ tuition dollars they would likely have to pay more. Indiana and others figure more of their out-of-staters may as well be international, arguing you can’t prepare students for a global economy without exposing them to students from abroad.

David Zaret, Indiana’s vice president for international affairs, says the school’s interest in international students is educational, not “nakedly financial.” He says IU could fill its out-of-state slots domestically, and points out that unlike some schools IU doesn’t charge international students more than domestic non-residents, so there’s no extra financial incentive. He also says there’s been no particular effort to recruit Chinese students; he credits the extraordinary growth to hundreds of IU alumni now in China spreading the word. In fact, he said in a brief phone conversation from Argentina, “I’d like to see more balance,” with more students from places such as South America and Turkey.

While international students bring revenue, there are also costs, obliging universities to expand services like international advising, English instruction, and even targeted mental health services. There is growing concern about the isolation of international students on campus. Expanding numbers may not help, just making it easier to find a bubble. One recent study found 40 percent of international students reported no close American friends.

Kedao Wang, a Shanghai native and one of about 6,400 overseas students at the University of Michigan, said his experience has been excellent but agrees growing numbers don’t solve the isolation problem. Virtually all Chinese students struggle at least somewhat to fit in, due to language and cultural barriers. Wang, who goes by Keven, bought football season tickets all four years and loves the games, but rarely sees fellow Chinese students at Michigan Stadium. When he first arrived he tried not to hang out only with Chinese students, but his social life has since moved in that direction.

Still, he says, the shy students who once studied in the United States on Chinese government scholarships have been replaced by better-off Chinese who pay their own way and arrive more familiar and comfortable with Western culture.

Wang says Chinese students are under no illusions why they’re recruited: “It’s a market economy. There are people who want this who are willing to pay.” Still, he’d like to see schools award more financial aid to internationals. Michigan non-resident tuition and fees ($41,870 for upperclassmen) are hugely expensive even for prosperous Chinese families, but are high enough that the international students who come here aren’t socio-economically diverse (only a handful of U.S. colleges offer international students the same aid as domestic students).

“There are so many bright students in China,” he said. “If you can give just a few of them a scholarship, they would come and succeed.”

A U.S. education is still highly desired by Chinese students, but Wang says “10 years ago people only knew the top schools.” Now they’re looking beyond the Ivy League and learning more about the range of options (including, he said, the fact that some U.S. colleges are terrible).

“I think that’s important,” Blumenthal said of the trend of international students moving beyond the most famous schools and into state schools, community colleges and liberal arts colleges. “They need to know that America’s as diverse as we know it is.”

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SCNM sets enrollment record

A record number of students have enrolled for the Fall 2012 starting class at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences (SCNM), continuing a consistent growth trend showing a 60 percent increase since 2008.

Nearly new 100 students have been accepted into the medical college’s four-year naturopathic physician degree program, which begins Oct. 1 at 2140 E. Broadway Rd. in Tempe, bringing the total number of students to 412.  Students accepted into the program must have previously earned a bachelor’s degree and completed science, English and humanities prerequisite coursework.

“During the past five years, there has been a steady increase in interest in naturopathic medicine and careers as naturopathic physicians,” said Melissa Winquist, SCNM Vice President of Student Affairs.  “We receive more than 8,000 inquiries a year into our program.  Students graduating from SCNM are the highest-trained experts in natural medicine.”

In 2008, 60 students were accepted into the fall class.  The next year, the number increased to 70, to 81 in 2010, 86 in 2009 and 97 this year.   Students this fall represent 27 states and Canada, where eight students live.  There are 26 students from Arizona.

Winquist said students spend the first two years studying basic sciences complemented by clinical observations.  Students begin seeing patients in their third and fourth years.  One-year post-graduate residencies provide hands-on practical experience.

SCNM, one of only five naturopathic colleges in the nation, will celebrate its 20th anniversary in 2013.

The college’s faculty includes naturopathic physicians, medical doctors, osteopaths, PhDs, and acupuncturists who teach in disciplines that include physical medicine, homeopathy, botanical medicine, mind-body medicine and environmental medicine.

“We train physicians by combining the best of conventional and alternative therapies with an emphasis on prevention,” said SCNM President and CEO Paul Mittman, ND, EdD.  “Our integrated curriculum exposes students to a diversity of medical knowledge, clinical applications, lab work and patient care that concentrates on whole-patient wellness to find the underlying causes of a patient’s condition rather than focusing strictly on symptomatic treatment.”

The college holds two open houses each year, called Discovery Days, when individuals interested in attending SCNM can learn more about the programs and the public can learn more about naturopathic medicine. Doctors will discuss natural options for pain management, fatigue, thyroid issues and digestion, among other subjects, and free activities include blood pressure checks, herb tea and green protein drink tastings, pulse ear acupuncture and chair massages.

The next Discovery Day is scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 3 on the campus in Tempe.

For information, visit www.scnm.edu.

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NAU poised to set enrollment records

Based on the first week of student registration, Northern Arizona University’s Mountain Campus appears to be on track for another year of record enrollment.

A university spokesman says the incoming freshman class totals about 4,100 and enrollment in Flagstaff is up by 700 to 18,200.

Both of those marks would be records.

Statewide, enrollment at NAU is expected to top 26,000 students.

The Arizona Daily Sun says the official count will come on the 21st day of classes at NAU.