Tag Archives: environmental design

Tartesso Elementary

Elementary School Leaves A Small Carbon Footprint

Buckeye’s Tartesso Elementary School is receiving high marks, but it has nothing to do with the kids in the classroom.

On Aug. 19, 2010, the United States Green Building Council awarded the 3-year-old school with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification for sustainable building design.

Tartesso, a part of the Saddle Mountain Unified School District, is the first fully state-funded LEED Silver School in Arizona with this recognition.

“Having the certification is a big bonus to our district,” said Dr. Deborah Garza-Chavez, principal of Tartesso. “It’s nice to be noticed as a small district by trying to provide the best learning environment for our students and staff.”

The school had just a little more than 200 students upon opening in 2008 and only served kindergarten through 6th grade. Now fully functioning up to 8th grade, more than 600 students walk the halls of a completely sustainable and environmentally conscious building.

Architects and engineers from DLR Group were responsible for the building designs of the school and worked with budgets allocated by the Arizona State School of Facilities Board.

“Before we started designing the facility in early 2006, we brought our team into a brainstorming session where we could evaluate and strategize as to what sustainable products we wanted to use,” said Bill Taylor, a LEED-accredited professional with DLR Group.

The staff and students at Tartesso have a wide variety of energy saving technologies and products that create a healthy learning environment.

In an effort to reduce water shortages, the building design provides a plumbing system that conserves water. All of the boys’ restrooms contain waterless urinals and the kitchen sinks have low flow water fixtures, a reduction that saves half a million gallons of water per year.

The school provides a high performing mechanical system that goes above and beyond state standards.

A completely computer controlled airflow system continuously brings in new air circulation and automatically turns off air conditioning in an unoccupied room.  This reduces the annual energy cost by 20 percent, in comparison to a building that just meets the state code requirements.

In addition to significant energy savings, DLR Group improved the indoor environmental quality of Tartesso.  The building is positioned so that natural daylight offsets the artificial lighting in all occupied academic spaces, reducing energy and improving the educational environment.

Only low organic compound paint was used and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) free carpets were installed to promote a healthy interior for students and staff.

“[Students] have benefited from not having those harsh smells,” said Angel Tellez, Facilities Engineer for Saddle Mountain Unified School District. “Everything is kid friendly and environmentally friendly and that is improving the learning environment.”

Not only has the school been a leader in sustainable innovations, but it has served as an asset to the economy by purchasing materials from local companies. Ingredients in the concrete were all locally harvested and nothing was shipped long distance.

“This is a place that has students, staff and the community in mind,” said Premnath Sundharam, Senior Associate for DLR Group. “It’s an educational tool for what can be done on limited funds while still making an impact on the environment.”

Phoenix_skyline_Arizona_USA

A Voyage Of Discovery In Phoenix

Facing a down economy, shrinking budgets and significant pressures to outperform the year’s commitments, how do you find time for sustainability? Let’s face it, if there is no payback within the current year, it’s unlikely you can get capital or modify your operating budget to make any kind of significant difference toward a green program, right? Wrong!

In a recessionary environment there’s more than one way to cut costs and leverage those savings to support other initiatives. In addition to pure cost savings, a little bit of planning and adjustment of current policies can yield results with little or no additional expense.

Our approach at the Greater Phoenix Chapter of IFMA, beginning in August 2008, was to establish a Facility Managers’ Green Peer Group (FMGPG) to foster open information exchange and provide a forum for sharing best practices.

What FMGPG has done is to create the environment for the peer group to be successful. A facilitator who is familiar with the subject matter is the primary pivot point; we manage and develop the agenda, secure the location and communicate through the FMGPG to the group members. The facilitator then leads the meeting and keeps the group focused on the agenda and future goals.

The initial goal of the peer group was to educate the members on the five major categories of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) as they related to the Existing Building Operations and Maintenance structure, or EBOM.

The LEED-EB system focuses on building maintenance and operations. Unlike the other LEED standards, points are awarded for established programs and policies with measured results over time. Metrics are taken during a performance period lasting from three to 12 months.

As with the LEED for new construction products, points are awarded in six categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor air quality, and innovation in operations

There are 92 available points, with a minimum of 34 required for the lowest level of certification. Most organizations nationwide appear to be striving for Silver or Gold certification based on the initial condition of the building.

We established a yearlong program that was based on the following formula:
General Discussion and Checklist Review + Facility Examples and Benchmarking + Site Visit = A Solid Foundation of Understanding.

So, what’s the bottom line on the benefits of the peer group:

  • Approaching sustainability concepts with minimal or no impact to your FM resources and budget.
  • Marketing your FM organization through sustainability involvement.
  • Taking advantage of LEED benefits without certifying your site.
  • Decoding the myths and fears of LEED.
  • Strengthening your FM position by demonstrating sustainability initiatives.
  • Demonstrating the hidden value of your FM organization by introducing and achieving sustainable initiatives.
  • Educating your staff, customers and stakeholders, as well as yourself, on sustainability and the workplace.
  • One LEED case study, managed by an IFMA CFM (Certified Facility Manager), has shown the following validated results:

    • Effectively reduced electricity use by 35 percent.
    • Effectively reduced natural gas use by 41 percent.
    • Reduced domestic water use by 22 percent.
    • Reduced landscape water use by 76 percent.
    • Diverted up to 85 percent of its solid waste.
    • Reduced total pollution by 26 percent.
    • Reduced CO2 emissions by 17 percent.

    A new study by CoStar Group, the commercial equivalent of MLS, has found that sustainable “green” buildings outperform their peer, non-green assets in key areas such as occupancy, sale price and rental rates, sometimes by wide margins.

    The results indicate a broader demand by property investors and tenants for buildings that have earned either LEED certification or the Energy Star label, and strengthen the “business case” for green buildings, which proponents have increasingly cast as financially sound investments.

    According to the study, LEED buildings command rent premiums of $11.24 per square foot over their non-LEED peers, and have 3.8 percent higher occupancy. Rental rates in Energy Star buildings represent a $2.38 per square foot premium over comparable non-Energy Star buildings, and have 3.6 percent higher occupancy. And, in a trend that could signal greater attention from institutional investors and the C-level, Energy Star buildings are selling for an average of $61 per square foot more than their peers, while LEED buildings command a remarkable $171 more per square foot.

    At the end of the day — even in a down economy — you can make a difference, even with little or no budget.

    For the first time, Dial Corp.'s research and development will be housed with the company's headquarters.

    Dial Corp. Gets Ready To Move Into Its New Headquarters

    By year’s end, Dial Corp. expects to have moved into a new 350,000-square-foot national headquarters in Scottsdale, and for the first time it will house its research and development operations under the same roof.

    What’s more, Dial Corp. will be the first tenants in One Scottsdale, a luxury retail and lifestyle community at the northeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Loop 101. In addition to Dial’s presence, One Scottsdale will consist of high-fashion retail shops, upscale restaurants, boutique hotel rooms, office space and a diversity of residential housing.

    The move from existing facilities in North Scottsdale was set in motion in 2005.

    “Faced with an expiring lease at the end of 2008 on its R&D facility, Dial began searching for a new location,” says Natalie Violi, director of corporate communications for Henkel of America Inc., Dial’s parent company. “The goal was to purchase a large enough parcel of land to house a world class R&D facility and at the same time be located in a desirable location for our employees.

    “It was during this process that Dial decided to also move its headquarters to the same location as its R&D facility to inspire collaboration between our scientists and businesses.”

    Dial’s current R&D facility is located at 15101 N. Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale, where it has been for 32 years. It is near its current headquarters for the past 11 years at 15501 N. Dial Blvd. in Scottsdale. The current research center across from Kierland Commons likely will be razed as the new Scottsdale Quarters project takes shape. The owners of the existing headquarters building are looking for new tenants.

    Violi says housing the headquarters and R&D facility under one roof is a first for Dial, including its former location on North Central Avenue in Phoenix, and before that in Chicago.

    The amenities Dial employees enjoyed as neighbors of the Kierland Commons mixed-use development were a factor in choosing the new site, says Brad Gazaway, vice president and corporate counsel, who is the Dial executive in charge of the new building project.

    “Finding a location that would afford similar — and possibly more — amenities was an important consideration in our selection process,” Gazaway says. “We believed this not only for the convenience that nearby hotels, restaurants, homes and retailers offer our employees and business on a day-to-day basis, but also the fact that such amenities and creative architecture and surroundings found in mixed-use developments can foster inspiring innovation and development that will bring about increased business productivity and results. Such environments also serve as a valuable platform for employee recruitment and retention.”

    By relocating to One Scottsdale, Gazaway says, the move enables Dial to be “a part of an exciting and innovative environment in which our employees will thrive and flourish.”

    Total cost of the project, says Gazaway, is “north of $100 million.”

    Dial is looking for LEED certification for its new home. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified buildings are healthier work and living environments, which contribute to higher productivity and improved employee health and comfort.

    Going “green” may add somewhat to the cost, but should result in savings and other benefits in the long run. The building has many “green” aspects, such as workstations designed to be safe, healthy, comfortable and functional.

    Gazaway mentions other “green” features. Natural lighting is emphasized, and a roof garden on the fourth floor with trees and benches is ideal for employee use at lunchtime, and for parties and receptions, he says. All of the wood used in construction is from recycled material. Excess materials were separated — wood in one pile and paper products in another — for recycling. Sundt Construction, the project’s general contractor, spearheaded the recycling effort, Gazaway says.

    Furthermore, an enhanced heating and air-conditioning system meets LEED standards for performance. Additionally, Dial will provide special parking spaces for carpoolers, spaces for bicycles, changing rooms and a fitness room.

    “In today’s environment, Dial wants to be in the forefront of consumer products as far as sustainability measures,” Gazaway says. “We want to show that we’re building a new facility and we are taking our environment seriously. We want to provide a building that our employees can enjoy for years to come. It’s important for us to take a leadership role in establishing new buildings. We’re falling in line with the city of Scottsdale’s mandates. Scottsdale wants all new buildings to fall under this LEED certification. It sets the right tone.”

    Violi adds that being environmentally conscious is a core value of Dial’s parent company, Henkel of America.