Tag Archives: flagstaff

Ski Flap

Snowbowl will open Thursday

A northern Arizona ski resort that got nearly three feet of snow from recent storms is opening this week.

Skiers and snowboarders can hit the slopes Thursday at the Arizona Snowbowl. Another ski area, Sunrise Park Resort near Greer, plans to open a day earlier.

A winter storm moving into the state late Tuesday into Wednesday morning could bring even more snow to the resorts.

Officials at the Snowbowl say they’ll supplement the natural snow between storms by using newly installed snowmaking equipment.

Northern AZ Weekend Trips - EAZ Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Northern AZ Weekend Trips (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Northern AZ Weekend Trips — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Williams

200 W. Railroad Ave.,
Williams, AZ 86046
(800) 863-0546
experiencewilliams.com
Dubbed the “Gateway to the Grand Canyon,” the picturesque town of Williams sits at the base of Bill Williams Mountain in one of the largest Ponderosa Pine Forests in the world, and it’s just a mere 60 miles south of the Grand Canyon. Here, you can hop aboard the Grand Canyon Railway; stroll its main street, Route 66; or, visit Bearizona, where you can watch bears up-close.


Page

P.O. Box 1507,
Page, AZ 86040
(888) 261-PAGE (7243)
visitpagearizona.com
Page is your destination for hiking, biking, boating and off-road adventure. Have you heard of Horseshoe Bend, the horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River? That’s in Page. How about the the most-visited and most-photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest, Antelope Canyon? That’s here, too. Page is your “Frontier of Adventure.”


Flagstaff

One E. Route 66,
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
(800) 842-7293
flagstaffarizona.org
Welcome to high mountain country, where you can take part in skiing in the winter, watch the flowers bloom in the spring, play rounds of golf in the summer and witness the fall foliage. Breathe in the clean, mountain air as you hike the San Francisco Peaks; or, just a drive away, visit the Grand Canyon National Park, Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, Wupatki National Monument or Meteor Crater.


Kayenta

Navajo Indian Reservation,
Kayenta, AZ 86033
Just 20 miles south of the Utah border on US 163 is Kayenta, located on the Navajo Reservation. Kayenta is considered the gateway to one of the world’s most photographed landscapes, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, just 30 miles north of the town.


Sedona

331 Forest Rd.,
Sedona, AZ 86336
(800) 288-7336
visitsedona.com
The spectacular Oak Creek Canyon. The magnificent red rocks. Vortexes. There is virtually no end to Sedona’s attraction. Hike or bike the red rock trails, including the popular Cathedral Rock; spend a night or two in one of its award-winning resorts and spas, including Enchantment Resort; or come for the weekend for one of the town’s many festivals and events, such as its Yoga Festival. The possibilities are endless.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Flagstaff_NAU_Skydome

NAU poised to set enrollment records

Based on the first week of student registration, Northern Arizona University’s Mountain Campus appears to be on track for another year of record enrollment.

A university spokesman says the incoming freshman class totals about 4,100 and enrollment in Flagstaff is up by 700 to 18,200.

Both of those marks would be records.

Statewide, enrollment at NAU is expected to top 26,000 students.

The Arizona Daily Sun says the official count will come on the 21st day of classes at NAU.

Hospitality And Casino Construction Increase On Tribal Lands - Gila River Indian Community

Hospitality And Casino Construction Increase On Tribal Lands

The Gila River Indian Community is building two new hotels that total more than 200 rooms, a new, 70,000 SF casino, and a conference center. The Navajo Nation is building its first Arizona casino near Flagstaff.

“(Construction in Indian country) is actually one of the market sectors that is really thriving,” says Rogers Owers, an attorney with Andante Law Firm, whose speciality is construction laws in Indian country. “Whether it’s design, construction, or brokering the real estate deals, cash flows into the industry as a whole.”

In Tucson, a new 44,500 SF convention center and a 1,120-car parking structure opened at Casino del Sol in November. Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino increased its guest capacity to 300 rentable rooms, and renovated its restaurant in July.

As several Arizona tribes reveal major hospitality and casino construction projects, one thing is a sure bet — 2012 is shaping up to be another jackpot year.

The Arizona Department of Gaming reports that trial casino revenues steadily declined from 2008 to 2010, but returned to the green in 2011. During this period, hospitality and casino construction in Indian country slowed.

Talking Stick Resort, which opened its doors on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community in 2010, was the last significant Native American casino and hospitality project in almost a year.

Today, several sizable construction projects in Indian country are underway or open for business. The largest, a multifaceted undertaking by the Gila River Indian Community, includes a new 90-room hotel and the demolition and remodel of Vee Quiva Casino in West Phoenix, plus a new conference center, 130-room hotel and restaurant at Lone Butte Casino in Chandler.

The Gila River Indian Community, going all in, also is reportedly opening a new hotel at Toka Sticks Golf Course in Mesa, which is a short distance from Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

The construction venture at Vee Quiva is still in its developmental stages, according to Melody Hudson, public relations manager for Gila River Casinos. It is expected to open in the summer of 2013 at a cost of $135M.

“Rebuilding Vee Quiva Casino is part of a strategic plan the Gila River Indian Community has set in place to refresh our casinos while ensuring the long-term sustainability of the Community and creating new job opportunities in Arizona,” says Anthony Villareal Sr., Casino Expansion Owners Team chairman.

After its reconstruction, Vee Quiva Casino will total nearly 175,000 SF — almost double its original size.

Further north, the Navajo Nation broke ground last March on Twin Arrows Casino outside of Flagstaff, its first casino in Arizona.

The 320,000 SF, $150M casino, scheduled to open in July, will include a hotel and conference center. General contractor is Hunt Construction and the architect is Friedmutter Group.

Some casinos, on the other hand, already have their cards on the table. Casino Del Sol and Harrah’s Ak-Chin opened their newly renovated facilities in 2011.

The Pascua Yaqui Tribe renovated and expanded Casino Del Sol’s hotel and convention center in Tucson to the tune of $75M. The additions included 215 new rooms, a conference center, a parking structure and a spa. It is the second phase of the tribe’s ongoing hospitality and casino refurbishment project. McCarthy Building Companies served as GC and LEO A DALY was the architect.

McCarthy project manager Kurt Nyberg says construction went smoothly because the tribe first commissioned his company in 2003.

“What helped with this expansion is that the Casino Del Sol had gained building experience when both firms worked on the original casino project,” Nyberg says, “so the process was not entirely new from the owner’s perspective.”

Another big player in Arizona, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino and Resort, finished its hotel and restaurant renovations in July after 11 months of construction. Lead designer Jason Ploszaj of RSP Architects says the construction was vital, because the “hotel was turning away guests nightly.”

The expansion, a $20M, 5-story hotel tower, doubled the number of rentable rooms at the Maricopa resort.

“In order to better serve guests, Harrah’s decided that after more than 10 years of success, and expansion of 152 new hotel rooms was necessary to refresh the hotel experience,” Ploszaj says.

For more information on casino and hospitality construction visit, ciic.construction.asu.edu

 

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

November Art Walk Events in Arizona

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011


Phoenix, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-10 p.m.
(602) 256-7539
facebook.com/FirstFridayArtwalk

The weather will be cooling down … just perfect for visiting our various arts districts with
great spaces and amazing art. Park at the Phoenix Art Museum, and ride our free shuttles (or ride light rail, take your bike, pedicab, taxi or walk).


Flagstaff, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-9 p.m.
kathrynwillisart.com

Enjoy a beautiful fall evening on the streets of downtown Flagstaff, with music, art, refreshments and lively community vibes!


Jerome, AZ ~ Jerome Art Walk

Saturday, November 5th, 5-8 p.m.
(928) 649-2277
www.jeromeartwalk.com

Twenty-six studios and galleries will host openings and happenings throughout the artist colony. From the Old Jerome High School studios to The New State Motor Company with the Patrick Lincoln Gallery, art, music and lively conversation.
Download the walk map.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art Walk at Water Tower Park

Saturday, November 5th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Bisbee after 5

Saturday, November 12th, until 8 p.m.
(520) 432-3554
www.discoverbisbee.com

Experience the town-wide Art Walk with more than 30 shops and galleries, special sales and promotions, live entertainment and refreshments and artist receptions.


Tucson, AZ ~ 5th La Encantada Fine Art Festival

Friday & Saturday, November 11th & 12th, 10-5 p.m.
www.laencantadafestival.org

45 of the region’s finest artists are slated to present and sell their work at the La Encantada Fine Art Festival. The show will also be featuring free children’s art activities and live entertainment all day long!


Sahuarita, AZ ~ 3rd Annual Pecan Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-6 p.m.
(520) 820-3299
www.sahuaritapecanfestival.com

Sahuarita Pecan Festival has been approved as an Official Centennial Event!


Kingman, AZ ~ Kingman Cancer Care Arts & Crafts Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-5 p.m. & Nov 13th, 10-4 p.m.
(928) 753-1186
www.kingmantourism.org

You’ll be sure to find that perfect item for that person that has everything. This show features many vendors, original arts, crafts, food and more.


Scottsdale, AZ ~ Thursday Art Walk

Thursday, November 17th, 7-9 p.m.
(480) 990-3939
www.scottsdalegalleries.com

This is America’s original Art Walk. Wander into galleries that capture your fancy, stroll around a delightful area punctuated by dramatic statues, bubbling fountains, tree-covered courtyards and more.


Tucson, AZ ~ 30th Annual Holiday Craft Market

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 18th-20th
(520) 624-2333
www.tucsonmuseumofart.org

This event has more than 120 booths of juried work, including jewelry, metalwork, painting, pottery, ceramics, watercolors and food; join this great event.


Yuma, AZ ~ North End Art Walk

Friday, November 18th, 5-9 p.m.
(928) 373-5202
yumamom.com

Dozens and dozens of artists will showcase their work in ceramics, jewelry, prints and canvases, calligraphy, photography, glass and mixed media.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Holiday Art Walk

Saturday, November 26th, late into the evening
(520) 432-2071
www.discoverbisbee.com

Local merchants and artists offer art work, antiques and collectibles, jewelry and wares.  Decorated shops remain open, offer beverages and snacks to make your shopping pleasure a festivity. Located in Historic Bisbee.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art in the Open

Friday, November 26th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Grand Canyon, AZ ~ 4th Annual Grand Canyon Celebration of Art

Through November 27th
(928) 863-3877
www.grandcanyon.org

Proceeds from this event will be dedicated to funding an art venue on the South Rim that will preserve and showcase the spectacular collection of historic and contemporary paintings owned by Grand Canyon National Park and the Grand Canyon Association.

[stextbox id="black"]If you want to post your Art Walk,
scroll to the bottom of the page and contact us.[/stextbox]

 

The Grand Canyon National Park makes a great day trip.

Northern Arizona Day Trips

Want to get away, but don’t have the time to plan a vacation? Then a short, fun day trip is the perfect option. Check out this list of northern Arizona attractions to plan a great day trip.

  • Aravaipa Canyon
    BLM Safford Field Office: 711 14th Ave., Safford
    928-348-4400
    Home to unique plant and fish communities, mountain lions and bighorn sheep, the canyon is protected by the Nature Conservancy and is a federal wilderness area. Historic sites left from thousands of years ago still exist, so visitors should respect any archaelogical sites and artifacts.

  • Canyon de Chelly
    Chinle
    928-674-5500
    Cultural resources of Canyon de Chelly include architecture, artifacts and rock imagery.

  • Grand Canyon National Park and Monument
    Grand Canyon
    928-638-7888
    One of the Seven Wonders of the World and one of the most popular attractions in the nation.

  • Grand Canyon Railway
    233 N. Grand Canyon Blvd., Williams
    800-THE-TRAIN (843-8724)
    Following tracks constructed 100 years ago, the Railway offers four classes of daily train service between Williams and the Grand Canyon. Covering 65 miles of high desert plains, small arroyos and portions of the world’s largest Ponderosa pine forest.

  • Hon-Dah Resort & Casino
    777 Hwy. 260, Pinetop
    800-929-8744
    Play indoors while in the White Mountains area at Hon-Dah Resort-Casino. This casino has 600 of the newest slot machines, Blackjack, poker, dining and accommodations are offered. The Indian Pine Restaurant, located in the casino, offers a full-service menu with a variety of tasty selections. From wood-fired pizzas to gourmet dinner entrees, there is something for everyone.

  • Lake Havasu
    314 London Bridge Rd., Lake Havasu City
    800-2- HAVASU (242-8278)
    Home to the world-famous London Bridge, Lake Havasu offers more than 400 miles of stunning coastline that is perfect for watersports, fishing, skiing, houseboating, camping, golfing and hiking.

  • London Bridge
    314 London Bridge Rd., Lake Havasu City
    800-2-HAVASU (242-8278)
    In 1962, the 130-year-old London Bridge was discovered to be sinking into the Thames. In 1968, the bridge was put up for auction and Robert P. McCulloch was the winning bidder. He spent $7 million to move the bridge to Lake Havasu City, which took three years.

  • Montezuma Castle
    Camp Verde
    928-567-3322
    A multistoried, 20-room ancient Indian cliff dwelling built more than six centuries ago.

  • Out of Africa
    3505 Camp Verde Bridgeport Hwy., Camp Verdea
    928-567-2840
    Call us wild! Call us crazy! Just don’t call us a zoo. At Out of Africa, you get a different view of wildlife. Here, exotic animals roam in spacious habitats, so you can see their natural behavior up-close. And, with exciting shows like Tiger Splash and the Predator Feed, Out of Africa is like nothing you’ve ever seen. Open daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

  • Painted Desert/Petrified Forest
    One Park Rd., Petrified Forest
    928-524-6228
    A 160 million-year-old prehistoric flood plain. The largest and most colorful find of petrified wood in the world.

  • Payson
    303 N. Beeline Hwy., Payson
    928-474-5242
    Considered the Festival Capital of Arizona and situated in the world’s largest group of Ponderosa pines.

  • Red Rock State Park
    4050 Red Rock Loop Rd., Sedona
    928-282-6907
    Arizona’s famous Oak Creek meanders through this scenic park, creating a diverse riparian habitat abounding with plants and wildlife.

  • Sedona
    331 Forest Rd., Sedona
    800-288-7336
    Surrounded by magnificent Red Rock formations, Sedona offers the best in accommodations, dining and shopping. Visitors come here for outdoor activities/adventures and top-notch galleries and arts.

  • Slide Rock State Park
    6871 N. Hwy. 89A, Sedona
    928-282-3034
    The park is named after the famous Slide Rock, a stretch of slippery creek bottom adjacent to the homestead. Open every day.

  • Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument
    Wupatki Loop Rd., Flagstaff
    928-526-0502
    A once-active volcano, the crater is located 12 miles north of Flagstaff on Sunset Crater off Wupatki Loop Road.

  • Tonto National Monument
    Roosevelt
    928-467-2241
    Shallow caves overlooking the Tonto Basin in southeastern Arizona shelter masonry dwellings nearly 700 years old, which were home to the prehistoric Salado people.

  • Verde Canyon Railroad
    300 N. Broadway Clarkdale
    800-320-0718
    Offering one of the most beautiful views of Arizona you’ll ever see. Take a picnic or splurge for first-class cars with appetizers and drinks. However you go, this four-hour train ride takes you through a piece of “natural Arizona” that will take your breath away.
Red Mountain Trailhead photographed by Kristine Cannon

The Fall And Ensuing Therapy Session On Red Mountain

The Fall & Ensuing Therapy Session on Red Mountain

The walls feel entirely too far apart at this point. I could feel myself breaking into a cold sweat. The orange-hued walls tower above me, the sunlight receding until it leaves me in the mountain’s chilly shadow.

That’s all this place was anyway – a large cave, it felt. Really, it’s a volcano with a natural amphitheater cut into it. And I felt trapped. I was left battling for my bones, even my life, to be spared.

Red Mountain, about 25 miles north of Flagstaff, is where Frank and I decided to spend our Saturday afternoon this past summer. This popular hiking site is definitely a kid friendly, easy stroll, but this trail had never scared me quite this much before because I decided to take a risk.

My footing slips a little bit, setting loose tiny rocks and kicking up a small cloud of dirt and heightened fear. My breathing and heartbeat quicken their pace. The rocks descending down the slick, steep slope aren’t nearly as audible now. They’ve been falling for a while, it seems…

Frank reminds me to hold on, that he’s going to pull me back up. I had to muster up the courage to move from my face down, arms-and-legs-outstretched position, clinging for dear life.

And then I lost my footing.

A shrilling shriek echoes through the amphitheater.

“Hold on!”

Adrenaline is pumping through my veins; I can’t feel anything but my feet sliding against the wall while trying desperately to stop this epic fall. I can’t hear anything but the rocks from above, below and alongside us falling rapidly down the slope. I can’t see anything but Frank clouded in the kicked-up dirt, tightly gripping my arm.

My eyes close, and suddenly we’re stopped, about 25 feet above level ground. It felt like it lasted minutes, but I’m sure it lasted a mere 15 seconds…maybe even less.

Our heavy breathing slows to a steady pace. “Well, we’re not dead,” I thought to myself, “But, whoa, what a rush!”

I’m not an adrenaline junkie by any means, but that was the first time in my life I had experienced something so frightening yet thrilling and exciting. I swore I would walk away with at least a broken finger. Instead, I walked away with an incredibly painful gash in my forearm, cuts and scratches all over my legs, and a new found respect for safe hiking.

I can safely say this was the most amazing, exciting, scary, wonderful, fun experience I’ve ever had in Arizona. Yes, I walked away bruised and battered, but aren’t those technically the most memorable experiences one could have?

And I mean really memorable…you remember the pain, the fear, the rush, the innocent hike preceding the horrendous fall, the nervous laughter afterward and overcoming the fear of taking a chance and stepping foot onto that mountain ever again. [I eventually did.]

But that’s life.

You never know what will happen the next minute. You never know you’ve made a mistake until you’re experiencing the repercussions of it. But the real test is how you handle it all – the fall and the aftermath.

On Red Mountain, I didn’t expect a cathartic experience. I expected to have a few hours of “getting away from it all” but ended up with a different take on life.

So, Frank helped me stand up on my shaky, unstable legs; I brushed myself of the dirt and debris, took a sigh of relief and thought to myself, “I’ll get back on this mountain soon…and this won’t happen again. And if it does, then I can call myself an idiot.”

Green Housing

Green Homeowners Can Now Turn To Converted Shipping Containers

“Living Green” has gone vogue and so has finding new creative “out of the box” ways to do so.

Next month, the forward thinking Phoenix-based development firm of UpCycle Living, led by Ashton Wolfswinkel and Jason Anderson, will break ground on a cutting-edge residential community known as Switzer Terrace in the beautifully forested mountain top city of Flagstaff, Ari., utilizing stacked shipping containers.

Recent years have seen eco-friendly developers look for new ways to promote sustainable living, and this new form of housing has emerged as a phenomenal way to reuse these virtual “LEGO-blocks” as modern sustainable modular homes.

shipping_container_homeShipping containers were invented more than 50 years ago, and are certainly recognized as the basic unit in our global distribution network of products. Every commodity imaginable is shipped throughout the world from toys from China, textiles from India, grain from America, and cars from Germany. Yet, these visionary developers, architects and green designers, such as Upcycle Living and green living enthusiasts, are increasingly turning to these strong, cheap boxes as source building blocks to create some amazing modern architectural wonders.

According to the Upcycle Living’s architects, the modified containers are “nearly indestructible,” as well as resistant to mold, fire, and termites. The shipping containers can be readily modified with a range of creature comforts and can be connected and stacked to create modular, efficient spaces for a fraction of the cost, labor and resources of more conventional materials. Some of the recent green living uses include disaster relief shelters to luxury condos, vacation homes, and off-the-grid adventurers.

With its modern lines and appealing spaces, the containers turn heads. Upcycle Living’s forested Switzer Terrace  community  boasts individual 6,000-square-foot lots. One such model includes a two bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, 1,200 square foot spacious modern home with a two-car garage.  This luxury mountainside showpiece is built from four prefabricated, recycled steel shipping containers, along with some traditional building materials. Seventy percent of the building will be efficiently assembled in a shop, saving time, money and resources.

One such configuration includes a home perched on a hillside lot, with the four containers on top of a two-car garage.  Alternatively, the unit could be configured on a level lot with the garage along the side of the home.

On the inside, the home also demonstrates the importance of a livable floor plan and a well-orchestrated flow of space. On the ground floor, this open-plan module contains the living room, dining area and kitchen — and can be entirely open to the outside by incorporating vast windows or enclosed. Classic modern furniture provides comfort and style without taking over the room. The open kitchen, with its gleaming stainless steel appliances, is ideally suited to the love of entertaining the curious green living friends and family. Upstairs, private spaces are more compartmentalized. affordable-shipping-container-homeThe master bedroom at one end of the unit could look out onto a grove of trees (and will eventually have its own private deck).  The simple lines of the office area at the opposite end are highly conducive to concentration. Overall, this Upcyle Living home is a striking example of what can be achieved with a well-thought-out modular system of construction and design that focuses on sustainable living.

Although it is doubtful this new residential community and product will rebound the Arizona housing market, Upcycle Living has clearly taken a giant leap forward in introducing an innovative housing product whose time has come. However, only time will tell whether progressive Flagstaff homebuyers will catch the vision of this truly “out of the box” green living alternative.

Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs

Flagstaff Tops The Nation In Percentage of Construction Jobs Lost

Flagstaff lost the highest percentage of construction jobs between July 2009 and July of this year, as 276 of 337 metro areas nationally saw declines, according to the Associated General Contractors of America.

Flagstaff lost 700 construction jobs, a 32 percent dip from last year. The Chicago-Joliet-Naperville area lost the most construction jobs — 32,900, or 23 percent.

Statewide, Arizona lost 13,900 construction jobs (down 114,000 from 128,000), an 11 percent decrease. It was a decrease of 54 percent from the state’s peak in 2006, according to the AGCA.

The Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale area lost 8,600 construction jobs (down 86,600 from 95,200), a 9 percent loss; and Tucson lost 2,300 construction jobs (down 14,200 from 16,500), for a 14 percent dip. Yuma fared the best, experiencing just a 7 percent loss.

The employment figures, based on an analysis of federal employment data, demonstrate the widespread decline in demand for construction services that continues to outpace stimulus-funded work, association officials say.

“There is no doubt that we have seen an increase in stimulus activity this summer,” says Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Unfortunately, that increase in stimulus activity is largely being overshadowed by continuing declines in overall demand for construction that are likely to persist well into next year.”

Other areas experiencing large declines in construction employment are: Las Vegas (14,800 jobs, 24 percent); Houston (14,700 jobs, 8 percent); Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale (10,700 jobs, 9 percent); and Seattle-Bellevue-Everett (10,400 jobs, 14 percent).

Simonson says that 31 metro areas actually added construction jobs over the past 12 months, while another 30 areas experienced no change in construction employment.

The construction economist said the impacts of the stimulus can be seen in the fact that many of the construction employment declines metro areas are experiencing are less severe than just a month ago. The year-over-year construction employment declines in cities such as Las Vegas, Houston and Seattle are less severe than the figures recorded in June, Simonson adds. However, he says that too few cities were adding construction jobs to have any widespread impact on construction employment.

“As much as we would hate to see how much worse the construction employment figures would be without the stimulus, the fact is our industry is continuing to suffer even as some areas of the economy have begun to expand,” says Stephen Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer. “And with regular, long-term infrastructure bills stalled in Congress, it looks like construction workers will have little opportunity to continue rebuilding our economy.”