Tag Archives: Ford

BJCupPR

Barrett-Jackson Brings Back Cup to Hot August Nights

Barrett-Jackson, The World’s Greatest Collector Car Auctions™, is upping the ante when it comes to best in show competitions. Held in downtown Reno, the Barrett-Jackson Cup is back for the 2nd Annual Hot August Nights Auction, July 31-Aug. 2, with a prize purse north of $100,000 and growing.

With the help of generous sponsors like General Motors, Ford, Sherwin Williams, Craftsman, Waterloo, Adam’s Polish and more, the purse has more than doubled since the inaugural event last year. The prize package and trophy top all other similar awards in the industry, with the added bonus of national television coverage. The Ultimate Best in Show trophy is awarded along with $30,000 cash and other huge prizes on the auction block and seen around the country on the National Geographic Channel.*

Barrett-Jackson’s historic partnership with the world’s premiere classic car and nostalgia festival, Hot August Nights, began in 2013 and proved to be a match made in car heaven. Since then, Autoweek named Hot August Nights a top-three destination in the world for automotive enthusiasts. Huge hype around the auction’s sophomore campaign is growing just as fast as the prize purse.

Judges Bobby Alloway, Pete Chapouris and Bob Millard, some of the most reputable names in the business, will pick a total of 25 cars from the downtown Reno “Show-n-Shines.” The Show-n-Shines are made possible through a partnership with The Eldorado Hotel Casino, Silver Legacy Resort Casino, Circus Circus Hotel and Casino and Harrah’s Reno. The 25 cars go to the downtown ballroom where the top five advance to the final ceremony on Saturday Aug. 2. Starting with fourth runner-up, the five finalist cars will enter the Auction Arena, one at a time, to receive their prize. The award ceremony culminates with the Ultimate Best of Show winner and presentation of the Barrett-Jackson Cup live in front of a television broadcast audience of more than 100 million homes during Barrett-Jackson Reno Auction coverage on the FOX family of networks.

The 2013 winner was a custom 1969 Ford Torino owned by George Poteet of Collierville, Tenn. and built by Troy and Jack Trepanier of Rad Rides by Troy. It was a highlight moment when Jack Trepanier, a keystone in the collector car community, accepted the award on the auction block. Sadly, Jack passed away in March of this year. Barrett-Jackson is dedicating the 2014 Barrett-Jackson Cup in his honor.

Entrants must be a registered participant of Hot August Nights and the Show-n-Shines. Register your vehicle or get more information by visiting HotAugustNights.net or calling the Hot August Nights Office at (775) 356-1956.

CHILL rink

W Scottsdale Launches CHILL Ice Rink

One of the coldest nights of the season was the perfect setting for W Scottsdale to launch its CHILL ice rink.

The only way to describe the transformation of the WET deck into the CHILL rink at W Scottsdale is a winter wonderland. CHILL is a 1,500-square-foot hybrid ice rink that covers the WET pool. It will stay open until December 29.

Ford Runway2W Scottsdale kicked off CHILL’s season opening with a fashion show by FORD at 10 p.m.  in the living room of the W Scottsdale’s lobby. The show featured Fashion by Robert Black, and the clothes the models donned could only be described as glitter overload… and I loved it! So many great pieces that would be absolutely perfect for a New Year’s Eve celebration!

Some of my favorite pieces included leather leggings with a glittery blazer that could be perfect for a Saturday night out in Old Town.

A mini black dress with the champagne bottle and glasses graphic had me speechless, Ford Runwaybecause if there is one thing that I love more than a LBD it’s my love for the bubbly.

A see-through cover up that transitioned between a glittery blue to a glittery pink was absolutely stunning and the model wore a matching gold bandeau and high waist shorts set underneath.

The atmosphere of the party was very chill and everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves. Carolers were singing to get the guests in the holiday state of mind and everyone was sitting back and laughing with good friends. It was a great evening to get dressed up, skate around the rink and pop a bottle of Champs!

image005

SRP Expands ‘Green Fleet’ of Electric Vehicles

Pull into the parking lots at Salt River Project’s headquarters in Tempe and you will notice electric vehicle charging stations sprinkled throughout for the convenience of employees and customers.  More Level 2 (240 Volt) charging units are coming, as SRP continues to invest in its “green fleet.”

As part of the company’s green fleet program, SRP is increasing its line of new-technology vehicles with the addition of five new Ford plug-in hybrid electric vehicles – three Fusion Energi and two C-MAX Energi – which are scheduled to arrive in October. Currently, SRP has five Chevy Volts; a total of 15 green vehicles will be leased by 2014.

“The initial five Chevy Volts were added to SRP’s fleet as part of a demonstration project with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to help determine the impact of electric vehicles on the Valley grid,” said Jim Wood, SRP’s manager of transportation.

The electric vehicles are being rotated through the company to get a wide variety of driving distances and habits. As part of the program, an OnStar system will collect data such as drive time, state of charge, charging details, trip routes and charging locations. In the same vein, Ford’s MyFord ® Mobile app will collect rich data for the company on employee driving and charging habits, with the goal of improving all-electric driving and charging performance. The MyFord ® Mobile app also provides drivers and fleet managers with real-time battery charge status, a vehicle locator and value charging, which allows a car to automatically recharge during lower-cost, off-peak electricity rates, when there is less strain on the electrical grid.

A team of representatives from departments throughout SRP, including Facilities, Transportation Services, Load Research, Environmental Management, Policy & Compliance (EMPC) and others, will continue to review and analyze data collected on the performance of the technology.

The project will help SRP collect information on how the plug-in hybrid is used and charged. The Volt, for example, is powered only from electricity stored in its 16-kilowatt-hour (kWh) lithium-ion battery for a typical range of 25 to 50 miles. The on-board engine provides electricity to power the drive unit for extended-range capability, and it plugs into a standard household 120-volt outlet (or 240 volts for charging.)

SRP is building excitement among its employees by allowing them to vote on the best custom-designed wrap for each of the new Ford plug-in hybrids.

The top five employee-voted designs will be announced Nov. 7.  In addition, employees are now test-driving SRP’s plug-in hybrids to become more familiar with the technology and to find out why SRP is adding these vehicles to its fleet.

“We’re very proud of the high level of interest that employees have demonstrated during our fall transportation campaign.  These new additions to our green fleet will not only reduce emissions, but are fun to drive. Perhaps you’ll spot one during your next commute,” said Kelly Barr, senior director of Environmental Management Policy & Compliance.

SRP is the largest provider of power and water to the great Phoenix metropolitan area.

image005

SRP Expands 'Green Fleet' of Electric Vehicles

Pull into the parking lots at Salt River Project’s headquarters in Tempe and you will notice electric vehicle charging stations sprinkled throughout for the convenience of employees and customers.  More Level 2 (240 Volt) charging units are coming, as SRP continues to invest in its “green fleet.”

As part of the company’s green fleet program, SRP is increasing its line of new-technology vehicles with the addition of five new Ford plug-in hybrid electric vehicles – three Fusion Energi and two C-MAX Energi – which are scheduled to arrive in October. Currently, SRP has five Chevy Volts; a total of 15 green vehicles will be leased by 2014.

“The initial five Chevy Volts were added to SRP’s fleet as part of a demonstration project with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to help determine the impact of electric vehicles on the Valley grid,” said Jim Wood, SRP’s manager of transportation.

The electric vehicles are being rotated through the company to get a wide variety of driving distances and habits. As part of the program, an OnStar system will collect data such as drive time, state of charge, charging details, trip routes and charging locations. In the same vein, Ford’s MyFord ® Mobile app will collect rich data for the company on employee driving and charging habits, with the goal of improving all-electric driving and charging performance. The MyFord ® Mobile app also provides drivers and fleet managers with real-time battery charge status, a vehicle locator and value charging, which allows a car to automatically recharge during lower-cost, off-peak electricity rates, when there is less strain on the electrical grid.

A team of representatives from departments throughout SRP, including Facilities, Transportation Services, Load Research, Environmental Management, Policy & Compliance (EMPC) and others, will continue to review and analyze data collected on the performance of the technology.

The project will help SRP collect information on how the plug-in hybrid is used and charged. The Volt, for example, is powered only from electricity stored in its 16-kilowatt-hour (kWh) lithium-ion battery for a typical range of 25 to 50 miles. The on-board engine provides electricity to power the drive unit for extended-range capability, and it plugs into a standard household 120-volt outlet (or 240 volts for charging.)

SRP is building excitement among its employees by allowing them to vote on the best custom-designed wrap for each of the new Ford plug-in hybrids.

The top five employee-voted designs will be announced Nov. 7.  In addition, employees are now test-driving SRP’s plug-in hybrids to become more familiar with the technology and to find out why SRP is adding these vehicles to its fleet.

“We’re very proud of the high level of interest that employees have demonstrated during our fall transportation campaign.  These new additions to our green fleet will not only reduce emissions, but are fun to drive. Perhaps you’ll spot one during your next commute,” said Kelly Barr, senior director of Environmental Management Policy & Compliance.

SRP is the largest provider of power and water to the great Phoenix metropolitan area.

guayule

Guayule could drive Arizona’s economy

It’s common knowledge that America’s largest import is oil, but do you know what’s second? Hint: it’s a commodity used for tires, hoses and thousands of household products.

The United States imports 100% of it’s natural rubber from the Hevea tree grown in nations like Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. Once upon a time, there was enough rubber to supply all of our needs, thanks to imported natural rubber and synthetics made from petroleum, but like with everything else in the global economy, the need for rubber is being stretched beyond it’s supply.

Enter Arizona, the home of a native Sonoran Desert plant called guayule (why-you-ly). A hundred years ago, it was touted by names like Edison, Firestone, Ford and Rockefeller as the panacea for our nation’s rubber shortage. Ironically, it even appeared on the front page of the New York Times on December 7th 1941, touted as a backstop supply of rubber in case of Japanese aggression. Shortly thereafter, over 25,000 acres was put into production as part of the war effort.

Unfortunately, like every other time guayule has cropped up, worldwide prices or geopolitics have conspired to cut it down before long-term research could be done–until now.

In 2009, a Casa Grande company, PanAridus, started acquiring the largest privately owned germ plasm bank of guayule on the planet, marrying the sciences of genetics and bio-agriculture to making guayule profitable for farmers to grow and for tire companies to use in the manufacturing process.

Guayule and Arizona are a match made for a planet with finite resources. Not only does the plant use about half the water as conventional crops like cotton or alfalfa, but it’s grown on unproductive and arid land. One hundred percent of the plant is used, either for rubber, resins or as cellulosic biomass.

With consistent testing in hand, PanAridus is now growing more guayule per acre than can be grown by tapping the Hevea tree, and this past autumn for the first time in history, guayule samples were publicly offered to be tested against ‘traditional’ rubber sources that have been used to make tires, tubing and medical supplies.

Will 100 years be worth the wait? With an exploding Asian market, the possibilities for a center for the $300 billion tire industry being sited in Arizona look positive. PanAridus is currently looking at sites for a test facility in rural Arizona that will allow it to grow its patented strains in large enough quantities for tire companies not just to test its purity, but to actually blend it into the tires they sell all around the world.

Blending rural agronomy with genetics to grow crops like guayule will give us key strategic advantages we need not only to create jobs at home and increase profits at the farm gate, but also to create a ‘best practices’ sustainable industry that can be exported around the world.

 

Michael Fraley is CEO of PanAridus. Learn more at www.PanAridus.com.

guayule

Guayule could drive Arizona's economy

It’s common knowledge that America’s largest import is oil, but do you know what’s second? Hint: it’s a commodity used for tires, hoses and thousands of household products.

The United States imports 100% of it’s natural rubber from the Hevea tree grown in nations like Indonesia, Thailand and Vietnam. Once upon a time, there was enough rubber to supply all of our needs, thanks to imported natural rubber and synthetics made from petroleum, but like with everything else in the global economy, the need for rubber is being stretched beyond it’s supply.

Enter Arizona, the home of a native Sonoran Desert plant called guayule (why-you-ly). A hundred years ago, it was touted by names like Edison, Firestone, Ford and Rockefeller as the panacea for our nation’s rubber shortage. Ironically, it even appeared on the front page of the New York Times on December 7th 1941, touted as a backstop supply of rubber in case of Japanese aggression. Shortly thereafter, over 25,000 acres was put into production as part of the war effort.

Unfortunately, like every other time guayule has cropped up, worldwide prices or geopolitics have conspired to cut it down before long-term research could be done–until now.

In 2009, a Casa Grande company, PanAridus, started acquiring the largest privately owned germ plasm bank of guayule on the planet, marrying the sciences of genetics and bio-agriculture to making guayule profitable for farmers to grow and for tire companies to use in the manufacturing process.

Guayule and Arizona are a match made for a planet with finite resources. Not only does the plant use about half the water as conventional crops like cotton or alfalfa, but it’s grown on unproductive and arid land. One hundred percent of the plant is used, either for rubber, resins or as cellulosic biomass.

With consistent testing in hand, PanAridus is now growing more guayule per acre than can be grown by tapping the Hevea tree, and this past autumn for the first time in history, guayule samples were publicly offered to be tested against ‘traditional’ rubber sources that have been used to make tires, tubing and medical supplies.

Will 100 years be worth the wait? With an exploding Asian market, the possibilities for a center for the $300 billion tire industry being sited in Arizona look positive. PanAridus is currently looking at sites for a test facility in rural Arizona that will allow it to grow its patented strains in large enough quantities for tire companies not just to test its purity, but to actually blend it into the tires they sell all around the world.

Blending rural agronomy with genetics to grow crops like guayule will give us key strategic advantages we need not only to create jobs at home and increase profits at the farm gate, but also to create a ‘best practices’ sustainable industry that can be exported around the world.

 

Michael Fraley is CEO of PanAridus. Learn more at www.PanAridus.com.