Tag Archives: gas

Power Outage Map

UNS Shareholders Approve Acquisition by Fortis

Shareholders of UNS Energy Corporation voted overwhelmingly today to approve the proposed acquisition of the company by a subsidiary of Fortis Inc.

The votes were tabulated at today’s special meeting for shareholders at UNS Energy’s Corporate Headquarters in Tucson. Approximately 97 percent of the ballots cast supported the company’s acquisition by Fortis, the largest investor-owned gas and electric distribution utility company in Canada.

“Today’s vote is a positive step toward a new partnership that will provide benefits for shareholders, customers, employees and the communities we serve. Joining Fortis will provide additional financial strength to help us maintain safe, reliable service throughout Arizona,” said Board Chair and CEO Paul J. Bonavia.

The merger agreement provides that Fortis will acquire all of the outstanding common stock of UNS Energy for $60.25 per share in cash. The $4.3 billion transaction, which includes the assumption of approximately $1.8 billion in debt, would provide additional capital and new resources for UNS Energy’s subsidiaries, including Tucson Electric Power (TEP) and UniSource Energy Services (UES). Both companies will remain headquartered in Tucson under local control with current management and staffing levels and no planned changes to existing operations or rates.

Joining the Fortis family of companies would improve UNS Energy’s access to capital to fund the ongoing diversification of its generating fleet as well as investment in other infrastructure improvements. Upon closing, Fortis will inject $200 million of equity into UNS Energy.

The merger is subject to the approval of regulators, including the Arizona Corporation Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; the expiration or termination of the applicable waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976, as amended; and the satisfaction of customary closing conditions. UNS Energy anticipates the transaction will be finalized by the end of 2014.

Larry Pobuda

Commercial Real Estate Veteran Larry Pobuda Joins Transwestern's Phoenix Team

 

Transwestern announced that commercial real estate veteran Lawrence (Larry) Pobuda has joined its Phoenix office, increasing its role in the leasing and sales of office buildings and providing in-depth expertise in development and investment.

As senior vice president, Pobuda serves institutional, corporate and private owners, as well as corporate users.

“It is exciting to make strategic expansions in our range of services with someone such as Larry,” said Transwestern Senior Vice President Bill Zurek. “His national relationships and experience in a variety of real estate disciplines will enhance our already strong capabilities.”

Pobuda arrives from Minneapolis where he co-founded Stewart Lawrence Group, a partnership involved in acquiring and developing commercial real estate assets. In Minneapolis, he provided advisory services to key clients including the University of Minnesota.

He also served as senior vice president and member of the five-person executive team at United Properties/NorthMarq, a 500-employee, full-service commercial real estate firm. Pobuda also served as the 2010 National Chair of NAIOP, the 15,000-member commercial real estate development association.

His recent role as NAIOP Chair also brings an additional national perspective to Transwestern’s Phoenix team. Pobuda will maintain his relationships in Minneapolis in order to facilitate connections between those clients and Transwestern’s Minneapolis office.

“I am delighted to join Transwestern’s Phoenix team, which offered me the rare opportunity to interface between the worlds of development, investment and brokerage,”  Pobuda said. “Phoenix is a wonderful community where I have felt at home even while I was based in Minneapolis. As the region’s economy continues to improve I look forward to helping grow Transwestern’s business.”

Pobuda’s activity in Minneapolis included tenant representation, project and facility management and lease administration. He served such high-profile clients as BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota, Ecolab, UnitedHealth Group, Silicon Graphics and Macromedia.

Responsible for the leasing oversight of 1.8 MSF of Class A office space, Pobuda successfully closed more than 2 MSF of leases with an aggregate value of more than $420M for companies including GMAC/RFC, Bank of America, Weber Shandwick, Oracle, Microsoft, Merrill Lynch, William Mercer and AON.

 

81270399

Low gasoline prices here for holiday weekend

Gasoline prices at the pump this Memorial Day holiday weekend will be at their lowest level in three years around Arizona.

Officials with Triple-A Arizona said Thursday that the average statewide price for unleaded regular gasoline is $3.45 a gallon. That’s up by less than a penny from last week.

This week’s national average is $3.65 per gallon, an increase of nearly 6 cents from last week.

Tucson has the lowest average gasoline price in Arizona at $3.18 a gallon while Flagstaff has the highest at $3.67.

South Carolina has the lowest average gas prices in the continental U.S. at $3.24 a gallon with North Dakota having the highest at $4.23 a gallon.

electricity

SRP Offers Free Electrical Safety Workshop

SRP is sponsoring a free Electric Safety Workshop to educate workers on the potential hazards of working near overhead and underground electrical power lines and other utilities. The workshop will focus on tree workers, landscapers and excavators as well as individuals who work around utility lines.

Instruction will be in English and Spanish.

The event will include safety presentations on overhead and underground electrical, gas and other utilities, OSHA regulations, Blue Stake procedures, trenching and shoring demonstrations, and live electrical demonstrations of what can happen when contact is made with power lines. The event will also feature presentations by the Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Arizona Public Service, Southwest Gas, Cox Communications, Arizona Blue Stake, Arizona Burn Center, Trench Shore Rentals, Asplundh Tree Expert Company and Liberty Wildlife. There will also be safety presentations including a live tree rescue and hazards involving chain saws and aerial lifts.

Participants must be 18 years or older. The workshop includes lunch and a chance to win raffle prizes. Tree workers can receive 4.5 CEUs (A/U/T/M) from the International Society of Arboriculture.

When: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, February 23. Registration begins at 6 a.m.

Where: SRP’s PERA Club, 1 East Continental Drive in Tempe.

Where: Every year, professional tree trimmers, landscapers and excavators are killed or seriously injured in electrical contact tree-trimming and excavation accidents.  Workers also operate dangerous equipment and are vulnerable to serious injuries when working near overhead and underground electric lines and other utilities.

For more information or to register, call (602) 236-2995 or email electricsafetywksp@srpnet.com.

stk100406cor

Arizona gasoline prices fall for 9th straight week

Arizona motorists are paying less at the pump for the ninth consecutive week.

Officials with Triple-A Arizona said Thursday that the average statewide price for unleaded regular gasoline is $3.05 a gallon. That’s down by more than 5 cents from last week and represents the lowest pump prices this year.

This week’s national average is $3.26 per gallon, up by more than 4 cents from last week.

Tucson has the lowest average gasoline price in Arizona at $2.87 a gallon while Flagstaff has the highest at $3.39.

Missouri has the lowest average gas prices in the continental U.S. at $3.00 a gallon with New York having the highest at $3.72 a gallon.

gasoline

Arizona gasoline prices keep falling

Arizona motorists are paying less at the pump again this week.

Officials with Triple-A Arizona said Thursday that the average statewide price for unleaded regular gasoline is $3.62 a gallon. That’s down by nearly 6 cents from last week.

This week’s national average is $3.50 per gallon, a decrease of more than 9 cents from last week.

Tucson has the lowest average gasoline price in Arizona at $3.38 a gallon while Flagstaff has the highest at $3.85.

Missouri has the lowest average gas prices in the continental U.S. at $3.14 a gallon with California having the highest at $4.07 a gallon.

stk100406cor

Arizona gas prices fall for 3rd week in row

Arizona motorists are paying less at the pump again this week.

Officials with Triple-A Arizona said Thursday that the average statewide price for unleaded regular gasoline is $3.68 a gallon. That’s down by nearly 2 cents from last week.

This week’s national average is $3.78 per gallon, a decrease of almost one penny from last week.

Tucson has the lowest average gasoline price in Arizona at $3.52 a gallon while Flagstaff has the highest at $3.88.

South Carolina has the lowest average gas prices in the continental U.S. at $3.49 a gallon with California having the highest at $4.31 a gallon.

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Lori Singleton ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Lori Singleton, Salt River Project (SRP)

Lori Singleton, SRP

Lori Singleton is the manager of sustainability initiatives and technologies at Salt River Project. She is a 29-year employee of SRP and 40-year resident of Arizona. She is responsible for design and implementation of SRP’s environmental outreach programs with special focus on renewable energy.

Lori’s responsibilities at SRP include development and implementation of renewable energy projects to meet SRP’s sustainable resource goals. Singleton oversees research and development projects to support company-wide initiatives for SRP including gasoline lawn mower recycling, tree planting, clean school bus initiative, travel reduction and other internal environmental programs.

She works on development and implementation of the “green” energy pricing program, solar incentive program for residential and commercial customers and renewable energy education programs for implementation in middle school and high school curricula.

In addition, she does promotion and public relations for all new renewable energy projects and purchases (solar, wind, geothermal, landfill gas, low head hydro, fuel cells) while serving as the environmental issues media spokesperson for SRP and being a constant representative of SRP on numerous environmental committees, boards and commissions.

She was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve on the Solar Energy Advisory Council and also has several other current affiliations including: Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors; Audubon Society, chair, Board of Directors; Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, chair; Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President & National Board Director; Southwest Center for Education; and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of Directors.

Current Affiliations

Solar Energy Advisory Council, appointment by Governor Janet Napolitano
Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors
Audubon Society, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, Chair
Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President &
National Board Director
Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of
Directors

Affiliations (Past)

Valley Forward Association, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force
City of Phoenix, Environmental Quality Commission
Valley Metro, Clean Air Advisory Committee
Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Environmental Committee
Valley of the Sun United Way Loaned Executive


Topic: How people & organizations can get involved in the green movement from an energy perspective.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



 

Tourist Group 2008

The Tourist Trade

By Don Weiner

Arizona’s tourism industry expects to take more than a few hits from an uncertain economy. “Whenever we see a downturn in the economy like this, especially when the staples of life are so much more expensive — food, gas, that sort of thing — it does have some downward pressure on leisure travel. People are less inclined to travel,” says Jonathan Walker, president and CEO of the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau. “They’re traveling for shorter periods of time or cutting out travel altogether.”

tourist trade 2008

But for every hit from soaring fuel prices and consumer cutbacks, Arizona tourism can deliver some pretty effective counterpunches. Its luxury resorts and spas, gourmet dining establishments and world-class golf courses are no less attractive to high-value visitors. Scenic wonders such as the Grand Canyon and a favorable climate are still huge draws. Major events should continue to attract crowds. And visitors from near and far are still intrigued by the state’s mixture of Hispanic, American Indian and cowboy cultures.

“What’s great about Arizona is we have the whole package,” says Debbie Johnson, president and CEO of the Arizona Hotel & Lodging Association.

Cheryl Cothran, a Ph.D. and director of the Arizona Hospitality Research and Resource Center at Northern Arizona University, notes that the travel industry has historically been a big part of the state economy.

“Tourism has always been important,” she says. “It looks like going forward a couple of decades it’s going to continue to be that way.”

She also points to a few factors that, while not recession-proof, are still encouraging.

Cothran says state tourism is population-driven. As the metropolitan Phoenix and Tucson areas continue to grow, an increasing number of visitors are coming to see family and friends. In fact, a research presentation for last year’s Arizona Governor’s Conference on Tourism shows that 46 percent of nonresident overnight visitors indicated they came here specifically for that reason. It was still the main reason when it came to Arizona’s resident overnight visitors. In other words, don’t expect Mom and Dad to give the kids a pass on visiting just because they’re feeling some pain at the pump.

Then there are those who fill the resorts, book the tee times and top off their days with some fine dining.

“Those high-income visitors who travel to the expensive resorts and spas are probably not going to change their plans that much,” Cothran says.

In fact, a report she prepared, “Arizona’s Tourism Future: Effects of Population & Demographic Change,” states that the bulk of travel spending is by the top 20 percent of affluent households.

Even with this market segment, however, there are some definite challenges.

First, experts agree that Arizona is primarily a fly-in market, and the fact is that airlines are trimming routes and downsizing some planes heading to various destinations.

Also, according to Johnson, visitors may be doing some downsizing of their own.

“I think what you see generally sometimes is that people who might have stayed at a … luxury resort are maybe dropping down a tier,” she says.

This has resort operators working extra hard, says Rachel Sacco, president and CEO of the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau.

“The only thing that you can do in a destination like this, where you are very dependent on a fly-in market, is really to just look at your customers and hopefully you’ve done a very good job of creating value, a great experience and (are) making it very, very difficult for your customers to say, ‘Oh, I’m going to skip my trip to Scottsdale this year,’” she says.

This may equate to credits that can be used for spa treatments, meals or golf. It may even mean gasoline credits.

cover october 2008

“Maybe there are high-end customers less concerned about discounting, but they certainly want value,” Sacco says. “And the smart approach is make them feel like they’re always getting more than what they’re giving.”

Sacco also says area restaurants and retailers are feeling the pinch. Some have told her tourism accounts for as much as a third of their bottom line.

“And for a restaurant to even say 20 (percent) or 25 percent, that’s a large amount,” she says.
One sensible marketing strategy, according to Johnson, is to reach for what she calls “lower-hanging fruit.”

“I think what we’re finding and what we’re seeing already is that people are traveling closer to home,” she says. “And so for us, what that means is kind of changing a little bit of our marketing strategy and make sure that we’re doing a good job of marketing to our residents and to people that are within a good driving distance to Arizona.”

www.visittucson.org
www.azhla.com
www.nau.edu
www.scottsdalecvb.com