Tag Archives: Georgia Lord

westmarc

WESTMARC Creates United Front To Boost West Valley

“You can’t just say you ‘support regionalism,’ you have to believe it.” Surprise Mayor Sharon Wolcott is talking about attitude in the West Valley.

Thirty minutes earlier in a separate conversation, Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord made nearly the same comment. “We believe in regionalism and we put it into practice,” she says. “On this side of the Valley, it’s not just words, it’s real.”

District 5 Maricopa County Supervisor, Clint Hickman, points out the window of his 10th floor office. “They place us so when supervisors look out the window, we’re looking at our district,” he said. Gazing across West Phoenix, the dome of University of Phoenix stadium is clearly visible in front of the White Tank Mountains. “I was born and raised in the West Valley,” he continues. “As a business owner, a public servant, and West Valley native, I believe we’re stronger for working together.”

Talk to any business leader about the West Valley, and the words heard are “regionalism,” “working together” and “diversity.” Maricopa County districts 4 and 5, and 15 communities from Surprise to Gila Bend, Wickenburg to Phoenix are starting to flex economic development muscle. When the synergies are totaled, the sum is the United Cities of West Valley.

The spirit of cooperation west of Interstate 17 is a break from history. As recently as a decade ago, West Valley cities were clawing for territory, car dealers, and the next power center. Tens of thousands of families were driving to qualify for affordable homes popping up in dozens of sprawling tracts. Politically, there may as well have been walls running down city limit lines.

Then came the recession. The economic downturn had a chilling impact on the West Valley. Faced with abandoned neighborhoods, empty strip centers and vacant warehouses, municipal revenue streams dribbled to nothingness. What was the norm wasn’t working.

The change started quietly. “It all began shifting over the past three to four years,” recounts Lana Mook, mayor in El Mirage. “We, the area’s mayors and business leaders, realized we would be a lot stronger working together than working separately.”

The challenge was bringing together the region’s assets and promoting the area. The catalyst had been sitting there since 1990. The Western Maricopa Coalition (WESTMARC) was the one place where mayors, businesses and public officials connected. In 2011, the WESTMARC board appointed a former Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) senior vice president to the role of president and chief operating officer. Michelle Rider took the reins of an old organization with a new charge.

The regional development organization took on a new focus. Its board of directors and Rider decided to leave business recruitment to organizations like GPEC, Arizona Commerce Authority and individual cities’ economic development departments.

“We saw our role as creating a strong environment in which business can flourish,” she explains. “We focus on three priorities. Our efforts are to promote the West Valley, enhance economic development and increase member value. We partner with GPEC and Arizona Commerce; they have the recruitment resources. We need to ensure when a business comes knocking on our door, we’re ready.”

“Let’s say there are a lot of misunderstandings about the West Valley outside the West Valley,” muses Mayor Lord. “Many of those misunderstandings are because people’s only experience with the Valley is sitting in traffic on I-10 when returning from California. They haven’t stopped here to explore.”

“I drive to work in the morning between two of the most beautiful mountain ranges in the state,” Supervisor Hickman says. “I look at the vast expanses of open land, the many homes, the business clusters we have, and realize, there’s a lot to offer.”

Site selection consultants look at many factors before plopping a business into a market. Key among those are similar firms, transportation and workforce. The West Valley has a well-kept secret. It is home to significant diversity in the three key siting factors. The region is home to a diverse collection of business sectors.

Mayor Wolcott lists the base: “Manufacturing and logistics, healthcare, advanced business services, aerospace and renewable energy businesses are located all over the region. We have the most diverse business and population base in the state.”

There’s another asset: Maricopa County west of I-17 has vast tracts of undeveloped, single ownership land.

“We learned from the rapid development in the East Valley,” explains Mayor Lord. “The cities in the West Valley have jealously guarded industrial land, Luke Air Force Base and our transportation corridors.”

One of the region’s major corridors has a significant cheerleader. Mayor Wolcott has pressed for improvements to Grand Avenue since she first took office. “This is a multimodal corridor that’s unique to the West Valley,” she says. “No other road in the state is like this. It connects ten cities and runs from the Capitol to Wickenburg; essentially, it runs all the way to Las Vegas.”

“The West Valley has an extraordinary mix of transportation modes,” echoes Mayor Mook. “We have both (Union Pacific) and (Burlington Northern) rail roads, a collection of spurs, (Loop) 303, I-10 and some day, I-11.”

The biggest asset in the region is its workforce. “Goodyear is the sixth fastest growing city in the United States,” Mayor Lord says with pride.
The rest of the West Valley is growing rapidly. In 2010, the region was home to 39 percent of the County’s population, according to the Maricopa Association of Governments. By 2040, MAG says the share will climb to 46 percent for the region.

“Every work day you can almost feel the land tilt,” says Mayor Wolcott. “The roads are filled with our residents driving out of our region to go to work. We have a significant, well-educated workforce who’d rather work closer to home.”

More than half the Northwest Valley’s workforce commutes into Deer Valley, Central Phoenix and the Scottsdale Airpark.

“We want our residents to stay closer to home, and we’re working as a region to make that happen,” Mayor Lord is emphatic about cutting the commutes.

Manufacturing, medicine, aerospace, renewable energy and advanced business services. These are the roots of the “West muscle” promoted by WESTMARC.

Rider is passionate about all of this. “We’re bringing our members together as a powerful force to make these assets known. There’s a story to tell, and we’re getting the word out.”

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-001
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-001
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-081
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-081
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-086
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-086
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-002
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-002
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-003
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-003
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-005
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-005
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-010
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-010
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-014
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-014
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-018
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-018
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-020
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-020
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-019
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-019
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-021
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-021
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-022
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-022
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-023
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-023
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-024
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-024
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-025
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-025
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-026
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-026
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-027
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-027
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-028
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-028
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-029
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-029
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-030
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-030
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-031
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-031
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-032
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-032
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-033
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-033
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-034
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-034
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-035
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-035
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-036
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-036
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-039
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-039
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-040
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-040
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-041
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-041
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-042
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-042
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-044
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-044
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-045
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-045
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-046
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-046
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-047
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-047
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-048
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-048
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-049
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-049
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-050
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-050
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-052
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-052
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-053
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-053
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-062
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-062
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-064
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-064
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-065
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-065
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-066
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-066
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-068
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-068
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-069
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-069
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-071
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-071
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-072
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-072
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-073
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-073
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-074
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-074
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-080
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-080
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-075
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-075
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-076
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-076
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-082
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-077
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-077
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-079
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-084
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-083
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-004
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-006
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-007
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-008
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-009
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-011
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-012
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-013
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-015
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-016
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-017
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-037
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-038
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-054
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-056
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-060
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-063
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078
azbigmedia_mostinfluentialwomen_srp2014-078

They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

tracer-2

Lockheed Martin signs lease in Goodyear

Lockheed Martin, a publicly traded aerospace and defense company, announced on Monday, Aug. 11 that it has signed a two-year lease for 31,540 square-feet of office space in Buildings 12 and 13 at 1300 S. Litchfield Road in Goodyear.

Jones Lang LaSalle acted as Lockheed’s broker in the transaction.

The landlord, Reliance Management, is pleased to have a new lease insuring that Lockheed employees will continue to work at the historical site, keeping slightly more than 50 jobs in Goodyear, including its Flight Operations Group and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SARS) program. For more than 80 years, 1300 S. Litchfield Road has been the home to Goodyear Aviation and other aviation companies, and home to the GS & IS Division of Lockheed Martin since the 1990s.

Presently, Lockheed occupies more than 400,000 square feet of space at 1300 S. Litchfield Road (1300 SLR) in eleven buildings which they intend to vacate over the next two years.

The announcement came as good news as the high-paying jobs retained at the Goodyear site will allow Lockheed Martin to maintain its aerospace presence in the city.

“We are pleased and excited that Lockheed Martin has come to an agreement with the property owner to continue working at the Goodyear site,” said Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord. “Lockheed Martin’s commitment to keep part of its operations here underscores that Goodyear remains a great place to do business. The aerospace and defense industry will be key to Goodyear’s future, and we will continue to support those businesses, like Lockheed Martin, who provide quality jobs for our residents.”

A Lockheed Martin official echoed Mayor Lord’s sentiments.

“Lockheed Martin Mission Systems and Training is excited to be part of the Goodyear community today and into the future,” said Jeffrey Paul, manager of Airborne Ground Surveillance Radar Systems for Lockheed Martin.

“Our Airborne Ground Surveillance Radar Systems have a legacy going back to the invention of Synthetic Aperture Radar at the Goodyear site more than 50 years ago,” Paul added.

Reliance Management working with brokers, Brian Gleason, SIOR and Bonnie Halley, CCIM of Phoenix West Commercial of Litchfield Park have been marketing space in four buildings previously occupied by Lockheed. There are three office buildings totaling 22,837 square feet as well as a 13,138 square foot data center available for immediate occupancy. Phoenix West Commercial is also actively marketing the remaining 11 buildings totaling 412,160 square feet.

CottonField.PhoenixAZ.140320

Goodyear ranks as 6th fastest-growing city in the U.S.

The city of Goodyear is the sixth fastest-growing city in the United States, according to rankings released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The Census Bureau ranked the top 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S. with San Marcos, Texas coming in as No. 1. The town of Gilbert, which came in at No. 12, was the only other municipality in Arizona to make the list. Many of the other ranked cities were in Texas and throughout the West.

The ranking comes just weeks after the Boulder, Colorado-based National Research Center completed the Goodyear Citizen Satisfaction Survey in which the city received numerous high marks. Among the high grades Goodyear received from residents include: being considered a good place to live (95 percent approval); fire and police departments were near or above 90 percent; and feeling safe in neighborhoods was at a whopping 97 percent.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said she believes that the ranking strengthens the validity of the citizen satisfaction survey, and that Goodyear will continue to be a fast-growing city.

“The ranking goes to show you that Goodyear is a not only a good place to live, work and play, but that the city continues to attract people of all ages,” Mayor Lord said. “We not only have a highly-educated workforce [20 percent have bachelor degrees] and one of the highest average incomes in the state [$73,000], but also a wide-array of job opportunities and housing.”

Goodyear’s population, which currently is 73,832, soared 245 percent between 2000 to 2010, according to the American Community Survey year estimates.
“If you move to Goodyear, it’s by choice,” Mayor Lord added. “People move here because they want to live here and retire here.”
To view the entire list of fastest-growing cities, go to: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/census-bureau-fastest-growing-cities-2012-13-23829449.

goodyear

Goodyear is U.S.’ 6th fastest-growing city

The city of Goodyear is the sixth fastest-growing city in the United States, according to rankings released by the U.S. Census Bureau on Thursday.

The Census Bureau ranked the top 15 fastest-growing cities in the U.S. with San Marcos, Texas coming in as No. 1. The town of Gilbert, which came in at No. 12, was the only other municipality in Arizona to make the list. Many of the other ranked cities were in Texas and throughout the West.

The ranking comes just weeks after the Boulder, Colorado-based National Research Center completed the Goodyear Citizen Satisfaction Survey in which the city received numerous high marks. Among the high grades Goodyear received from residents include: being considered a good place to live (95 percent approval); fire and police departments were near or above 90 percent; and feeling safe in neighborhoods was at a whopping 97 percent.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said she believes that the ranking strengthens the validity of the citizen satisfaction survey, and that Goodyear will continue to be a fast-growing city.

“The ranking goes to show you that Goodyear is a not only a good place to live, work and play, but that the city continues to attract people of all ages,” Mayor Lord said. “We not only have a highly-educated workforce [20 percent have bachelor degrees] and one of the highest average incomes in the state [$73,000], but also a wide-array of job opportunities and housing.”

Goodyear’s population, which currently is 73,832, soared 245 percent between 2000 to 2010, according to the American Community Survey year estimates.

“If you move to Goodyear, it’s by choice,” Mayor Lord added. “People move here because they want to live here and retire here.”

To view the entire list of fastest-growing cities, go to: http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/census-bureau-fastest-growing-cities-2012-13-23829449.

baseball

Goodyear Ballpark named best in Cactus League

After a long, fierce and competitive battle of the spring training ballparks, the results are in and it’s official.

Goodyear Ballpark – the spring training home of Major League Baseball’s Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians, has been voted as best place to see a spring training game in the Cactus League in USA Today’s 10Best Reader’s Choice Travel Poll.

Overall, Goodyear Ballpark – the crown jewel of the city which has been gaining notice on a national level also finished second nationally among Arizona and Florida spring training ballparks in the poll spearheaded by the newspaper’s longtime baseball writers Bob Nightengale and Paul White.

Goodyear Ballpark, which was completed in 2009 and seats 10,311, also recently was named the top “must see” spring training facility by National Public Radio’s Pittsburgh station’s travel reporter Elaine Labalme who traveled to spring training ballparks in both Arizona and Florida.

“This is quite an honor for Goodyear Ballpark,” Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said of USA Today’s 10Best poll. “We’re proud to be recognized as the No. 1 ballpark in the Cactus League, and thank the fans for voting us there.”

This year marked the first year of the Best Spring Training Facility category in USA Today’s 10Best Reader’s Choice Travel Poll, an annual contest in the largest newspaper in the United States. Readers and fans were allowed to vote once a day for a month – from Feb. 24 to March 24.

Goodyear was edged out by Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Fla. – the spring training home of the Tampa Bay Rays. Salt River Fields, the spring training home of the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Colorado Rockies located on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian community, finished third.

“They told us we ran a great campaign,” said Debbie Diveney, business-operations supervisor of Goodyear Ballpark. “We tried to have fun with it – we even had fans voting live with us at the games – beginning with Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord’s urging the fans to vote during our opening weekend festivities on Feb. 28 – right up to the very end. It was a valiant effort on our part. Thanks to all the fans who participated. Wait ‘til next year.”

loan programs - chateau on central 2

Goodyear Mayor co-chairs Luke AFB West Valley Council

The city of Goodyear remains front and center when it comes to being poised and prepared for the arrival of the F-35 Lightning II Fighter Jet pilot training program at Luke Air Force Base in early 2014.

But right now, members of the Luke West Valley Council – the regional group promoting the success of Luke and the economic vitality the F-35s are projected to bring to the region, are moving forward with Goodyear helping to steer more success for the future.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord was nominated and elected to be the incoming Co-Chair of the Luke West Valley Council during its quarterly meeting on Thursday, Dec. 19. Mayor Lord was thrilled to be elected to co-chair the group, along with Luke Air Force Base Brigadier General Michael Rothstein.

Mayor Lord succeeds El Mirage Mayor Lana Mook as co-chair to the council, which has more than 20 members.

“It’s an honor to be nominated and elected by my peers to serve on the group that represents our region,” Mayor Lord said. “Not only is the future of Luke Air Force Base vital to our city, but it is important to the region and state of Arizona and our country. Many people serving in the military or military-related jobs call Goodyear their home, and we’re proud that we were part of the partnership that was able to help secure the F-35 Fighter Jet program at Luke through strong community support.”

In her role as co-chair, Mayor Lord will lead the meetings and discussions in how to further the success of the base as it moves forward with expansion and other programs. Luke expects to see $260 million of construction over the next decade and other support businesses are expected to open with the arrival of the F-35A fighter pilot training program next year.

Luke West Valley formed in the 1980s to garner regional and community support for the importance of Luke’s success in the region. The group is comprised of Luke AFB officials, elected officials from 12 West Valley cities and Maricopa County as well as representatives from the governing bodies of Sun City and Sun City West. The meetings are also often attended by West Valley legislators and outside organizations that support and partner with Luke Air Force Base.

The Air Force has credited the strong community support as a factor that led to Luke Air Force Base being awarded the F-35 Mission by the Department of Defense.

economic development - 8 honored

GPEC honors Valley mayors for contributions

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) last night honored Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny and Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord at its annual dinner, which celebrates GPEC’s successes over the past year and looks ahead to upcoming initiatives. This year’s dinner sold out with an all-time high attendance of approximately 650.

Mayor Tibshraeny was presented GPEC’s Outstanding Regional Contribution award for his exceptional leadership, which has helped increase Greater Phoenix’s economic competitiveness and create a more diversified regional economy. His assistance in the successful recruitment of General Motors, Continuum Nationstar Mortgage and many other organizations has resulted in more than 4,800 jobs for the Chandler area and propelled economic prosperity for the surrounding region.

“Mayor Tibshraeny has expanded the region’s technology sector with his steadfast leadership and business savvy,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Chandler’s innovative approach to economic development, and the entrepreneurial talent it recruits, is helping to make the Greater Phoenix region this country’s next high-technology hub.”

Mayor Lord received the Distinguished Service Award for her leadership in spearheading GPEC’s official protest against the U.S. International Trade Commission’s (ITC) proposed tariff on Chinese-manufactured photovoltaic panels. While the tariff was ultimately still imposed, Mayor Lord’s eloquently represented both Goodyear and the region on a national stage during a formal hearing at the ITC in Washington. She also expertly led GPEC’s Ambassador Steering Committee for three years, taking it from 130 participants to more than 1,200.

“Mayor Lord’s dedication to her community, its citizens and its employers are second to none,” Broome said. “Her leadership on the solar tariff issue greatly advanced the reputation of both Goodyear and the Greater Phoenix region, particularly abroad. As a result, she’s also shown the world’s businesses and entrepreneurs that the region supports, and advocates for, free trade.”

During the ceremony, GPEC showed videos highlighting each mayor’s successes. Those videos can be viewed at the following links:

Mayor Tibshraeny: https://vimeo.com/76570245
Mayor Lord: https://vimeo.com/76573543

Staying Innovative as a One Man Operation

Goodyear lands ASU business incubator program

When the new branch of the Maricopa County Library system is completed in Goodyear later this year, it could include expanded space for the business leaders of tomorrow to work and brainstorm through a partnership in an incubator program with Arizona State University.

During the Goodyear City Council work session on July 8, Tracy Lea, venture manager at Arizona State University’s SkySong incubator center unveiled its Alexandria Model, a program that will be inside an approximate 1,000-square-foot room in the new Goodyear branch library to serve as an entrepreneur and innovation center for those pursuing business ideas. The Alexandria concept is derived from a centuries-old library purpose dating as far back as 300 B.C. in Alexandria, Egypt, where townspeople came together to discuss issues, solve problems and expand on ideas.

The city council will vote on finalizing the agreement with ASU on the incubator program after it returns from its summer break.

City leaders were excited to see the presentation for the program, which will provide entrepreneurs of all ages the tools, resources and mentors to get on the pathway of development and establish themselves in the community.

“We appreciate SkySong because we know of its successes,” Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord said. “We are so excited about this partnership and look forward to hearing the successes that generate from our local entrepreneurs.”

Having a business “incubator” in Goodyear is one of City Council’s initiatives and the city’s Economic Development Department has been working with SkySong in south Scottsdale to make center a reality in Goodyear.

SkySong’s Tracy Lea said the center also could have a military focus as Luke expects to see $260 million of construction over the next decade.

During the meeting, Lea said, “The Alexandria Concept will create a wonderful pipeline for development. “It’s been extraordinary working with this group of people in this city, and, I believe this is such a rich environment for this to take flight.”

“The West Valley has some amazing growth right now,” Lea added. “Goodyear is creating a terrific growth pattern in and of itself.”

The library, which is budgeted at $1.1 million, will include 9,600-square-feet that will feature a 1,600-square-foot multi-purpose room in addition to the 8,000-square-feet of library space. Design work for the library is on schedule to be completed by the end of July and construction beginning as early as August.

 

F-35-Wallpapers-by-cool-wallpapers-2

Goodyear backs additional F-35 squadron at Luke

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord was among a number of state-wide officials during the Department of Defense’s announcement of three additional squadrons to the Air Force’s F-35A Lightning II fighter jet program at Luke Air Force Base.

Since the DOD’s initial announcement that Luke AFB will be the training center for the F-35s, cities and community groups throughout the West Valley have voiced their support for the military community and Luke’s mission of remaining the premier base for fighter pilot training.

“We are very pleased that Luke Air Force Base will now be home to three additional squadrons of F-35 Fighter Jets.” Goodyear Mayor Lord said. “The support of Goodyear and the surrounding West Valley communities played a huge role in this decision and we will continue to advocate on behalf of Luke and our military families.”

“Not only is this decision good for the security of our nation, but it will also have a huge economic impact on Goodyear, the West Valley and the State of Arizona.” Mayor Lord added.

The first three F-35A squadrons are scheduled to begin arriving at Luke AFB next year. Over the next several years, Luke will operate 170 aircraft; 144 will be the F-35A while 26 F-16s will remain for foreign military training.

Goodyear is among 13 Valley and West Valley municipalities partnering in the Luke Forward campaign that generated awareness of the positive impacts the Air Force’s next generation strike fighter will bring to the state. Through that community support involving tens of thousands of citizens participating in public hearings, the DOD recognized the importance of keeping Luke as the hub for fighter pilot training.

Two brand new training facilities are currently being constructed at Luke in preparation of receiving the F-35A fighter jets. An operations building will open later this year, while the 145,000 square-foot academic center is planned to open in mid to late 2014.

“This is great news for the region,” Goodyear City Manager Brian Dalke said of the DOD’s announcement on Thursday. “We value Luke Air Force Base as a neighbor as well as the economic support the military community currently provides to our city. We welcome the expansion of F-35 program with open arms. Not only will the program be beneficial for the local economy, it will strengthen national security.”

Banner Good Samaritan Hospital

Banner Health Center preview on June 29

West Valley residents can tour the new Banner Health Center in Goodyear from 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 29.The Center is designed to support high quality, convenient health care for the entire family.

Attendees will hear remarks by Banner Medical Group CEO Jim Brannon and Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord at 8:30 a.m., followed by a celebration including food, tours, giveaways, children’s activities and information about Banner Health facilities and services. Community members are invited to meet physicians and staff and even make an appointment.

“We want to become part of the fabric of the community by becoming the medical home residents look to for help in keeping their families healthy,” said Jim Brannon, chief executive officer of Banner Medical Group. “This Banner Health Center is designed to provide primary care to the entire family in one space. We want it to be the place you would choose for prevention, wellness, basic and complex medical care and the advice you need to thrive with chronic health conditions.”

At opening on July 10, staff physicians will include family practitioners and pediatricians. Banner Health Centers accept most insurance plans. The Center will be open extended hours from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. Same-day appointments will also be available. Laboratory and X-ray services are also on-site.

Banner Health Center in Estrella will also be the gateway to the incredibly comprehensive services offered throughout Banner Health system, including Banner Estrella Medical Center and specialty facilities such as Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, Cardon Children’s Medical Center and Banner Concussion Center.

This location at 9780 South Estrella Parkway joins the existing Banner Health Centers offering health care where you want it and how you want it in Gilbert, Queen Creek, Surprise, Verrado and Maricopa, Ariz. as well as South Loveland, Colo. For more information on the Banner Health Center in Estrella, visit www.BannerHealth.com/HealthCenterEstrella.

Health Insurance

AZ Isotopes bringing jobs to Goodyear

AZ Isotopes has selected the city of Goodyear as the site for a state-of-the-art facility which will improve the diagnosis and treatment of serious diseases. By producing several  medical isotopes that are either not currently available or difficult to obtain in Arizona, the Goodyear facility will support health care by giving physicians and their patients the most modern tools for diagnoses and treatments as well as research towards  improving medical outcomes.

Construction and operation of the facility also will result in high-quality jobs.  Initially, about 50 technical and managerial professionals will be employed.  As demand for the isotopes and the research program expands, additional high-quality positions will be added.  Substantial growth can be expected as industry analysts estimate the projected market for medical isotopes at about $6 billion by the year 2018.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord is highly supportive.  She stated: “We are excited to bring this new high-tech life sciences enterprise to Goodyear, along with highly skilled professionals and high-paying jobs.  Goodyear has everything companies like AZ Isotopes need to operate and grow their businesses.  We are growing and ready to help accommodate companies like AZ Isotopes to provide jobs and expand our work base.”

The Goodyear-based Western Regional Center for The Cancer Treatment Centers of America is also supporting the city’s efforts to help ensure that the new research and production facility is located nearby. It stated: “Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center (Western) in Goodyear applauds the city’s economic development efforts in healthcare initiatives which lower the nation’s reliance on foreign products.”  Edgar D. Staren, MD, PhD, President and CEO of Western added, “We look forward to a readily available local isotope supply that could support our patient needs.”  Additionally, several major universities (including the University of Arizona) have already expressed interest in taking advantage of the facility’s research capabilities.

The Goodyear location will contain the full spectrum of operations necessary for providing the highest quality support for medical care and research.  Included will be manufacturing, engineering, administrative, sales and executive positions.  AZ Isotopes has assembled an internationally-renowned team of top scientists and physicians to begin site preparation and facility design and construction.

The site for the Goodyear plant is a 10-acre tract along Litchfield Road, north of Maricopa 85 and close to the Phoenix-Goodyear airport.  Because delivery time is critical to the users of medical isotopes, the facility’s proximity to the airport is very fortuitous. AZ Isotopes President and COO David Barshis stated, “Goodyear offers an ideal location for our planned operations, and local government has been extremely helpful in the process expected to provide a key competitive advantage over other isotope manufacturers.”

The heart of the facility is a unique, variable-energy medical cyclotron accelerator capable of producing medical diagnostic imaging and therapeutic isotopes which are not currently available, or have limited availability, from other commercial sources in the U.S.  This facility will join other local cyclotrons supporting various related types of medical treatments in the area. Locally, the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic has already announced plans to construct a facility to house a cyclotron designed specifically to be used for fixed-beam proton therapy at its new $130 million cancer center.  And the Phoenix-based Banner Alzheimer’s Institute is currently replacing its smaller cyclotron with a new unit for production of isotopes that enable detailed brain imaging.

114338026

GPEC makes case against solar tariffs

In support of the prospering solar industry in the Greater Phoenix metro area, City of Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord testified against proposed tariffs on Chinese-manufactured photovoltaic cells and modules at a hearing of the International Trade Commission in Washington. The City of Goodyear is a member of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and home to the only U.S. manufacturing hub for China-based Suntech, the world’s largest solar manufacturer. Mayor Lord is the only elected official testifying at the hearing.

“Greater Phoenix was one of the hardest hit regions in the nation during the economic downturn, but thanks to the hard work of leaders in our community, we’ve created an industry cluster for renewable companies to create a more diverse and sustainable employer base,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, the region’s premier economic development organization. “Now, we’re home to more than 260 companies within the solar supply chain, 27 manufacturing facilities and more than 9,000 jobs associated with renewable energy companies and utility-scale projects – a significant number when considering that parts of our state are at more than 20 percent unemployment.

“There’s no doubt in my mind that if implemented, these tariffs would have a detrimental effect not only on our existing solar and renewable energy industry but also in our ability to attract further investments in this sector from around the world,” Broome added. “It would send a signal that the U.S. is closed for business when it comes to this flourishing global industry.”

GPEC works closely with companies on their expansion and relocation plans, including a concentrated approach to those making a foreign-direct investment in the United States. In recent years, it championed a renewable energy-specific incentive that has drawn numerous solar companies to Arizona, including Suntech. Additionally, there are another dozen Chinese companies with investments totaling $400 million that have identified the Greater Phoenix region as a potential location for their projects.

GPEC recently filed a formal letter of protest to the U.S. Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission against the tariffs. To view the letters, please visit www.gpec.org/tariff .

“Many of Goodyear’s economic development efforts center on solar or foreign-direct investment. As a small city located in a Foreign Trade Zone, we want more Suntechs – not less,” Mayor Lord said in her testimony. “In Goodyear, a town of just 70,000, Suntech employs more than 100 well-trained professionals and, if market demand continues, has plans to more than double that number.

“I’m worried that the imposition of punitive duties will put both current and future jobs at risk, in addition to those at related companies within the supply chain and the residual effects they could have on the people, schools and welfare of my community,” she added.

The Brattle Group recently reported that a 100 percent tariff would result in estimated job losses between 17,000 and 50,000 in 2014. Clearly, if implemented these tariffs would be detrimental not only to Arizona’s solar industry but also the entire industry nationwide and the U.S. economy as a whole, in addition to substantial job losses.