Tag Archives: grand canyon

BORDER GOVERNORS

Will Brewer keep the Grand Canyon open?

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer must decide Wednesday whether to send more money to keep the Grand Canyon National Park open.

The agreement Brewer struck last week with the National Park Service to pay to keep the park open expires Friday night. The deal requires Brewer to give the park two days’ notice if she wants it to remain open.

Arizona is paying $93,000 a day to keep the canyon open during the government shutdown.

Businesses that rely on the canyon for tourist dollars were hurt during the 11 day closure that ended Saturday morning. Brewer is using money from the state Office of Tourism, the town of Tusayan and businesses to pay for park operations.

Grand Canyon - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona strikes deal to reopen Grand Canyon

Arizona reached a deal Friday with the Interior Department to pay for Grand Canyon National Park to completely reopen using state and local funds during the federal government shutdown.

The deal means the park should reopen Saturday, allowing thousands of tourists to flock to the natural wonder in northern Arizona, said Andrew Wilder, spokesman for Republican Gov. Jan Brewer.

Arizona will pay the national Park Service $651,000 to keep the Grand Canyon open for seven days. The $93,000 a day is less than the $112,000 daily rate the federal government said this week was needed to fund the park operations.

In addition to state money, cash provided by the town of Tusayan and raised from private business would also be included in the funding.

Park spokeswoman Kirby-Lynn Shedlowski said Friday evening that officials at the park hadn’t been notified of the deal and were awaiting word.

Brewer had been pushing to only use state money to open a portion of the park, something the Interior Department said Thursday it would not contemplate because of the complexities of keeping some parts of individual national parks closed while other parts were opened.

National parks in Utah began opening Friday after Gov. Gary Herbert sent $1.67 million to the U.S. government, while Colorado paid $360,000 to reopen Rocky Mountain National Park through Oct. 20.

Brewer and the state’s congressional delegation had been lobbying the Obama administration to allow reopening of the park since shortly after it closed Oct. 1. Three other states also made the request about their parks.

Diane Costantino - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Diane Costantino – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane CostantinoManaging partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Costantino has been managing partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers since June 2004. She helps her clients with acquisition structuring, global expansion and other complex tax matters. She also gives back to the community through her involvement in Boys and Girls Clubs and United Way. She also received the Spirit of Philanthropy Award for her work with the Arizona’s Children Association. She is a Graduate of the University of Arizona.

Surprising fact: “I love being outdoors, am an avid hiker and have hiked the Grand Canyon numerous times.”

Biggest challenge: “To succeed as the managing partner required seeking advice from accomplished leaders, prioritizing what I wanted to achieve, collaborating
with my partners and developing a winning strategy.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

brand_vignette

Kiehl's Since 1851 Arrives in Scottsdale

The Store

Kiehl’s Since 1851, the venerable New York-based purveyor of fine quality skin and hair care preparations, opened its very first retail store in at Scottsdale Fashion Square. Kiehl’s is proud to offer visitors and the Scottsdale community the opportunity to discover the brand’s efficacious skin, hair and body care products, personalized customer service and 162-year-old heritage.

BB Cream_SPF 50“Scottsdale has long been on our wish list for a new store, and our new space at Scottsdale Fashion Square is the ideal location to fully introduce Kiehl’s to Arizona,” said Chris Salgardo, President, Kiehl’s USA. “Our new store allows us to bring Kiehl’s further into the Southwest and share our New York heritage with a whole new community. Each element of our new store, from the design of the fixtures explaining our skin, hair and body formulations, to the historical photographs, mementos and Kiehl’s icons, helps tell the extensive story of our unique company that began as an old-world apothecary at the corner of 13th Street and Third Avenue in New York’s East Village. From design, to customer service, to the high-performing natural ingredients that are the basis of our products, we did everything possible to bring a modern version of our original store to Scottsdale, and I look forward to introducing our new community to our skin care, our customer service and our story.”

Kiehl’s at Scottsdale Fashion Square mirrors the unique ambiance found in the company’s original New York Flagship, which began as a neighborhood apothecary in 1851. The new store brings a modern New York apothecary to Scottsdale, referencing the company’s original East Village roots and blending vintage and antique apothecary fixtures with a modern neon flare. The interior design advances Kiehl’s longtime commitment to the environment with the use of natural, sustainable materials and energy-efficient light fixtures, while enhancing the overall service experience for Kiehl’s patrons.

Kiehl’s at Scottsdale Fashion Square also utilizes natural, sustainable materials and energy efficient light fixtures – and encourages patrons to recycle Kiehl’s packaging with a specially designed recycling bin, promoted through Kiehl’s Recycle and Be Rewarded! program. The program offers customers the opportunity to return empty Kiehl’s jars, bottles and tubes to the store for recycling, in exchange for complimentary products.
Kiehl’s commitment to education through attentive service is accentuated through a dedicated personal consultation area. The enhanced space provides an opportunity for customer representatives and patrons to converse privately about products best suited for the customer’s individual needs. A separate men’s destination offers specialized educationActivatedSun_LotionSpray_SPF50 tailored to the specific concerns of male patrons.  All customers receive the kind of attentive service for which Kiehl’s is known around the world today. In addition, simple, no-frills packaging allows Kiehl’s to formulate its products with high quantities of the most efficacious natural ingredients available.

Generous sampling through Kiehl’s “try before you buy” program offers the complete Kiehl’s line of skin and hair care for men, women, children and babies with a generous offering of its traditional product samples. To assure its customers always find exactly what they need, Kiehl’s offers a 100% money back guarantee on all purchases, and guarantees that customers will see revitalized skin in 28 days or their money back.
Custom gifting 365 days a year allows customers to create personalized gifts year-round. A Kiehl’s Customer Representative will help the customer assemble a personalized, custom gift box, choosing items based on recipient, theme, ingredient or price, from any and all products in the store.

Design

  • A 6-ft table provides patrons a comfortable station for complimentary Healthy Skin Consultations by Kiehl’s Customer Representatives, which helps them determine the formulas best suited for their personal needs.
  • A  space for specialized shaving and grooming education and demonstrations is designed for men. Specially designed accents such as military-style lockers, black subway tile, and props to demonstrate the perfect shave, bring this relaxing stop to life for Kiehl’s male patrons.
  • Black Nero Marquina marble highlights the shop’s exterior façade, honoring the marble exterior of the original Kiehl’s New York Flagship.
  • Carrera marble tables, counters and trim provide a utilitarian, functional approach.
  • Natural, sustainable materials, such as tabletops made from paperstone, a waterproof material made from 100 % post-consumer recycled paper.
  • Energy-efficient LED lighting illuminates Kiehl’s products in an environmentally friendly way.
  • Reclaimed wood floors and exposed brick walls evoke the old-world quality of Kiehl’s East Village neighborhood.
  • A bronze and crystal chandelier is inspired by the crystal chandeliers that have adorned Kiehl’s Flagship store in NYC for years.
  • A custom-painted motorcycle, an icon of Kiehl’s heritage, will be on permanent display, evocative of the passions and adventurous spirit of Kiehl’s founding family.
  • Antique apothecary glassware and vintage props  reference the company’s early years as a neighborhood apothecary.
  • Vintage photographs and mementos – take customers on an exciting journey through Kiehl’s 162-year history.
  • Pop-art inspired graphics – the late Andy Warhol was a long-time Kiehl’s fan, purchasing Blue Astringent Herbal Lotion in bulk from the Flagship, and special graphics were created in his honor.

About Kiehl’s Since 1851: Kiehl’s was founded as an old-world apothecary in New York’s East Village neighborhood. After years as an ambitious apprentice, John Kiehl purchased the business and began operating under the Kiehl name, serving the burgeoning New York community with unique herbal remedies. In 1921, John Kiehl’s apprentice, Mr. Irving “Doc” Morse, purchased the business and expanded it to a full-service pharmacy, stocking medicines, tinctures, and the first Kiehl’s-branded products. Doc Morse, a pharmacist and herbologist, passed the business on to his son, Aaron, himself a chemist and avid motorcyclist and aviator. Aaron’s daughter, Jami, was raised at Kiehl’s amongst the “family” of employees, who together fostered a tradition of attentive, personalized service for every patron. Over the generations, the Morse family committed Kiehl’s to serving the community uniquely efficacious skin and hair formulations made with the finest natural ingredients in the apothecary tradition.

Store hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.  For more information about Kiehl’s, please visit www.kiehls.com.

168786407

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

Despite the typical images of a colorless and dry land that the word “desert” brings up in our minds, Arizona has a lot more to offer than varying shades of brown. Arizona landscapes and sights are unique and often breathtaking. They show the long, rich history of Arizona before buildings and people. Here are the 10 top Arizona landmarks and sights that are most eye-catching and jaw-dropping.

Meteor Crater, Winslow

10.

Meteor Crater

It is the world’s best preserved meteor crater, located near Winslow. It is nearly a mile across, 2.4 miles in circumference and over 550 feet deep. The crater was formed approximately 50,000 years ago when a piece of an asteroid traveling at 26,000 miles per hour collided with the Earth.

Grand Canyon

9.

Grand Canyon

Tourists come from around the world to see the magnificent sights of the Grand Canyon. It is one of the natural wonders of the world and proves that with its great size and history. The Grand Canyon spans 277 river miles and is up to 18 miles wide and a mile deep.

Canyon de Chelly

8.

Canyon de Chelly

It is the longest continuously inhabited landscape in North America and provides unique sights to anyone who visits. Besides the visual appeal, this area holds a lot of spiritual and cultural significance. There is architecture, artifacts and rock imagery from the past peoples that will amaze anyone.

Flickr: BethinAZ

7.

Oak Creek Canyon

Located near Flagstaff, Oak Creek Canyon offers spectacular scenes with its colorful rocks and unique formations. It is smaller than the Grand Canyon with a length of 88 miles but is no less breathtaking.

Cathedral Rocks, Sedona

6.

Cathedral Rocks

Cathedral Rocks is located in Sedona, an area known for its unique and often awe-worthy sights. The best view of this sight is along the Red Rock Crossing, where visitors and residents like to hike and enjoy the outdoors. Sedona, and particularly the areas where hiking is most popular, is also known for what people refer to as vortexes that give off a soothing and healing energy.

Monument Valley

5.

Monument Valley

Monument Valley borders northern Arizona and southern Utah in the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley Park. Its large sandstone buttes are the main attraction of this sight, and they are one of the most photographed landscapes in the world.

North Coyote Butte

4.

The Wave

This amazing sight is located near the Arizona-Utah border in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. A permit from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is required to visit the Wave, but it is well worth it to see this unique Navajo Sandstone in person.

Papago Park

3.

Papago Park’s Hole-in-the-Rock

This unique sight is closer to home for many Phoenix area residents and far more accessible. Climbing up into one of the series of holes in this hill of red, arkosic conglomerate sandstone gives you a wonderful view of the park and surrounding area.

Corkscrew Canyon

2.

Corkscrew Canyon

This incredible sight is hidden away, just outside of Page, AZ. The only way to get to it is to take one of the tour shuttles that leaves from Page, but once you’re there you know the trip was worth it. You’re surrounded by winding sandstone as soon as you enter, and when the sunlight shines through just right, this sight is very breathtaking.

Flickr: Coconino National Forest

1.

Bell Rock Pathway

Along the Bell Rock Pathway — a hiking trail in Sedona — is an amazing view of the landscape which includes Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte. At the right time of the year, you can see just how green Arizona can get and the remarkable contrast of the red soil, as shown above.

Grand Canyon - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Judge Upholds Mining Ban Near Canyon

U.S. District Judge David Campbell late yesterday denied a uranium industry motion to overturn the Obama administration’s ban on new uranium mining on 1 million acres near the Grand Canyon. The ban was adopted January 2012 to protect the Grand Canyon’s watersheds. The withdrawal prohibits new mining claims and development on old claims that lack “valid existing rights” to mine.

“It’s a great day for the Grand Canyon, and for rivers, wildlife, and communities across the West,” said Ted Zukoski of Earthjustice, one the attorneys representing conservation groups and the Havasupai tribe in the case. “The uranium industry was hoping to cripple the Interior Department’s ability to temporarily protect lands from destructive mining. Today’s opinion upholds the Interior Department’s authority to take such protective measures.”

The National Mining Association, Nuclear Energy Institute, Northwest Mining Association and others last year filed four lawsuits challenging the withdrawal and the underlying federal authority to enact any withdrawals larger than 5,000 acres. The Havasupai tribe and conservation groups intervened to uphold both.

“Today’s decision upheld the government’s important role in preventing private profiteers from poisoning public lands under the authority of an antiquated mining law,” said Grand Canyon Trust’s Roger Clark. “We look forward to the court’s upholding of other federal responsibilities to protect the Grand Canyon.”

Judge Campbell denied industry’s motion to overturn the withdrawal and the underlying federal authority to enact withdrawals larger than 5,000 acres. The industry groups had claimed that the presence of an unconstitutional legislative veto in the subsection that contains the Interior Secretary’s authority to withdraw land parcels larger than 5,000 acres means that the Interior Secretary had no authority at all to withdraw such lands. The judge ruled — as the government, Havasupai tribe and conservation groups had argued — that the unconstitutional veto provision could be “severed” from the law without affecting the Grand Canyon’s watershed withdrawal or the Interior Department’s general authority to protect such lands.

“Today’s ruling protects not only the Grand Canyon’s watershed, but millions of acres of other public land that have been withdrawn to protect natural values from destructive mining,” said Taylor McKinnon with the Center for Biological Diversity. “By upholding the federal withdrawal authority, today’s ruling is good news for public lands, water and wildlife.”

If successful, the uranium industry’s argument would have eliminated the Interior Secretary’s authority to protect large tracts of public lands from mining. Over the last five years, the secretary has used his authority to “withdraw” areas greater than 5,000 acres for up to 20 years to protect lands all across the West. Examples include nearly a half-million acres within national wildlife refuges; habitat for desert tortoises and pronghorns as well as archeological treasures in Nevada; habitat protecting the largest wintering Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep herd in North America (on Wyoming’s Whiskey Mountain); recreational areas in Washington and Wyoming; forests in Oregon; and special features like the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah.

“Currently, there are limited tools to protect sensitive public lands and wildlife from harmful uranium mining — this is one of them,” said Sandy Bahr, director of the Sierra Club’s Grand Canyon Chapter. “Today’s decision will mean the Grand Canyon watershed and other withdrawn lands throughout the West will continue to be protected from new mining claims.”

The court’s decision does not end the four industry lawsuits challenging the Grand Canyon mineral withdrawal decision. Industry can still raise arguments that Interior Secretary Salazar failed to properly consider environmental and economic impacts of the withdrawal. Those issues are likely to be briefed this spring.

Grand Canyon Google

Google maps now include Grand Canyon trails

Google is giving people a way to virtually hike the Grand Canyon.

The search giant released images Thursday that map the most popular trails at the park’s South Rim and other walkways.

The Mountain View, Calif.-based company used a rosette of cameras mounted for the first time on a backpack to gather thousands of panoramic images last year.

The so-called trekker captured images every 2.5 seconds, showing the steep switchbacks of the Bright Angel Trail, the change from juniper trees to scrub brush and the Colorado River.

Google has said it wants to deploy the backpacks to other national parks and forests, and to ancient ruins and castles.

The company also has used tricycles, push carts and snowmobiles to map places where vehicles cannot travel.

Arselia and dad at the Grand Canyon, Photo: Arselia Gales

A 10-Year-Old’s Unforgettable Journey To The Grand Canyon

Traveling with my mother and father is the fondest memory I have of my childhood. Together, we’ve traveled to Las Vegas, Baltimore and even Niagara Falls. As a little girl and even as a young adult I’ve always looked forward to learning where our adventures would take us.

When I was younger, I always wanted to go to the magnificent wonder known as the Grand Canyon. I’d seen pictures in magazines and on TV, and I just wanted to be there and experience the beauty first-hand. I was taken aback by the gorgeous, vibrant colors and the fact that something so amazing was just within my reach.Grand Canyon, Photo: Arselia Gales

In November 2002, when I was just 10 years old and living in El Paso, Texas, my parents decided to take a nice, little Arizona excursion. These trips were definitely not out of the ordinary. My grandparents lived in Tucson, so going to Arizona was very normal to me.

Grand Canyon, Photo: Arselia GalesIt’s no surprise that when my parents told me we would make a little pit stop at the Grand Canyon that I was nothing short of ecstatic.

When the trip began, I referred to myself as “Arselia Gales: Reporter/Recorder” and documented every single detail of the trip from the car ride there to the car ride home. Nothing was left unnoticed. I was determined to capture the magnificence of the Grand Canyon and everything in-between. Grand Canyon, Photo: Arselia GalesWe still have those old VHS tapes somewhere and even got some of them transferred to a DVD.

I also put myself in charge of taking all the photographs. I was a young multimedia journalist and didn’t even know it.

When we arrived to the Grand Canyon, I was awestruck. It was even better than the pictures. I was speechless.

I was also freezing.Grand Canyon, Photo: Arselia Gales

I can remember the long, seemingly treacherous drive up to the canyon. As the elevation increased, the temperature decreased. The declining temperature never seemed believable because the sun was shining just as it was in Phoenix. I really wanted to see some snow.

Luckily my mother was aware of the cold temperatures and came well prepared. My shiny silver jacket, which hung in my closet at home untouched, was now my best friend.

The four days we spent at the canyon were probably some of the four best days of my young life. Every day, my parents and I would go on new trails and explore new parts of the canyon. We saw lots of wildlife, and I’m grateful we never ran into any mountain lions or bobcats.

I’m still convinced we didn’t see the entire canyon, but I’m happy with what we saw. I’ve never seen anything so beautiful. The sunrise and sunsets were gorgeous, and the canyon itself was breathtaking. It was never-ending. I even remember seeing the Colorado River. I could see why this was one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

In addition to our daily canyon travels, my parents and I went to museums and saw an IMAX movie about the Grand Canyon.

When our four days in the canyon were up, I was happy and sad. I was glad that I finally could cross something off of my hypothetical bucket list, but I was sad that the trip was coming to an end.

Now that I’m older, I’d definitely love to see the Grand Canyon with my roommates or even go with my parents again. I’ve never seen anything so stunning and magnificent. Perhaps the Grand Canyon and Niagara Falls tie for first place in the “Places I’ve Been” category, but that’s another story.

For more information about the Grand Canyon, visit nps.gov/grca/index.htm.

Top 5 Grand Canyon Adventures (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Grand Canyon Adventures (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Grand Canyon Adventures — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Canyon Trail Rides

280 W. Bryce Way,
Tropic, UT 84776
435-679-8665
canyonrides.com
The half-day mule trip descends down the North Kaibab Trail to the Supai Tunnel, 2,300 feet. Wranglers take riders of all levels into the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, Zion, and Bryce Canyon every day.


Grand Canyon Skywalk

Located near Grand Canyon West Airport, Peach Springs, AZ
702-220-8372
grandcanyonskywalk.com
The Grand Canyon Skywalk at Grand Canyon West extends 70 feet beyond the West Rim of the Grand Canyon, allowing visitors to gaze down nearly 4,000 feet to the canyon floor, a height far exceeding those of the world’s largest skyscrapers.


Grand Canyon Whitewater

916 Vista, P.O. Box 1300,
Page, AZ 86040
800-343-3121
grandcanyonww.com
Grand Canyon Whitewater rafting trips give you the opportunity to be in one of the most spectacular places on earth. Whitewater rafting the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon is beyond your imagination and gives you a chance to experience the true spirit of the Canyon.


Grand Canyon Airplane Tours

Grand Canyon Airport,
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023
928-638-2359
grandcanyonairlines.com
Arguably one of the world’s oldest and most experienced Grand Canyon airplane tour companies, Grand Canyon Airplane Tours has been in continuous operation since 1927.


The Grand Hotel

149 S. State Rte. 64,
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023
888-63-GRAND (47263)
grandcanyongrandhotel.com
The Grand Hotel is one of the premier Grand Canyon hotels, with the entrance to Grand Canyon National Park just one mile away, and the South Rim of the Canyon just a short car ride away. The warm and spacious lobby is reminiscent of a mountain lodge with exposed timbers and stone, a large flagstone fireplace, and cozy seating areas.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

Pink Jeep Tours, Grand Canyon

Pink Jeep Tours Expands To The Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon has long been a destination for visitors around the world. Now, sightseeing company Pink Jeep Tours will give visitors the chance to experience the beauty of the canyon even more. With locations in Sedona and Las Vegas, Pink Jeep Tours has established itself as “the thing” to do in both cities, according to those who have experienced the desert ride. Both Sedona and Las Vegas currently offer tours to the Canyon, so it was fitting that an office with Pink Jeep tours at the Grand Canyon would be the next step.

Beginning August 1, Pink Jeep Tours began operating from the National Geographic Visitor Center seven days a week with customer service representatives on hand to answer questions, schedule tours and provide the ultimate experience for visitors at the Grand Canyon. The tours will be similar to the those experienced in Las Vegas and Sedona, with the same qualified tour guides and fun.

“When other tour companies are scaling back, we are stepping up our game and providing visitors what they want — more adventure, sightseeing and enjoyable tour opportunities in our existing markets of Sedona and Las Vegas, and now at the Grand Canyon,” says Pink Jeep Tours CMO Grant Ferguson.

Pink Jeep Tours also partnered with Destination Cinema, operator of the IMAX at the Grand Canyon, to bring a new tour component with the movie experience.

The expansion of Pink Jeep Tours at the Grand Canyon is just the beginning of exciting growth and adventure opportunities in Arizona and beyond.

“We look forward to not only what being located at the IMAX at the Grand Canyon will offer the millions of visitors each year, but where we will be able to expand our brand next,” Ferguson says.

Destination Cinema CEO, Bob Perkins, expressed his excitement about the partnership stating, “Destination Cinema is delighted to welcome Pink Jeep Tours as a marketing partner at the National Geographic Visitor Center.
Their ground tours will add another valuable component to the services offered at the center.”

With four tours available, including a spectacular ride along the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, a guided walk along the Trail of Time and the opportunity to view the sunset at the Canyon, these tours will quench the eyes with beauty to last a lifetime.

Tours range in price from $68-$88, with discounted pricing for children 12 and under. Tours can be booked by calling (800) 873-3662.

Pink Jeep Tours Grand Canyon — making your visit even more Grand! For complete tour descriptions, visit pinkjeeptours.com.

Grand Canyon Railway

All Aboard The Grand Canyon Railway! [PHOTOS]

All aboard the Grand Canyon Railway!

Visitors from all over the world come to Arizona to visit the Grand Canyon, whether it be via flight, road trip or bus ride.

But one of the most calming, scenic ways to get the Grand Canyon is the Grand Canyon Railway — a two-and-a-half to three hour ride through the mountains and plains with musical performances, games, trivia, folklore and history, and surprises along the way — including an old-fashioned shoot out and train robbery!

According to the Grand Canyon Railway’s website, each train engine and each train car has been restored to its original state by the staff.

Once we all made it to the Grand Canyon we were free to roam the area for about three hours before we had to be back on the train. This gave us all plenty of time to soak in the sights and really enjoy the whole experience.

If you’re interested in going, here are the rates:

 Coach ClassAdults: $75.00 | Children: $45.00 First ClassAdults: $140.00 | Children: $110.00
Observation DomeAdults: $170.00 Luxury Parlor ClassAdults: $190.00

Check out these photos from this very family-friendly tour as well as my stroll at the Grand Canyon:

Grand Canyon Railway

For more information about the Grand Canyon Railway, visit thetrain.com.

 

Arizona Centennial

Arizona Centennial Events: Where Will You Be?

Arizona is celebrating its 100th birthday February 14, 2012 — so where will you be? Check out what’s happening around the state for the Arizona Centennial.


Arizona Centennial Events:


Central Arizona

Arizona Centennial Best Fest, Phoenix

Arizona Centennial Best Fest will take place in downtown Phoenix and include an “Arizona World’s Fair” exhibit, kids zone, performance stages and food stations hosted by some of the best Arizona restaurants, wineries and breweries. Admission is free.

Saturday, February 11 from noon to 10 p.m.
Sunday, February 12 from noon to 6 p.m.

Arizona State Capitol
1700 W. Washington Street
az100years.org

A Tale of Two Cities Parade & Festival, Goodyear & Avondale

The cities of Goodyear and Avondale will host a joint parade on Saturday, February 25. The parade will celebrate Arizona’s Centennial with floats, bands, vintage cars, horses, gymnastic troops and dance troops and will begin at 10 a.m. on Litchfield Road; travel east on Thomas Road and end at Dysart Road.

Carefree Sundial Centennial Time Capsule, Carefree

The Carefree Sundial is the largest sundial in Arizona. In honor of the Arizona Centennial, Carefree will place a Centennial Time Capsule into the Sundial that will be opened in 2059, the Sundial’s Centennial. The placing of this capsule will be held on February 14th at the Sundial.

Fandango! Arizona Gala

This centennial gala will be held by the Arizona Centennial Commission. Cocktails, dinner, silent auctions and appearances by Hugh Downs, Harvey Mackay, Rex Allen Jr., Gov. Jan Brewer and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor will be part of this celebration. Tickets start at $250. The gala will take place on Tuesday, February 14 at 5:30 p.m.

Phoenix Convention Center
North Ballroom, Third and Jefferson streets
az100years.org

Mesa Takes Flight Festival

This celebration features aviation and aerospace. Fun activities, such as an interactive Flight-O-Vation performance, a paper-airplane competition and an original play about the Wright brothers, will be part of the festival. Admission is free.

Friday, February 10 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m
Saturday, February 11 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Sunday, February 12 from noon to 4 p.m.

Mesa Arts Center
1 E. Main Street
(480) 644-6500
mesaartscenter.com


Northern Arizona


Arizona Centennial Train and Centennial Sweetheart Dinner, Williams/Grand Canyon

Never been on a train? Never been to the Grand Canyon? This is your chance to ride a 1923 Harriman coach to one of the seven natural world wonders. After the train ride, treat yourself to a Centennial Sweetheart Dinner at the Sultana Theatre, built in 1912. Proceeds from the dinner will be donated to the local Historical Society. Train departs at 9:30 a.m.,  dinner will be held at 6 p.m.

Tuesday, February 14
Call (928) 635-0273 for reservations
Tickets are $50 per person

Great Pine Cone Lowering for Centennial Statehood Day, Flagstaff

On February 14, the Weatherford Hotel will repeat its New Year’s Eve festivities by lowering the Great Pine Cone at 7 p.m. This will be followed by a LED light show of the state colors in celebration of Arizona’s 100th birthday.

Arizona Centennial Quilt Project 100 Years — 100 Quilts Exhibit, Sedona

The 100 Quilts Exhibit will showcase 100 quilts entered from around the state. Each quilt is unique and most represent the communities the quilters live in. The highlight of the exhibit will be the Arizona Centennial Quilt.

February 18, 2012 – December 2012

Arizona Historical Society Museum
949 East Second Street
520-628-5774
arizonahistoricalsociety.org

Sedona International Film Festival

The Sedona International Film Festival will feature “100 Years of Film in Arizona.” The film festival is a celebration of independent film from around the world. More than 145 films will be featured during this nine-day festival (February 18-26). For ticket information call (928) 282-1177.


Southern Arizona


Tucson Symphony Orchestra: Arizona Centennial Celebration

The Tucson Symphony Orchestra will celebrate Arizona’s 100th birthday with a program of music, dance, spoken word and a performance by R. Carlos Nakai — the world’s premier performer of the Native American flute.

Friday, February 10 at 8 p.m.
Sunday, February 12 at 2 p.m.

Tucson Symphony Center
2175 North Sixth Avenue
(520) 882-8585
tucsonsymphony.org

Arizona’s Centennial Celebration, Tucson

Taste colonial food and listen to historical stories about Tucson. Parking will be free on the nearby streets. This event takes place on Saturday, February 11 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Tucson Presidio
133 W. Washington
downtowntucson.org

Tucson Gem & Mineral Show

The largest gem and mineral show in the United States will celebrate the Arizona Centennial the weekend of February 9 – 12. The show is open to the public and will offer educational exhibits. Proceeds from the show will be used to support mineral knowledge and appreciation. Tickets may be ordered through ticketmaster.com] or by calling (800) 745-3000.

Thursday, February 9 from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Friday, February 10 from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturday, February 11 from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Sunday, February 12 from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Tucson Convention Center
260 South Church Avenue
tgms.org

Have more events you’d like to add to this list?
Let us know in the comments section!

Oak Creek Canyon

Oak Creek Canyon: A Scenic, Smaller Canyon

Occasionally referred to as the “scenic, smaller cousin” of the Grand Canyon, Oak Creek Canyon, just south of Flagstaff, is known for some of its geological details, including colorful rocks and unique natural formations.

Getting to Oak Creek Canyon isn’t hard, either; in fact, State Rt. 89A goes right into it. Before you go into the actual canyon, though, you might want to take a look at the Oak Creek Canyon Vista. From this place, you can get a nice bird’s-eye view of much of the canyon. Also, if you’re interested in Native American jewelry and crafts, and other items from the locals who set up displays around the area, you can pick up something at this vista.

While it’s definitely possible to explore the majority of the canyon just by driving down State Rt. 89A and taking in the sights, what fun is that? Most of the people who take the time to come to Oak Creek Canyon want to do more than just stay in their car the whole time; they want to go out and hike, or swim, or fish, or do any number of other things to make the most of their visit. If you’re one of these people, there are overlooks, picnic areas, hiking trails and swimming holes scattered throughout the canyon.

Oak Creek Canyon even offers its visitors something to see as they’re leaving. On the way away from the canyon, the keen-eyed observer might notice some of the various natural sculptures on the horizon. Among others, there’s Steam Boat Rock, Courthouse Butte and Bell Rock.

So if you’re around Flagstaff and want a place to go where you can see a neat little piece of the Arizona landscape, go give Oak Creek Canyon a look. And try not to stay in your car the whole time.

For more information about Oak Creek Canyon, visit its page on U.S. Forest Service’s website.

November Art Walk Events in Arizona

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011


Phoenix, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-10 p.m.
(602) 256-7539
facebook.com/FirstFridayArtwalk

The weather will be cooling down … just perfect for visiting our various arts districts with
great spaces and amazing art. Park at the Phoenix Art Museum, and ride our free shuttles (or ride light rail, take your bike, pedicab, taxi or walk).


Flagstaff, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-9 p.m.
kathrynwillisart.com

Enjoy a beautiful fall evening on the streets of downtown Flagstaff, with music, art, refreshments and lively community vibes!


Jerome, AZ ~ Jerome Art Walk

Saturday, November 5th, 5-8 p.m.
(928) 649-2277
www.jeromeartwalk.com

Twenty-six studios and galleries will host openings and happenings throughout the artist colony. From the Old Jerome High School studios to The New State Motor Company with the Patrick Lincoln Gallery, art, music and lively conversation.
Download the walk map.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art Walk at Water Tower Park

Saturday, November 5th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Bisbee after 5

Saturday, November 12th, until 8 p.m.
(520) 432-3554
www.discoverbisbee.com

Experience the town-wide Art Walk with more than 30 shops and galleries, special sales and promotions, live entertainment and refreshments and artist receptions.


Tucson, AZ ~ 5th La Encantada Fine Art Festival

Friday & Saturday, November 11th & 12th, 10-5 p.m.
www.laencantadafestival.org

45 of the region’s finest artists are slated to present and sell their work at the La Encantada Fine Art Festival. The show will also be featuring free children’s art activities and live entertainment all day long!


Sahuarita, AZ ~ 3rd Annual Pecan Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-6 p.m.
(520) 820-3299
www.sahuaritapecanfestival.com

Sahuarita Pecan Festival has been approved as an Official Centennial Event!


Kingman, AZ ~ Kingman Cancer Care Arts & Crafts Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-5 p.m. & Nov 13th, 10-4 p.m.
(928) 753-1186
www.kingmantourism.org

You’ll be sure to find that perfect item for that person that has everything. This show features many vendors, original arts, crafts, food and more.


Scottsdale, AZ ~ Thursday Art Walk

Thursday, November 17th, 7-9 p.m.
(480) 990-3939
www.scottsdalegalleries.com

This is America’s original Art Walk. Wander into galleries that capture your fancy, stroll around a delightful area punctuated by dramatic statues, bubbling fountains, tree-covered courtyards and more.


Tucson, AZ ~ 30th Annual Holiday Craft Market

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 18th-20th
(520) 624-2333
www.tucsonmuseumofart.org

This event has more than 120 booths of juried work, including jewelry, metalwork, painting, pottery, ceramics, watercolors and food; join this great event.


Yuma, AZ ~ North End Art Walk

Friday, November 18th, 5-9 p.m.
(928) 373-5202
yumamom.com

Dozens and dozens of artists will showcase their work in ceramics, jewelry, prints and canvases, calligraphy, photography, glass and mixed media.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Holiday Art Walk

Saturday, November 26th, late into the evening
(520) 432-2071
www.discoverbisbee.com

Local merchants and artists offer art work, antiques and collectibles, jewelry and wares.  Decorated shops remain open, offer beverages and snacks to make your shopping pleasure a festivity. Located in Historic Bisbee.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art in the Open

Friday, November 26th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Grand Canyon, AZ ~ 4th Annual Grand Canyon Celebration of Art

Through November 27th
(928) 863-3877
www.grandcanyon.org

Proceeds from this event will be dedicated to funding an art venue on the South Rim that will preserve and showcase the spectacular collection of historic and contemporary paintings owned by Grand Canyon National Park and the Grand Canyon Association.

[stextbox id="black"]If you want to post your Art Walk,
scroll to the bottom of the page and contact us.[/stextbox]

 

centennial top10

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

Despite the typical images of a colorless and dry land that the word “desert” brings up in our minds, Arizona has a lot more to offer than varying shades of brown. Arizona landscapes and sights are unique and often breathtaking. They show the long, rich history of Arizona before buildings and people. Here are the 10 top Arizona landmarks and sights that are most eye-catching and jaw-dropping.

Meteor Crater, Winslow

10.

Meteor Crater

It is the world’s best preserved meteor crater, located near Winslow. It is nearly a mile across, 2.4 miles in circumference and over 550 feet deep. The crater was formed approximately 50,000 years ago when a piece of an asteroid traveling at 26,000 miles per hour collided with the Earth.

Grand Canyon

9.

Grand Canyon

Tourists come from around the world to see the magnificent sights of the Grand Canyon. It is one of the natural wonders of the world and proves that with its great size and history. The Grand Canyon spans 277 river miles and is up to 18 miles wide and a mile deep.

Canyon de Chelly

8.

Canyon de Chelly

It is the longest continuously inhabited landscape in North America and provides unique sights to anyone who visits. Besides the visual appeal, this area holds a lot of spiritual and cultural significance. There is architecture, artifacts and rock imagery from the past peoples that will amaze anyone.

Flickr: BethinAZ

7.

Oak Creek Canyon

Located near Flagstaff, Oak Creek Canyon offers spectacular scenes with its colorful rocks and unique formations. It is smaller than the Grand Canyon with a length of 88 miles but is no less breathtaking.

Cathedral Rocks, Sedona

6.

Cathedral Rocks

Cathedral Rocks is located in Sedona, an area known for its unique and often awe-worthy sights. The best view of this sight is along the Red Rock Crossing, where visitors and residents like to hike and enjoy the outdoors. Sedona, and particularly the areas where hiking is most popular, is also known for what people refer to as vortexes that give off a soothing and healing energy.

Monument Valley

5.

Monument Valley

Monument Valley borders northern Arizona and southern Utah in the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley Park. Its large sandstone buttes are the main attraction of this sight, and they are one of the most photographed landscapes in the world.

North Coyote Butte

4.

The Wave

This amazing sight is located near the Arizona-Utah border in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. A permit from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is required to visit the Wave, but it is well worth it to see this unique Navajo Sandstone in person.

Papago Park

3.

Papago Park’s Hole-in-the-Rock

This unique sight is closer to home for many Phoenix area residents and far more accessible. Climbing up into one of the series of holes in this hill of red, arkosic conglomerate sandstone gives you a wonderful view of the park and surrounding area.

Corkscrew Canyon

2.

Corkscrew Canyon

This incredible sight is hidden away, just outside of Page, AZ. The only way to get to it is to take one of the tour shuttles that leaves from Page, but once you’re there you know the trip was worth it. You’re surrounded by winding sandstone as soon as you enter, and when the sunlight shines through just right, this sight is very breathtaking.

Flickr: Coconino National Forest

1.

Bell Rock Pathway

Along the Bell Rock Pathway — a hiking trail in Sedona — is an amazing view of the landscape which includes Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte. At the right time of the year, you can see just how green Arizona can get and the remarkable contrast of the red soil, as shown above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A doctor in New York City writes an article for the Youngstown Vindicator about how climate may affect health. Those diagnosed with illnesses such as tuberculosis, began migrating to Arizona in the 1900’s and it has since been known as the ideal climate for many illnesses and conditions.

Experience AZ Online

Experience AZ Magazine Is Now Online

Experience AZ is officially online! ExperienceAZOnline.com offers everything found within the Experience AZ magazine, including statewide activities as well as options for lodging, dining, shopping, and so much more.Experience AZ Website

But on Experience AZ’s website, you’ll always find timely deals, travel offers, articles and blogs. In fact, you — the visitor and reader — have the ability to register to the website, which means you’ll have the ability to submit blogs, photos and more.

Experience AZ online is your source for everything Arizona related. It is the perfect travel guide to some of the best places and secrets this wondrous state holds.

Discover new cities and locations, towns and landmarks; From the desert to the snow-capped mountain ranges, learn about every region of the state, north to south, east to west — Experience AZ covers it all.

Read about visitors’ Arizona experiences and adventures in the Travel Blog section of the site, whether they involve road trips to Cave Creek, wakeboarding in Saguaro Lake or rock climbing Queen Creek.

Experience AZ Website The Places to See section is great for those wanting to learn about a featured city or landmark, such as the Grand Canyon or Tombstone, “The Town Too Tough to Die.” Simply, these are some of the most popular places to see in Arizona.

Find out Where to Stay, Where to Play and Where to Eat … for every city in the state.

A complete directory is also available to all who come to the site, listing nearly every possible lodging, dining, shopping and adventure options, and much, much more — in every area of the state.

And don’t forget to check the calendar where we post events happening in every city.

Browse around or plan your trip. Experience AZ online is your Arizona travel guide, right at your finger tips, whenever you decide to visit the Grand Canyon State!

Route 66 - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Route 66: What Bridges Arizona To The Rest Of The Nation

Once dubbed the “Main Street of America,” Route 66 Twin Arrows Trading Post - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011not only is a landmark in U.S. history, but also played a vital role in developing Arizona’s economy as a major piece of the state’s infrastructure not long after statehood in 1912.

Arizona has always been known as a gateway to California. First, with the California Gold Rush of 1849, when thousands of people traveled through Arizona on their way to hunt for riches in the Golden State. Since there were no established routes through Arizona, these pioneers blazed their own trails, eventually creating a travel corridor. When built in Arizona, Route 66 followed this same path.

Commissioned in 1936, Route 66 began in Chicago and spanned all the way to Santa Monica, Calif. It was not fully paved until 1937.

Taking Route 66 through Arizona to California not only was popular because it was the easiest way to California, but also because of the tourist attractions and small towns that thrived along the route’s path. From the 1930s into the mid-1950s, Arizona’s tourism industry experienced a golden age as this historic route ran near the Grand Canyon and was a short jaunt away from the Painted Desert and Meteor Crater. In time, Route 66 took its place in American folklore, inspiring a popular song.

Route 66 entered Arizona through Holbrook, which attracted Easterners. Tourism instantly became an important part of its economy. It is reported that the first tourist camp in the U.S. was built in Holbrook. When Route 66 became the official transcontinental highway, tourism took off. It ceased during World War II when gasoline was rationed, but resumed after the war.

The advent of the automobile also was an economic boon to Winslow, which was a major stopping point along Route 66. Cafes, trading posts, motor courts and garages thrived. Similarly, Flagstaff’s economy grew. For years its motor courts and cafes catered to weary travelers.

Seligman, a railroad town founded in 1886, was referred to as the “Historic Birthplace of Route 66.” Its economy flourished when the Santa Fe Railroad established repair facilities there, including the Harvey House Road House.

The last major Route 66 town in Arizona was Kingman, although Oatman and Topock were officially the last towns along the old route. Again, the stretch of 66 that ran through Kingman’s downtown was rich in motels, restaurants and shops. That downtown is listed in the Historic Register for Historic Places. The neon signs of the 1940s proclaiming “Motel Row” remain intact.

But as the nation’s infrastructure grew and improved in the post-war boom years, Interstate-40 arose and Route 66 became irrelevant. Soon, much of the old route was decommissioned.

If it’s “fun in the sun” that attracts people to Arizona these days, it was Route 66 that paved the way for millions to visit and even more to stay and call the Grand Canyon State home.

For more information about Route 66, visit historic66.com.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Monument Valley in Arizona, part of the Arizona Office of Tourism's new marketing campaign - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Arizona Launches Innovative Media Campaign To Bring Back Tourists

Arizona has gotten a bad rap as of late, with the added national backlash from the passage of SB 1070 making it even tougher for the state to climb out of the recession. But the Arizona Office of Tourism is fighting back, and it has only one word for you — monumental.

It’s part of the Arizona Office of Tourism’s “In One Word — Arizona” marketing campaign that launched Nov. 8. The campaign couples iconic images of Arizona with one word describing the image. Bet you can guess which image is paired with “grand.”

The campaign’s eight images, ranging from the Grand Canyon and Monument Valley to Sedona and Flagstaff’s distinctive terrains, will run from November 2010 to May 2011 primarily in Chicago and Los Angeles, the two major markets for Arizona tourism.

This campaign features traditional print, TV and radio ads, but also includes innovative strategies, such as video-on-demand, “wallscapes” on buildings in Chicago and Los Angeles, and versions of the ads appearing on the print-out boarding passes of eight major airlines.

The advertising is “layered to continue to drive home the wonders and the diversity of Arizona,” says Sherry Henry, director of the Arizona Office of Tourism.

Spreading the message of Arizona’s allure is not limited to the Hollywood Hills and Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. An extensive digital media campaign also will run in San Francisco, Denver, New York City and other major markets, as well as Mexico and Canada.

But the biggest accomplishment of AOT’s new campaign is the fact that despite intense budget cuts that practically erased the marketing budget, the campaign is forging ahead, focused on bringing in much-needed tourism to the state.

The state Legislature removed revenue from the tourism formula from AOT’s budget and placed it in the general fund. Because of this shift, the AOT will receive approximately $14 million less in the 2011 fiscal year than it received in the 2010 fiscal year.

“We have this budget, and we are going to make this budget stand like it is 10 times what we have,” Henry says, adding that AOT’s mission is “to use the dollars we do have to drive as much revenue as we can.”

The budget stress isn’t the only issue facing Arizona’s tourism industry. The recession, which caused the budget decrease, is the No. 1 issue, Henry says. The swine flu epidemic of 2009 hurt, as well as the “AIG effect,” in which big businesses cut down on holding corporate meetings at resorts. Then, boycotts from the passage of SB 1070 gave a further beating to an already crippled industry.

However, Henry says Arizona’s tourism is going to surge back because of the state’s well-established image and the strong partnerships within the tourism industry.

“The branding of Arizona hasn’t changed,” Henry says. “There are some misconceptions of what’s happening here, but it hasn’t really affected the Arizona we all know and love.”

AOT has partnered with local convention and visitor bureaus and the Arizona Tourism Alliance to reach the group-and-meeting tourism market. The relationships between all sectors of Arizona’s tourism industry are “stronger than any other state we know of,” Henry says.

Although 2009 saw a 10.2 percent decrease in travel expenditures and a 2.1 million decrease in overnight visitors, 35.3 million visitors still made Arizona their destination of choice.

Statistics show that in 2010, top-of-the-line leisure traveler numbers are up, Henry says. AOT identifies leisure travelers as Arizona’s target visitor.

“We’re finally beginning to see it creep up again,” Henry says of visitor numbers.




Arizona Office of Tourism's new campaign

Images courtesy of the Arizona Office of Tourism




AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Photo Credit: Meagan Carlton

Grand Canyon: Witnessing Two Memorable Wonders

Whenever out-of-state relatives visited, my family would always take them on a weekend trip to give them a chance to see a different part of Arizona other than the valley. It would be an adventurous activity up north, in an attempt to prove to them that Arizona isn’t all saguaros and dirt like most perceive it to be. One year, we took a friend on the must-see Pink Jeep Tour where we went deep into red-rock country for some bumpy four-wheeling fun. Another time we took our grandparents on the Verde Canyon Railroad, which is known as the longest-running nature show in the state. The train weaves through a valley at 12 mph, allowing passengers to see the flora and fauna in between Clarkdale and Perkinsville. All the trips are filled with gorgeous sights and  long-lasting memories.

However, the number one most memorable moment was during a trip to the Grand Canyon with our aunt, uncle and cousins who were visiting from Indiana.We made the drive in two cars via the Flagstaff route. Once we reached the park, we settled into our two cabins before going to see one of the world’s wonders. The best part of taking friends or family that have never been to the Grand Canyon is watching their face when they finally see it. Their eyes grow twice their normal size as if trying to take in the entire vastness of the canyon, and their mouths drop open saying “wow” in a non-verbal way. After the initial shock-and-awe wore off, we took them down the Bright Angel trail a bit. We walked down the trail that was no wider than arm’s length, hugging the side of the canyon wall and moving out of the way of the donkeys. When we felt we had gone far enough, we turned around to make the tiring hike back up.

We went to bed early because we were all tired, but also because we planned to catch the sunrise the next morning. You cannot visit the Grand Canyon and not watch the sunset or sunrise. It let’s you see the shadows slip away and the shades of red painting the walls and valleys. We drove to the lookout where a bundled-up crowd had slowly started growing. Right before the sun began to crest, we saw a light in the distance grow brighter and brighter. You could hear surprised gasps escape the mouths of everyone around you once they realized what the light was that they were seeing. It was a meteorite falling into the earth’s atmosphere right over the Grand Canyon. The flaming fireball zoomed right at us and many ran to hide while other tourists began snapping pictures. I clung to my father, as I watched my life flash before my eyes – literally. However, we were lucky that day. The meteorite disintegrated as it flew through the atmosphere and disappeared right over the forest behind us.

A quiet had enveloped the crowd. Everyone was looking at each other with large eyes and open mouths wondering if they had really witnessed what they just had. The sun rose over the horizon in a silence, as all the minds were still replaying that morning’s site that was now burned into memory.


Photo Credit: Meagan Carlton


Photo: Omni Tucson National Golf Resort & Spa

We Have A Winner! Two Nights At Omni Tucson National Golf Resort & Spa

Kristen Barrett is the winner of our contest. She shared her experiences in Flagstaff with us on Facebook and won!

Stay tuned for our next AZNow.Biz contributor contest. Follow us on Twitter @AZNowBiz for instant notification about our next contest.


Hot ballooned over the Grand Canyon?  Cheered on the Suns at a playoff game?  Come face-to-face with a javelina in the desert?

If you’ve had an interesting, fun or cool Arizona experience, let us know about it and win a two-night stay including golf and breakfast for two at the Omni Tucson National Golf Resort & Spa!

Each time you share an experience on our Facebook wall, you’ll be entered for a chance to win.  Invite your friends to come and enter as well.  But hurry, this contest expires Wednesday Oct. 27.

More contributor giveaways are coming your way, so keep your eyes peeled for new chances to win!

Grand Canyon

Solar-Power, Eco-Friendly Grand Canyon & More

With so much happening locally, this week we’ve gathered stories about Arizona’s green endeavors, including a solar-powered plane and the Grand Canyon’s eco-friendly practices, and why a massive lawn is part of the Postal Service’s goal to reduce its energy needs.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing Shelby Hill.

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.


Green Roof Gives Postal Service Energy Savings
In Midtown Manhattan one building is lucky enough to have a lawn, on its roof.  This 2.5-acre lawn isn’t for sunbathing; it is part of the United States Postal Service’s goal of reducing its energy 30 percent by 2015.  With the help of this immense lawn, the USPS is more than two-thirds of the way to meeting its goal.

Unmanned Solar Plane Flies for more than a Week
A solar-powered unmanned plane flew a total of 336 in Arizona and landed last Friday.  The previous record for longest flight of an unmanned solar-powered plane was 30 hours, which the 110-pound plane beat by more than 10 times.

The Grand Canyon Goes Green
As previously mentioned ecotourism is a new way to be green while on vacation.  Well, now one of the most famous and most visited vacation spots in Arizona, the Grand Canyon, is a little bit greener.  With solar panels powering a building and recycling bins scattered along trails, your family’s visit to the Grand Canyon just got more eco-friendly.

The Greenest Wedding So Far
We’ve written about green weddings before ,but all of the others pale in comparison to this greenest of the green weddings.  A couple from Maine is growing and raising (yes they’re raising their own chickens) all of the food to be served at their wedding.  Aren’t weddings stressful enough?

Feds Capture and Recycle CO2
The federal government, via the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, is putting $106 million into six projects that turn carbon dioxide (CO2) into beneficial products.  The products range from biofuel to cement