Tag Archives: grant

Tailoring Jobs

Goodwill gets $30K Bank of America grant

Goodwill of Central Arizona recently received a $30,000 grant from the Bank of America Charitable Foundation that will provide funding to Goodwill’s Computer and Customer Service Training (CCST) program. The grant is part of the bank’s focus on supporting local workforce development programs.

Goodwill of Central Arizona offers CCST training programs on-site at four (West Central Phoenix, Peoria, Southwest Phoenix and Yuma) of its 21 career centers. As a result of the grant, training services at these locations will be further supported.

Goodwill training programs feature a two-week curriculum that includes: technical computer skills (internet usage, Microsoft Suite), human relations services, and extended career preparation services. Additionally, the grant will enhance Goodwill’s ability to prepare more job seekers for long-term competitive employment at family-sustaining wages.

“We appreciate Bank of America’s support and dedication to our mission,” said Tanya Perry, chief financial officer. “We have 21 Career Centers throughout Central Arizona and with corporate support from Bank of America, we’ll be able to reach even more job seekers in their search for employment.”

All of Goodwill’s Career Centers offer on-site Career advisors, and provide job preparation and employment services including: interviewing skills training, resume writing, on-site hiring events and more. They are equipped with computers, printers, Internet access, telephones, and fax machines to provide services at no cost to the community.

“Having the right career preparation can make all the difference in helping workers to be successful in an already competitive workforce,” said Benito Almanza, Arizona market president, Bank of America. “We’ve seen firsthand the tremendous impact of Goodwill’s Career Centers career-readiness programs for underemployed and unemployed residents in aiding future employment success. Bank of America’s workforce development grants help continue this type of focused and effective job preparation opportunities because sustainable employment ultimately helps to advance financial longevity.”

stem.cell

TGen’s Barrett awarded $200,000 research grant

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) awarded a $200,000 grant today to Dr. Michael Barrett of the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Dr. Barrett, an Associate Professor in TGen’s Clinical Translational Research Division, was one of 14 “outstanding scientists” across the nation named to receive a total of $5 million in grants for pancreatic cancer research.

The grants were announced during the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, April 5-9. With more than 34,000 members, AACR is the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research.

Specifically, Dr. Barrett was one of five scientists to receive a 2014 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Innovative Grant, “intended to promote the development and study of novel ideas and approaches in basic, translational, clinical, or epidemiological research that have direct application and relevance to pancreatic cancer.”

Dr. Barrett’s project, “Genomic drivers of therapeutic responses in metastatic disease,” will investigate the molecular underpinnings of how and why pancreatic cancer spreads to other parts of the body.
“The fundamental hypothesis of this application is that distinct clonal tumor populations that arise during the natural history of pancreatic cancer mediate the clinical responses in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer,” Dr. Barrett said.

“The vision of our work is to bring together advanced genome technologies and the clinical resources available through TGen and our various collaborators to make an immediate impact in the lives of patients with pancreatic cancer and other malignancies,” said Dr. Barrett, who also is a consultant with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center-Arizona.

The grants support research into high-priority areas in an effort to reach the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.

“The most promising science has been selected for funding through a rigorous peer-review process. This year’s grant recipients hail from leading institutions throughout the country and range from early career investigators continuing to build the field of pancreatic cancer leaders to more senior scientists,” said Julie Fleshman, president and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. “Their collective efforts have the potential to answer important questions that could lead to significant scientific advances for pancreatic cancer, and ultimately improve patient outcomes. We look forward to working with our new grantees and welcoming them to our team.”

Pancreatic cancer annually takes the lives of more than 38,000 Americans, making it the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. A staggering 75 percent of those diagnosed die within the first year, and only 6 percent survive more than five years.

“Pancreatic cancer is among the most deadly of cancers,” said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), and Chief Executive Officer of AACR. “With death rates steadily climbing over the past decade, more research into pancreatic cancer is urgently needed. The AACR is, therefore, proud to be partnering with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network to support cutting-edge scientific research projects that have the potential to lead to major breakthroughs in the prevention, detection, and treatment of this devastating disease.”

The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, in collaboration with the AACR, introduced the grants program in 2003, and has since awarded 108 research grants totaling more than $22 million to bright and motivated scientists across the country with the goals of developing a pipeline of researchers dedicated to studying the disease, supporting innovative ideas and approaches, and enabling the organization to reach its 2020 goal.

alzheimers

Flinn Awards $2M to Banner Alzheimer’s Institute

Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation, the philanthropic resource for Phoenix-based Banner Alzheimer’s Institute (BAI), part of the nonprofit Banner Health, received $2 million in grant funding from the Flinn Foundation, a privately endowed, philanthropic grantmaking organization in Arizona.

Aligning with the Flinn Foundation’s mission to advance biosciences in the state, the grant is an investment in BAI’s groundbreaking Alzheimer’s prevention research. Specifically, the funds will support activities related to the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative. A global Alzheimer’s prevention research endeavor spearheaded by scientists and physicians at BAI, the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative has been described by the director of the National Institutes of Health as a “cornerstone in the national plan to address Alzheimer’s disease.”

“The Flinn Foundation is an invaluable part of the fabric of Arizona’s philanthropic community, investing in organizations and programs with a track record for advancing research, civic leadership, and arts and culture in our state,” noted Andy Kramer Petersen, president and CEO of Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation. “We are honored that they recognize the tremendous potential of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative and value the work being done at BAI.”

The $2 million grant to BAI is the latest in a decades-long philanthropic relationship between the Flinn Foundation and Banner Health. Prior funding supported an array of community outreach and pediatric health care programs, the most notable being Banner School-Based Health Centers, a program delivering primary health care services to children and adolescents throughout the greater Phoenix area who lack health insurance and access to regular care.

To learn more about BAI, the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative, and corresponding local and global research efforts, visit www.BannerAlz.org. For more information about giving opportunities, please call Banner Alzheimer’s Foundation at (602) 747-4483 (GIVE).

Medical Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Del Webb Gives $500,000 to cut John C. Lincoln readmissions

Love, they say, makes the world go round. Apparently, at John C. Lincoln Hospitals in Phoenix, love also reduces hospital readmissions by frail Medicare patients.

A program that hires military combat medics and corpsmen to care for discharged elderly patients like beloved grandparents has slashed the John C. Lincoln Hospitals’ Medicare patient readmission rates to an astonishing 6 percent.

It’s not that the rates were bad to begin with. Before the program started last October, the Medicare readmission rates at John C. Lincoln Hospitals hovered around a respectable 18 percent – the national average is 20 percent. Those readmissions cost the federal government more than $17 billion annually.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) launched a campaign to encourage hospitals to do whatever necessary to maintain the health of discharged Medicare hospital patients with congestive heart failure, heart attacks or pneumonia, so fewer of them would be readmitted within the first 30 days after leaving the hospital. Financial incentives for readmission rate reduction and penalties for readmission rate increases were built into the CMS campaign.

John C. Lincoln’s innovative response to the CMS challenge mobilizes a cadre of veterans as transition coaches who provide designated Medicare patients with a personal touch along with support and guidance – to help them with follow-up medical instructions, prescription drugs, doctor appointments, nutrition and costs of care.

In the long run, reduced readmissions generated by the transition coaches produce significant savings for John C. Lincoln that far exceed program costs. But initial assistance to maximize the program’s effectiveness was needed.

The Del E. Webb Foundation stepped into that gap and awarded a $500,000 two-year grant to John C. Lincoln Health Foundation to support and expand the Health Network’s transition coach services. The grant will provide $250,000 this year to hire an additional five coaches, plus an additional $250,000 in July 2014 to hire five more, bringing the total number of John C. Lincoln transition coaches to 14.

The additional coaches make it possible to provide transition services not only to designated Medicare inpatients, but to all frail elderly patients being discharged from both hospitals, regardless of Medicare status or membership in John C. Lincoln’s Accountable Care Organization.

“But our primary goal is not to chase statistics,” says Transition Coach Program medical director John Lees, DO. “It is to reduce readmissions by helping at risk patients.

“Our first goal is to take care of discharged patients the way their own children or grandchildren would take care of them . . . to love on them and make sure their food, safety, medication, follow-up doctor visits, transportation or other everyday needs get taken care of, so their health is maintained, so they don’t relapse for preventable reasons,” Dr. Lees said. “Our goal is their optimal health.”

A key component, Dr. Lees said, is hiring transition coaches from the pool of trained military medics and corpsmen returning from active service in the Mideast. In spite of their rigorous training and experience, these soldiers are considered unqualified for most civilian health care positions. John C. Lincoln is providing employment relevant to the work they did in the field while harnessing their abilities, knowledge and disciplined initiative to address the needs of discharged Medicare patients.

Using the strategic, creative and responsive skills learned during military service, the transition coaches work with patients in the following major areas:

·         Medication self management – Making sure patients have access to pharmacies, can afford to their prescriptions, know how and when to take their medications, and understand the drugs’ purpose and potential side effects.
·         Physician follow-up – Making sure the patients know when to see primary or specialty physicians for follow-up care, that such visits are scheduled and that the patient has needed transportation.
·         Patient-centered health records – Teaching the patient to use a personal health record with a computer or smart phone to facilitate communication and continuity of care.
·         Nutrition and home safety – Making sure the patient and pets have adequate healthy food so that malnutrition doesn’t impair recovery; checking the home for hazards that can lead to falls or other injuries.
·         Red flags – Making sure the patient recognizes symptoms that indicate his or her condition is worsening and knows what to do to get help.

These services, none of which involve medical care, are essential to the preservation of patients’ health, Dr. Lees said.

“Many have asked why our program is so much more successful than other hospitals’ efforts to maintain the health of their discharged Medicare patients,” Dr. Lees said. “We’re still evaluating our experience to find out why.”

However, some factors the transition team believes are crucial to their success include:

·         Veterans relate well with patients.
·         Veterans are geared to recognize and solve problems, traditionally or out-of-the-box, creatively and immediately.
·         Transition coaches with access to John C. Lincoln’s electronic health records system don’t have to rely on their patients for health history, medication review or other information, because all that can be accessed on a computer, laptop, tablet, iPhone or Android. Follow-up doctor appointments or prescription refills can be made expediently online.

“We are enthusiastic about our initial success,” Dr. Lees said, “and we hope that our program, the national winner of the 2012 White House Healthcare Policy Challenge, will be recognized as a best practice that will become a model for the nation.

“There are currently more than 20,000 military combat medics and corpsmen returning from Iraq and Afghanistan who need jobs and who could help preserve the health of Medicare patients released from hospitals across America,” Dr. Lees said. “Wouldn’t it be ideal if they could do what our transition coaches are doing?”

youth

Tumbleweed receives $40,000 grant from PetSmart

Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development has received a $40,000 grant from Phoenix-based PetSmart Corporation, launching a collaboration to support at-risk youth.  Grant money will be divided between the Casa de Sueños “House of Dreams” program and the Greenhouse Project.

Casa de Sueños is a program fully devoted to unaccompanied minors who have come into the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.  With the support of PetSmart, a therapeutic garden will be added to this safe and secure shelter, which also provides family reunification services.

“The donation provided by PetSmart will supply a beautiful environment for the youth in the program, some of whom have suffered trauma and abuse,” said Jacquelin Hawley, Casa de Sueños Program Director.  “The garden will also provide therapeutic opportunities for the youth through planting, growing and caring for the vegetables.”

Greenhouse Project provides transitional housing and independent living skill development programs for homeless youth ages 18-25, who are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and/or Questioning (GLBTQ).

“PetSmart’s generous donation is allowing us to work with clients up to age 25 and that support is much needed,” said Debbie Kayatt, Greenhouse Program Director.  “Very limited resources are available to those over 21 years of age in our community.”

“We know that young adults are our future- as a company and a community,” said David Lenhardt, President and Chief Operating Officer for PetSmart.  “Diversity among our youth should be nurtured, and we are committed to partnering with organizations like the Tumbleweed Center to support and celebrate the diversity of the young people in our community.”

For more information about Tumbleweed programs and services, visit www.tumbleweed.org.

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Actors Theatre Awarded $30K Shubert Foundation Grant

Actors Theatre moved several steps closer to ending its “pause” following a successful annual fund outreach campaign combined with the awarding of a $30,000 Shubert Foundation grant for general operations.
The Shubert Foundation, whose focus is to sustain and advance live performing arts in the US, has funded Actors Theatre consistently since 2001.

Actors Theatre closed out its fiscal year 2013 annual fund effort with donations of $54,000 from more than 200 donors in June alone.  The year-long outreach brought in contributions from a total of 1,391 donors.

“As we make our way back from our ‘pause,’ support from an organization like the Shubert Foundation brings with it a level of acknowledgement that we’re on the right track.  We also received many comments from donors who shared that support and enthusiasm for our strategic rebuilding of the company,” said Producing Artistic Director Matthew Wiener.  “They also told us how much they missed our programming.  We’ll be filling that void shortly.”

The New York City-based Shubert Foundation provides general operating support to nonprofit professional resident theatre and dance companies as well as to support the development of other arts-related organizations.

In April, Actors Theatre announced that A Steady Rain will open the 2013-14 season from Oct. 25 to Nov. 10 at the Playhouse in the Park at the Viad Corporate Center.  Ticket information is available at www.actorstheatrephx.org.  Performance dates are being finalized for Good People and the remaining two shows are being determined.  Tickets will go on sale once all details are in place.

To support Actors Theatre with a donation or for more information, visit www.actorstheatrephx.org.

child.hospital

UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation Offers Grants

The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan.

Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 per grant to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids.

To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to UHCCF at www.uhccf.org. Donations are used for grants to help children and families in the region in which they are received.

“The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation is dedicated to improving a child’s health and quality of life by making it easier to access needed medical-related services. The grants enable families to focus on their children’s health instead of worrying about how they’ll pay their medical bills,” said Jeri Jones, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “Eligible families are encouraged to apply online for a medical grant today and take advantage of this valuable resource.”

In 2012, more than 36 grants totaling more than $95,000 were awarded to families in Arizona. Nationwide, more than 1,300 grants, worth more than $4.1 million, were awarded for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy. As successful fund-raising efforts continue to grow, UHCCF is hoping to help more children and families in 2013.

child.hospital

UnitedHealthcare Children's Foundation Offers Grants

The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation (UHCCF) is seeking grant applications from families in need of financial assistance to help pay for their child’s health care treatments, services or equipment not covered, or not fully covered, by their commercial health insurance plan.

Qualifying families can receive up to $5,000 per grant to help pay for medical services and equipment such as physical, occupational and speech therapy, counseling services, surgeries, prescriptions, wheelchairs, orthotics, eyeglasses and hearing aids.

To be eligible for a grant, children must be 16 years of age or younger. Families must meet economic guidelines, reside in the United States and have a commercial health insurance plan. Grants are available for medical expenses families have incurred 60 days prior to the date of application as well as for ongoing and future medical needs. Parents or legal guardians may apply for grants at www.uhccf.org, and there is no application deadline. Organizations or private donors can make tax-deductible donations to UHCCF at www.uhccf.org. Donations are used for grants to help children and families in the region in which they are received.

“The UnitedHealthcare Children’s Foundation is dedicated to improving a child’s health and quality of life by making it easier to access needed medical-related services. The grants enable families to focus on their children’s health instead of worrying about how they’ll pay their medical bills,” said Jeri Jones, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “Eligible families are encouraged to apply online for a medical grant today and take advantage of this valuable resource.”

In 2012, more than 36 grants totaling more than $95,000 were awarded to families in Arizona. Nationwide, more than 1,300 grants, worth more than $4.1 million, were awarded for treatments associated with medical conditions such as cancer, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, diabetes, hearing loss, autism, cystic fibrosis, Down syndrome, ADHD and cerebral palsy. As successful fund-raising efforts continue to grow, UHCCF is hoping to help more children and families in 2013.

arizona.desert

ULI Receives $12,500 Grant For ‘Reinvent PHX’ Program

The Urban Land Institute of Arizona has received a $12,500 grant to strengthen development opportunities between the City of Phoenix, educational and medical institutions, and the surrounding community that could include infrastructure or real estate development, workforce training, local purchasing and tailored services to expand customer base in surrounding neighborhoods for the “Reinvent PHX,” effort.

ULI’s ongoing involvement with “Reinvent PHX,” unites decision-makers in one-on-one or small group settings surrounding public-private partnership strategies for community revitalization and “shared-value” community investment options.

“We are thrilled to receive the grant to aid the City’s Reinvent PHX, it validates the work completed to date and provides new opportunities for implementation,” said Deb Sydenham, ULI Arizona’s Executive Director. “We look forward to using the money to create lasting partnerships that encourage positive community development.”

The expected outcome is a community-wide understanding of public-private opportunities between the City of Phoenix and anchor institutions. “Reinvent PHX” is targeting key decision-makers representing Gateway Community College, Arizona State University, St. Joseph’s Hospital, University of Phoenix and many others.

In addition, the ULI Arizona District Council will lead a series of ongoing expert facilitated forum(s) on public-private partnership opportunities. Discussions will surround district parking facilities, employee/student housing and real estate development to encourage strategic and mutually beneficial industry clusters.

The money received for the program will support ULI priorities such as considerable relevancy and focus on the “Creation of Resilient Communities,” and “Connecting Capital and the Built Environment Through Value,” goals.

Interested parties should contact Deb Sydenham, Executive Director, ULI Arizona (602-449-7921) to find out more about the grant ULI received or about “Reinvent PHX.” For more information on ULI Arizona visit www.arizona.uli.org.

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UA earns grant to study biodiesel effects

Researchers at the University of Arizona have won a $1.4 million grant to study the occupational and environmental health effects of underground mining equipment that runs on biodiesel-blend fuels.

The university says mining operators are shifting from diesel to biodiesel-blend fuels in a bid to lower exposure to pollutants.

Biodiesel is made from vegetable oil or animal fat and can be added to diesel as a blend or used on its own.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health awarded the grant to the university’s public health college and mining department.

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Reynolds Foundation Awards ASU $8.21 Million for Business Journalism

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation, the nation’s leader in philanthropic support of professional development and education in business journalism, has awarded two grants totaling $8.21 million to Arizona State University to improve coverage of complex business and economic issues.

A grant of $6.21 million will continue the work of the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism, which was created in 2003 and has been operated by ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication since 2006.

A $2 million grant will establish a permanent endowment at the school for the Donald W. Reynolds Visiting Professorship in Business Journalism. The visiting professor will join Andrew Leckey, the inaugural Donald W. Reynolds Endowed Chair in Business Journalism, to grow the school’s specialization in business and economics journalism.

“The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has benefited thousands of students, working journalists and journalism faculty over the past six years from its home at the Cronkite School,” said Reynolds Foundation Chairman Fred W. Smith. “This new funding will assure the long-term continuation and expansion of these programs and is a testament to the commitment of the institution’s leadership to quality business journalism education.”

The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation is a national philanthropic organization founded in 1954 by the late media entrepreneur for whom it is named. Headquartered in Las Vegas, it has committed more than $115 million nationwide through its Journalism Program.

ASU President Michael M. Crow, who has worked closely with Smith and Reynolds Foundation President Steven Anderson, said the foundation’s latest investment will ensure that the university continues to serve as the global hub for business journalism education and professional development.

“Since the start of the Great Recession, the health and direction of the economy have been paramount in the news,” Crow said. “The issues and proposals concerning economic growth, job creation, taxation and oversight of credit markets are interconnected and often difficult to grasp. These generous grants from the Reynolds Foundation will enable the Cronkite School to further evolve the study and practice of reporting and analyzing these important and very difficult topics.”

Since its inception, the Reynolds Center has reached more than 15,000 working journalists, journalism educators and university students across the country with workshops, seminars and a variety of webinars and Web-based tutorials. Its website, BusinessJournalism.org, is a highly popular destination for journalists and students seeking information about the latest concepts and techniques in business journalism.

In addition, each January the center hosts Reynolds Week, during which competitively selected journalists and university professors attend intensive, all-expenses-paid seminars on covering business and economics and teaching business journalism. Future plans include the delivery of business journalism coursework online for both professionals and students under the leadership of Director Linda Austin.

Cronkite Dean Christopher Callahan said the Reynolds Foundation, through its support of the center and business journalism education, has “truly changed the face of business reporting in America. It’s a remarkable story of philanthropy making a real difference.”

A Reynolds Visiting Professorship in Business Journalism was launched at the Cronkite School in 2010, providing the opportunity for students to benefit from the knowledge and expertise of a distinguished business journalist. In addition to teaching courses in business journalism, the visiting professor establishes partnerships with local business media and contributes to BusinessJournalism.org.

The new endowment will make the visiting professorship at Cronkite permanent.

“This long-term commitment to visiting business journalism professors at the Cronkite School again underscores the Reynolds Foundation’s firm determination to improve the quality of business journalism,” said Leckey, the founding director of the Reynolds Center, former CNBC anchor and a longtime syndicated investment columnist for the Chicago Tribune. “Gaining this knowledge benefits the students in our Business Journalism Specialization and fits perfectly within the Reynolds Center’s ever-expanding outreach.”

Former New York Times business reporter Leslie Wayne was the Cronkite School’s inaugural Reynolds Visiting Professor in Business Journalism during the spring 2010 semester. Susan Lisovicz, a longtime Wall Street correspondent for CNN, was the visiting professor last year, followed by former Los Angeles Times business journalist Sharon Bernstein earlier this year.

In January 2011, the Reynolds Foundation awarded a five-year grant to the Cronkite School to establish and administer a visiting business journalism professor program that ultimately will create a network of 11 visiting professorships at 11 different schools. Colorado State University, Grambling State University, Texas Christian University and the University of South Carolina hosted the inaugural visiting professors during the spring 2012 semester. Central Michigan, Elon and Louisiana State universities will host professors in spring 2013.

The Reynolds Foundation has played an integral role in helping the Cronkite School grow into one of the premier professional journalism programs in the country.

The Cronkite School, named in honor of the longtime CBS News anchor in 1984, prepares the next generation of journalists in both the time-honored fundamentals embraced by Cronkite and the multimedia skills necessary to thrive as journalists in the digital age. Housed in a state-of-the-art media complex in downtown Phoenix, the school is the home of the Carnegie-Knight News21 Initiative, the Arizona PBS nightly newscast Cronkite NewsWatch, the regional news provider Cronkite News Service, the New Media Innovation Lab and other programs developed around the hands-on “teaching hospital” model of journalism education.

The Donald W. Reynolds Endowed Visiting Professor in Business Journalism is the fifth endowed faculty position at the Cronkite School, joining the Knight Chair in Journalism, held by Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Steve Doig; the Frank Russell Chair for the Business of Journalism, held by former Minneapolis Star Tribune Editor Tim McGuire; the Weil Family Professorship, held by former Washington Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr.; and the Reynolds Endowed Chair held by Leckey.

john wayne cancer foundation give grant

Valley Group Gets John Wayne Cancer Foundation Grant

The John Wayne Cancer Foundation (JWCF) has awarded a major grant to the Arizona Myeloma Network (AzMN) to support the organization’s 5th Annual Navajo Nation Cancer Awareness and Advocacy Conference. This is the fifth year the JWCF has awarded a grant to AZMN. This free conference will be held at the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, AZ on Saturday, June 23, 2012 from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided, and 6 CME/CEU credits will be available for healthcare professionals who are attending this outstanding cancer education event.

“The John Wayne Cancer Foundation has been committed to our cancer conference from the beginning,” states AzMN President Barbara Kavanagh. “Support from JWCF, in addition to other key sponsors, is what allows us to present programs for cancer education and awareness to the Navajo Nation each year. Our work is helping to change the way cancer is perceived on the Navajo Nation. People are now openly discussing cancer, and learning that early detection and treatment is available and effective.” Many hundreds of cancer survivors, families, caregivers and healthcare providers have traveled from all 4 Corners of the Navajo Nation – Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado, to learn and to share their cancer journey.

A grant from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Phoenix Chapter, in 2008 made it possible for AzMN to start the Diné Women Helping Women (DWHW) program, which has trained over 50 women and men to give presentations about cancer prevention, early detection, screening and mammograms on the Navajo Nation. The DWHW program is coordinated by Jacquelyn Arviso, a Navajo woman who first volunteered for DWHW after her grandmother passed away from breast cancer.

“I came to a meeting, listened to the possibilities of what an outreach program would do for the community, and immediately decided that this was something we needed for our people. There was nothing like Diné Women Helping Women on the Navajo Reservation, and to get support, training and to be able to educate our people was something that I had to be a part of,” she states.

Jacquelyn works closely with AzMN, as well as local resources: Davina Segay, Navajo Health Educator, and Dr. Patricia Lowery, Surgeon, and Gail Oglesbee, RN and Cancer Case Manager, both with the Fort Defiance Indian Hospital, among others. “The DWHW volunteers set up information booths at community health fairs, rodeos, Chapter houses and also do presentations in work settings,” says Arviso.

The Conference faculty includes cancer researchers and leaders from the Mayo Clinic, AZ Cancer Center, NAU, and Fort Defiance Indian Hospital, as well as traditional healers, and health educators. Key sponsors include: Fry’s Food Stores, Delta Dental of Arizona Foundation, Millennium Pharmaceutical, Sanofi-Aventis, Chevron Mining, the Leukemia Lymphoma Society (LLS), and the John C. Lincoln Hospital/Young Cancer Survivors program, among others.

For more information on the John Wayne Cancer Foundation, visit John Wayne Cancer Foundation’s website at teamduke.org. For information on Arizona Myeloma Network, go to azmyelomanetwork.org

humana

Humana Invites Nonprofits To Apply For $100,000 Grant

An opportunity for Maricopa County charities to secure significant funding to improve the health and wellness of community residents has just opened up thanks to Humana. Non-profit organizations are now invited to apply for the $100,000 Humana Communities Benefit-Arizona charitable grant, sponsored by health benefits provider Humana Inc.

For the sixth consecutive year, the Humana Communities Benefit program will award a one-time, $100,000 grant to a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Maricopa County focused on improving health experiences or building healthy communities. Applications from nonprofit organizations in Maricopa County are being accepted now through June 29. Organizations will be considered in the operational areas of childhood health and education, health literacy and services or intergenerational health. Following a selection process by a panel of local judges, the 2012 grant winner will be announced at a celebratory event on Oct. 25.

“The Humana Communities Benefit-Arizona grant has helped several deserving organizations positively impact community health in ways they may not otherwise have been able to accomplish, and we are delighted to continue this program in 2012,” said Michael Franks, Regional President of Senior Products for Humana’s West Region and co-chairperson of the awards program.  “We encourage all eligible non-profit organizations to apply.”

The Humana Communities Benefit program in Arizona awarded the 2011 grant to Arizona Bridge to Independent Living (ABIL), which provides independent living services to people with disabilities throughout Maricopa County. The organization used the funds to purchase adaptive exercise and fitness equipment – specifically designed for the physically disabled – for its Virginia G. Piper Sports & Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities. The facility, one of only two nationwide to provide this type of service, had its grand opening in February 2012.

“Since 2007, we have contributed more than $700,000 to Phoenix-area community health initiatives led by some of the area’s most innovative nonprofits,” said Curt Howell, president of commercial operations for Humana in Arizona and co-chairperson of this year’s charitable-awards program. “Humana believes strongly in supporting the local communities in which we operate by helping deserving nonprofits in Arizona, and we look forward to continuing the tradition this year.”

More information on the application and the grant are available at www.Humana.com/HCB. Questions can also be directed to Humana by e-mail to ArizonaBenefits@Humana.com.