Tag Archives: great depression

Tumbleweed Logo

Tumbleweed Center Relocates Phoenix Headquarters

Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development will expand and relocate its headquarters from Downtown Phoenix to Siete Square II, 3707 N. 7th St. in Midtown, according to Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona, Inc.

Tumbleweed was established in 1972 with a mission to provide a safe space for collaborating with youth and young adults in the community who are vulnerable or experiencing homelessness.  The organization serves more than 3,000 young people each year, ages 12 to 25 years.

“Tumbleweed made a very shrewd decision to expand and relocate its headquarters at this time, locking in to today’s historically low rates.  This allowed us to lower occupancy costs over the long term,” said Paul Andrews of Cushman & Wakefield.  “This strategy cut thousands of dollars in future rent expense that now can be redirected back into the organization’s much needed programs that serve Metro Phoenix’s teenage youth.”

The local non-profit has leased 13,047 square feet at the garden office complex and will locate from 1419 N. 3rd Street in fall of 2013.

Siete Square II is one of four buildings within the larger Siete Square garden office complex.  The Indiana Farm Bureau owns Siete Square II.  Paul Andrews of Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona, Inc. represented Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development in its lease negotiations.

Phil Breidenbach and Lindsey Carlson of Colliers serve as exclusive leasing agents for Siete Square II, representing the Indiana Farm Bureau.

WellsFargoLogo

Wells Fargo Plans 410,000 SF Expansion in Chandler

By Eric Jay Toll, Senior Correspondent for Arizona Builder’s Exchange |

Special to Arizona Commercial Real Estate magazine

 

Wells Fargo unveiled its 410,000-square-foot Chandler campus expansion to a neighborhood meeting in the East Valley September 16. Arizona Builder’s Exchange broke the story Monday night that the bank filed a rezoning application with the city to allow a pair of four-story buildings on the northwest corner of Price and Queen Creek roads in the Price Corridor.

More than 2,500 additional employees will work in the new Wells Fargo buildings, bringing campus employment to more than 5,000 workers.

The bank has selected an architect, but has not named the contractor for the project. A formal announcement with construction schedule is expected shortly. AZBEX reports sources saying the project could cost as much as $90 million.

The building shapes, design and materials are intended to mirror Phase I of the campus. The offices will rise to 64 feet. Three more buildings and parking garages are projected for future phases. The city has not set a hearing date for the zoning. Wells Fargo has not yet announced its construction schedule.

Read the original story here.

 

Eric Jay Toll is the senior correspondent for Arizona Builder’s Exchange. His freelance work appears in a number of regional and national publications, including upcoming stories in AZRE and AZ Business.

Musicals

Top 5 Musicals That Represent An Era

America is well known for its musicals. They are not only entertaining, but are a glimpse into the history of the United States as well.

Here are the top five that have the most to say about America’s intriguing history:


5.

42nd Street

Flickr: by yumiang


Based on the novel of the same name, this 1933 film is set in urban New York during the Great Depression. It is about an unknown chorus girl rising to stardom on Broadway. This musical is what they refer to as a “Backstage Musical.”

4.

Chicago

Flickr: by Alex Liivet


Set in the roaring ’20s, this film depicts a time of rising crime and gangster activity in Chicago. Based on a play with the same name, the plot was inspired by the true events of the 1924 trials of murderesses Beulah Annan and Belva Gaertner from the Chicago Tribune.

3.

Hairspray

Flickr: by ydiggnme


It’s an era of change in this film musical. This was inspired by the 1988 original film and is about the struggle of racial and social prejudice. Tracy Turnblad is a unique leading lady that changes the world with her attitude and dance moves.

2.

Grease

Flickr: by Ralphhogaboom


Grease is a 1950′s, rock-n-roll-era musical filmed in 1978. This musical is jam packed with nostalgic symbols from the era such as Elvis Presley, James Dean, Greasers, poodle skirts and leather bomber jackets.

1.

Wizard of Oz

Flickr: by Don Nunn


This musical is based on Frank L. Baum’s novel and depicts the Vaudeville era,  as well as a time that is still trying to recover from the Great Depression. Dorothy’s most well remembered phrase, “There’s no place like home” spoke volumes about the time and continues to impact today’s culture.

Coins

Can the Savings Rate Save America?

The financial norms of our society have changed considerably over the past five years. Assumptions surrounding retirement, investment returns and job security have all changed 180 degrees.

Perhaps this recession has been so monumental that it will permanently change the old norms and embrace a new realistic standard. Will this crisis create a new generation of Americans that look at money and entitlement similar to those who lived through the Great Depression?

Prior to this current recession, many people were living a lifestyle that was beyond their means. The Bureau of Economic Analysis stated that in 2005, America was only saving approximately 1 percent of its income. For many, the need for consumption of goods and services dominated their paychecks, so much so that they exhausted their savings accounts, ran up credit card balances and stripped the equity from their homes. You could say that America was living an era of overindulgence.

Today, it seems that people appreciate and respect their money more than they have over the past few decades. If they are currently employed, they are grateful to be able to provide for their families, as well as make sure that every dollar is stretched to its full potential.

Consumers now realize that when economic times become difficult, they cannot depend on banks to lend them money. This is why America is now saving more that 6 percent of its income — we are preparing for the unexpected and unknown.

In my opinion, the more people save, the stronger our economic landscape will become over time.

Of course many economists and Wall Street banks would love for consumers to return to their old spending habits, which would create a quick and bliss recovery.  Our economy is dependent on consumer spending and statistics have shown that the American consumer represents approximately two-thirds of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product. Unfortunately, the fundamental problem of overindulgence would not be addressed if this were to happen. We would only be setting the stage for another crisis in the future.

Fundamentally, it is beneficial to our financial system that Americans are saving more. It is unrealistic to assume that the United States economy will bounce back quickly; it will most likely take a number of years and still produce a high level of discomfort.

A slow recovery is acceptable as long as the consumer continues to make smarter decisions financially and attempts to avoid past mistakes. Perhaps if this positive trend continues, could our country’s best years still be ahead of us?