Tag Archives: Greater Phoenix Leadership

cox-hires-stephen-rizley

Long-time Cox leader Rizley announces retirement

Cox Communications Senior Vice President and General Manager Steve Rizley will retire at the end of the year. During his 34-year career at Cox in Phoenix, Rizley motivated and galvanized those around him, and created unique relationships with his employees, customers and the Southwest community through his many years of service to area non-profits. Rizley announced his retirement to employees last month.

In announcing Rizley’s decision to retire, Paul Cronin, Sr. Vice President of Operations, Cox Communications said “It’s never easy to say good-bye to a friend and colleague, especially one that has been a part of the Cox Family and the cable industry for more than 30 years. As general manager, Steve worked tirelessly on his employees’ behalf each day, and made sure Arizona was at the forefront of new product launches for our customers, including brining the company’s first gigabit residential product offering to the Valley and the latest Internet speed increases to customers statewide.”

Rizley has long been a community advocate for organizations including the American Red Cross, Greater Phoenix Leadership, Arizona Historical Advisory Commission, and Cox Charities to name a few, and is a past-chair of the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce and campaign cabinet co-chair for the Banner/M.D. Anderson Cancer Center capital campaign. He has also received several prestigious business and industry awards and honors including the National Cable & Telecommunications Vanguard Award and the “Man of the Year” from the American Cancer Society, as well as the Cable Television Advertising Bureau’s President’s Award.

“Steve’s well-deserved reputation was built on much more than his professional excellence serving Cox’s Southwest Region. During his time as Chairman of our Board of Directors, he left his mark on our Chamber and the business community with strong, visionary servant leadership that has helped shape our organization and our state. We are all indebted to Steve for his dedication and service, and I, personally, am proud to call him my friend.” said Todd Sanders, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Chamber of
Commerce.

”It has been a great pleasure and inspiration having a leader like Steve at the helm for Cox for so many years. While the company has enjoyed great success in Arizona and Nevada under Steve’s leadership, he has also made our communities stronger with his commitment to local service and business leadership,” said Susan Anable, Vice President of Public Affairs, Cox Communications Southwest Region.

The company said it plans to announce Rizley’s replacement in the coming weeks.

sales.tax

Arizona Business Community Supports HB2111

The undersigned organizations and businesses want to express their strong support for the passage of HB2111 with the floor amendment that will be offered by Senator Steve Yarbrough. This final amendment represents major concessions to address concerns that have been expressed by the city representatives.

This final amendment reflects the cities’ request for a separate online portal for the collection of sales taxes in the 18 non-program cities. In addition, the amendment reflects the cities’ demand to maintain the authority to audit single-location businesses in their city. Lastly, the amendment removes all of the changes to prime contracting tax except for the trade and service contractors.

While the Yarbrough amendment reflects major concessions to the cities that undermine some of the important reforms recommended by the Transaction Privilege (Sales) Tax Simplification Task Force, we believe this final proposal still reflects historic progress that deserves final passage.

The Senator Yarbrough floor amendment will provide for the following:

* Single Point of Administration – the Department of Revenue (DOR) will become the single point of administration and collection of TPT. However, at the request of the cities, there will be a separate online portal for the 18 non-program cities. Despite this concession, the cities remain opposed because they want to continue to require businesses making paper sales tax remissions to pay the state and city separately. Their proposal provides most small businesses no administrative relief from making multiple payments to multiple jurisdictions each month.

* Single and Uniform Audit – DOR will administer a standardized state audit program where all state and city auditors are trained and certified by DOR. Despite major concessions from the business community to allow cities to continue to audit local businesses, the cities continue to push for further changes that will undermine much needed reforms to standardize state and local audits.

* Trade/Service Contracting Reform – Service contractors working directly for an owner to maintain, repair, and replace existing property would pay tax on materials at retail and not be subject to the Prime Contracting Tax. During Task Force deliberations, the cities repeatedly conceded that this area of the prime contracting tax was problematic and should be changed. However, after almost a year of study and discussion, they have offered a change to the taxation of service contractors that provides no administrative relief and couples that change with a request that the state give the cities $80 million from use tax collections.

Arizona’s chaotic and dysfunctional sales tax system has been the subject of considerable controversy at the Capitol for over 30 years. The creation of the Task Force, as well as the appearance for the first time that the cities recognized the need for reform, gave Arizona businesses great hope that this system would finally be reformed. We strongly encourage state policymakers to pass a sales tax reform bill that is grounded in sound tax policy and focuses on reducing the extraordinary compliance costs on Arizona businesses.

Kevin McCarthy, President, Arizona Tax Research Association
Michelle Lind, Chief Executive Officer, Arizona Association of REALTORS
Bas Aja, Executive Vice President, Arizona Cattlemen’s Association
Glenn Hamer, President & CEO, Arizona Chamber of Commerce
Steve Macias, Chairman, Arizona Manufacturer’s Council
Francis McAllister, Chairman, Arizona Mining Association
Courtney LeVinus, Arizona Multihousing Association
Michelle Allen Ahlmer, Executive Director, Arizona Retailers Association
Steve Chucri, President/CEO, Arizona Restaurant Association
Rick Murray, Chief Executive Officer, Arizona Small Business Association
Steve Zylstra, President & CEO, Arizona Technology Council
Greg Turner, Vice President, Senior Tax Council, Council On State Taxation (COST)
Lisa Rigler, President, Small Business Alliance AZ
Todd Sanders, President & CEO, Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce
Tom Franz, President, Greater Phoenix Leadership
Connie Wilhelm, President, Home Builders Association of Central Arizona
Tim Lawless, Chapter President, NAIOP
Farrell Quinlan, Arizona State Director, NFIB
Ronald E. Shoopman, President, Southern Arizona Leadership Council
Scot Mussi, President, The Arizona Free Enterprise Club
Matt Beckler, Vice President, Treasurer & Chief Tax Officer, Apollo Group, Inc.
Steve Barela, State & Local Tax Manager, Arizona Public Service
Steve Trussell, Executive Director, Arizona Rock Products Association
Michael DiMaria, Director of Legislative Affairs, CenturyLink, Inc.
Gayle Shanks, Owner, Changing Hands Bookstore
Michelle Bolton, Director of Public Affairs, Cox Communications
Nikki Daly, Owner, Flair! Salons
David Karsten, President, Karsten’s Ace Hardware
Reuben Minkus, Minkus Advertising Specialties
PetSmart, Inc.
Tina Danloe, General Manager, Pima Ace Hardware
Molly Greene, Senior Government Relations Representative, Salt River Project
Les Orchekowsky, President & Co-Owner, Sierra Ace Hardware, Inc.
Ann Seiden, Administrator/Corporate Public Affairs, Southwest Gas Corporation
Joseph Hughes, Director of Government Affairs, U.S. Airways
Walgreens Co.

Glenn Hamer is president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry is committed to advancing Arizona’s competitive position in the global economy by advocating free-market policies that stimulate economic growth and prosperity for all Arizonans.

CEO Linda Hunt - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Linda Hunt, CEO, St. Joseph’s Hospital And Medical Center

CEO Series: Linda Hunt

Title: President
Company: CHW Arizona/St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center


How is St. Joseph’s preparing itself to meet the changes being brought on by national health care reform and the state’s budget crisis?

We’ve been on the ground from the very beginning. Catholic Healthcare West, our parent company, has really been involved with the Obama Administration in looking at different ways to provide health care, and we know that health care has to change. The most important thing for us has been quality — providing the high quality access. We have a lot of people without care or without access to care. So when you look at how do we do that and how do we lower our cost of delivering care, those things have been driving forces for St. Joseph’s and CHW to be intimately involved in what needs to occur.
It’s a tremendous strain if we have the (state) budget cuts that are proposed. About 44 percent of our patients are AHCCCS (Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System ) patients, and this will be anywhere between $25 million to $31 million for just our organization alone that we will see decreased.
We also are part owners of Mercy Care Plan, so for us it’s a real concern. Mercy Care Plan has 386,000 lives, and about 60,000 of those lives (coverage) will be eliminated if the state budget crises and the state waiver go through.

The mass shooting that took place in Tucson really put attention on the work of Level I trauma centers, such as the one at St. Joseph’s. What message has that sent to Legislators and the community?

Tucson was a great example of why Level I trauma centers are needed. It truly is the life-saving component of life care. If we would not have had the hospital in Tucson, if we would not have had the trauma surgeons, the neurosurgeons right there ready, a number of those people would not have survived. I think Gabby Giffords can really say one day, “I owe my life to these people and to the quick response that they had.” We have very limited funding. As you know, it’s not about money coming in from the federal government or the state government for Level I. It’s really thanks to a number of our patients who have insurance and the variety of people who give to us to make sure we can continue to have the resources available to provide that kind of care.

How has St. Joseph’s evolution mirrored that of the state’s health care industry?

When the (Sisters of Mercy) got here in the 1890s, they found a very small community of people who were working here, but also many other people who had come here because they were ill. (The sisters) came here to teach, and all of a sudden they looked around and said, “My gosh, it’s not about teaching. We have to provide health care for these people. They’re dying in the streets.”

So, I feel we are the beginning of health care in this community and have continued for almost 116 years. When you look at the number of firsts that were done at St. Joseph’s, many times we brought health care and progressive health care to this community. When you look at the first residency, the first pharmacy in-house, the first NICU, the first MRI, the first CAT scan … it truly is a jewel to be treasured in this community.

Is health care a cooperative effort in the Valley?

I think we all compete. We are businesses. But I think it’s a camaraderie because we’re all about taking care of people in this community. When you look back, there are a lot of great friendships that you have with the other CEOs. And we do share. We share resources. When we get in trouble as a Level I trauma center, when we’re overwhelmed, everyone pitches in and we fan out patients. We do a number of things together. If we need equipment, we lend it to each other. So in a way we compete, but we are all here to serve this community and I think that is very important.

How does St. Joseph’s work with rural communities?

Look at Children’s Rehabilitative Services, which we have been a partner of the state with in caring for children. We have clinics all over the state. We work with the Indian communities; we work with Flagstaff, Prescott; Yuma and Tucson work together with us. So right there is a perfect example of that collaboration. We have outreach clinics throughout the state, especially in the rural areas. We train residents and new physicians, which we think is a very important part of training the next generation of caregivers. We are training a lot of the physicians that will be practicing in rural Arizona and other rural areas of this country.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix has stripped St. Joseph’s of its Catholic standing. how does that affect the average patient?

If you came into our hospital in early December and you came in today, we would look no different. The one thing we cannot do is Mass in the chapel. We still have worship services, they’re just not Catholic worship services. But we do have rosaries, we have spiritual hours, we have people who are there to allow you to pray and to provide that spiritual comfort, just as we did in the past. … We acknowledge that (Bishop Thomas J. Olmstead) has the authority to no longer designate us a Catholic hospital. We’re all very sad about that. … But we will always take care of people who are here and do what we can do to make sure they are safe, and that they receive the care that they deserve. … it came down to we had to save the life we could and we did.


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Vital Stats: Linda Hunt

  • Service Area President, Catholic Healthcare West
  • President, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing from William Carey College in Mississippi
  • Master of Science in Nursing Administration from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
  • Graduated from the Johnson & Johnson Fellows Program in Management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania
  • Was on the faculty at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Regis University in Denver
  • Active in Greater Phoenix Leadership and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council

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Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011