Tag Archives: green

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Best Industrial Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Marshalls Distribution Facility
Developer: Marshall’s of MA, Inc.
Contractor: Layton Construction
Architect: Ware Malcomb
Brokerage: Cresa
Size: 1,525,876 SF
Completed: September 2013

The Marshall’s Distribution Facility’s sheer scale is awe-inspiring, capping at 1,525,876 SF this facility is not only large but also has energy efficiency and conservation embedded into its framework. The restrooms inside this facility use low-flow water closets and urinals, saving 83,000 gallons of water a year. Instead of being evaporative cooled, Marshall’s is air-conditioned. This will save a whopping 6,000,000 gallons of water per year. The roof of this facility is painted white to avoid trapping heat from the sun, and its HVAC energy system is designed to save energy for the entire building as a whole. The building also uses natural lighting to light many of the areas making the use of artificial lighting low and keeping costs low. When the facility was being constructed, the waste was recycled and the material used was low in volatile organic compounds.
marshalls

Encantada, CBRE

CBRE Secures $33.8M Loan for Encantada Apartments in Tucson

CBRE’s Capital Markets Debt & Equity Finance Group announced today the successful refinancing of the Encantada at Riverside Crossing, a Class-A apartment community in Tucson. The $33.8M loan was funded through international insurance company AIG, Inc.

The financing of Encantada at Riverside Crossing was originated by Jim Sellers, Senior Vice President, Tim Prouty, First Vice President and Theresa Witz, Senior Analyst of CBRE’s Debt and Equity office in Tucson.

Bert Lopez has grown HSL Properties into the major apartment owner/developer in Southern Arizona,” said CBRE’s Sellers. “He has given to the community in a variety of ways and this was an opportunity for CBRE to contribute to his successes by bringing insurance company capital to our area.”

The project is sponsored by HSL Properties, Inc., who developed the apartment community in 2011. Tucson-based HSL Properties is a real estate company that focuses on multifamily apartment properties, particularly in the southwestern United States. The company has also invested in office and retail buildings, shopping malls, a golf course and hotels. 

Encantada at Riverside Crossing is a 304-unit Class-A apartment community with a mix of one- , two- and three-bedroom floor plans. Amenities include a resort-style pool and swim up lounge with a double-sided fireplace, state-of-the-art athletic center, private 27-seat THX movie theatre, indoor/outdoor clubhouse with wifi, flat screen TVs and complimentary coffee bar. All units are TEP-guaranteed for energy efficiency and include 9 and 10 foot ceilings, granite countertops, walk-in closets and full size washer and dryer.

The property is located along River Road, one of Tucson’s busiest east-west arterials, with convenient access to the I-10 freeway and the foothills of North Tucson. Northwest Medical Center is located less than one mile north and two regional malls are within two or three miles of the property. The 13.09-acre site is one of only five new multifamily properties built in the north Tucson submarket since 2009.

CMI_042

Artists Co-working Space to Open in Scottsdale

The historic arts district of Old Town Scottsdale will be the site of new co-working community for artists that is the first of its kind in the United States. The Creative Center of Scottsdale is a community for artists including sculptors, to painters, to photographers, to graphic designers, mixed-media artists as well as businesses and organizations that serve the arts community.

“We have been working to develop this concept for quite some time,” said Michelle Pelberg, creator of The Creative Center of Scottsdale, “It was important to us that this facility not only serves the needs of the next-generation artists in our community, but also preserves the history, architecture and legacy of the building and the district,” she said.

The Creative Center works similarly to an incubator-a collection of creative minds exchanging ideas and insights with one another in a common space. Their goal is to use collaborative co-working as a tool to build the Phoenix area art scene into a thriving hub of opportunity.

The Center is designed to be a flexible workspace for the vast and varying needs of all kinds of creative minds. Artists can work and create in their open workspace, focus at their private desk, create and showcase their work in gallery-like private studios, store their equipment in private lockers or recharge at the Center’s onsite coffee shop, SIP. With monthly rates ranging from $125-1,422 there is a space that works for everyone. All options include free Wi-fi, a full kitchen, and access to 2 conference rooms.

Housed in the iconic Scottsdale landmark, Mandall’s Shooting Supplies store, the Creative Center of Scottsdale will proudly participate in the City of Scottsdale’s Green Building Program. Scottsdale-based Architect Christina Noble of Contour Architecture is spearheading the building design and implementing unique green building resources and protocols.The Program encourages a whole-systems approach through design and building techniques to minimize environmental impact and reduce the energy consumption of buildings while contributing to the health of its occupants.  The Creative Center is focused on adaptive reuse through preserving the original structures as well as sourcing their materials responsibly. All fixtures and materials were selected looking at the proximity of their creation to the space.

“The Creative Center of Scottsdale is one of the first new buildings to be built according to the City of Scottsdale’s Green Building program,” Nobel said. “We are working closely with the city to make The Creative Center a model for all future green building in Scottsdale,” she said.

The Creative Center of Scottsdale is the answer for those looking to escape the home office, the kitchen table, or the unpredictable realm of public spaces. With their artist-friendly environment and beautiful studio spaces designed to showcase work, the Center aims to be a haven for those who create and work in the creative field.

The Creative Center of Scottsdale is expected to open in early 2014. The center is taking reservations for workspace and gallery space now.

Calfee06

Cassidy Turley Completes 69,471 SF Lease for 1st United Door Technologies

Cassidy Turley announced it completed a lease for 69,471 square feet for 1st United Door Technologies, LLC at Geneva Industrial, 1016 W. Geneva Drive in Tempe. Senior Vice President Bruce Calfee and Vice President Josh Wyss, of Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Group, represented the Tenant while Executive Vice Presidents Steve Sayre and Pat Harlan represented the Landlord, CLPF Geneva Industrial, LP (Phoenix).
1st United Door Technologies is a Tempe, Arizona based garage door manufacturer. The company specializes in steel and wood doors for both commercial and residential use. Ownership is comprised of the former owners and senior management of Anozira Door Systems. Since 1982, 1st United Door Technologies has been serving Homebuilders across the Nation with unique and distinctive garage doors that enhance the beauty and value of the Builders homes. With over 150 years of door installation and manufacturing experience, the management team is known for providing innovative and quality products at very competitive prices. The new Geneva Industrial location is part of a company expansion.
Built in 1981, Geneva Industrial is a ±69,471 square-foot, industrial manufacturing building. The property is part of the South Tempe Industrial Corridor and is in close to the I-10 and US-60 Freeways. The building is currently 100 percent leased.

GSR5620 - Womens-1

"Joggings" Are Happening AND are Actually Pretty Cool

While it may not be socially acceptable to take a jog in jeans, one of the trends for men and women this fall/winter season is bending the rules.

Jog jeans, a unique fusion of not only style and comfort but of design and denim, are the perfect medium for anyone deciding which pair to wear: sweats or jeans.

What’s really outstanding about the new trend is how the look and feel is achieved. Died in an indigo wash, and then designed with signature denim details, the jog jean surpasses past trends like “jeggings.” As much as the exterior looks and feels like denim, the soft sweat knit fabric on the inside makes for a notable difference.

One variation of the trend can be found at G-Star Raw located in Scottsdale Fashion Square Mall.

The GSR 5620 for men and women mixes classic sweat details at the hem and wait with G-Star Elwood denim pocket details.

Website helps users make more sustainable decisions

The number of opportunities to make “clean, green and well” decisions continues to grow rapidly. In the last decade alone, more than 460 “eco-labeling” schemes have emerged, providing a vast amount of information on consumer products and services. But paying attention to detail reveals a web of complex, sometimes conflicting information that can be hard to decipher and even harder to put to everyday use.

Enter Andrew Krause, a recent graduate of ASU’s School of Sustainability (SoS) master’s program who has been working on simplifying, as well as customizing the concept of sustainability to suit everyone’s needs. Krause, along with his mentor and senior scientist at ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability George Basile and two former classmates, has launched the action-oriented online social platform eEcosphere.

Krause, a native of Sonoma, Calif., joined SoS because its unique approach integrates the new field of sustainability science with behavior change – two vital elements when it comes to budging the needle on sustainability and key principles that ultimately inspired the creation of eEcosphere.

He says the social web platform is underpinned by years of scientific research, conducted by Basile and other scientists, which focuses on sustainability planning and tools that help individuals and businesses take action across the globe. He hopes the website will help people adopt a more eco-conscious lifestyle by making it fun, easy and effective.

“Everyday, the person makes a variety of decisions, driven by default, often outdated habits,” Krause says. “Take, for example, the way we choose to do laundry. There are a number of emerging opportunities to be smarter – like using less water and a non-toxic detergent during the process – but changing habits may be hard.”

According to Krause, who has led various sustainability-related ventures in the past, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to making the world a better place.

“A person may already be saving energy but might need help with water conservation; someone else might need help with both,” Krause elaborates. “eEcosphere helps people identify and adopt ideas that match their personal sustainability goals. It embeds a scientific approach in the decision-making process and encourages people to take action as a group using the social web.”

In 2011, ASU’s Edson Student Entrepreneur Initiative awarded Krause and his team $18,000 to develop the eEcosphere venture. The award enabled the start-up to incorporate as a legal business and reach key fundraising milestones. Krause assumed the leadership role and spent early days hiring software developers and copywriters, and networking with sustainability experts.

“The Edson grant helped our vision come to life faster,” Krause says. “We’ve built eEcosphere multiple times to make it more compelling to individuals and clients who’ll ultimately use our product.”

Krause and Basile are now putting the online platform through the ultimate user test: the ASU community. eEcosphere is playing a key role in ASU’s various sustainability campaigns, including the Zero-Waste Initiative. A preview of the website has been unveiled this week in hopes of collaborating with nearly 82,000 members of the Sun Devil family to help the university meet its goal of becoming a zero-waste campus by 2015.

“Modifying waste management habits at such a huge scale requires collective action on the part of students, faculty and staff,” says Krause. “eEcosphere will engage with the university community, collect and analyze detailed insight regarding user preferences, and provide new updates and incentives to help people stay motivated and informed.”

Krause says ASU is the perfect live laboratory for eEcosphere.

“This institution is leading sustainability efforts internationally,” Krause explains. “If we can facilitate good ideas at ASU, we can help other large-scale enterprises do the same with their customers as well.”

Basile adds to that thought.

“The ASU platform has been vital to the evolution of eEcosphere,” Basile says. “The institution has helped us incubate forward-thinking ideas, and permitted us to take risks and embark on adventures.”

Krause credits Basile, an internationally recognized sustainability veteran himself, for much of his drive and success as a student entrepreneur. Basile, in return, has nothing but high praise for his pupil.

“At 26, Andrew has already proven his ability to help innovative new ventures get off the ground,” Basile says with pride in his voice. “He has also passed along business finance, internship and job opportunities to fellow students. I’ve waited for a generation of students who’d align themselves with the concept of sustainability and find ways to take action. Andrew represents that generation. He is an informed, driven millenial.”

Krause says the time has come for a concept such as eEcosphere to be successful in the marketplace of ideas.

When asked what the future looks like to him, he asks:

“Is it cliché to say, ‘bright?’”

Join the live preview of eEcosphere by becoming an early user at www.eEcosphere.com.

ULI Greenprint Foundation

ULI Joins Forces With Greenprint Foundation To Promote Green Development

The Urban Land Institute (ULI) is enhancing its commitment to environmentally conscious development with the transfer of the activities and assets of the Greenprint Foundation into the newly formed ULI Greenprint Center for Building Performance. With this action, ULI is continuing the operation of a unique industry-to-industry initiative through which leading real estate professionals exchange information and measure individual building and portfolio performance on the basis of energy use and carbon emissions.

The announcement of the transfer of the Greenprint Foundation’s activities and assets to the institute was made Friday at ULI’s headquarters office in Washington, D.C. The ULI Greenprint Center will be incorporated into ULI’s broader Climate, Land Use and Energy (CLUE) initiative. The center will carry on the Greenprint Foundation’s mission, which is to lead the global real estate community in the use of greenhouse gas reduction strategies that support the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) goals for global greenhouse gas stabilization by 2030. The ULI Greenprint Center will continue to advance the Greenprint Foundation’s goal of a 50-percent reduction in building emissions by that date. Currently, the energy used in buildings represents one-third of all global energy consumption.

ULI, with nearly 30,000 members worldwide — including 850 in Arizona — is a 75-year-old research and education institute dedicated to leadership in the responsible use of land and building sustainable, thriving communities. The Greenprint Foundation, currently based in New York City, was founded in 2009 by longtime ULI member Ronald P. Weidner as a worldwide alliance of real estate owners, investors, financial institutions and other industry stakeholders committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions across the global property industry. To date, the Greenprint Foundation’s member organizations are: Aetos Capital; AvalonBay; Beacon Capital Partners; Blackstone Group; DEXUS Property Group; Douglas Emmett; Equity Office Properties; GE Capital Real Estate; GLL Real Estate Partners; Hines; Jones Lang LaSalle; LaSalle Investment Management; Paramount Group; PATRIZIA Immobilien; Prologis; Prudential Real Estate Investors; RREEF, a member of the Deutsche Bank Group; Sonae Sierra; and TIAA-CREF.

“With the support and resources of ULI, the ULI Greenprint Center will lead the global property markets in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in a meaningful and measurable way. More importantly, it can help change the behavior of the population at large,” said Weidner, the founder of the Greenprint Foundation.

The flagship product of the Greenprint Foundation is its Greenprint Performance Report™, which includes the Greenprint Carbon Index (GCX), a tool used by Greenprint Foundation members to gauge relative progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions over time. The first volume of the report, issued in 2010, contained results obtained from performance during 2009 as a baseline measurement. The second volume, issued in 2011, had results for 2010 that included 1,623 properties in the Americas, Europe and Asia, and which covered a total of 31 million square meters of commercial space. It showed a 0.6 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the previous year on the like-for-like portfolio of submitted properties.

The international scope and size of the report, including the GCX, make it one of the real estate industry’s largest, most verifiable, transparent and comprehensive energy benchmarking tools. It is unique in that it provides an open standard for measuring, benchmarking and tracking energy usage and resulting emissions on a building or portfolio basis.

Carbon-equivalent emissions are measured in kilograms per square meter of space per year, and the analysis is conducted for each building or group of buildings, and then reported in the aggregate for each property asset type: office, industrial, retail, multifamily and hotels.

“The voluntary information exchange between Greenprint Foundation members that informs the report reflects ULI’s time-tested tradition of sharing knowledge for the benefit of the industry. We look forward to building on the collaborative spirit and effort that has formed the basis for the Greenprint Foundation and its Carbon Index,” said ULI Chief Executive Officer Patrick L. Phillips. “Through the ULI Greenprint Center for Building Performance, we are aiming to fill a void of information on the value of investments in energy conservation and greenhouse gas reductions. We are extremely excited about the ability of this new center to demonstrate that environmentally sound building practices make economic sense.”

The ULI Greenprint Center is an extension of ULI’s long involvement in environmental issues. Since its establishment in 1936, ULI has played a decisive role in the formation of industry best practices regarding land use, green buildings, sustainable communities, smart growth, transit-oriented development, land conservation and green infrastructure. The ULI Greenprint Center will assume the Greenprint Foundation’s existing research program and ongoing engagement with owners of real estate toward value-enhancing carbon reduction strategies. ULI Trustee Charles B. Leitner III, formerly the president and chief executive officer of the Greenprint Foundation, will be the chairman of the ULI Greenprint Center and will serve as co-chairman of the advisory board for ULI’s CLUE initiative.

“The creation of the center will enable both organizations to jointly leverage their resources to keep the Greenprint Foundation’s momentum going,” Leitner said. “I see the ULI Greenprint Center’s work as becoming the global real estate industry’s diary of its efforts to dramatically lower the impact of buildings on the environment. We will continue to promote increased awareness of innovative technologies and best operating practices to reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. Through this center, ULI can help position the land use and real estate industry as part of the solution to climate change.”

The ULI Greenprint Center will join ULI’s existing dedicated centers of research and programs, which include the ULI J. Ronald Terwilliger Center for Housing, the ULI Daniel Rose Center for Public Leadership in Land Use, and the ULI Center for Capital Markets in Real Estate. Together, these centers of research and program excellence form dedicated components of ULI’s broader research and education activities.

The ULI Greenprint Center’s work will be guided by an advisory board, to be chaired by Leitner, which will include key industry leaders from Greenprint’s founding member companies. Among other members, the advisory board will include Weidner; ULI Trustee and first Greenprint President Kenneth W. Hubbard, executive vice president of Hines U.S. in New York City; Fred A. Seigel, president and chief operating officer, Beacon Capital Partners, LLC, Boston; Colin Dyer, president and chief executive officer, Jones Lang LaSalle, Chicago; Gerd Kremer, managing director, GLL Real Estate Partners, Munich; and Ron Herbst, global head of energy management and sustainability, Deutsche Bank AG London in London. Patrick and ULI Senior Vice President for Initiatives Uwe Brandes will also serve on the advisory board. The ULI Greenprint Center Advisory Board will work with the center’s staff to build on recent accomplishments and further develop the center in accordance with its mission.

For more information about the Urban Land Institiute, visit uli.org.

green jobs 2011

What Are “Green” Jobs?

The term “green collar” is springing up in corporate America every day. It is now considered to be an effective way to produce and reproduce products and services while trying to reserve the earth’s precious resources. In order to say you have a “green job,” the business must be considered environmentally conscious. Cleaning up the environment, restoring our planet to healthy standards and controlling climate change are considered environmentally conscious jobs.

The focus on going green in companies has been known as the “green collar” industry. This new job trade is not only rewarding for the company and employees but to consumers as well. Having a sustainable career with innovative techniques that help make the world a better place doubles as a career and way of life.

Companies, such as jobing.com, now offer green job categories to feature such positions.

What exactly is a green job?

A green job is a profession that directly works with materials, technology or policies that contribute to making sure the environmental impact of products and services are minimal. Some may require special training or knowledge.

Why choose green jobs?Green Jobs, Lumber Work

This industry will provide better and longer lasting future for the earth. Jobs have gained importance when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act announced they would provide $750 million for programs to train and help workers grow in the emerging industry.

It allows new and innovative research to be accomplished, opening the door to job training and special projects in the renewable energy industries. Of the funding given, $500 million will go into this training.

The demand for new employees is opening doors for jobs daily. The growth in the business can create nearly 5,000 new jobs within five occupations during the next year.

Where can you find a green job?

Green jobs can be found within environmental jobs such as plants, sciences, earth or agriculture. They are also found in fishing, forestry, fuel, solar industries, engineering and energy.

Sustainable planning and waste management positions link local jobs to the Valley. They help to create green buildings, energy saving techniques, environmental compliance and waste management corrections.

Other industries to think about when researching green jobs are:

  • Bicycle repair and bike delivery services
  • Car and truck mechanic jobs, production jobs, and gas-station jobs related to biodiesel
  • Hauling and reuse of construction materials and debris (C&D)
  • Hazardous materials clean-up
  • Landscaping
  • Materials reuse
  • Non-toxic household cleaning in residential and commercial buildings
  • Parks and open space expansion and maintenance
  • Printing with non-toxic inks and dyes
  • Public transit jobs related to driving, maintenance, and repair
  • Recycling and reuse
  • Small businesses producing products from recycled materials
  • Solar installation
  • Tree cutting and pruning
  • Whole home performance, including attic insulation, weatherization
Otis Elevator 2011

Otis Elevator Company Shows The Way To Green

Otis Elevator Company, a unit of United Technologies Corporation, launched a major global environmental program Feb. 8th called The Way to Green. The program is designed to extend to every aspect of their business — from design and manufacturing to products and end-of-life recycling.

The Way to Green is designed to significantly boost the companies’ commitment to environmental protection and sustainability while reducing energy consumption and offering the finest performance.

By introducing this program, the company will encourage environmental awareness to 60,000 of its employees, customers, suppliers and business partners making them aware of environmentally sensitive practices.

Eiffel Tower Otis blog 2011, Flickr, Moonlightbulb

They are the world’s largest manufacturer and maintainer of people-moving products — including elevators, escalators and moving walkways. More than 200 countries use Otis Elevator Company and over 1.7 million elevators and escalators are being maintained worldwide.

If you have never heard of them, think about the Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building; the Eiffel Tower; the Shanghai World Financial Center and the Los Angeles International Airport. All of these places have elevators installed by this company.

Products:

The line of Gen2 elevator systems feature regenerative drives that reduce energy consumption by up to 75 percent compared to conventional systems.

The Gen2-coated steel belts and machines require no additional lubrication, and LED illumination is standard, lasting up to 10 times longer than conventional fluorescent lamps. An automatic switch-off mode saves up to 80 percent wasted energy.

Otis escalators and moving walkways reduce energy consumption by up to 60 percent, an efficient, automatic lubrication system reduces annual oil usage by up to 98 percent versus conventional systems, and LED lighting options are up to 30 percent more energy efficient.

Manufacturing:

Otis implements processes that recycle 97 percent of industrial waste produced by Otis facilities.

water otis blog 2011, Flickr, Snap

The manufacturing facility in Madrid uses solar panels to generate about 60 percent of the site’s energy needs.

The TEDA Manufacturing Center in China has achieved Gold-level Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification. Advanced technologies in use at this location reduce energy usage by at least 25 percent compared to conventional design and manufacturing methods.

Otis facilities have reduced water consumption by 12 percent by optimizing conservations through rainfall collection, recycling and the use of water-efficient fixtures.

More than 200,000 Gen2 elevator systems — covering a wide range of applications — have been sold to date, making it the fastest selling product in Otis company history. The Way to Green has taken “going green” to a whole new level.

Going green 2011

10 Ways To Go Green For Free In Your Home

“Going Green” is more than a term for saving our planet; it’s a lifestyle. Changing the way you perform everyday household activities can help you save money, energy and time.

You don’t have to leave home or spend money to turn your house green. The following simple activities take little to no effort to increase your home’s green power. You’ll feel better about yourself knowing you’re doing something to help the environment without spending any green.

open curtains 2011, Flickr d'n'c

1. Open Curtains

Leave your curtains open for as long as possible. Allow the daylight to brighten your home. According to Salt River Project’s Website (SRP), on average, lighting accounts for about eight to 10 percent of the energy bill. Turn off lights when you are not using them. The myth turning your lights on and off costs more is wrong. You save more energy turning them off than leaving them on.

drink tap water 2011, Flickr TheGiantVerm

2. Drink Tap Water

It’s no secret that water bottles load our landfills and take an average of 700 years before they decompose. Drinking tap water will not only cut down the price to dispose of plastic bottles, it will cut down the price to make them. According Refillnotlandfill.org, if everyone in New York were to use a reusable water bottle for one week, 24 million bottles would be saved. Switching to tap water will reduce waste and conserve resources.

clothes dryer 2011, Flickr Tracy O

3. Clean The Lint Screen In The Dryer

Taking the lint filter out of the dryer and cleaning the fuzzy fur only takes a few seconds, but can save you a pretty penny. The dryer filter collects fluff while drying clothes and most people forget to clean it. When the filter is dirty it takes longer to dry clothes causing the dryer to work harder and longer using more energy in the process. By cleaning the lint filter after you dry each load you reduce the risk of a higher electric bill, waste of resources and damaging your dryer.

compuer 2011, Flickr Si1 very

4. Turn Your Computer Off At The End Of The Day

Although there is an energy saver (sleep or standby) option on your computer that allows the screen to go black and conserve energy, the computer is still receiving electricity and, therefore, costing you money. A typical desktop computer can use between 65 to 250 watts, a laptop can use 15 to 60 watts and a monitor can use 15 to 70 watts. For example, leaving your 100-watt light bulb on all day for a month costs about $5, and that’s just one bulb. On average, $15.60 is the cost for leaving your computer on all month. Turn your computer off at the end of the day so it can rest, and you can save money.

plastic bags 2011, Flickr Swanksalot

5. Recycle Plastic Bags

After you come from the grocery store, don’t throw away those plastic bags, keep them in a drawer. When you need a small bag to go in your office, bathroom or bedroom trash bins, utilize those. Reusing plastic bags reduces the waste of plastic going in the recycling bins and later to the landfill. If you have no need for trash bags, get a plastic bag recycling bin and dispose of them properly. According to Plasticbagrecycling.org, in 2006 more than 812 million pounds of plastic film and bags were recycled, which is enough to manufacture nearly 1,500,000 composite lumber decks.

shower 2011, Flickr Spring Dew

6. Take Shorter Showers

Taking shorter showers save on wasted water and money. The typical shower time should be five minutes or less. Water is used at about 2.5 gallons per minute costing $2 per 1000 gallons, equaling .005 cents per minute.  That number may seem small but what’s important and worth knowing is how much water you will save. In one year, doing this simple task could save 4,500 gallons of water.

laundry 2011, Flickr mysza831

7. Line Dry Laundry

No, it isn’t the 70’s and almost everyone has an electric clothes dryer, but many people put clothes in the dryer that could be hung on a line. Jeans are a perfect example of something to line dry. They are weighty and take more energy to dry. Hanging heavy-duty clothes out to dry saves money, keeps clothes looking newer longer and cuts down drying time. Arizona is a dry state — take advantage of the heat.

paying bills 2011, Flickr bandita

8. Get Bills Online

The Internet has taken over in communication. Take advantage of that by receiving your bills online. You’ll save the company printing the bills money, and they will stop charging you a delivery fee — saving you money in return. When logging on to your accounts to pay your bills, choose the option that says “go paperless,” and they will start sending your bills to your email address. You will no longer receive a paper bill, and by doing this you will reduce paper waste.

junk mail 2011, Flickr Charles Williams' photostream

9. Stop Junk Mail

I can’t think of one person who doesn’t get annoyed by the junk mail filling their mailbox. Not only is it irritating, it packs our garbage bins faster than you may think. Credit card offers, catalogs, newsletters and fliers from places at which you don’t shop go from the mailbox to the trash bin. Stop receiving junk mail by visiting DMAConsumers.org (The Direct Marketing Association’s Mail Preference Service). It may take a few minutes, but you will stop getting wasteful mail.

tell friends 2011, Flickr Comedy nose

10. Tell Friends About Going Green

There is no chore in talking to our friends. Next time you’re on the phone with a friend tell them of money saving green tips to use for themselves. Word of mouth is the biggest advertising agent. Getting another person to improve their living habits to support the environment will benefit everyone around them, including you. Don’t forget to remind them to pass the news along.

BIG Green Conference & Expo

Speaker: Kirsten Shaw ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Kirsten Shaw, AE3Q

Kirsten Shaw is a Certified Indoor Environmental Consultant, a Building Performance Institute (BPI) Building Analyst and Shell certified professional and a RESNET HERS Rater.She provides certification training for future energy auditors and home performance contractors for both BPI and RESNET. She earned a master’s degree in environmental science from ASU and has been working to improve our built environments for over 15 years.

Topic: Defining Energy Audits: With APS & SRP promoting and paying for utility customers to get energy audits, learn exactly what these are and how to know you’re getting the real deal.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Lori Singleton ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Lori Singleton, Salt River Project (SRP)

Lori Singleton, SRP

Lori Singleton is the manager of sustainability initiatives and technologies at Salt River Project. She is a 29-year employee of SRP and 40-year resident of Arizona. She is responsible for design and implementation of SRP’s environmental outreach programs with special focus on renewable energy.

Lori’s responsibilities at SRP include development and implementation of renewable energy projects to meet SRP’s sustainable resource goals. Singleton oversees research and development projects to support company-wide initiatives for SRP including gasoline lawn mower recycling, tree planting, clean school bus initiative, travel reduction and other internal environmental programs.

She works on development and implementation of the “green” energy pricing program, solar incentive program for residential and commercial customers and renewable energy education programs for implementation in middle school and high school curricula.

In addition, she does promotion and public relations for all new renewable energy projects and purchases (solar, wind, geothermal, landfill gas, low head hydro, fuel cells) while serving as the environmental issues media spokesperson for SRP and being a constant representative of SRP on numerous environmental committees, boards and commissions.

She was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve on the Solar Energy Advisory Council and also has several other current affiliations including: Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors; Audubon Society, chair, Board of Directors; Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, chair; Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President & National Board Director; Southwest Center for Education; and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of Directors.

Current Affiliations

Solar Energy Advisory Council, appointment by Governor Janet Napolitano
Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors
Audubon Society, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, Chair
Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President &
National Board Director
Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of
Directors

Affiliations (Past)

Valley Forward Association, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force
City of Phoenix, Environmental Quality Commission
Valley Metro, Clean Air Advisory Committee
Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Environmental Committee
Valley of the Sun United Way Loaned Executive


Topic: How people & organizations can get involved in the green movement from an energy perspective.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



 

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Sonja Bochart ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Sonja Bochart, SmithGroup

Sonja Bochart, SmithGroupSonja Bochart, a green design advocate, has more than 15 years of experience as an interior designer and is an active member of the U.S. Green Building Council and the International Living Building Institute.As an associate at SmithGroup, she actively promotes holistic design approaches and healthy work environments for commercial design projects and is NCIDQ Certified and a LEED Accredited Professional.

Ms. Bochart is knowledgeable on how green design affects clients’ biggest bottom line—their employees—as well as the benefits of green design, the biggest obstacles faced for “greening” interior spaces and identifying resources to streamline change.Striving to expand the boundaries of conventional design practices, she strives to send a message that well designed projects respect and support their surrounding environment, and in turn these projects promote the health, wellness, productivity of their occupants and nourishes their spirits.

To continuously expand her insight into the latest developments in the field of design and share her knowledge, Ms. Bochart actively participants in several industry organizations, publishes and speaks frequently on related topics, and teaches at Arizona State University. Her portfolio includes educational, community and international medical facilities as well as corporate spaces and mixed use structures.

Through her efforts to synthesize the latest research into her designs and teaching, her contribution has helped to shape happier, healthier and more sustainable interiors.


Topic: An informative presentation on Biophilic Design, nature-inspired architecture, and how it is the next great design journey of our times.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Feature Big Green 2011

Speaker: Melisa Camp ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Melisa Camp, Go Green Investments

Melisa Camp, Go Green Investments

Melisa Camp, “The Green Queen,” is CEO of Go Green Investments, Realtor with the GREEN designation, and Consultant on sustainable living. Camp is a LEED Green Associate working toward obtaining the LEED AP-Homes accreditation. She has served as USGBC AZ’s Residential Green Building Advocate since 2009 and educates and raises awareness with other Realtors, builders, homeowners, government officials, green professionals, and lenders & appraisers.

Camp has an Interdisciplinary Studies Degree in Business and Communication from ASU and a Master’s degree in Education from the University of Phoenix, and she has started her Green MBA as well.

Some of her accomplishments include co-hosting LEED for Homes overviews, ReGreen workshops, a Green Home Tour, publishing two local residential LEED for Homes case studies, and speaking at the AZ Biz Green Forum. Camp is a member and volunteer for the Green Phoenix Chamber of Commerce and Habitat for Humanity volunteer. As a former teacher and journalist, Camp authors a well-followed blog, “Bring the Green” and is drafting a series of children’s books and seeking publication.

Camp is also working on the development of a green home class for Realtors. She is passionate about going green and teaching anyone who will listen. She has attended GreenBuild in Phoenix and Chicago as well as the Sonoran Green Expo in Tucson. In her spare time Camp plays competitive sand volleyball and is a stay at home Mother. Her energy is contagious to those around her and her motto is “What good is what I know if I do not share it with the world?”


Topic: Green Home Rating System in Multiple Listing Service (MLS): Systems that are searchable within the MLS and specific to the Phoenix area like LEED, NAHB, SRP PowerWise Homes, EnergyStar and Scottsdale Green Building Programs.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Room 158

BIG Green Conference 2011



BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.



BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Mark Kranz ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, AIA, LEED AP, is the design principal and lead designer for the Phoenix office of SmithGroup’s Higher Education and Science and Technology Studios.  Mark’s work has been published locally, regionally and nationally.

He speaks publicly about sustainable design strategies for laboratory and academic facilities, and his work is consistently recognized by the design and construction industries.  Kranz works regionally within the Western United States with research institutions and institutions of higher education creating laboratory and instructional facilities that elegantly reflect their specific context and function.

He has spent the past 11 years with SmithGroup, creating the vision for some of the most significant architectural contributions for some of the most prominent institutions and public entities in the Southwestern United States including Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, the City of Phoenix, the State of Utah, The City and County of Denver, and the Maricopa County Community College District.

He is currently behind the design visions for numerous landmark projects for clients including the National Renewable Energy Laboratories in Golden Colorado, The University of Hawaii at Hilo, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command in Honolulu, Hawaii, as well as Gateway Community College in Phoenix, Arizona.


Topic: Sustainable Strategies for Higher Educational Facilities: A case study of four sustainable educational facilities in four unique settings.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Kevin Woodhurst ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Kevin Woodhurst, Dolphin Pools and Spas

Kevin Woodhurst, Dolphin Pools & Spas

Kevin Woodhurst has been building and promoting energy efficient pools since 1996.

The companies that he has owned or worked with utilize the latest technologies and standards in order to deliver consumer and environmentally projects that save or conserve natural resources. Kevin has been a student to the pool industry for many years and as such has held or holds more certifications than nearly anyone in the country.

In Kevin’s words he says, “It is still not enough, you must go out every day and try to be better and learn something new”. Kevin is a well known industry expert and participates nationally and internationally in many industry forums.

He has won multiple local, state and national awards but still enjoys the smile on the face of a satisfied client more than anything.


Topic: Energy-Efficient Pools

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011

 


BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

Feature Big Green 2011

Speaker: Hyman Schaffner ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Hyman Schaffner, One Source Commercial Solutions

Hyman SchaffnerHyman Schaffner’s company delivers continued sustainability by offering green emergency services and construction. His company focuses on the continuing sustainability or minimizing the effects to certified and non-certified existing building for emergency and non-emergency services. Schaffner has been endorsed by Fireman’s Fund insurance and AIG/Chartis as their green reconstruction contractor for Arizona. Also, he holds several emergency service contracts for LEED EB properties including the Platinum AZ Fish & Game property.Schaffner has been delivering minimal impact alternative construction methods to the existing building market since 2005 and is recognized by a large number of building owners and commercial management companies for his proactive approach to recycling and alternate services, minimizing the effects to the environment for normal construction. He has power points for project that he has delivered these services for and Schaffner is very passionate about the services he delivers form simple construction maintenance projects to large tenant improvements projects.

Topic: Emergency services for LEED EB & OM-certified and non-certified buildings and how to minimize the impact to the building, its occupants and EA & MR.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 159

BIG Green Conference 2011

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.



Sponsors:

Facebook

What You Get With The New Facebook Profile

On December 5 Facebook introduced another change to their ever-rotating lineup of profile options. The latest update establishes a new layout for user profiles and more options for displaying work and education information. While the new profile is currently on an opt-in basis only, Facebook will be gradually rolling out the change and plans to have all Facebook users switched by early 2011.

What to Expect:

While current profiles push basic user information such as career, education and hometown off to the side, the new profiles will feature this information at the top of the page directly under the user’s name. This move bumps off the most recent status update that was usually displayed in this spot.

The new profiles also feature 5 recently tagged photos in addition to the main profile picture and users can choose to display featured friend groups (family, coworkers, etc.). Facebook users can expect more than just a new profile page though. The photo display page has undergone a transformation as well, featuring an “infinite scroll” rather than the page-by-page layout of before.

Along with the aesthetic changes come increased options for connecting with other users. The new Facebook profile offers the option of tagging your coworkers in career information and listing projects you have worked on with them. As for education, you can list classes you have taken and connect with old classmates.

How to Opt-In:

If you can’t wait for the new profile to be implemented for all of Facebook you can opt-in to the change by visiting www.facebook.com/about/profile and clicking the green “Get the New Profile” button.

New Facebook

Green Housing

Green Homeowners Can Now Turn To Converted Shipping Containers

“Living Green” has gone vogue and so has finding new creative “out of the box” ways to do so.

Next month, the forward thinking Phoenix-based development firm of UpCycle Living, led by Ashton Wolfswinkel and Jason Anderson, will break ground on a cutting-edge residential community known as Switzer Terrace in the beautifully forested mountain top city of Flagstaff, Ari., utilizing stacked shipping containers.

Recent years have seen eco-friendly developers look for new ways to promote sustainable living, and this new form of housing has emerged as a phenomenal way to reuse these virtual “LEGO-blocks” as modern sustainable modular homes.

shipping_container_homeShipping containers were invented more than 50 years ago, and are certainly recognized as the basic unit in our global distribution network of products. Every commodity imaginable is shipped throughout the world from toys from China, textiles from India, grain from America, and cars from Germany. Yet, these visionary developers, architects and green designers, such as Upcycle Living and green living enthusiasts, are increasingly turning to these strong, cheap boxes as source building blocks to create some amazing modern architectural wonders.

According to the Upcycle Living’s architects, the modified containers are “nearly indestructible,” as well as resistant to mold, fire, and termites. The shipping containers can be readily modified with a range of creature comforts and can be connected and stacked to create modular, efficient spaces for a fraction of the cost, labor and resources of more conventional materials. Some of the recent green living uses include disaster relief shelters to luxury condos, vacation homes, and off-the-grid adventurers.

With its modern lines and appealing spaces, the containers turn heads. Upcycle Living’s forested Switzer Terrace  community  boasts individual 6,000-square-foot lots. One such model includes a two bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, 1,200 square foot spacious modern home with a two-car garage.  This luxury mountainside showpiece is built from four prefabricated, recycled steel shipping containers, along with some traditional building materials. Seventy percent of the building will be efficiently assembled in a shop, saving time, money and resources.

One such configuration includes a home perched on a hillside lot, with the four containers on top of a two-car garage.  Alternatively, the unit could be configured on a level lot with the garage along the side of the home.

On the inside, the home also demonstrates the importance of a livable floor plan and a well-orchestrated flow of space. On the ground floor, this open-plan module contains the living room, dining area and kitchen — and can be entirely open to the outside by incorporating vast windows or enclosed. Classic modern furniture provides comfort and style without taking over the room. The open kitchen, with its gleaming stainless steel appliances, is ideally suited to the love of entertaining the curious green living friends and family. Upstairs, private spaces are more compartmentalized. affordable-shipping-container-homeThe master bedroom at one end of the unit could look out onto a grove of trees (and will eventually have its own private deck).  The simple lines of the office area at the opposite end are highly conducive to concentration. Overall, this Upcyle Living home is a striking example of what can be achieved with a well-thought-out modular system of construction and design that focuses on sustainable living.

Although it is doubtful this new residential community and product will rebound the Arizona housing market, Upcycle Living has clearly taken a giant leap forward in introducing an innovative housing product whose time has come. However, only time will tell whether progressive Flagstaff homebuyers will catch the vision of this truly “out of the box” green living alternative.

Photography of Joel Sartore - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Life Through The Lens Of Wildlife Photographer Joel Sartore

It is summer in Antarctica. Frigid temperatures have been replaced by mild, 50-degree days.

Surrounded by green hills rolling into lush, snow-capped mountains and thick fog, Joel Sartore is crouching low to the ground. Usually, it is he who is chasing his subjects, but this time the tables have turned. Instead, in the middle of the beach-like terrain, Sartore is surrounded — by penguins. King penguins to be exact.

“Most of the time the animals I’m seeing are running away, they don’t want anything to do with me,” Sartore says, adding that the King penguins did the exact opposite. “They just wanted to stare at me. I got low on the ground and they stood right over me and looked at me. The whole thing was just tranquil, peaceful, and one of the most impressive things I’ve ever been a part of.”

Most of us will never get the chance to experience such an event. But for Sartore, it’s just another day on the job. From Antarctica to Russia, he has seen it all. Throughout his 20-year career working as a photographer for National Geographic, Sartore has traversed the globe, photographing everything from rare wildlife to hurricane aftermath and even state fairs.

“Once I discovered photography, there was never any turning back for me,” he says.

Sartore’s impressive body of work has been featured in Time, Life, Newsweek and Sports Illustrated. He also has contributed to several book projects and has been the subject of national broadcasts.

In addition to his talents as a photographer, Sartore devotes his energy to conservation efforts. A Nebraska native, he is committed to conservation in the Great Plains, is co-founder of the Grassland Foundation, and a founding member of the International League of Conservation Photographers.

Sartore will share his passion for sustainability as the speaker at Valley Forward’s 41st Annual Luncheon on Dec. 3.

“That is just an excellent group. There needs to be 100 groups like them. We have to start talking about this stuff and realizing that it’s easy to be green. It’s certainly a better way to live your life,” Sartore says. “There needs to be more and more people thinking and caring about the earth. We don’t have the luxury of time to count on the next generation to start saving the planet. We have to be doing it now.”

Sartore addresses the global environmental crisis using photography as his platform.

“I really am constantly faced with environmental problems,” says Sartore, a self-professed hyperactive person. “My job is to get people to think.”

While photographing the American Gulf Coast during one of his first assignments for National Geographic, Sartore was drawn to the plight of animals and the environment.

“I remember walking the beach and the bottom of my feet were black with spilled tar and oil, and there was garbage and a dead dolphin wrapped in plastic,” he says. “When you see things like that it makes you think that we could be doing a lot of things better, could be treating the Earth better.”

Sartore’s focus on building a sustainable future has allowed him to draw attention to issues that are often overlooked. His latest book, “Rare: Portraits of America’s Endangered Species,” sheds light on some of the country’s most endangered species of plants and animals, and what the public can do to help. “Rare” was originally inspired by a magazine assignment, before turning into a personal project for Sartore and later a full-fledged book.

Several of the subjects featured in the book were shot in Arizona, including the California condor, photographed at the Phoenix Zoo; and the Tarahumara leopard frog, photographed at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum in Tucson.

Although, sadly, one of the other animals featured in the book, the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, became extinct during the book’s production, Sartore emphasizes the importance of highlighting environmental issues.

“It was a very good experience to give a voice for the voiceless,” Sartore says. “The encouraging thing is that most species in the book could make it if we pay attention to it. I guess that’s what I try to convey to people: There’s always hope. These things are absolutely worth saving.”

Sartore’s passion for photography began in high school and continued into college, where he earned a degree in journalism with an emphasis in photojournalism from the University of Nebraska. Thanks to some great mentors, Sartore decided to pursue a career in photography, but he didn’t forget his journalism roots.

“In any of these situations I go into, I bring with me a reporter’s aesthetic and background to it,” he says.

This background has proven beneficial, as he shoots such a wide variety of subjects in exotic locations around the world.
“I want to know why things are the way they are and how to fix it,” he says.

As thrilling as his job may be, it comes with its share of dangers. When asked how many times has he almost been killed, Sartore responds on his website: “More than I care to tell my wife about for sure.”

He hasn’t let the danger stop him, but he does try to err on the side of caution.

“You can’t take more pictures if you’re dead,” he writes.

Sartore continues to journey around the globe in search of the next great photo. Currently, he’s preparing to travel to Africa for an assignment. Despite two decades of experience under his belt, Sartore still worries.

“I’m very nervous that I’ll fail, starve and die, in that order,” he says. Irrational fear or secret to success? Maybe worrying is just part of the job, Sartore adds.

“Everything has worked out well so far, yet I’ve always been very worried that nothing ever would,” he says. “With a strong story you may just reach those people who can change the world. If I can right a few wrongs, then that’s probably a life well spent.”

    If You Go:
    Valley Forward’s 41st Annual Luncheon
    11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
    Dec. 3
    Hyatt Regency Phoenix
    122 N. Second St., Phoenix
    Reservations: info@valleyforward.org; (602) 240-2408


Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Environmental Protection Agency

The Environmental Protection Agency Celebrates Its 40th Anniversary

On Dec. 2, 1970, the the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was founded. Since the inception of the agency, the world has changed. Today, the green movement is stronger than ever, and our focus on bettering the environment is unwavering.

The EPA has also grown with the changing times. You can view the agency’s history on an interactive timeline featured on its website. Some noted achievements include the increase of recycling by American families and businesses. In 1980, only about 10 percent of trash was recycled, increasing to more than 33 percent in 2008. The agency has also helped create high-wage jobs for more than 3,300 Americans and through the passage of the Clean Air Act, helped Americans live better, healthier lives.

It’s safe to say that the work of the EPA has been fundamental in the shaping our country’s policies and practices regarding the protection and conservation of the environment. Happy anniversary and here’s to many more years of success!

Shop local stores in the Phoenix area for the holidays

Shop Local For The Holidays

We all know major department stores have big holiday sales, but so do local stores.

Local stores also have the added bonus of being good for your conscience. They’re greener – many of their products aren’t shipped in from all over the world – and they help the local economy more than chain stores. See our recent Local First Shift Arizona article.

If you’re looking to shop local this holiday season, here’s a few Phoenix-area shops to help you on your search for the perfect  Hanukkah, Christmas or Christmakkah gift.

1. Souvia Tea

Souvia Tea is stocked with more than 140 teas and gifts for tea lovers. Souvia Tea is part of Local First Arizona’s Buy Local Week that offers deals on local products from Nov. 26 to Dec. 5.

15414 N. 7th St. Ste. 8
Phoenix, Ariz. 85022
(602) 938-1216

2. Natural Paws

For the month of November, Natural Paws is discounting all Web sales 10 percent and offering free shipping. Natural Paws is part of Local First Arizona’s Buy Local Week that offers deals on local products from Nov. 26 to Dec. 5.

3. Pink House Boutique

Pink House Boutique is a one-of-a-kind co-op bursting with home décor, recycled, new and vintage clothing, and much more. The boutique also features local designer Bri Bridge.

7009 N. 58th Ave.
Glendale, Ariz. 85301
(623) 298-1766

4. SeeSaw Designs

Find unique stationary, prints and calendars at SeeSaw Designs.

6125 E. Indian School Road Ste. 2009
Scottsdale, Ariz.  85251
(480) 284-4987

5. Embellish Home

Give the gift of embellishment from Embellish Home. The store offers everything from decorative crowns to whimsical tea towels.

5202 N. 7th St.
Phoenix, Ariz. 85014
(602) 277-1499

6. Frances & 7. Smeeks

Here’s a double dose of local. Frances and Smeeks, both owned by the same woman and located on the same stretch of Camelback Road, are chalk full of everything from vintage candy to clothes to paper goods.

Frances
10 W. Camelback Road
Phoenix, Ariz. 85013
(602) 279-5463

Smeeks
14 W. Camelback Road
Phoenix, AZ 85013
(602) 279-0538

8. Sphinx Ranch

For the foodie in your life, look no further than Sphinx Ranch. The shop specializes in gift baskets, but you can pick up anything from Arizona wines to chips and salsa produced locally at their store.

3039 N. Scottsdale Road
Scottsdale, Ariz. 85251
(480) 941-2261

9. Maria Funicello Jewelry Designs

If your gal likes to shine, check out Maria Funicello Jewelry Designs. These beautifully crafted silver pieces are sure to wow her this holiday season.

10. Etsy.com

Etsy.com is the perfect place to shop several shops at a time. Just use Etsy’s Geolocator to find sellers in Phoenix, Scottsdale, Flagstaff, Tucson and many more cities. You can find practically anything from a local seller on Etsy, from aprons to jewelry to soap to home furnishings.

Here’s a few Arizona Etsy sellers to check out:

Petite Bonfire – Sewn goods, Tucson
Wing Flash – Jewelry, Tucson
Rose & Root – Soaps, Phoenix
The Tom Kat Studio – Party supplies, Chandler
Jason Hill Design – Artwork, Phoenix
Mommy’s Little Monsters – Children’s clothing, Phoenix
Nesta Home – Home decor, Phoenix
Pink Dandy Shop – Bath and cosmetic products, Phoenix
Spinup Yarns – Yarn, Flagstaff
Red Canyon Glass – Glassware, Flagstaff

Visit Local First’s Web site for a list of local shops and Tucson shops participating in Buy Local Week.

Southwest Build-it-Green Expo & Conference

Speaking Opportunities At The Annual Southwest Build-It-Green Conference

Don’t miss out! The annual Southwest Build-It-Green Expo & Conference is scheduled for April 15-16, 2011 and speaking opportunities are still available! Fill out your speaker form (PDF) today.

As the largest sustainability expo in Arizona, this is one event you won’t want to miss. Last year’s expo attracted more than 200 exhibitors and 10,000 attendees, with topics ranging from green awareness, to solar power, LEED certification, water filtration, and many more.

BIG also features guest speakers of local, national and international prominence. Among some of the speakers last year were Anthony Floyd, AIA, LEED-AP Green Building Manager for the City of Scottsdale; Dr. Tom Rogers, professor and Chair of Construction Management at Northern Arizona University; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; James Brew from the Rocky Mountain Institute; Lori Singleton, manager of Sustainability Initiatives and Technologies at Salt River Project and many more.

In addition to the conference, the exhibits showcase products such as eco-friendly appliances and environmentally conscious landscaping techniques that aim to reduce Arizona’s carbon footprint. There are a wide variety of topics and something for everyone – homeowners and businesses alike.

For more information visit www.builditgreenexpo.com.