Tag Archives: green products

Green Marketing

Adding A Splash Of Green To Your Marketing Campaign Can Help You Hit The Right Target Market

What makes marketing a green product or service different from any other type of marketing campaign? In some ways, nothing; in other ways, green marketing can be a different animal. In addition to selling a product or service, green marketing seeks to change the way the buyer thinks about the product or service, encouraging a change in behavior.

Everything from building products and services to automobiles to apparel are now going green. As a result, marketing managers are now faced with the challenge of not just getting target markets to want their product, but also helping them to see value in changing their behavior. But how do you create a marketing campaign that will compel the public to change its view?

Tips to influence change

Don’t just tell how your product is better for me — show me.

It’s not enough to tell your audience your product conserves water or reduces energy. You have to visually demonstrate how it benefits the user. The green company PeopleTowels does a great job of showing its environmental benefits with an image of eight industrial-sized garbage bags filled with paper towels representing the average amount of paper towels a person uses each year. The visual effectively denounces excessive paper towel use and promotes the company’s brand of eco-friendly, on-the-go cloth towels.

Make benefits tangible

We’re asking people to voluntarily change their behavior for the greater good. Make the benefits of doing so too obscure and you’ve lost them. Consider the popularity of the Toyota Prius. In 2010, this hybrid car landed a spot on Forbes’ list of “high in demand” cars. So what is the tangible benefit to driving this eco-friendly cruiser? The annual cost of gas is only $846, which is especially low compared to other cars on the list that ranged from $1,510 to $4,745 annually.

Keep it positive.

Don’t tell your audience what they are currently doing wrong by using other products; show them what they can do to make an impact. People are less likely to listen to your message if you are scolding them. Make the message motivate your target market to do the right thing.

Make it relevant.

Create an emotional connection with your audience that communicates the importance of using your product or service. That communication can take several forms. The company Grass Roots Environmental Products does this by offering products for children and moms alongside other green products to express their interest in child-safety. This allows them to connect with their customers on a deeper level.

The key to a successful green marketing campaign is to appeal to the target audience through messaging that encourages them to take action. Developing a buzz can be an effective tool for influencing others. Building a sense of community — we are all in this together — and showing how your product or service can help, not only provides a reason for change, but the desire to be a part of that change.

The idea of starting your own business can be frightening with the recession - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

6 Tips To Launching Your Own Business In A Down Economy

The idea of starting your own business can be frightening, particularly with the recession stubbornly choking the Arizona economy. However, by following a few tips for getting started, launching your own company doesn’t need to be scary.

In fact, there are a few advantages to launching a business during an economic downturn. Commercial space is available at extraordinarily good prices. Talented professionals are looking for work. Goods and services can be found at discounted prices. And, depending on your industry, competition may be scarce.

1. Practice Due Diligence
It’s critical to objectively evaluate your proposed venture. Asking yourself some hard questions may discourage you from pursuing your first venture, but that is not a negative or pessimistic approach. It’s a useful tool for evaluating your business. Start with these questions: Is there a genuine need for the product or service you are offering? Is that need already being met by established companies? If so, what improvement or unique feature are you bringing to the table? Do you have the necessary skills and resources to start your business? If not, are you prepared to bring in the people with the skills and capital that are needed, and possibly give up some ownership?

2. Prepare a Business Plan
Too often, entrepreneurs articulate a great idea and foresee success, but gloss over the hard work. That hard part is thinking through the idea for your business and writing it into a plan, including the steps you’ll need to take to implement your idea. Start with an outline and consult a book or online guide about writing business plans. It’s important that your end result is a completed plan that includes a budget for your business.

3. Determine Capital Requirements
Most small businesses are funded with the business owner’s own money and funds from family and friends. A venture capitalist or angel investor may provide the necessary capital in exchange for part ownership of your business. It’s critical to focus on the amount of money you will need to start and operate your business, including at each stage of the company’s development.

4. Create a Board of Advisers
Creating a network of advisers can be a tremendous asset to a start-up business. It’s helpful if that board consists of advisers with a diverse array of professional backgrounds. That diversity will ensure you receive insights from a wide range of perspectives. Good choices for advisers may include your attorney, accountant, suppliers, customers, bankers and realtors.

5. Tap Into Available Resources
There are myriad advisers, consultants and nonprofit agencies that will assist you in developing your business — marketing it, creating websites and raising capital — who work for free or a nominal fee. The Small Business Administration (SBA), for instance, is a valuable and cost-effective resource. Moreover, SCORE: Counselors to America’s Small Business, provides free advice and mentoring for small business owners. If you pay for a similar service, be sure to get recommendations from a trusted adviser. Then, check that company’s references.

6. Listen
The more you listen — the more you truly hear an adviser’s ideas — the more advice you will be able to translate into actionable plans for your company.

Still, while these recessionary times may present a good opportunity for entrepreneurs, there are several considerations to keep in mind.

Select an industry that is doing well, despite the recession. The health care industry, senior care and information technologies are financially better off than many other industries.

Choose a business sector with a bright future — Businesses that tap into growing consumer demand for green or sustainable products may be an avenue worth pursuing. There was a 41 percent increase in consumer purchases of green products and services from 2004 to 2009, according to the research firm Mintel. Moreover, there may be federal or state subsidies or tax credits available for green companies.

Select a company with low capital requirements. Home-based businesses with low start-up costs may be good choices, notably because the ongoing credit crunch will likely make it tough to get a loan to cover these expenses.

If you are considering starting your own business, you will be in good company. More than half the companies listed on the Fortune 500 in 2009 were launched during a recession, according to the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Moreover, in 2009, an average of 558,000 new businesses were launched each month in the United States.

The trick to joining these ranks is to get started. There’s no better time than now, recession or not.

“The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something,” Nolan Bushnell, founder of both Atari and Chuck E. Cheese, once said. “It’s as simple as that. A lot of people have ideas, but there are few who decide to do something about them now. Not tomorrow. Not next week. But today. The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Paper-To-Pencil Machine

Green News Roundup-Green Advertising, Products & More

Welcome back to our weekly green news roundup. This week we’ve decided to focus on introducing you to some green advertising campaigns and green products.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing kasia@azbigmedia.com

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.

G.E. Says, ‘Eco! Eco! Hello! Hello!’
General Electric has been revealing its innovative “ecomagination” ads since 2003. The newest ad campaign titled “Tag your green” is making its rounds through the viral landscape on Flickr, Howcast and YouTube. The goal is to encourage fresh ways of thinking about the environment.

DBA 98 Pen
While perusing the Web I came across two really exciting products that will make you look at office supplies in a whole different way.
The DBA 98 Pen is a 98 percent biodegradable pen, the only one in the world. The ink is made of simple, environmentally friendly ingredients and it was also produced in a wind-powered facility in the U.S. Talk about a green way to write!

Paper-To-Pencil Machine Repurposes Printed Pages
If your office looks anything like mine, there is always plenty of papers floating around. We do our best by recycling all our used paper, but this machine takes it to a whole new level! This concept was created by designers Chengzhu Ruan, Yuanyuan Liu, Xinwei Yuan & Chao Chen and it basically takes old paper and pops out whole pencils. The pencils core is fed in and then as the paper is put in the machine, it wraps around the core and is compressed. And voila! you’ve got yourself a pencil. Now will this make it to production? Who knows. But I think it’s a great tool. Even if the office doesn’t have much use for pencils, I’m positive local schools would be more than happy to accept them.

Image courtesy of: Yanko Design

Insic Wall Socket

Green News Roundup- Green And Sustainable Retail Products

Welcome back to our weekly green news roundup. This week we’ve decided to focus on highlighting green products, some are available now and some are still in prototype stage. Either way, they point to an exciting new direction for the retail industry and their involvement with sustainability.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing kasia@azbigmedia.com

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.

Insic Wall Socket is an outlet product created by Designer Muhyeon Kim that lights up and displays how many watts are being used by whatever device is being plugged into it. The idea behind it is that users will see just how much energy their devices are using and will become more aware of unplugging things when not in use to save energy.

Simple Shoes based out of Flagstaff, Ariz. is committed to making sustainable footwear that is vegan and eco-friendly. Products include bamboo, organic cotton, crepe, jute, hemp, cork, water based glues, recycled car tires, and PET recycled plastic. Not only are the shoes sustainable but the entire manufacturing process is as well.

Healthy Baby Happy Earth is a store in Glendale, Ariz. that sells environmentally friendly items for babies including cloth diapers, organic cotton clothing and a food processor that allows parents to make their own baby food. A lot of their products also provide long-term purposes like the cloth diaper which can serve from newborn to potty-training age.

Yumberi Yogurt is serving up frozen treats in Glendale, Ariz. while also supporting a sustainable environment. All of the yogurts at Yumberi are served in biodegradable bowls made from corn oil and plant fibers and the spoons are made from potato skins. The company also supports eco-friendly events such as their monthly contest that asks kids to write a letter explaining what they are doing to help change the world.

Image via Yanko Design

Green News Roundup, Wind Energy in US

Green News Roundup – Wind Industry, Green Products

Welcome to our weekly green news roundup. This week we’ve gathered stories about green products for the home, that status of the wind industry in the U.S. and more. Feel free to send along any stories you’d like to see in the roundup by e-mailing me at kasia@azbigmedia.com.

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state.

Cape Cod Project Is Crucial Step for U.S. Wind Industry
Offshore wind turbines have been crucial to generating electricity in nine European countries, and China’s first opens this month. Finally, after 10 years of effort, the Obama administration is getting ready to announce the decision on Cape Wind off the coast of Massachusetts. The decision could determine the future of wind energy in the United States. (This article, written Monday, provides context for the project, which was approved Wednesday.)

Why Are Windmills Always White?
Now that the Cape Cod project has been approved, it’s important to understand the fundamentals of how wind energy and windmills work. It may all seem basic, but this article explains the little nuances of windmills — the color, the design — and how they work together to provide us with energy.

IKEA to put solar panels on roof of Tempe store
IKEA is planning to install 2,600 solar panels on its 46,000-square-foot Tempe location.  It will produce about one million kilowatt hours of electricity every year and offset 712 tons of carbon. This is IKEA’s third solar project, following Pittsburgh and Brooklyn, and is expected to be completed in the fall.

Green Products for the Home
Renovating? Seize the opportunity to make adjustments to reduce energy and water use. This article suggests places to shop for sustainable home items, and suggests specific items, such as the Solatube, a skylight-like device that can be installed on a roof to redirect sunlight into a house. As long as you’re making changes, might as well make them green.

60% of Americans Live Where Pollution “Reaches Dangerous Levels”
Steps have been taken to decrease air pollution in cities in recent years, but unfortunately it continues to be a problem. 175 million Americans currently live in places where air pollution reaches dangerous levels on a regular basis. Hopefully legislation will keep coming and pollution will continue to decrease.