Tag Archives: Harry Garewal

Elliot Corp Center

CBRE Completes $23.5M Sale of Elliot Corporate Center in Tempe

CBRE arranged the sale of Elliot Corporate Center located at 875 W. Elliot Road in Tempe, Ariz. The 223,392 square-foot office building commanded a sale price of $23.5 million, or $105.20 per square-foot.

Jim Fijan and Will Mast with CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the seller, tenants-in-common owners through Costa Mesa, Calif.-based Thompson National Properties LLC . The purchase was a joint venture between Everest Holdings in Scottsdale, Ariz. and Walton Street Capital in Chicago, Ill.

This transaction is another example of the continued demand for office investment properties in the southeast Valley,” said Fijan. “Savvy investors recognize the continued strengthening of the market and well-located, well-taken-care of assets, like Elliot Corporate Center, are going to be well received.”

Anchored by The Apollo Group, Inc.’s The University of Phoenix, which occupies 162,069 square feet, the two-story Elliot Corporate Center was 87% at the time of sale. The project also houses Lamson Business College in 32,400 square feet. The remaining vacant space totals 29,923 square feet and is available for lease.

Built in 1998, Elliot Corporate Center benefits from immediate access to I-10 at Elliot Road as well as access to a densely-populated, large and well educated workforce in south Tempe and the extended southeast Valley.

Arizona Majority

Surging Hispanic Population Growth Creates Opportunity, Challenges

Arizona’s Majority Minority

Surging Hispanic population growth creates opportunity, challenges

 

Arizona’s population is changing as fast as its landscape. At present, approximately 1.6 million Hispanics, or one in four Arizonans, call the Grand Canyon State home. Since 40 percent of the state’s population now consists of Hispanic and other minority residents, the U.S. Census Bureau estimates Arizona will soon be joining Texas, California, New Mexico and Hawaii as a “majority minority” state.

majority_minorityHispanics are the biggest and fastest growing minority group in Arizona, in its K-12 schools and in the United States, according to Datos 2005, an annual report released by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The number of Hispanic Americans grew by 40 percent between 1990 and 2000 and 49 percent from 2000 to 2004. Between 2000 and 2020, Hispanic growth is estimated to outpace that of non-Hispanic Whites by nearly 2 to 1. “Local businesses need to focus on the Hispanic market,” says Dr. Loui Olivas, assistant vice president of academic affairs at Arizona State University. “Whether businesses do an effective job will be measured through the metrics of customers, billing and revenue by market segmentation. But unless, and until, businesses grasp the numbers and clearly identify what they mean, the Hispanic market will continue to be a lost opportunity for many of them.”

Harry Garewal, president and CEO of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, recommends local business owners utilize published data to learn about the Hispanic market. Datos 2005 is a 10-year culmination of demographic and census data that can help businesses understand the changing Hispanic market, and in turn, help them develop a sound marketing strategy for selling products and services to the Latino community. “Businesses will have a better chance of developing a good marketing strategy if they understand the market,” Garewal adds. “That includes understanding that all Hispanics are looking for the same things as everyone else—opportunity, good quality of life, education and what brings happiness in life.”

Avondale Mazda, an independently owned used car dealership that opened in November 2005, used the Datos report to develop its first marketing strategy. Since close to 50 percent of the local community and its customer base are Hispanic, the report was extremely helpful, says Xavier Brizar, Avondale Mazda’s Hispanic marketing and business manager. “Datos helped us gain a better understanding of the Latino market and the information was easy to understand,” he adds. “In the dealership world, no one in the past would consider using direct mail, but we learned from the report that Hispanics do read it, so using direct mail has been very successful for us. We also know the Latino market uses the Internet (13.6 million Hispanics online), so we have an Espanola link on our Web site to direct them to an Avondale Mazda site in Spanish.”

Avondale Mazda has banners, signage and information about buying cars in Spanish inside the dealership, which makes Hispanic customers feel welcome and comfortable. The dealership also is involved in the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and is supportive of local community events. “This is a small dealership with only 40 employees, so if someone calls that speaks Spanish, they get to talk to me every time,” adds Brizar, who prior to Avondale Mazda spent 18 years as the marketing manager of Pioneer Ford, where 50 percent of customers were Hispanic. “We know our Hispanic customers want to speak with a person, so it’s important we take care of them in the manner they appreciate.”

Home furnishings retailer IKEA launched a Hispanic multimedia marketing campaign in the United States in late 2004. The ongoing campaign includes Spanish-language TV and radio commercials, print ads, a 300-page Spanish catalog, store signage, product information brochures in both English and Spanish and sponsorships. They also have Spanish-speaking employees in stores. “The Hispanic market is vital to our business,” says Maria Lovera, IKEA’s deputy marketing manager for general and Hispanic markets in the United States. “We’ve always seen it that way, but in the last couple of years, we have strengthened our efforts to address their unique needs and understand their culture. We have also allocated more money for our Hispanic marketing efforts and made a very significant increase in our advertising budget. We feel this is a fast-growing market that is going to be phenomenally successful for retailers who can understand the benefit and embrace the Hispanic community.”

Phoenix is a top 10 Hispanic television market. Hispanic consumers spend an average of 58 hours per week watching television. Arbitron ranked Phoenix as the ninth largest Hispanic radio market reaching 742,000 Hispanics more than 12 years old. Nearly half of Phoenix Hispanics read a Spanish-language newspaper compared to half as many reading an English-language daily.

The Hispanic marketing team at Qwest has used Datos every year since 2000, as one of its tools to compile demographic and census information on the local and regional Hispanic market. They also use it to compare differences year after year in population growth, household growth, buying trends and purchasing power and to develop the company’s marketing strategy. “Datos comes in handy for the Arizona market in particular because it has the lionshare of the Hispanic market in our region,” says Hector Placencia, marketing director for Qwest. “Arizona’s population changes year to year and the updated reports keep us on the curve of these changes. There are many tools out there, but for us, Datos speaks to our customer base. We also share it internally with senior management to raise awareness of change within the Qwest organization.”

AZ Business CoverBased on the growth of the Hispanic population in Arizona over the last year, Qwest, like IKEA, has allocated additional monies for marketing and advertising to the Hispanic community. The fattened budget also includes face-to-face events. “The Hispanic consumer likes to do business in person,” says Alex Juarez, marketing manager for Qwest. “So we partner with businesses in the community like Food City where we have Qwest kiosks set up to meet with them face to face. It works out great because we understand our market very well.”

www.azhcc.com

 

 

Arizona Business Magazine Aug/Sept 2006

AZ Business Magazine Aug-Sept 2006 | Previous: Baby Steps | Next: Policy Agenda

 

Baby Steps

Hispanic Chamber To Push For Guest Worker Program

Baby Steps

Hispanic Chamber to push for guest worker program

By David Schwartz

They are the lessons pulled from the history books and reinforced in the mind of a 12-year-old boy working in the picking fields of Holtville, a small agricultural enclave in Imperial Valley, Calif. It was there that young, macho Harry Garewal learned first-hand about the importance of immigrant labor, schooled on the tricks of the trade from the guest workers at the time as he harvested crops of carrots, onions, watermelons and tomatoes.

 

baby_stepsBeyond wearing long sleeves in the blaring sun and using overripe tomatoes to wash away the insecticides, the youth cultivated a broad realization that sticks with him today. “This country has been reliant on imported immigrant labor since its inception,” says Garewal, president and chief executive of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “That’s the way it has been and always will be. That’s what this issue is all about. Our labor market is based on supply and demand. There is a demand for these workers. And we need to have a program in place that gets the job done.” That’s why the 567-member chamber now is pushing for a federal guest worker program with renewed vigor, backed by small and medium-sized businesses who overwhelmingly have said they want the group to get involved in public policy issues.

Starting first with “baby steps,” Garewal says the chamber plans to add a stronger voice than ever before to the immigration debate as the nation struggles with a solution to what most agree is a broken system. Congress is expected to hold public hearings around the country this summer to listen to what the American public has to say about the divisive issue. This as President George W. Bush has made immigration reform a top priority and a guest worker program a key element in his plan.

Garewal says the timing could not be better for the chamber to play a more active role on an issue that hits hard locally, potentially harming Arizona’s robust economy. “Before, we served as an information highway and voiced our opinion to people,” says Garewal, who has led the chamber for three years. “Now, we’re going to do a little more.”

He says future plans tentatively call for the chamber to join or start a political action committee and hire a part-time lobbyist to rally support. Chamber members also would be trained to help make the case for reforms.

Chamber officials are working from a document that was passed by its public policy committee about three years ago, stitched together after a meeting with congressional leaders and staff members from Arizona. Outlined in the one-page proposal are the key reasons for a federal guest worker program and six tenants that such an effort should contain.

Jessica Pacheco, the committee’s chairwoman, says the policy seeks to move beyond the politics and heated rhetoric swirling about the issue and provide businesses with badly needed workers at a time when the labor market is wound tightly.

“What we wanted to do was bring some facts back into the conversation,” says Pacheco, an Arizona Public Service Co. executive. “The fact is that we need temporary workers to fill jobs in this country. We frankly don’t have enough bodies to do certain jobs.”

She says a guest worker program is not about amnesty or a path to citizenship—two thorny issues that often cloud the debate and prevent clear-headed measures from progressing. Pacheco also says that changes are needed to improve the system now, allowing employers to determine whether prospective employees are legal. “Any thoughtful business person in this country believes there is a need for a guest worker program,” Pacheco says. “It’s just good for business.”

AZ Business MagazineRay Gonzales, president of RBG Construction Co. in Glendale, says a guest worker program is long overdue and that the workers are vital to the industry and others statewide. “It would really hurt if we tried to get rid of these people instead of making it right for them,” adds Gonzales, whose decade-old company employs about 80 workers. “It’s a shame that we fail to recognize that immigrants bring success to whatever it is and wherever we are using them.”

In the end, Garewal believes long-awaited immigration reform—one with a guest worker program at its heart—will be passed into law in the near future. “I think we will come to an agreement in this country for systematic improvement,” he says. “It may take a couple of years to iron out the details, but it is going to happen. It has to happen.”

www.azhcc.com

 

 

 

Arizona Business Magazine Aug/Sept 2006

AZ Business Magazine Aug-Sept 2006 | Previous: Mi Casa Su Casa | Next: Majority-Minority