Tag Archives: health care professionals

hr_director_mega_biz

2009 Mega Business HR Director Of The Year Honoree

Dale SpartzName: Dale A. Spartz, Ph.D.
Title: Vice President of Human Resources
Company: John C. Lincoln Health Network

Years with city: 9
Years in current position: 9
Year incorporated: 1927
Employees in AZ: 3,470
Employees in HR dept.: 15
www.jcl.com

Imagine it’s an ordinary day at your company and you wander over to the employee cafeteria for lunch. A member of senior management joins you for a bite and a little conversation. You know each other.

That’s the kind of environment Dale A. Spartz has fostered at John C. Lincoln Health Network in his role as vice president of human resources. JCL executives are encouraged to interact with employees in order to promote face-to-face communication. Executives also participate in team-building exercises, and the CEO holds regular meetings with employees. Potlucks, holiday lunches and volunteer opportunities keep employees engaged with one another and their managers.

Under Spartz’s leadership, a culture of excellence is promoted through a variety of awards that recognize length of service, special achievements, exceptional nursing care and physician dedication to patients, and teamwork. Diversity also is appreciated at Phoenix-based JCL. Spartz’s human resources team has extended employee benefits to domestic partners, regardless of gender; special fairs encourage employees to showcase their cultural backgrounds; and international recruitment of registered nurses is ongoing. Also, older nurses returning to work are supported through a nurse-refresher course.

Women are well represented throughout JCL’s employee ranks, including the executive team. The CEO is a woman, as are eight of 15 vice presidents.

Described as a caring man with a comforting personality, Spartz is credited with leading the way in ensuring a healthy home-work balance at JCL. Some employees telecommute, while others work flex schedules. Child care is available onsite, as is adult day care for elderly parents and spouses. A fitness and wellness center also is available to employees.

Recruitment and retention of qualified and caring professionals is key to surviving and thriving in the highly competitive health-care industry, and Spartz’s educational background demonstrates his qualifications in that area. He has a doctorate in organizational development, a Master of Science degree in industrial and organizational psychology, a Master of Arts in human resources management, a Bachelor of Science in management and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. Spartz is credited with being particularly strong in recruiting and developing talent, whether among nurses, his own staff or among myriad specialized health care professionals.

JCL’s employee satisfaction ranks well above national averages, as measured by Charlotte, N.C.-based Morehead Associates, an employee and physician research firm for health care organizations. JCL’s high-satisfaction scores have been recognized by Morehead through its Galaxy Award. JCL’s dedication to human services has helped it reduce expenses associated with recruitment, training and turnover.

Spartz also has demonstrated his leadership through the creation of partnerships between JCL and nursing colleges. In fact, the partnerships are a human resources function. Through these partnerships, employees who are in nursing school work in jobs commensurate with their education and are eligible for promotions as their education progresses. Spartz established a 90-day check-in with the nurses’ supervisors that includes a ceremony and a cash award. JCL also offers a mentoring program under which established registered nurses help new RNs integrate into the nursing profession and the JCL culture.

Arthur Andrew Medical

Justin Marsh, Of Arthur Andrew Medical, Uses Japanese Enzymes To Cure People

Justin Marsh
Arthur Andrew Medical
Title: Founder and CEO
Est: 1999  |  www.arthurandrew.com

Justin Marsh, co-founder and CEO of Arthur Andrew Medical, is shining a light on an unconventional approach to improving health. But it all started far from the world of medicine.

Marsh left college with an electronics engineering degree and began his career working as a subcontractor for Motorola, Intel and AMD, developing and installing software.

“Ultimately, it wasn’t my education that allowed me to get into my current industry, it was more by chance and some key contacts that pointed me in this direction,” Marsh says.

Marsh switched careers when he joined the medical field as an investor, eventually buying out all of his partners to become the CEO of Arthur Andrew Medical. The company’s name derives from the middle names of the two founders, Thomas Arthur Aldrich and Justin Andrew Marsh.

The Scottsdale-based company began in 1999 as an international broker and distributor of enzymes and probiotics. To launch the line, Marsh took out a portion of equity from his house and relied on revolving credit. In 2003, Arthur Andrew Medical had a breakthrough when it found enzymes in Japan that it claimed surpassed any available in North America. Enzymes — along with several other benefits — convert our food to energy, eliminate viruses, and purify our blood. When they are formulated with materials found in nature, their beneficial uses can increase. These formulations are known as nutraceuticals or dietary supplements.

Arthur Andrew Medical teamed up with specialized doctors to formulate these enzymes and create nutraceuticals as a natural and alternative way to heal and help patients. The company’s line now consists of seven products that perform several different functions.

The business originally began with the intent of selling only to health care professionals. But Marsh says that as customers wanted more availability of the product, the company decided to open up the line to distribution across the U.S., and one day it plans to expand internationally.

The company has a staff of 10 and a sales force that includes more than 20 contractors and distributors. Besides the office in Scottsdale, Arthur Andrew Medical has a satellite office in San Diego. With four competitors worldwide, including three right here in Arizona, the company must work hard to earn consumers’ trust. One challenge the company struggles with is creative marketing.

“We are not permitted to say that we can diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease without first spending millions of dollars on FDA approval,” Marsh says, adding that as a result, the company relies on patient and doctor referrals.

With a claimed 70 percent rate of returning customers, this hurdle hasn’t stopped Arthur Andrew Medical from achieving success.

“Unlike pharmaceuticals, our products are effective without any concern of becoming habit-forming or causing damaging side effects,” Marsh says. “We have had success with patients that were considered untreatable with conventional methods.”

Marsh says his main goal is for people to know that, depending on the product, the FDA does not always have the final say.He adds there are options that can help when conventional medicine can’t.

“We approach medicine in an entirely different manner,” Marsh says. “We know our products work and we know there are no risks.”

Today, despite the poor economy, the company continues to grow. Marsh says Arthur Andrew Medical is on track to exceed its growth expectations for this year, with record-breaking sales logged in March.

“It seems the public eye is beginning to see the value of nutraceuticals as the cost of maintaining good health is much less expensive than recovering from poor health,” Marsh says.

Growing Number Of Health Care Professionals Are Getting Their MBAs

Growing Number Of Health Care Professionals Are Getting Their MBAs

Despite the sluggish economy and rising unemployment, a growing number of health care professionals are headed back to school to get an MBA and increase their value in the job market.

A recent survey by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education showed an 18 percent increase in applications to graduate programs across the country for 2009-2010. More than 5,500 applications were submitted to the commission’s 83 accredited programs in 72 colleges and universities, and close to 2,100 were new students. The health care workers who signed up for MBA programs are from organizations such as long-term care facilities, hospitals, consulting firms, health insurers, government agencies and pharmaceutical firms. Doctors, nurses and health care specialists are also going back to school for their MBAs.

“We encourage all physicians to go back to school and get an MBA,” says Amanda Weaver, executive director of the Arizona Osteopathic Medical Association. “They need the education as a survival mechanism because of the managed-care environment and the reduction in Medicare fees. In the 1980s and 1990s, doctors did well in business. Now it takes a concerted effort.”

Marjorie Baldwin, director of Arizona State University’s School of Health Management and Policy in the W.P. Carey School of Business, said about 60 percent of students in the MHMS program at W. P. Carey are health professionals seeking to move into leadership positions; the remaining 40 percent have other backgrounds, but want to move into the health care field.

“Health care is a growing sector with opportunities for leadership and many people know that,” Baldwin says. “MBAs bring a lot to the table like knowledge of accounting and financial practices. They also think analytically about the way health care is provided and the way resources are utilized. They understand strategy, how to lead an organization and how to communicate with various constituencies. They bring a keen interest to the core product of the health care industry, which is patient care.”

The health care industry will generate 3 million new wage and salary jobs between 2006 and 2016, more than any other industry.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, health care continued to add jobs in February, with a gain of 27,000. Job growth occurred in ambulatory health care and in hospitals.

The W.P. Carey School of Business graduates more than 1,000 MBAs annually. It offers two MBA health options: an MBA with a specialization in health care and a concurrent degree MBA/MHSM (Master of Health Sector Management). The MHSM also is offered as a stand-alone degree. The W.P. Carey MHSM is the only accredited program in health management in Arizona. Tuition for the MBA programs is roughly $35,000 for two years, but there is a payoff.

A survey conducted by ASU alumni in 2006 showed that 100 percent of MBA graduates landed a job within three months. The starting salary for MBA graduates is approximately $80,000 per year.

“There are many complexities and differences between the health care and business sectors,” Baldwin says. “Our students at ASU take economics with an MBA business core. Economics is built around supply, demand and competition. But health care doesn’t work that way. We don’t decide what we’re going to buy and sell. Health care providers decide what we need. We also don’t pay for it, the insurer does. People going into the health care industry need to understand this.”

Michael Abeles of Banner Estrella Hospital earned his MBA in 2005 from the University of Phoenix. He left the trucking industry to go back to school and now works alongside senior leadership at the hospital on employee development, talent mapping and employee relations.

“In today’s market a bachelor’s degree helps you get ahead, but it’s the MBA that provides you with better opportunities,” he says. “Companies need well-rounded leaders that can read and understand financial statements, work force planning and legal risks. So going back to school and increasing your education can only help your journey and assist you in becoming more competitive in the job market.”

Paul Binsfeld, founder and CEO of Company Nurse, worked for years before going back to college for his MBA. As a result, he was able to share practical business experiences with classmates and learn from them.
“I acquired a wealth of business information when I went back to school for my MBA and it gave me enough confidence to start my business,” he says. “It also permitted me to raise funds, tackle administrative and hiring issues, market my business and assess my capital needs. And I’ve been building my business, clientele and success ever since.”

Binsfeld started Company Nurse in 1997. The Scottsdale-based firm provides nurse medical triage and injury-management programs for thousands of employers across the country. Company Nurse has grown 400 percent in the last four years. Starting this year, growth will be 20 to 30 percent annually, Binsfeld says.

“Health care spending is not going down and there are lots of inefficiencies in the delivery of health care in this country, so everyone from physicians to administrators to nurses could benefit from more business acumen,” he says. “With an emphasis on cost savings and efficiencies today, an MBA is a logical step.”

BrucePearson

Q & A With John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital’s New CEO Bruce Pearson

Bruce Pearson took over the CEO role at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital in Phoenix in April. AB met with him to find out more about his goals for the hospital, as well as his insight on various issues the health care industry is facing.

What is your background in the health care industry?
I grew up in the Northwest and I had a Master’s in Business Administration, and I had a desire to get into hospital management. I moved to Arizona to go back to school at Arizona State University — they have a master’s program in health services administration. So I came here for an MHA degree and I went to work for a local health care organization and I just loved it here. So we moved here 26 years ago, and I’ve had the opportunity to work at several facilities/hospitals around different parts of the Valley — the central Valley, the West Valley, the East Valley — and now it’s my opportunity to work in the North Valley.

What prompted your move?
John C. Lincoln has an excellent reputation for clinical care as being a place that people want to work for, and one of its designations is as a magnet hospital for nursing. It was actually the first hospital in the state of Arizona to become a magnet hospital … What that means is they met the criteria that had been established at a national level to receive a designation as a hospital that truly is a magnet to attract and retain professional nurses. … Also, the organization is truly unique among hospital organizations in its level of commitment to the local community here. We not only provide hospital and health care services, but John C. Lincoln also has demonstrated a tremendous commitment to other community-oriented services through our Desert Mission, which was actually started over 80 years ago in the area. We have a food bank, we have the Lincoln Learning Center (a nationally accredited child-care facility), a community health center, a children’s dental clinic … providing free dental care, the Marley House (a family resource center that helps stabilize families in crisis) and a neighborhood renewal program.

What are your goals for the hospital?
It’s already a great organization, but my goal as the CEO is to work with the team of people who are here to continue to make improvements in the quality of care that we deliver, in our technologies (continue tobring in the latest technology and applying it), working with the physicianswho are here and with new physicians who come in and bring new skills, and to continue to make this agreat place for patients toreceive care, for staff to work and for physicians to practice medicine.

What is the greatest dilemma facing hospitals in Arizona?
One of the challenges nationally for hospitals is a shortage of health care professionals, and nursing would be a great example of that. The John C. Lincoln organization has a very successful nursing program in partnership with Grand Canyon University and we work with them and other universities and colleges to help train nurses. It is a problem, but John C. Lincoln is also part of the solution.