Tag Archives: Hensel Phelps

Mill & Rio Salado Rendering, DWC

Hayden House Tempe plans $200M mixed-use project in Tempe

Cassidy Turley has announced that Hayden House Tempe, LLC, a partnership between San Diego-based Douglas Wilson Companies (Douglas Wilson, Chairman and CEO), Hensel Phelps Development LLC, a subsidiary of Hensel Phelps based in Greeley, CO, (Jeff Wenaas, President) and Los Angeles-based Karlin Real Estate closed on 2.51 acres at the southwest corner Mill Avenue and Rio Salado Parkway in Tempe for $16,875,000. Karlin Real Estate also provided the debt in this transaction. The site is home to Hayden House, the oldest continuously occupied structure in Metropolitan Phoenix and Arizona, built 1871-1873.

Cassidy Turley Executive Managing Director Brent Moser, Vice President Mike Sutton and Associate Brooks Griffith negotiated the transaction on behalf of the seller, Michael Monti’s Catering.

The partnership, Hayden House Tempe, LLC plan to develop Mill & Rio Salado, a $200 million mixed-use creative office and lifestyle-hotel development located on the 2.51 acre parcel widely considered to be the gateway to Tempe’s downtown core. This landmark project consists of a two towers: a 15-story 280,000 square foot Class A office building and a 16-story 274-key Kimpton hotel along with 17,000 square feet of complimentary restaurants and retail.

Historic Hayden House

Historic Hayden House

“Tempe is experiencing tremendous investment and revitalization. This environment combined with the Partnership’s ability to deliver a high-quality, urban mixed-use development will ensure this is a landmark project for downtown Tempe,” stated Douglas Wilson, Chairman/CEO of Douglas Wilson Companies.

Hensel Phelps has been selected as the contractor for Mill & Rio Salado. Construction is expected to start in mid-2015 with completion in 2017. Jerry Noble, Patrick Devine and Greg Mayer with Cushman & Wakefield have been awarded the leasing assignment for the office space at Mill & Rio Salado.

The historic Hayden House, one of Arizona’s original homesteads, will be preserved and repurposed as a destination restaurant to serve the Valley and the surrounding office and hotel guests. The building evolved from a typical Sonoran row house that was Charles Hayden’s family home until 1889, to a boarding house and eventually a restaurant that has been operating continuously in the building since 1924.

Carl Hayden, an Arizona Representative and Senator, was born in the home in 1877. Historians have labeled Carl Hayden “the most important person in Arizona history.” Leonard Monti purchased the property in 1954, and the restaurant, at the time known as La Casa Vieja, was renamed Monti’s La Casa Vieja. The restaurant underwent several additions to the original historic structure.

“The sale and subsequent development of the Mill & Rio Salado site is symbolic of the Tempe transformation into a destination for both corporate and high-tech companies as well as a vibrant lifestyle and entertainment district,” said Mr. Moser with Cassidy Turley.

North Tempe has emerged as one of the most desirable submarkets in the Valley.  It boasts the lowest vacancy rates in Metro Phoenix, with a Class A Vacancy rate under 5%.  It is home to several large office users in multiple industries.  Real estate leaders cite access to ASU, Light rail, freeways, walk able amenities, and true Class A office space as the leading reasons Tempe is experiencing such dynamic attention from office tenants.

The Mill & Rio Salado site is located less than a block from Phoenix’s acclaimed light rail system, across the street from Tempe Beach Park and Tempe Town Lake.  The development will compliment the core of over 3 million square feet of Class A office in Downtown Tempe that has become a magnet for the technology industry due to its central location within the Phoenix Valley and its close proximity to Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport and Arizona State University.

LarryGonda

Larry Gonda Joins Hensel Phelps Western District

Larry Gonda is the new chief estimator in the Hensel Phelps Western District office. He has worked in the construction industry for 38 years and been with Hensel Phelps for the past 29 years. While at Hensel Phelps, he has had the traditional career path of moving through the ranks and has held positions of superintendent, project manager, senior estimator and chief estimator, giving him a comprehensive perspective of all aspects of the construction process.

A product of Southern Illinois University, Larry has lived and worked in Colorado, Texas and Arizona during his career. He currently heads a department of nine estimators and is responsible for work procurement and costing throughout Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada and Utah. He has been involved in projects ranging from $1,000,000 to $700,000,000 including Design-Bid-Build, CM at Risk, Competitive Hard Bid, Design-Build, and Turnkey Developments.

rsz_phx_sky_train

PHX Sky Train Makes Its Long-Awatied Debut

 

Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport celebrated a major milestone with the opening of the PHX Sky Train April 8.

The Phoenix City Council and Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton took the first official ride after a ribbon-cutting event earlier in the morning.

Passengers using the PHX Sky Train will find a seamless connection between Terminal 4, which serves 80% of the passengers at Sky Harbor, East Economy parking, and the regional METRO light rail system at 44th St. and Washington.

“This is an exciting day for the city of Phoenix and Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport,” Mayor Stanton said. “The PHX Sky Train’s connection to light rail paves the way for convenient, multi-modal transportation to and from the Airport and is a true point of pride for our city.”

Travelers using Terminal 4, Sky Harbor’s busiest, will access the free PHX Sky Train from Level 3, where the gates and security checkpoints are located. From there, it is a two-minute ride to Sky Harbor’s largest economy parking area. Those wanting to connect with the METRO light rail only have a five-minute ride between Terminal 4 and the 44th St. Station. Trains arrive and depart every three to five minutes.

The automated, electrically-powered PHX Sky Train operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. “We are especially proud that the environmentally-friendly project has achieved Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification from the Unites States Green Building Council,” said Phoenix Aviation Director, Danny Murphy.

The PHX Sky Train stations also provide many amenities for travelers, including the ability to print boarding pass at kiosks and pet parks. Early Bag Check, available at East Economy parking since December, also opened at the 44th St. Station on April 8. It allows travelers flying Southwest or US Airways to check their bags at the station for no additional cost.

For those picking up travelers, the 44th St. Station features a cell-phone waiting lot. METRO light rail customers will have the opportunity to purchase light rail tickets at the 44th St. Station.

By early 2015, the PHX Sky Train will serve all three terminals at Sky Harbor, with a station Terminal 3 and a walkway to Terminal 2. In its final stage of construction, the PHX Sky Train will continue to the Rental Car Center.

“This project is a significant milestone in Sky Harbor’s growth. It will make traveling easier by relieving the roadways of congestion and will further connect our community with sustainable transportation options,” said Phoenix City Manager David Cavazos.

Key companies involved in the design and construction of the PHX Sky Train (Stage 1) include:

Fixed Facilities

Gannet Fleming – Prime Design Engineer

HOK – Station Architect

Hensel Phelps – CM at Risk

McCarthy Building Companies – General Contractor

URS – Project Management Consultant

Train System

Bombardier – Train System Provider/Operator

The Weitz Company – Train System Contractor

Lea + Elliott – Train System Consultant

 

srp installs solar energy systems

Energy Consortium’s Roadmap puts state of path to build industry

Imagine Arizona as the energy hub of the Southwest — where major regional transmission lines tie into infrastructure in the state and serve a growing regional demand for energy. Arizona would be a place where an increasing percentage of jobs are related to the energy industry, whether in manufacturing, generation, transmission, energy efficiency, service or technology innovation. Many of these jobs would be higher-wage jobs requiring a skilled labor force fed by Arizona’s schools and universities. Arizona could be a hub of energy-sector jobs, with factories making equipment for the industry and power plants shipping electricity to neighboring states via new power lines, all contributing to a better economy.

That is the essence of the Arizona Energy Consortium’s Energy Roadmap, which the group hopes with be a catalyst for the state’s energy industry in the same way Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap helped the state increase bioscience jobs by 41 percent and helped increase the number of bioscience establishments by 27 percent during its 10-year plan.

“It was important to create this document to give the energy industry a unified voice and direction,” said said Michelle De Blasi, co-chair of the AEC and a shareholder at Greenberg Traurig. “The energy industry is going to be here forever. We are always going to need energy. So the Roadmap was designed to make the industry better for everyone — consumers, developers, legislators. So it was critical that we get it right.”

This is the vision the Roadmap hopes to realize over the next decade: Arizona is the energy hub of the Southwest, with a diverse energy mix supporting reliable transmission, a strong base of manufacturing facilities, increased numbers of higher wage jobs, and world-class research institutions, resulting in increased economic development for the state and region.

Once that vision is realized, De Blasi said the state can expect to reap these benefits:
• Enhanced job creation and higher-wage jobs within Arizona
• Increased state economic revenue
• Enhanced energy export potential
• Heightened energy self-sufficiency and national and state security
• Increased transmission reliability
• Continued low cost energy

“This Roadmap is going to help Arizona be looked at differently from outside its borders,” said Chris Davey, co-chair with De Blasi of the AEC and president of EnviroMission, which is developing a solar tower in Western Arizona. “The Roadmap will create a sense of certainty, which appeals to the finance community. So when they are looking to invest, that certainty creates a more attractive environment for developers and investors.”

Davey and De Blasi said they will be rolling out the Roadmap this year, presenting it to groups throughout the state. For more information on the Roadmap, visit aztechcouncil.org.

ROADMAP CONTRIBUTORS

Arizona Commerce Authority
Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy
Arizona Public Service
Bridge Strategy Group
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
City of Mesa, the Office of the Mayor
Cleantech Open
Dircks
DIRTT
DMB Associates
Energy Services Coalition
EnviroMission
Faithful+Gould
Greater Phoenix Economic Council
Greenberg Traurig
The Green Chamber – Greater Phoenix
Golder Associates
Hensel Phelps
Ikoloji
Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals
J.D. Porter & Associates
Kolbe Connect
Matthew McDonnell
Ormond Group, LLC
RG Schmelzer, Inc.
Salt River Project
Stream Energy
Tucson Electric Power
Valley Forward
Valley Partnership

Steve Grauer - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Q&A: Vice President/Western District Manager Steve Grauer

Steve Grauer shares how he got started in the construction industry and what he thinks about the future of Hensel Phelps Construction in Arizona.

Q: How did you get your start in the construction industry?

A: As a young boy, I was constantly around the construction business. My father was a vice president of an interior subcontractor in the Northwest. During high school, my brother and I worked part time on residential projects doing laborer work and light carpentry. While attending college (University of Washington), I continued to work on commercial projects as well. I knew from an early age that construction was an industry that I wanted to be part of and that would provide a challenging career. Construction has certainly done that for me.

Q: Hensel Phelps has made its mark in Arizona for more than 30 years, with 30 projects worth an estimated $1.8B. How proud are you of that mark?

A: I am extremely proud to continue the legacy whose foundation was set in 1979. A repeat corporate client, IBM, brought us to Tucson from Colorado. Our continued success with IBM on their projects in Tucson created the opportunity to continue to work together and took us further West to California, where today we have two district offices. The construction market has changed greatly in Arizona since then. With the approval of Alternate Project Delivery Methods in the early 2000’s, the diverse portfolio of project types that Hensel Phelps undertakes, as well as the experience of our people on those projects, has allowed for growth and opportunities with many new owners. Regionalization and establishing a permanent presence here is key to developing longterm relationships with owners, subcontractors, designers, trade associations and the communities our people live in. We are proud to live and work in a community and state as great as Arizona.

Q: How did Hensel Phelps weather the Great Recession, which took its toll in Arizona on the commercial real estate industry?

A: This year marks Hensel Phelps’ 75th anniversary in business. From that first farmhouse in Northern Colorado that Hensel built, we have come a long way and seen many tough and challenging times. The Hensel Phelps organization and the Western District each had their 3 best years in our 75-year history during the Great Recession. We attribute this to our repeat clients that continue to entrust their projects to us, relationships in the Industry as a whole and the unparalleled performance of our people. We are grateful for all of them.

Q: Hensel Phelps is completing its portion of PHX Sky Train this year and embarking on another major project – the Solar Tower in La Paz County. How optimistic are you about Hensel Phelps’ presence in Arizona the next 10, 20 or even 30 years?

A: I am extremely optimistic and confident about our continued presence in Arizona in the future. In the construction industry, change is constant. Market sectors and economic conditions are always providing challenges to change. It is a matter of survival. While we may not look exactly the same 30 years from now, we will be here.

Q: You went to college in Washington and now live in Arizona. How important is the Western Division to the overall picture at Hensel Phelps?

A: The Western District, covering Arizona, Southern Nevada, New Mexico and Oklahoma, is extremely important to Hensel Phelps. Establishing a local presence, committing to the communities in which our families live and developing relationships is critical to our continued success. Prior to our corporate commitment of establishing a district office in Arizona, these states where covered by other district offices. Our CEO and President, Jeff Wenaas, is from Tucson and attended both UA and ASU. There is a strong commitment from the top. Arizona and the Southwest have been and will continue to be very important to us. We are the local contractor with the national reach!

Q: As Vice President and Western District Manager, what project (or projects) are you most proud of?

A: As a district manager, I am proud of all of our projects, but most importantly our people and performance on those projects. We are fortunate to get the opportunity to perform a wide range of project types for both public and private owners, utilizing a wide variety of project delivery methods. The depth of experience of our people allows them to seamlessly operate on these different projects and exceed our owner’s expectations in the overall construction experience.

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STATS:

  • Number of years with HP: 22, with stints in Washington, California, Nevada, Utah and Colorado.
  • Number of years as Vice President/Western District Manager: 4
  • Family: Wife Stephanie and daughters Morgan and Skyla; and two Labrador Retrievers, Dakota and Mocha.
  • Hobbies: Traveling, fishing, hunting and shooting.
  • Favorite sports teams: Denver Broncos – and of course the Arizona Cardinals.

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For more information on Steve Grauer of Hensel Phelps Construction, visit Hensel Phelps’ website at henselphelps.com.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

green schoolhouse - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

This Green Schoolhouse Rocks

Phoenix’s Roadrunner Elementary School is going green thanks to Hensel Phelps and a California-based organization

Investment in a child’s education takes on an entirely new meaning with the Green Schoolhouse Series project. Started in 2008, the Green Schoolhouse Series is in the process of creating the world’s first LEED Platinum design schoolhouse.

In Arizona, it’s happening at Roadrunner Elementary School in Phoenix. Hensel Phelps Construction Co. is the general contractor and one of the first companies to reach out to the project.

“Hensel Phelps’ participation is all about giving back to the community where our employees and their families live and work,” says project manager Alex Bertolini.

“Hensel Phelps’ teamwork, drive and passion for the project continues to amaze the (Cause and Effect Evolutions) team as well as the other partners that have signed onto the project,” says Stefanie Valles, public relations coordinator for San Diego-based Cause and Effect Evolutions, a cause marketing/business development organization.

The Green Schoolhouse Series is a collaboration bringing together corporations, foundations, school districts, communities, media outlets, and volunteers to build high-performance, environmentally-sustainable, LEED-Platinum designed Green Schoolhouses at Title I, low-income, public schools. Hensel Phelps was the right pick for the project because of its reputation in the school-building market as well as being a leader in sustainability, Valles says.

The work at Roadrunner Elementary, 7702 N. 39th Ave., will provide students the opportunity to learn the importance of sustainability and its relevance. Construction began in May and is expected to be complete in July.

Green Schoolhouse Series projects are not just rewarded “Platinum” because of sustainability features, but also for being an influence that ultimately increases students’ performance in school. More than 300,000 trailers are used as classrooms across the country. A quarter of U.S. classrooms are considered dangerous and cause health problems in students, leading to their absence and overall neglect of educational benefits.

According to Greening America’s Schools Reports, the American Federation of Teachers and National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, there is a significant improvement in the following areas:

  • Improved learning: 26% progression in math and 20% progression in reading;
  • Healthier students: 5% increase in attendance and 9% decrease in asthma-related absences;
  • Cost savings: 33% reduction in energy usage and 30% reduction in water usage.

The founders of the Green Schoolhouse Series project, Marshall and Jeff Zotara, began school makeovers long before the company formed. In 2001 they influenced the growth of elementary school sustainability by implementing energy conservation and gardens.

The Green Schoolhouse Series focuses on students in K-12. The Safari model, which is being built at Roadrunner Elementary, will be completed for grades K-5. The Studio is for grades 6-8 and the Loft is for high school students. The project’s purpose at Roadrunner will lead the students and community through a journey of discovery of sustainability through the plan’s technology and education.

While the school is intended for students to move forward in education, the architectural plan, produced by architectural firm Stantec, was designed entirely backwards. All the components were donated before the building process began; therefore the design had to revolve around the various materials that were provided.

If the features mentioned weren’t fascinating enough, the schoolhouse construction would not be built by contractors but by at least 1,000 volunteers. Now that’s an investment in education.

Cause and Effect Evolutions “looks and asks for any skilled volunteers that would like to give back (to the community),” Valles says, as well as the corporate sponsors of the project. More than 1,000 volunteers have donated their time and effort into producing the LEED Platinum design schoolhouse. The volunteers were presented with an “accelerated extreme home-makeover schedule, which is unlike any other building project,” Bertolini says.

The Safari model was also rewarded the Edward E. Kirkbride award in May 2011 for excellence in educational and innovative planning and design. Roadrunner’s added on, versatile space will affect students, parent groups and the community.

“The Green Schoolhouse is geared toward a modern learning environment and provides students with a green mode of thinking,” Bertolini says.

For more information on the Green Schoolhouse Series, visit Hensel Phelps’ blog at henselphelpsconstructionco.wordpress.com.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

PHX skytrain - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

All Aboard The PHX Sky Train

PHX Sky Train Stage 1 at Sky Harbor is a moving example of Hensel Phelps’ grand presence and reputation in Arizona

Ask Allan Bliesmer what’s most special about the $644M PHX Sky Train project, and his answer isn’t that surprising.

“The team effort toward a common goal,” responds Bliesmer, operations manager for Hensel Phelps Construction Co., general contractor for the Stage 1 fixed facilities of the massive project at Sky Harbor International Airport. “The city, designer, and Hensel Phelps addressed each challenge with a solutions-orientated approach.

“The people involved in the project refrained from developing or maintaining personal agendas, and worked together, utilizing each member’s expertise, to develop the best design and construction solutions for the project.”

Once Hensel Phelps was selected as construction manager for the first phase of the train’s stations and elevated guide-way tracks, preliminary work began and lasted 20 months — from June 2008 to February 2010. (Bombardier Transportation was chosen as the system provider).

Stage 1 — a 1.7-mile stretch — will transport airport visitors and employees between METRO light rail, east economy parking and Terminal 4, which serves 80% of Sky Harbor’s passengers. Stage 1 is scheduled for completion in 2Q 2012.

What was it about the company that helped Hensel Phelps land such a historic project? Prior to the start of the PHX Sky Train project, Bliesmer says, Hensel Phelps had just completed the automated train project at the Dallas-Ft. Worth International Airport. The Dallas-Ft. Worth system was installed throughout the entire airport and spanned a total of 5 miles in length with 8 stations.

In addition, Hensel Phelps has completed billions of dollars of aviation work around the country including automated train systems, terminals, hangars, administration facilities, rental car facilities, air traffic control towers and parking structures at a number of airports.

But one feature that makes PHX Sky Train different from other projects is a 350- foot bridge that carries the train above an active taxiway that is large enough for a 747 to pass through. An article in a national construction magazine boasted that the project “features many innovative design elements,” including the bridge.

“The Taxiway R crossing is a unique item not generally featured at other airports around the world,” Bliesmer says. “In order to maintain full use of the taxiway, the design had to accommodate a ‘bridge’ that would not encumber the use of the largest aircraft planned at the airport.

“To satisfy this, a 350-foot cast in-place concrete ‘bridge,’ at an elevation of 80 feet above grade, was incorporated to provide the necessary clearance. Another innovative approach was the use of precast tub girders in lieu of cast in-place concrete structural elements for a majority of the guideway structure,” Bliesmer adds. “The use of precast allowed the construction team to minimize the real estate needed on the ground to install shoring required for a traditional cast in-place concrete approach, resulting in minimization of issues associated with public access, airport operations and safety.”

The automated train was a necessity. Sky Harbor serves 42M passengers a year, and the number is projected to rise to 40M to 50M in 2013. The goal is to remove about 20,000 cars and trucks — up to 20% of the traffic circling Sky Harbor — from the airport area. The project is also a boon to the local economy. Stage 1 has created an estimated 6,000 jobs.

What are some of the challenges Hensel Phelps faced?

“The primary challenge with the integration of such a large construction project into an active airport,” Bliesmer explains, “is completing the work without causing interruption to the airport and airline operations, as well as maintaining safe access by public and airport employees.”

In order to accomplish public safety and minimize any impact to the airport operations and airline operations, much of the work activity is conducted during night-time hours when flight activity and public access at the airport is at a minimum, Bliesmer adds.

Stage 2, which will continue through the airport to the rental car center, was scheduled for completion in 2020. But last June, the Phoenix City Council voted to move up completion of a .6-mile section to connect Terminal 4 with Terminal 3, along with a walkway for passengers to access Terminal 2, to early 2015. Final cost of the project: $1.5B.

“The state-of-the-art system installed at Sky Harbor is the latest and greatest in the industry,” Bliesmer says proudly. “Having the opportunity to work with the City of Phoenix and the aviation team at Sky Harbor has furthered Hensel Phelps’ experience and recognition throughout the industry.”

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PHX SKY TRAIN BY THE NUMBERS

  • 14M: Pounds of precast concrete
  • 12M: Pounds of structural steel
  • 5,000: Drawings issued for construction
  • 340: Subcontracts issued
  • 40: Miles of wiring (power cabling)

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For more information on PHX Sky Train, visit Sky Harbors’ website at skyharbor.com/about/automatedtrain.html.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

AZRE Digital Issue

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Time flies when you’re having fun

Peter MadridAs I celebrate my second year as Editor of AZRE magazine in June, I ask myself … “Where did the time go?”

It seems as if it was just yesterday that I was trying to learn all I could about vacancy rates, foreign trade zones, REITs, BIM and CMARs … and then write about it.

After almost two years of attending at least 50 commercial real estate-related conferences, financial outlooks, breakfasts, lunches, discussions, you name it … I can honestly say I feel right at home among the many knowledgable professionals in attendance.

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks.

Speaking of anniversaries, this issue features coverage of a well-respected advocacy organization (Valley Partnership) and a well-known general contractor (Hensel Phelps), which are both celebrating notable milestones.

» Valley Partnership, which proudly calls itself “The Valley of the Sun’s Premier Advocacy Group for Responsible Development,” is celebrating its Silver Anniversary — 25 years. Our coverage includes a roundtable discussion with six past chairmen and a Q&A with the new chairman.

» Hensel Phelps, a Colorado-based GC with major projects in Arizona, is celebrating its 75th anniversary (more than 30 years in our state). HP is wrapping up work on Stage I of the PHX Sky Train at Sky Harbor International Airport. It also has been selected to build a proposed 2,800-foot Solar Tower power station in La Paz County for EnviroMission of Australia.

As for my two-year anniversary celebration … I think I’ll just read up some more on cap rates, GPLETs, permitting regulations…

Editors Letter Signature

Peter Madrid, Editor

Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

UA Cancer Center

Medical: University of Arizona Cancer Center


UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA CANCER CENTER

Developer: City of Phoenix
General contractor: Hensel Phelps
Architect: ZGF Architects
Location: NWC of Seventh and Fillmore streets, Phoenix
Size: 250,000 SF

The $135M, 6-story UA Cancer Center will be the latest addition to Downtown Phoenix’s Biomedical Campus. UA will partner with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and provide inpatient care and clinical operations. Expected start and completion dates: 4Q 2011 to 1Q 2014.

AZRE Magazine, September/October 2011
PHX Sky Train - AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

Public: Phx Sky Train


PHX SKY TRAIN

Developer: City of Phoenix
Contractor: Hensel Phelps Construction Co.
Architect: Gannett Fleming
Size: Three stations totaling approximately 200,000 SF and 1.9 miles of dual guideway
Location: Phoenix Sky Harbor International

The new $330M PHX Sky Train Stage 1 is comprised of three stations located at Terminal 4, the East Economy Lot parking near 44th and Washington streets. It will move passengers from the Valley Metro Light Rail station to Terminal 4. When Stage 2 is complete, it will extend service to the remaining terminals and rental car facility. Stage 1 completion date is set for May 2012.

AZRE September/October 2010