Tag Archives: higher education

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Developer of the Year

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Arizona Board of Regents

Winner of Best Public Project: McCord Hall
Finalist in Best Education Project: 
ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex & McCord Hall
Finalist in Most Challenging Project: ASU Downtown Sun Devil Fitness Complex

Whether it’s bringing groundbreaking development to Arizona’s college campuses or facilitating adaptive reuses of existing structures, Arizona Board of Regents is behind many standout projects this year. ASU developed two modern fitness complexes in 2013 as well as the stunning new school for W. P. Carey graduate programs at McCord Hall. Looking forward, ASU will redevelop its Sun Devil Stadium, the College Avenue Commons (Block 12) project on its main campus and see the groundbreaking of its law center in downtown Phoenix as well as a redevelopment of the Annex along College Avenue north of the main campus. The University has the largest enrollment numbers in the nation and the aggressive development to match. That doesn’t mean University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University aren’t also aggressively developing. ABOR recently requested $1B from the state legislature for research development totalling 1,675,400 SF, which will include projects for all three universities.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Merit for Iconic Development

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Manzanita Hall
Developer: American Campus Communities
Contractor: hardison/downey construction
Architect: Studio Ma
Size: 218,000 SF
Location: 600 E. University Dr.
Completed: October 2013

manzyThis merit award winner can be appreciated by all the locals who have had generations of their families get the Sun Devil experience among the halls of this dormitory…To add to its local significance, this building also happens to serve as an underground pull box that feeds utilities from an underground tunnel system to ASU’s public safety and IT departments as well as the State DPS radio loop.


Honorable Mention:
Melrose Gateway Monument
Developer: City of Phoenix
General Contractor: Weitz
Architect: Gensler

Gensler_City of Phoenix_Melrose Final Rendering_night The 80-foot steel Melrose Gateway Monument, arched above the threshold of the Melrose Neighborhood District in central Phoenix, was fully fabricated and constructed in Phoenix. The steel was made from recycled content, its design abstracted from an organic floral pattern that strives to give a brand identity to the mid-century modern influences apparent in the neighborhood and its businesses.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Best Education Project

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Central Arizona College 
Maricopa Campus
Developer: Pinal County Community College District
Contractor: CORE Construction
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Size: 76,800 SF
Location: 17945 N. Regent Dr., Maricopa
Completed: July 2013

Central Arizona College created a new campus in the City of Maricopa that brings sustainability and education to the forefront. The three initial campus buildings are sustainable “academic sheds” designed to keep the students cool from the hot desert sun throughout the year. The building materials are utilitarian, natural, low-maintenance and recycled. Nothing is wasted for aesthetics. There is one central water plant that feeds the three new buildings on campus. It’s designed in a manner that considers the campus’ future growth and saves water consumption by 28 percent. The master-planned campus will be 10 times its current size by completion. The innovative and transformative research facility will serve as a vital tool for recruiting top scientists and engineers, and bring the seeds of change to a “bedroom community boomtown gone bust,” as the New York Times once published.
CAC

paying_for_online_education

NAU Introduces Personalized Learning

Ushering in a new chapter in 21st century higher education, Northern Arizona University (NAU) announced the launch of its Personalized Learning program, offering accredited, competency-based online bachelor’s degrees for just $5,000 a year. Initial degrees include Computer Information Technology, Liberal Arts and Small Business Administration. Students can begin the application process at www.nau.edu/personalizedlearning.

“Personalized Learning marks a watershed moment in higher education,” said John Haeger, president of Northern Arizona University. “As the first public university to launch this kind of competency-based program, Northern Arizona University is opening an entirely new level of access to a respected university education.”

Unlike standard online courses that offer repackaged content from traditional classrooms, or today’s popular MOOCs (Massively Open Online Courses), NAU’s Personalized Learning program enables students to earn a bachelor’s degree online in a time- and cost- effective manner by crediting their existing knowledge and tailoring coursework to their learning preferences.

“Personalized Learning takes the learning objectives of traditional college coursework and reorganizes them to be more engaging and applicable to today’s workplace,” said Fred Hurst, senior vice president, NAU-Extended Campuses and creator of Personalized Learning. “This program is about creating a skilled and inspired adult workforce with the necessary critical thinking skills that meet the demands of employers.”

Green Law - Valley Forward’s Goals Are Important To Dan Litteral’s Company, Apollo Group

Valley Forward’s Goals Are Important To Dan Litteral’s Company, Apollo Group

Dan Litteral
Vice President/Legal & Associate General Counsel
Apollo Group/University of Phoenix

Dan Litteral has been in higher education and has practiced regulatory law for more than 20 years, and that experience has enhanced his involvement with Valley Forward.

Litteral joined Valley Forward in 2007 through Apollo Group and the University of Phoenix, which have both been longstanding members and supporters of the organization.

“It became apparent to me that Valley Forward was an almost uniquely positioned organization for a metropolitan area that was really committed to public dialogue between organizations and civic leaders,  to promote environmentally sensible development,” Litteral says.

Before working for the University of Phoenix and Apollo Group, Litteral spent 20 years practicing law in the Washington D.C., area. He helped build the in-house legal department at the University of Phoenix and was University of Phoenix general counsel from 2003-2007. Litteral then was moved up to the Apollo Group where he currently runs a practice group for Apollo that provides education and regulatory law services.

Litteral says Valley Forward is staying fresh and relevant, and is important to Apollo Group because it has aligned goals. Apollo Group has focused on sustainability and appropriate environmental usages.

Since 2008, Litteral has sat on the Valley Forward board of directors and executive committee. He was also chair of Valley Forward’s Earthfest Educators Night, an annual event that invites between 300 and 500 teachers from around the Valley to learn about environmental education so they can share the information with their students.

Litteral wants to see a focus on continued relevance from Valley Forward. He says that as the economy turns around and the organization grows, it is important to improve the issues that revolve around sustainability.

“Valley Forward clearly wants to be the environmental go-to organization in the Valley in terms of balancing the need for growth, development an stability,” Litteral says. “By undertaking events and continuing to engage leaders in corporations and the business world, it will fulfill that mission.”

Valley Forward works with organizations such as Apollo Group to educate the community and businesses on how to be sustainable and environmentally friendly. Valley Forward provides an opportunity for public dialogue of discussing how to move forward with environmental considerations.

“Valley Forward has a long track record of making the Valley a good place to live and work, while understanding we need to continue to develop and grow, and to do so in an environmentally friendly way,” Litteral says.

William Pepicello, President, University of Phoenix - AZ Business Magazine June 2010

First Job: William Pepicello, President, University of Phoenix

William Pepicello, Ph.D.
President, University of Phoenix

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My first job was reading gas meters in Erie, Penn., as summer employment. I learned the importance of being on time and that the work had to be done regardless of the weather or other harsh conditions, which included crawling around grungy basements, avoiding aggressive dogs, and in one case a small riot.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first job in higher education was as an assistant professor of English at the University of Delaware, teaching freshman English. This job taught me that I really could have a positive effect on students’ lives. I also learned the value of connecting with students. Even in classes of 100, I made it a point to learn each student’s name and to talk to them when I saw them on campus. I have on occasion over the years run into one of these students, and surprisingly I still remember their names — and they mine.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I read gas meters at about $5 an hour, and my first teaching job garnered the princely sum of $12,000 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
My most significant mentor was Dr. George Johnson, the dean of arts and sciences at Temple University, where I taught in the ’80s. He taught me that being good was not good enough. He saw my ambition and helped me learn to think out of the box. Most importantly, he taught me that I should follow my passion, and that if I did this and was open to change, I would find success.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
The same advice that Dr. Johnson gave me many years ago. Higher education is in a period of significant change in America, and it is not an easy path to follow. But it is a very satisfying and vital profession. This is truly a time to focus on one’s passion for education and follow the path that presents itself. It has led me from being a professor of English and classical languages to my current job (who’d have thought?). And there is not a day that I don’t wake up energized and eager to get to work. Every day is an exciting new adventure.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would still want a career that keeps me connected and that ties to one of my passions. I have over the years done lots of radio and TV spots, as well as writing the occasional newspaper column. So, getting out of the box, I’d really love to do a morning drive-time talk show, probably sports talk. I even have the name: Pep Talk. So far Doug and Wolf aren’t biting though, and Phoenix has a great complement of sports broadcasters. But a guy has to dream …

Arizona Business Magazine June 2010

Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Grant Scholarships

Times Are Tough For Everyone, And Students Trying To Fund Their Educations Are No Exception

With college tuition constantly on the rise, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation is doing its part to help deserving Hispanic students throughout the Valley pay for their educations.

The foundation is a nonprofit organization whose main goal is to provide scholarships to Hispanic students attending Arizona post-secondary schools. The foundation also supports philanthropic efforts within the Latino community.

“As chairman of the board for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (AZHCC), one of the accomplishments that I am most proud of is the establishment of a scholarship program,” says Robert Espiritu, who works in acquisition marketing for American Express’ International Business Unit.

Espiritu developed the scholarship initiative in 2008, during the 50th anniversary of the chamber’s Black and White Business Awards Ball — the longest-running black-tie event in Phoenix.

In order to commemorate the anniversary, Espiritu developed the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation Scholarship Program, which now has grown into a permanent component of the awards.

Espiritu also decided on an unconventional way to raise money for the scholarships.

“The idea I had was to ask the audience for pledges for scholarships,” Espiritu says.

The donations began with companies who had pre-committed to donating money and continued from there. “It was kind of spontaneous; I just wanted to ask people if they wanted to join the donation …” Espiritu says.Soon, “call-outs” were made from attendees pledging various amounts to the scholarship fund. Those who pledged then came on stage and stated their pledge amounts.

The 2008 event turned out to be a huge success. Donors big and small, from individuals to corporations, banded together to raise nearly $110,000.
“The generosity on the part of our corporate citizens and individuals has been amazing and gives me great faith that even with this down economy we still have the support from our community,” Espiritu says.

Despite the difficult economic climate, an additional $35,000 was raised in 2009. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Qwest Communications, Humana, Wells Fargo, APS and SRP were some of the larger corporations to contribute at this year’s ball.

“To date, the AZHCC Foundation has raised approximately $140,000 in scholarships for deserving and aspiring Latino students,” Espiritu says. “I want to personally thank all of our donors for their contributions. Without them, all of this would not be possible.”

On May 19 of this year, 60 Latino students were presented with the scholarships at a private dinner at the Wrigley Mansion. Scholarship recipients ranged from first-generation college students to graduate students.

“To be awarded such esteemed honors means that my hard work paid off. But I still have so much more to do to prove that I am worthy of such recognitions,” says Annalili Chacon, a recipient of the scholarship and a Barack Obama Scholar at Arizona State University.

Cosme Madrid, a student at ASU, also received a scholarship.

“I wanted to apply for this scholarship simply because it applied to who I was. … I learned that the chamber of commerce supports Hispanics to get a higher education and so I went for it,” he says.

Madrid adds that being selected a winner “is a great feeling because it shows the hard work that I have done throughout my high school career to get to where I am and to receive this scholarship.”

Both recipients are grateful for the financial relief the scholarships provide and are better prepared for the road ahead.

“It is so important for us to reach out and help future generations of students, and for the Hispanic chamber especially to be able to assist our Latino students,” Espiritu says. “These students will become our future leaders and the goal of AZHCC’s scholarship program is to help facilitate the development of our future leaders through education.”

DATOS 2009 annual expert analysis of the role and impact of Latino businesses and consumers on the state’s economy

Comprehensive Information On Hispanics In Arizona

On Nov. 18, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, will release DATOS 2009, an annual expert analysis of the role and impact of Latino businesses and consumers on the state’s economy.

For nearly 15 years, DATOS has provided insight into issues ranging from the purchasing power of the Hispanic market to its prevalence in various segments of private industry. This year’s edition again provides detailed information on the Hispanic population’s growing impact on the economy. The report takes months to complete, with research overseen by Louis Olivas, professor emeritus at W.P. Carey.

The following is a summary of the key findings presented in DATOS 2009. The project is funded by SRP.

Hispanic Business
There are more than 2 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the United States with a combined revenue approaching $465 billion. Arizona is home to more than 35,000 Hispanic-owned businesses.

Nearly two out of every five Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona is a sole proprietorship and 67 percent are family-owned. More than one-third of Arizona’s Hispanic-owned businesses have annual revenues above $500,000, and the median household income among Arizona’s Hispanic business owners is $76,400.

Purchasing Power
The purchasing power of the Hispanic market commands attention. In 2008, Hispanics accounted for 8.9 percent of all U.S. buying power, up dramatically from 5 percent in 1990. In total, U.S. Hispanics control $951 billion in spending power, and by 2013 this figure is projected to reach $1.386 trillion. In Arizona, Hispanics account for 16 percent of the total state’s buying power, leading Arizona to rank fourth among all states for its concentrated Latino consumer market.

Hispanic Consumers
When it comes to marketing, Hispanic consumers have diverse attitudes. Often, an individual’s language preference is a key determinant in their perceptions of advertisements and products. Understanding more about Hispanics’ household composition, financial resources, homeownership rates, methods of telecommunication and product preferences are all essential to developing loyal consumers. For example, did you know that Latinos nationwide were responsible for buying 297 million movie tickets in the past year, compared to 150 million tickets for African Americans and 155 million for all other ethnicities combined?

Technology

The Hispanic population is embracing new media and other technology at a promising rate. Fifty-two percent of the Hispanic population is now online, representing 23 million users nationwide. Internet use is far greater among English-dominant and bilingual Latinos than Spanish-dominant Latinos, suggesting tremendous room for growth. Eight percent of second-generation Latinos and 89 percent of college-educated Latinos go online. In addition to downloading music, uploading photos, and researching products, online news is also popular among Latino Internet users. While online, at least 80 percent said they read the news at least once per month.

Cellular use is also notably high among Latinos. Hispanics are more likely than white non-Hispanics to buy the latest phones, upgrade them faster and use special features. Hispanic adults ages 18-34 use an average of 1,200 cell phone minutes per month, compared to 950 minutes for the general population. They are also more likely to use features such as text messaging and music downloading.

In addition to cell phone use, online social networking is another sign of high social connectedness among Latinos. Forty percent of Hispanics maintain profiles on sites such as MySpace, Facebook or MiGente, a trend that is likely to explode as more Latinos hit their teens and young adulthood.

Media

Arizona contains some major Hispanic media markets. According to Nielsen Media Research, Phoenix ranks eighth for Hispanic TV household markets. Print media is also alive and well in the Hispanic community. The vast majority of Hispanic adults (82 percent) read Hispanic newspapers, and the same proportion pass them on to at least one other person. Among Hispanics aged 25-34, 25 percent have called or visited a store in response to an advertisement.

U.S. Latino Population
As a proportion of total U.S. population growth, Hispanics accounted for 51.6 percent of that growth. This is predominantly the result of births to the existing population rather than immigration; six out of 10 Hispanics were born in the United States. Larger average household size (3.6 for Arizona Hispanics versus 2.7 for all Arizona residents) is another contributing factor.

Over the next four decades, the number of minority workers in the U.S. labor force will grow from 32 percent to 55 percent, with the greatest increase coming from Hispanics. The country as a whole will benefit from the productivity, purchasing power, taxes, and Social Security contributions of Hispanic workers.

AZ Population
Arizona ranks fourth among all states for the largest percentage of Hispanic residents. In 2007, 1.9 million Latinos accounted for 30 percent of Arizona’s total population.

Maricopa County in particular has experienced tremendous growth in the Hispanic population. Between 2000 and 2007, it ranked second (after Los Angeles County) for the largest increase in Hispanic population. Mirroring the nation, the majority of these Arizona Hispanics are U.S.-born (63 percent).

The median age of Hispanics in Arizona is 25, compared to 42 for the white non-Hispanic population, and the median household income is $40,476, compared to $55,554 for the white non-Hispanic population. Given the youthfulness of the Hispanic population, Arizona Latinos are certain to increase in number and purchasing power over the next few decades.

Birth and Fertility

In 2007, Hispanic births accounted for 25 percent of all births in the United States. Teen pregnancy is still a major issue facing the Latino community, but between 1991 and 2004, the birth rate for Hispanic teens fell 21 percent. Clearly, the relative youth of Hispanics will continue to impact future fertility patterns in the United States and Arizona. The Hispanic fertility rate in Arizona exceeds the U.S. Hispanic fertility rate. From 1987 to 2007, the number of Hispanic births in Arizona has increased 211 percent.

Growth trend

The Hispanic population in the United States has increased by 11 million since 2000, and Arizona ranks fourth among states for the largest percentage of Hispanics (30 percent). In the 2008 presidential election, Hispanics voted in record numbers, demonstrating growing civic engagement and a vested interest the country’s future. Specifically, 50 percent of Hispanics turned out to vote, an increase of 2.7 percent from the 2004 presidential election. And Hispanics are voting with their pocketbooks and mouse-clicks as well. Sixty percent of 18- to 34-year-old Latinos and 76 percent of U.S.-born Latinos access the Internet. During a recent 12-month period, the average amount spent online by a Latino in Phoenix was $831.

Hispanics Trend Young

One of the defining characteristics of the Hispanic population is its youthfulness. The median age of Hispanics in the United States was only 27.7 in 2008, compared to 36.8 for the total population. Nearly two-thirds of Hispanics are under the age of 35.

Furthermore, 25 percent of the nation’s children under age 5 are Hispanic. For all children under 18, 44 percent are non-white.

The median age of Hispanics in Arizona is 25, compared to 42 for the white non-Hispanic population. U.S.-born Hispanics’ median age is only 16, which means that half of these native-born Hispanics are not old enough to drive, vote or consume alcohol. However, they will be soon. And they are at a formative stage in their lives when core values and social and consumer habits are being influenced and developed.

Lifetime fertility for Hispanic women has been 45-47 percent higher than for white non-Hispanic women. From 1987 to 2007, the number of Hispanic births in Arizona has increased 211 percent.

Latino Student Population

In the fall of 2008, 416,705 Latino students were enrolled in Arizona’s K-12 system. Hispanics accounted for 86 percent of total growth in school enrollment from 1998 to 2008. According to the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, by 2017-2018, Hispanic high school graduates in Arizona will exceed the number of white non-Hispanic high school graduates. This phenomenon has already occurred in New Mexico and California, and Arizona is clearly moving toward this milestone.

    By the Numbers
    Trends that matter


  • U.S. Hispanics control $951 billion in spending power and by 2013 this figure is projected to reach $1.386 trillion.
  • Young Hispanics will grow to be Arizona’s future workers, business owners, consumers, voters and civic leaders.
  • Along the way, they will have significant impacts on Arizona’s public education system, arts and culture scene, and economy.
  • Hispanics are wired and tech savvy. They already utilize the Internet for shopping, social networking, and news. Their use of new technologies will continue to increase.
  • Source: DATOS 2009
The Business Community Is Ringing A Cautionary Bell On Further Cuts To The State’s Education System

The Business Community Is Ringing A Cautionary Bell On Further Cuts To The State’s Education System

Good schools are good for business. It’s that simple. Contrary to popular belief, incentives and tax breaks aren’t necessarily the only things businesses take into account when considering a move to Arizona or an expansion of a local operation. Sure, they want to make money, but the quality of the education system, from K-12 through colleges and universities, also is a key element in the decision-making process.

In early July, $3.2 billion in budget funding for the K-12 public education system was restored after initially being cut by Gov. Jan Brewer in a line-item veto. The education budget was also increased by $500 million, which now qualifies the state for $2.3 billion in federal stimulus money. Despite dodging that bullet, schools remain under the threat of future budget cuts, and that has caught the attention of business leaders. But paying attention isn’t enough. They need to be more involved in the process, insiders say, establishing and maintaining working relationships with state legislators who control the purse strings.

The business community has a stake in education on two fronts, says Chuck Essigs of the Arizona Association of School Business Officials (AASBO), which provides professional development opportunities for individuals working in all jobs in the education field.

“One,” he says, “is the ability of the education system, both elementary and secondary and the universities, to prepare an adequate work force, and to make sure schools are adequately funded so they can carry forth their mission of having an educated population. So when the business community hires people, they’re hiring people who have the skills and training to be productive workers.”

The second aspect involves Arizona businesses that are recruiting workers from out-of-state or businesses that are considering an expansion to Arizona from elsewhere.

“If those workers have school-age children, they want to know what the school system is like,” says Essigs, AASBO’s director of government affairs. “If they feel that their kids are not going to get a quality education, it might make them hesitant to leave where they are. They might think twice about taking a promotion and putting their kids at a disadvantage in a school that’s not up to the standards they want.”

Robert E. Mittelstaedt Jr., dean of the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, says most businesses are far more concerned about the general education environment.

“I remember a bank official in Philadelphia 25 years ago saying he couldn’t find a receptionist who could read and write,” Mittelstaedt says. “You still hear that. Companies expect to have an education system that graduates students who are qualified to enter the work force in some minimally accepted level.”

If the public schools fall short, perhaps because of inadequate funding, the option of sending children to private schools becomes a cost factor for employees.

Javier Rey, vice president-operations for State Farm Insurance’s Tempe operations center, says it’s critical that Arizona’s youth are better prepared for higher education, so they can contribute to the nation’s and state’s civic, economic and social advancement.

“The quality of schools is a factor that businesses look at when considering relocating or expanding,” Rey says.

Christopher Smith, manager of government and regulatory affairs for Cox Communications, calls education “critical to economic development.”

“It is an essential ingredient in the lifeblood of our economy, both nourishing the supply of talented workers and attracting and retaining the customers they serve,” Smith adds. “Education ranks high on the various lists of important factors in location/relocation decisions, not only due to the increasingly critical competition for knowledge workers, but also because executives making these decisions care deeply about the education of their own children.”

Smith gives Arizona’s education system reasonably satisfactory grades, but says the status quo is not good enough to meet today’s challenges.

“We need to break the mold a bit and unleash more of what made America so great — liberty, bold innovation, inspired risk-taking, creativity, robust competition and an unflagging entrepreneurial spirit,” he says.

Susan Carlson, executive director of the Arizona Business & Education Coalition (ABEC), a nonprofit K-12 education policy advocacy organization, says the business community needs to be more involved in the school-funding process.

“Business needs to be engaged in the conversation,” she says. “They need to watch what the Legislature is doing. We can’t keep saying ‘no’ around tax reform and ‘yes’ around increased skills for students. It may take more money, if money is allocated to the right things. It’s going to take being focused on research-based strategies. Educators are willing and committed to support research-based strategies, and redirecting some of the funding that exists.”