Tag Archives: hiring

94750491

U.S. adds 236,000 jobs in February

A burst of hiring last month added 236,000 U.S. jobs and reduced the unemployment rate to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent in January. The robust gains suggested that the economy can strengthen further despite higher taxes and government spending cuts.

The February jobs report issued Friday provided encouraging details: The unemployment rate is at its lowest level in four years. Job growth has averaged more than 200,000 a month since November. Wages rose. And the job gains were broad-based, led by the most construction hiring in six years.

The unemployment rate had been stuck at 7.8 percent or above since September. The rate declined last month because the number of unemployed fell 300,000 to just over 12 million, the fewest since December 2008.

More than half the decline occurred because 170,000 of the unemployed found jobs. An additional 130,000 stopped looking for work. People who aren’t looking for jobs aren’t counted as unemployed.

The unemployment rate is calculated from a survey of households. The job gains are derived from a separate survey of employers.

Stock prices rose as trading began at 9:30 a.m. Eastern time, an hour after the jobs report was released. Another day of stock gains would give the Dow Jones industrial average its fourth straight record close.

Employers did add slightly fewer jobs in January than the government had first estimated. Job gains were lowered to 119,000 from an initially estimated 157,000. Still, December hiring was a little stronger than first thought, with 219,000 jobs added instead of 196,000.

Robust auto sales and a steady housing recovery are spurring more hiring, which could trigger more consumer spending and stronger economic growth. The construction industry added 48,000 in February; it’s added a solid 151,000 since September. Manufacturing gained 14,000 jobs last month and 39,000 since November.

Retailers added 24,000 jobs, a sign that they anticipate healthy consumer spending in the coming months. Education and health services gained 24,000. And the information industry, which includes publishing, telecommunications and film, added 20,000, mostly in the movie industry.

The economy is also benefiting from the Federal Reserve’s drive to keep interest rates at record lows. Lower borrowing rates have made it easier for Americans to buy homes and cars and for companies to expand.

Culinary Dropout

Culinary Dropout At The Yard To Hire 75

Work at Fox Restaurant Concepts’ newest and biggest project, “The Yard,” located in North Central Phoenix. The transformed motorcycle shop near 7th St. and Bethany Home will house Culinary Dropout, which will open mid-February and is currently looking for experienced people who love to work and dine. Positions include servers, bartenders, hosts, cooks and dishwashers.

Culinary Dropout will begin the hiring process on Monday, January 14, 2013 and are looking for the following:

  • People passionate about food and drink and who know what it means to really take care of their guests.
  • People who spend their off-hours from cooking/bartending, talking about cooking/bartending, or being cooked for and being served drinks.
  • People who work with style.
  • People who are likely to request time off of work to go to concerts/play shows.
  • People who are regulars at: knife shops, concert venues, bars and restaurants, vintage clothing stores, First Friday events, cooking clubs, supper clubs and bartending events.

“The Yard” is a backyard, front porch and kitchen all rolled into one. This neighborhood-inspired project will occupy what once was the Ducati and Kawasaki motorcycle garage and dealership in the North Central Phoenix area. The authentic look of the motorcycle garage will be preserved while also presenting a unique and energetic atmosphere in the outdoor yard.

For more information about Culinary Dropout and “The Yard,” or to download an application, visit foxrc.com.

Culinary Dropout: 75 positions available

When: Monday, January 14, 2013, 9 a.m. –  5 p.m.
Tuesday, January 15, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wednesday, January 16, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Where: “The Yard” (old Kawasaki garage and dealership)
5632 N. 7th St., Phoenix

Economy

Six Tips for Hiring Right

I think the hiring process is broken.

Over the last few years, we’ve let resume scrapers, personality tests, and other technology take too big a role in how we process resumes, interview candidates, and hire new people. Successful candidates today write their resume and cover letters to keywords and search terms to hopefully help them float to the top of the hundreds of resumes they are up against to fill a single job opening.

I know the technology goal is to help Human Resource and hiring managers weed out those applicants who wouldn’t be a good fit for their organizations. And, although it may have streamlined the process of determining who should move forward through the interview process, I think in many instances it’s pushed the wrong people through.

I’ve been at Lendio since spring. I’m here because a former colleague knew my capabilities and was in a position to tell me about a possible role for me when I asked about it. He was also in a position to speak for me when it came time to make a decision about whether or not to hire me. Although I had a very successful track record where I was when I started to think about making this change, I can’t help but wonder if I would have received any serious consideration had I been an unknown commodity.

I have other friends who haven’t been so lucky.

Although this isn’t intended to be an advertisement for my friend Geoff, there will likely be some who think it is. I’m putting his name to the story because it’s real and it’s happening right now.

Geoff Crane is a project management friend I’ve known and worked with virtually over the last several years. Not too long ago, he determined that he needed to finish his education to better his career, so he went back to school. Since graduating, the pickings have been pretty slim—despite a 22+ years long successful career and a recent degree. So not long ago he offered a $25,000 finders fee to anyone who could help him find a job. Again, I’m not interested in the finder’s fee nor is this an advertisement for a job (nevertheless, I’m sure he’d talk to you if you’re interested). But it’s a great example of what a broken system has forced a highly skilled and talented professional to do to find a job.

Unfortunately, aside from getting some airtime on his local TV station, a couple of articles in the news, and some interesting PR, he’s still looking for a job.

I recently read an article written by Evernote CEO Phil Libin on how they hire and keep their best talent. Although most of it is real common sense (and doesn’t rely on a resume scraper), I think it bears repeating here. Here’s the list:

  1. Recommendations from close friends (or just hiring close friends) is the best way to start: I currently work with a number of colleagues and friends I’ve worked with before. Many of them where here before I was. They knew what I was capable of, and knew how we would work together. The logic of this is pretty straightforward. Evernote offers what Libin describes as a “generous bonus” if they end up hiring someone referred by an employee.
  2. Hire people smarter than you (or at least smarter about their particular job than you are): Several years ago, when I was leading the creative team at Response (a local ad agency), we made it a point to seek out the right talent. If we didn’t find a good fit, we wouldn’t hire. We thought it was more important to hire the right people and wouldn’t settle for the best person of those who had applied. It often meant waiting, but as a result, we got to work with some incredibly talented people.
  3. Make them write: Although I had never thought of this, I intend to do this in the future. Libin argues that you can fake it in person, but your real personality is revealed pretty quickly when asked to write a few paragraphs. This is great advice.
  4. Make sure they talk sense: The ability to communicate and collaborate is so important, this should be a no-brainer. Regardless of the technical prowess a potential candidate might have, if they can’t communicate with you or their colleagues, they aren’t going to be the right fit. It reminds me of my high school trigonometry teacher, he was brilliant—he just wasn’t very good at sharing his brilliance with me. I soon abandoned math never to return (thank heavens for calculators).
  5. Be generous with benefits that help the team get stuff done: Assume your people want to do a good job and give them the tools they’ll need to do it. This might sometimes mean buying lunch, being flexible with work schedules, or any number of other things. You know your people and what they need to get the job done.
  6. Don’t hire anyone you’re not willing to also fire: This is a tough one. Nobody likes to be the guy to drop the bomb and tell somebody they’re fired. Particularly if you’ve hired a close friend as suggested in #1, but sometimes one bad player can quickly ruin morale, end collaboration, destroy productivity, and even cripple an organization. Most people don’t show up to work with an “I wanna suck today” attitude, but if they aren’t willing or are unable to learn the skills they need to make a good fit, it’s better to act swiftly—much like ripping off a Band-Aid, you know it’s gonna hurt for a little while. But it’s much better than suffering through a bad hire that’s going to have long-term negative consequences.

My grandmother used to say, “Well begun is half done.” I think that’s true of hiring people too. Hire the right people and you’re half done, hiring the wrong people and you’re in trouble. What are you doing to ensure that you hire the right people—and then keep them?

 

As a Main Street business evangelist and marketing veteran with more than 25 years in the trenches, Ty Kiisel writes about leading people and small-business issues for Lendio (www.lendio.com).

manufacturing

Tucson lands building systems manufacturer

Building systems manufacturer Aris Integration has announced that it will be locating its corporate headquarters in Tucson.

Manufacturing operations are expected to begin in 2013, and the company expects to hire nearly 600 workers over the next five years.

Aris will make customizable wall panel systems from light-gauge steel framing and foam insulation for residential and commercial buildings.

The company will also offer design and engineering services for its building systems.

United Kingdom-based Fusion Building Systems will be a partner in Aris’ new factory.

Aris officials say the pool of experienced construction workers was among the reasons the company chose southern Arizona.

Regional economic development officials welcomed Wednesday’s news, saying more manufacturing businesses will contribute to a stronger economy.

Phoenix-area employment picture for the fourth quarter of 2010 appears positive

Survey: Valley Companies Plan To Hire More Employees This Quarter

The Phoenix-area employment picture for the fourth quarter of 2010 appears positive, as hiring is expected to increase slightly, according to the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey released today.

Between October and December, 15 percent of the companies interviewed plan to hire more employees. For the same period, 9 percent expect to reduce their payrolls. About 74 percent say they will maintain current staffing levels and 2 percent are not certain of their hiring plans.

Figures for the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale area point to a net employment outlook of 6 percent, according to the survey, making the Valley employment outlook a bit brighter compared to the rest of the nation and the rest of the state.

“Employers are more optimistic about hiring plans for the final three months of the year compared to (the third quarter) when the net employment outlook was 2 percent,” says Frank Amendariz Arizona regional director at Manpower. “Employers expect a much faster hiring pace compared with one year ago, when the net employment outlook was minus 4 percent.”

According to the survey, prospects in Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale are particularly strong in durable goods manufacturing, information, financial activities, professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality.

Hiring figures for the rest of the state show a mild increase as well, according to the survey.  For the fourth quarter of the year, 14 percent of the companies interviewed plan to hire more employees, and 10 percent expect to reduce their work force. Another 73 percent say they will maintain current staffing levels and 3 percent are uncertain of their hiring plans. The state’s net employment outlook is 4 percent.

“Employers expect to slightly slow down the hiring pace compared to (third quarter 2010) when the net employment outlook was 6 percent,” says Sunny Ackerman, a spokesperson for Manpower.

Nationally, of the more than 18,000 employers surveyed, 15 percent anticipate an increase in staffing, and 11 percent expect a decrease for a net employment outlook of 4 percent.

Onboarding Employees

The Critical Process Of Onboarding Your New Employees

You’ve sorted through stacks of resumes, interviewed the best and selected the perfect candidate. Now what? Once you’ve made the job offer and it has been accepted, it is time to start thinking about your onboarding process.

Onboarding is the term used to describe the process of integrating a new employee into your organization, and there are three steps to consider.

Be prepared
It is very unpleasant for an employee to show up to a new job, excited about the possibilities, and end up with the feeling that she was not expected and the company is surprised to see her. Since that is not the kind of surprise you want for your newest “most valuable asset,” it is important to prepare in advance for her arrival. Take into consideration such factors as:

The workspace — Is it properly equipped? Is it cleaned up, with the remnants of the prior occupant removed? Include a small “welcome” gift.

Name badge — If your staff wears name badges, be sure your new hire has one on her first day of work.

Time — Be sure the new hire’s manager has taken the necessary time to make introductions with co-workers. Your new hire should not be treated like he is an inconvenience to a busy schedule.

Welcome
Many employees make the decision about whether they are going to stay at their new organization within the first week. Since we only have a short period of time to make a good and lasting first impression, take these important steps to make him feel welcome:

Be sure your front desk personnel are trained to welcome new hires in the same way they welcome your customers. The welcome should say, “We’ve been expecting you and are glad you are here!”

Give your new hire a tour upon arrival. Be sure to point out the restrooms, drinking fountain, coffee maker, vending machines and break room, in addition to her workspace, the copier, supply room and other important rooms in your building. Remember, you want to make a good impression, so team her up with someone who is a great spokesperson for your organization.

The road to success
You want to set your new hire up for success from the start, so consider the following when laying out the roadmap for her first several months onboard:

If you have a formal job description, make sure your new hire receives a copy of it on her first day of work. The manager, or a co-worker who is knowledgeable about the job, should review the job duties and clearly define what is expected for each task. Define “success” up front, so your new hire knows what will be expected of her.

If the manager for the new hire is often in meetings or off-site, assign another “go to” person for your new hire. Since new hires decide early on if they are going to “fit” at this organization, it is important they feel comfortable asking questions and seeking assistance when needed.

We all have things to learn when starting a new job. Be sure your new hire is trained on all aspects of his job, from the mundane to the complex. Depending on your environment, it may be best to wait until a couple of days after the start of the new job to train on more complex matters. Give enough information for your new hire to go home loving his new job on the first day, and not so much information that he wonders how he will ever remember it.

Onboarding is a six-month to one-year process depending on the complexity of the work you do. Check in often with your new hire to make sure she has received the training she needs, has the proper equipment to do her job, understands your corporate culture and has made a few friends with whom she feels comfortable.

Since you have made a significant investment in selecting and hiring your newest “asset,” you want to do everything possible to get them onboard and keep them onboard. An effective onboarding process will set everyone on the right track.

Pick the Right Employee

Hiring The Right People Is More Important Than Ever, But Are You Asking The Right Questions?

When the economy slows, companies tend to slow their hiring and expect more from their existing employees. It quickly becomes critical that employees perform up to these new, heightened expectations. For those positions that companies do hire for, selecting the right candidate becomes more important than ever. However, many hiring managers tend to ask the wrong questions, focusing the interview on traits that are very trainable versus those traits that a company cannot train.

Hiring managers tend to focus questions on experience for the position, systems knowledge, actual time spent doing the job with previous employers, etc. In fact, these are actually poor predictors of a candidate’s success in the workplace. Generally, only employees applying for professionally educated positions (e.g. engineers, chemists, attorneys, etc.,) are exempt from this best practice. So what should you focus your interview on?

Focus of questions
Center your questions on traits that take more effort to develop. Interview questions should dwell on attention to detail, the candidate’s passion for the job, their initiative, and their self-confidence, to name a few.

There are many hiring managers that value a relative lack of experience (and many human resource managers that agree). Candidates without experience tend to lack the bad habits typical of those with experience. It is often easier to train a green candidate from ground zero (sometimes called growing a candidate organically) versus “untraining” an experienced candidate’s bad habits and then inserting the desired habits. A candidate who has worked for several companies doing similar roles and is now in your office looking for a job may have a significant number of bad habits and has a track record of leaving previous employers for “employment competitors.”

Experience is one of the easier items to give a new hire. However, try giving a new employee stronger customer-service skills, greater self-confidence to deal with those problem vendors, or a hunger for doing a great job. Those are not easily trainable, so those traits are what an interview should focus on.

Types of questions
Spend your time asking the candidate behavior-oriented questions. Typically, these questions start with phrases like, “Tell me about a time when you …” or “Give me a specific example of a time when you …” When asking these behaviorally focused questions, it is critical that the candidate gives you one specific example. Further, ensure he isolates his role in his example; don’t allow him to use words such as “we” or “our.” If he does, ask him what his specific role. This helps ensure his answer provides you with the information you need.

The days of asking, “If you were a tree, what kind of tree would you be and why” are over. The current trend is asking negative questions — questions that force a candidate to talk about her weaknesses. This helps you see her willingness to admit mistakes, how she has handled mistakes in the past, and — most importantly — what she has learned from those mistakes.

Sample questions
Putting these guidelines together is the key to a solid interview. Some general, behaviorally focused questions include:

Tell me about the last time you had a disagreement with a co-worker and what you did about it? — Listen to what the issue was over, how productive and mature the approach was, and what he specifically did to solve the problem. Candidates who have a passion for their work will work to resolve issues with co-workers and will keep the boss informed of personality clashes, typically without asking for intervention.

Tell me about the biggest mistake you made in the last 12 months and what you learned from it. — This negative question forces the candidate to take ownership for a relatively large mistake and should end with her telling you what steps she took to ensure a similar mistake (e.g. a time-management snafu, a relationship-building blunder, etc.) would not happen again. All employees make mistakes. Admitting them and taking corrective steps is the absolute most an employer can ask from their employees.

Give me your top three strengths and your biggest developmental need (weakness). — It is very telling to hear what a candidate believes are his behavioral strengths, as well as his biggest need. Listen for strengths that are traits you cannot teach a candidate (e.g. passion for the job, ability to work with others, etc.). Do not let candidates get away with telling you that their biggest need is that they work too hard or plan too much. Tell your candidate to dig deeper.

Interviews can be very useful at pulling out the different strengths and weaknesses of a candidate, as long as the interviewer is focused on the right personality traits and asks the right questions. Pull their experience from their resume, but pull their personality from their interview.