Tag Archives: human resource management

HR Awards 2010

2010 Human Resources Awards – Honorees and Finalists

2010 has been a tough year, especially for those in human resources who have the difficult task of dealing with the unpleasant consequences of a down economy. It’s time to show recognition to the hard-working HR professionals for all that they do for Arizona’s businesses.

The following are the honorees and finalists for the 2010 HR Awards:

HR Director of the Year

Honoree:
Maureen Sterbach Maureen SterbachVice President of Human Resources
St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
When Maureen Sterbach joined St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in 1998, the hospital turnover rate was 24 percent and morale was predictably low. Flash forward 12 years and the picture couldn’t be any more different. The hospital turnover rate is now 10 percent and growth has doubled to more than 5,000 employees.
Finalist:
Teresa Buelow Teresa BuelowVice President of Human Resources
Lapre Scali & Co. Insurance Services

HR Industry Leader of the Year

Honoree:
Cindy Jones Cindy JonesVice President of the Human Resources Division
Synergy Seven
This past year, Synergy Seven has guided companies through the difficult decision of downsizing. Cindy Jones’ veteran human resources skills came in handy during these precarious situations. The company’s main role is to provide support during restructuring, downsizing and reinventing, resulting in a successful transition.
Finalist:
Christine Nichols Christine NicholsHuman Resource Manager
Human Capital Strategies

HR Team of the Year

Honoree:
Direct Alliance HR Team Direct Alliancewww.directalliance.com
Employees in HR Dept.: 12
At Direct Alliance, there is no doubt as to what the outsourcing provider’s most valuable asset is — its work force. Direct Alliance’s “human capital” initiatives produce and retain the most innovative work force possible. The team filled more than 1,400 professional sales positions in 2010, doubling 2009′s number.
Finalists:
HR Team Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Authority Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport AuthorityEmployees in HR Dept.: 4
HR Team City of Scottsdale City of ScottsdaleEmployees in HR Dept.: 29
HR Team Kitchell KitchellEmployees in HR Dept.: 7
In & Out Box, Ready for Recovery - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Businesses Tasked With Retaining Key Talent In Months Ahead

Anne C. Ruddy, president of WorldatWork, an Arizona-based professional association of human resources practitioners, has extensive experience leading and managing large organizations at the highest level. A talent innovator, she uses her organization and its staff of 130 as a laboratory to test new practices and transfer new ideas to its membership regarding human capital. Here, Ruddy shares a few key strategies for managing talent in this economic recovery.

What kind of impact has the recession had on work forces around the nation?
In a word, negative. Employers are painfully aware that cost-cutting measures deployed to stay afloat during the recession adversely affected workers. One of our recent studies — “The Global Talent Management and Rewards Survey by WorldatWork and Towers Watson” — confirms just how gravely the cost-cutting measures taken during the financial crisis impacted employees’ workloads, their ability to manage work-related stress and overall employee engagement. As a result, companies can expect greater difficulty in motivating employees and retaining key talent during the economic recovery.

What can organizations do to ensure a smooth post-recession recovery?

The very first thing is to identify your top performers. Who are your high-value contributors? These include not only those who drive the most revenue, but also those who play crucial roles in areas such as product development and human resources, or those who help build the employer brand and reputation. Forget the rear view mirror — you’d be smart to base decisions on future business priorities, not just recent performance. Sales employees, for example, who have generated less income than usual during the economic crisis, will continue to be highly valued given the central role business development plays in most post-recession recovery plans.

So you inventory talent and now have a list of pivotal employees. What’s next?

Show pivotal employees they matter. A-players want to know they have a future place in the company. While promotions are one way to send this message, they’re not always possible in this economy. Special assignments, involvement in high-visibility projects, skill-building opportunities, and formal or informal recognition can be equally powerful engagement and retention tools. Also, keep top performers informed about evolving business strategies. Too often, top performers join competitors simply because inadequate communication has left them feeling unappreciated, uncertain about their roles or uninformed about changing business needs.

Many employers were forced to freeze or cut pay during the financial crisis. What should they do for the recovery?

Return to pre-recession pay practices as soon as possible, and differentiate based on performance. Failure to do so can result in high performers being demotivated, demoralized, or worse yet, cause them to look at other options for employment that seem to offer greater rewards for their efforts. Organizations need to make hard decisions, both in rating performance and allocating compensation dollars. If there isn’t enough cash to go around, don’t go spreading it like peanut butter!

Given current high unemployment rates, is the war for talent over?

Quite the opposite. Companies should prepare to compete for the best and the brightest. Don’t be lulled by a perceived surplus of post-recession talent. While it’s an employers’ market for some positions, demand remains high for critical skills. Impending baby-boomer retirements and projected shortages in critical technical disciplines will only intensify the competition. To get ahead, you need to measure the talent that exists in your organization today, in order to find the talent gaps you need to fill so that the organization can get where it needs to go.

What do successful companies know that others may not?

Progressive companies, what we often refer to as “employers of choice,” know that keeping those people who are critical to success is a lot easier than going out into the market and trying to find new people, train them, mother them, and get them ready to really be productive, which usually takes a year from their date of hire.
In good times and in bad, the best companies look beyond talent management to talent innovation. They are on a perpetual quest for the best and the brightest employees, who can truly elevate the organization as opposed to passively watching the organization grow.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Deloitte-Jonas McCormick

Deloitte LLP Names New Managing Principal Of Its Phoenix Office

One of the largest accounting and consulting organizations in Arizona, Deloitte LLP, named a new managing principal of its Phoenix office Nov. 15.

Jonas McCormick, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, is now managing principal of Deloitte’s Phoenix office. McCormick succeeds Michelle Kerrick, who was recently appointed managing partner of Deloitte’s Los Angeles office.

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s degree in business administration, McCormick has spent the majority of his career serving the Arizona market.

“Having spent the majority of my career serving some of Arizona’s largest companies, I am familiar with this marketplace and the complex business challenges local companies are facing,” McCormick notes. “In my role, I can help align Deloitte’s diverse offerings – which include audit, tax, financial advisory and consulting services – to address the needs of the organizations we serve.”

As a lead client service principal at Deloitte, McCormick helps companies across a range of industries implement operational excellence and performance improvement programs in their organizations. He assists clients in achieving strategic cost reduction and enhancing revenue and performance management with his vast knowledge in the areas of organizational design and development, human resource management and change enablement.

“One of my key objectives as managing principal of Deloitte’s Phoenix office is to build on the momentum we’ve established in Arizona, where we are currently ranked as the largest professional services firm, and grow our footprint in the local market,” McCormick says. “We will maintain our focus on delivering quality and value to our clients, while continuing to invest in our people and the community in which we live and work.”

Tony Buzzelli, vice chairman and regional managing partner of Deloitte LLP Pacific Southwest, commends McCormick for his competent leadership skills and looks forward to McCormick leading the Phoenix office.

“Having served some of the largest companies in Arizona over the last decade, Jonas has demonstrated strong leadership and success in driving value for our clients,” Buzzelli states. “Jonas’s focus on growing our business, developing our people and representing Deloitte positively in the marketplace position him well to serve as managing principal of our Phoenix office.”

hr_industry_leader

2009 HR Industry Leader Of The Year Honoree

Patrick BurkhartName: Patrick Burkhart
Title: Assistant Director
Company: Maricopa County Human Services Department/ Maricopa Workforce Connections

Years with city: 3.5
Years in current position: 2.5
Entity Established: 1998
Employees in AZ: 71
Employees in HR dept.: 4
www.maricopaworkforceconnection.com

Words such as “tirelessly” and “diligently” are used to describe the work ethic of Patrick Burkhart as he collaborates with Maricopa Workforce Connections (MWC) to help people find jobs and assist local businesses seeking qualified employees to hire.

Burkhart is assistant director of the Maricopa County Human Services Department, and MWC is a department division.

MWC offers comprehensive recruitment and talent-acquisition services to businesses, organizations and associations located in Maricopa County and outside the city of Phoenix. Its services are particularly important in today’s recessionary times, as it researches labor market trends and helps job seekers identify their transferable skills. MWC also helps individuals refine their employment search to ensure they are applying for the right jobs using appropriate information and job-hunting techniques. MWC is funded by a federal grant under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, and offers its services for free to both businesses and people.

Building relationships is Burkhart’s forte. He establishes rapport with community partners, business leaders and others who may be beneficial to MWC’s clients. He oversees MWC operations and is always looking for opportunities to leverage support and improve efficiency. For example, Burkhart tapped the expertise of another agency to streamline MWC’s processes, reduce waste and alleviate staff stress caused by the increasing number of job-seeking clients requesting assistance at the county’s career centers.

Burkhart also took the initiative to bridge gaps between MWC and other work force development agencies in the region to form the Maricopa County Human Capital Collaborative. The collaborative applies for grant funding to enhance the efforts of local work force agencies and bring additional resources to the area.

Because MWC is federally funded and resources are directed to businesses and individuals, money is not available to pay for memberships in various organizations. Instead, Burkhart and his team work closely with chambers of commerce, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, the Arizona State Council of the Society for Human Resource Management and the Governor’s Council On Workforce Policy at the Arizona Department of Commerce. Burkhart also works with dozens of public and private organizations that either provide services to the community or have a stake in MWC through positions on its youth council and board of directors.

MWC offers an array of business services, employer services, employed-worker training, on-the-job training, recruitment services, youth services and job fairs. MWC also informs businesses on an array of employment and training-related tax incentives. These incentives include state corporate income tax credits for the creation of new jobs at companies with less than 10 percent retail, a 40 to 60 percent reduction of property taxes for five years at small manufacturing companies, federal work opportunity tax credits and federal welfare-to-work tax credits.

MWC also offers assistance to companies that are downsizing and helps displaced employees with their transition to new employment. Services include information on unemployment insurance, career and job fairs, access to job postings, and workshops on job-search skills, resume writing, interviewing, personal finances and budgeting.