Tag Archives: job seekers

Job Seekers - Summer Job Search

Job Seekers: 10 Tips For Summer Job Searches

Every year as summer approaches, most job seekers and career changers make the mistake of halting all their efforts. They believe there is no point in pursuing new opportunities during the summer, and that nobody is making hiring decisions until the fall.

Ford R. Myers, career coach, speaker and author of “Get The Job You Want, Even When No One’s Hiring,” says, “Summer is no time for job seekers to be trading in their business suits for swimsuits or their briefcases for beach bags. Summer is the perfect time for career advancement.”

Myers offers the following 10 tips to help job seekers stave off the summer “brain drain” and focus on career success:

1. Create and Control Your Internet Image. Whether it’s LinkedIn, YouTube or Facebook, every professional should have an online presence. Many employers research job candidates on the Internet before making hiring decisions. Therefore, it is vitally important that you take control of your online identity and carefully monitor the “personal brand” you’re building on the Internet.

2.  Invest in Career Coaching. It might seem that career coaching would be a luxury in this difficult economic climate. Actually, this could  be the best time to get some career coaching. A qualified career coach can help you get totally clear on your objective, differentiate yourself from the competition, market yourself effectively, get the offer, and negotiate the best compensation.

3. Tune Into the Network.  Summer is one of the best times of the year to make new connections and find new opportunities. Contrary to popular belief, there are many summer networking events, planning meetings and social activities going on.

4.  Perform an Internal Career Audit.  Summer is a perfect time to take an honest look at your career – where you’ve been, where you are today, and where you’d like to go. Identify new goals based on your own definition of career success and then take action.

5.  Update Your Career “Tool Kit.” Most job seekers use only their résumé as the cornerstone of their search because their other “tools” are weak or nonexistent. But there are many other documents you should have in your “career tool kit” – accomplishment stories, positioning statement, one-page biography, target company list, contact list, professional references, letters of recommendation, and more.  These items are important not just to land the next job – but also to maximize your long-term career success.

6.  Solidify Relationships.  During the summer, most people are naturally more relaxed, convivial and generous in spirit. There is simply no better time to solidify existing relationships and forge new ones.

7.  Volunteer.  There are myriad volunteer opportunities available during the summer. This is a good way to help people, to feel good about making a difference, to have a renewed sense of purpose during your search, and to meet other professionals who may be able to help you.

8.  Call People.  Make new connections through your network and follow up with people you’ve already met. In many cases, people who are at work during the heat of the summer will not only be available for conversation, but will be grateful just to speak to someone.

9.  It is Better to Give Than to Receive.  The fastest and most effective strategy for getting help is to offer help to others. Ask the people in your network who they might like an introduction to or if there is any way that you can be of assistance to them professionally.

10. Become and Opportunity Magnet.  Always think and speak positively and never say anything negative. This will help you to become an opportunity magnet – poised to attract, interview and “hire” your next employer.

“If you are currently in career transition, these strategies should give you a fresh perspective on a summer job search. Instead of ‘taking a vacation’ from your career development activities, take full advantage of this overlooked opportunity to make real progress in your career quest,” adds Myers.

To find out more information about Ford Myers and how job seekers can improve their chances of getting a job, visit fordmyers.com.

Facebook Timeline

What Facebook Timeline Means For Job Seekers

An Intro to Facebook Timeline

It might be time to brush up on your Kierkegaard, because Facebook is about to become very existential. The new profile, called Facebook Timeline, is not concerned with what you are doing. It wants to know who you are. See the dramatic video below for a brief overview, or take a look at this article for a more detailed description of the changes.

 

 

As you can see, the most important parts of the profile will be static information, like where you went to school, where you work, what your interests are, and who you have been in a relationship with. The profile tells the world your history, or at least the history of your time on Facebook. These changes will have a big impact on the way people use Facebook, especially in a world where social networking is becoming a large part of the hiring process. So what do job seekers and employers need to know about this new Facebook Timeline?

Practical tips for job seekers:

Facebook Timeline essentially makes your profile an online resume.

So like a resume, try to emphasize your professional accomplishments and good qualities. Don’t just write where you worked, write about what you did while you worked there. Make sure your employment history is up to date.

Familiarize yourself with Facebook’s privacy settings.

The more control you have over your information, the better. Timeline will make it much easier to view a person’s entire Facebook history. Employers don’t need to see pictures of your 21st birthday or politically incorrect wall posts from your freshman year of college. Update your privacy settings so only close friends can see this type of information.

Go back through your history to find flattering posts and pictures to share publicly.

This information will help you present a consistent and positive story about yourself.

Pick a good cover photo.

The new profile has a spot for both a profile pic and large cover photo at the top of the page. This picture will represent you, so choose something that looks nice or shows off your creativity.

The new profile places more emphasis on your Likes.

So avoid liking things that might be considered distasteful or controversial.

Be aware of how you use third-party apps; some may publish a log of your activities.

For example, an app could show which music/movies you’re steaming or what articles you have read.

 

What employers need to know:

Don’t place too much emphasis on Facebook profiles during the hiring process.

There will be a wealth of information available on Facebook Timeline profiles, but not all of it will be accurate, verifiable or complete. You don’t want to make hiring decisions based on unreliable information.

Be aware of possible legal issues.

Companies that look up protected information like race, religion, or age run the risk of violating anti-discrimination and hiring laws. It might make sense to hire an outside firm for background searches; a third party can provide your company with information useful to the hiring process, but protect you from the data that you’re not supposed to see.