Tag Archives: jobing.com

Encantada, CBRE

CBRE Secures $33.8M Loan for Encantada Apartments in Tucson

CBRE’s Capital Markets Debt & Equity Finance Group announced today the successful refinancing of the Encantada at Riverside Crossing, a Class-A apartment community in Tucson. The $33.8M loan was funded through international insurance company AIG, Inc.

The financing of Encantada at Riverside Crossing was originated by Jim Sellers, Senior Vice President, Tim Prouty, First Vice President and Theresa Witz, Senior Analyst of CBRE’s Debt and Equity office in Tucson.

Bert Lopez has grown HSL Properties into the major apartment owner/developer in Southern Arizona,” said CBRE’s Sellers. “He has given to the community in a variety of ways and this was an opportunity for CBRE to contribute to his successes by bringing insurance company capital to our area.”

The project is sponsored by HSL Properties, Inc., who developed the apartment community in 2011. Tucson-based HSL Properties is a real estate company that focuses on multifamily apartment properties, particularly in the southwestern United States. The company has also invested in office and retail buildings, shopping malls, a golf course and hotels. 

Encantada at Riverside Crossing is a 304-unit Class-A apartment community with a mix of one- , two- and three-bedroom floor plans. Amenities include a resort-style pool and swim up lounge with a double-sided fireplace, state-of-the-art athletic center, private 27-seat THX movie theatre, indoor/outdoor clubhouse with wifi, flat screen TVs and complimentary coffee bar. All units are TEP-guaranteed for energy efficiency and include 9 and 10 foot ceilings, granite countertops, walk-in closets and full size washer and dryer.

The property is located along River Road, one of Tucson’s busiest east-west arterials, with convenient access to the I-10 freeway and the foothills of North Tucson. Northwest Medical Center is located less than one mile north and two regional malls are within two or three miles of the property. The 13.09-acre site is one of only five new multifamily properties built in the north Tucson submarket since 2009.

green jobs 2011

What Are “Green” Jobs?

The term “green collar” is springing up in corporate America every day. It is now considered to be an effective way to produce and reproduce products and services while trying to reserve the earth’s precious resources. In order to say you have a “green job,” the business must be considered environmentally conscious. Cleaning up the environment, restoring our planet to healthy standards and controlling climate change are considered environmentally conscious jobs.

The focus on going green in companies has been known as the “green collar” industry. This new job trade is not only rewarding for the company and employees but to consumers as well. Having a sustainable career with innovative techniques that help make the world a better place doubles as a career and way of life.

Companies, such as jobing.com, now offer green job categories to feature such positions.

What exactly is a green job?

A green job is a profession that directly works with materials, technology or policies that contribute to making sure the environmental impact of products and services are minimal. Some may require special training or knowledge.

Why choose green jobs?Green Jobs, Lumber Work

This industry will provide better and longer lasting future for the earth. Jobs have gained importance when the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act announced they would provide $750 million for programs to train and help workers grow in the emerging industry.

It allows new and innovative research to be accomplished, opening the door to job training and special projects in the renewable energy industries. Of the funding given, $500 million will go into this training.

The demand for new employees is opening doors for jobs daily. The growth in the business can create nearly 5,000 new jobs within five occupations during the next year.

Where can you find a green job?

Green jobs can be found within environmental jobs such as plants, sciences, earth or agriculture. They are also found in fishing, forestry, fuel, solar industries, engineering and energy.

Sustainable planning and waste management positions link local jobs to the Valley. They help to create green buildings, energy saving techniques, environmental compliance and waste management corrections.

Other industries to think about when researching green jobs are:

  • Bicycle repair and bike delivery services
  • Car and truck mechanic jobs, production jobs, and gas-station jobs related to biodiesel
  • Hauling and reuse of construction materials and debris (C&D)
  • Hazardous materials clean-up
  • Landscaping
  • Materials reuse
  • Non-toxic household cleaning in residential and commercial buildings
  • Parks and open space expansion and maintenance
  • Printing with non-toxic inks and dyes
  • Public transit jobs related to driving, maintenance, and repair
  • Recycling and reuse
  • Small businesses producing products from recycled materials
  • Solar installation
  • Tree cutting and pruning
  • Whole home performance, including attic insulation, weatherization
Aaron Matos is the founder and CEO of Jobing.com. - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Jobing.com’s Aaron Matos Talks About His First Job

Aaron Matos
Title: Founder/CEO
Company: Jobing.com

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
I was a bike mechanic at Swiss American Bicycles. I learned how to work for a boss who was demanding about service quality, timeliness and doing things right. When I was 14, I thought he was overbearing and too hard on me and others. Now, 24 years later, I realize he helped feed an insatiable desire to do excellent work.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
I was a personnel manager at El Dorado of Sun City. I learned that HR and managers can have too many rules, and that if management creates a culture where people are empowered they can accomplish great things.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
(Swiss American Bicycles) $3.35 an hour; (El Dorado of Sun City) $21,500 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
Chris Gaffney, the current lead investor at Great Hill Partners. He has supported and pushed me as CEO … He has taught me that business and life have a long arc, and that you’ve got to keep your eye always focused on building a great business for your customers first and foremost.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Focus on getting things done and accomplishing things. I always traded responsibility for pay, knowing pay would come. Too many people focus on “promotions” or “job titles.” Work to take on big projects and accomplish big important goals for your company. Not only will you learn and grow faster, but others will notice and you’ll get those promotions because you earned it.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I don’t spend energy thinking about what you could be doing instead. Too many people don’t succeed because they have their eye on another ball in a different game. Be passionate about what you’re currently doing.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Job Hunting with Jobing.com - AZ Business Magazine February 2008

Good Job Hunting

For Jobing.com, it’s the people, not the technology, that makes the difference.

 

At Jobing.com, The Wall says it all. Scrawled on walls that wrap around a busy office and down a hallway are comments from countless clients, partners, association groups and government friends expressing their appreciation for a job well done. Aaron Matos, the 35-year-old brains behind the fast-growing Jobing.com, says The Wall just kind of happened.

“It originally was just images and our mission statement and some things we wanted internally,” Matos says. “One day a client came in and wanted to write on the wall. He signed a little note — and suddenly it caught on.”

Launched in Phoenix in 2000, Jobing.com was named to the Inc. Magazine 2007 list of the 500 fastest growing privately owned companies in the country for the third consecutive year. It also received an Economic Engines of Arizona Award last year from Arizona Business Magazine.

Jobing.com serves 18 markets in eight states, including Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, Florida, California, Nevada and Wisconsin, matching local residents with local jobs. Nationally, Jobing.com counts 35,000 employers among its clients, gets 3 million hits a month from job seekers, and provides leads for 80,000 different types of jobs, spokesman Joe Cockrell says.

In the Phoenix area, health care related jobs make up a large part of the firm’s business. It’s free for job-seekers; employers pay a fee to advertise based on a variety of factors.
“Prior to starting Jobing,” Matos says, “I was in human resources for 10 years. It became clear to me that what really helps drive a business is recruiting the right talent. You could never train the wrong person to do the right job.”

A native Arizonan, Matos worked full time in HR-related jobs while attending Glendale Community College and Arizona State University West, earning a bachelor’s degree. He holds a master’s in business administration from Northwestern University.

“I found early on most people didn’t love their jobs,” he says. “It was clear to me that when people loved what they did, they performed better and were passionate about their lives.”
Sports sponsorships with the Phoenix Suns and Arizona Diamondbacks led Matos to explore opportunities with the Phoenix Coyotes hockey team.

“We decided to think big,” he says, referring to a 10-year naming rights deal for the Glendale arena that houses the Coyotes and is considered a first-rate concert venue.
“We felt it would catapult our brand and the awareness of the company,” he says, but declines to disclose how much the deal cost.

Ironically, when Jobing.com holds a job fair in the Phoenix area, Jobing.com Arena is too small. Held in the adjacent University of Phoenix Stadium, the fairs typically attract more than 300 employers and 7,000 to 10,000 job seekers in a day, he says.

Another marketing tool is the fleet of some 160 multicolored small vans that Matos calls “moving billboards — they get Jobing’s name out into the community.”

Every employee gets one and the company reimburses them for the monthly payments, plus pays for gas, but not insurance.

Matos was interested in computers at an early age.

“I’ve always been a computer guy,” he says, “but the passion behind this business is on the human resources side, not the technology side.”

Matos came up with the idea for Jobing.com while working for a publisher of niche newspapers. Today, his company is the fifth largest of its kind in the country. His goal is to cut into the market share of his two biggest competitors, Monster and Career Builder, and to tap into help-wanted ads that newspapers are losing.

The reason for the growth of the industry, he says, is that advertising online is more cost-effective and it’s easier to reach a targeted audience.

Kent Ennis, deputy director of the Arizona Department of Commerce, sees Jobing.com as a perfect fit for the state agency.

“Commerce tries to recruit businesses to the state, which includes new jobs, and Jobing.com recruits the work force,” he says.

Matos doesn’t consider Jobing a tech company, even though the connection between employers and job seekers is via the Internet.

“We consider ourselves much more of a services media company, serving HR professionals and job seekers,” he says.

Ron Schott, executive director of the Arizona Technology Council, says Jobing.com combines the human element with technology, using a state-of-the-art computer system. Job hunting on the Internet is the wave of the 21st century, Schott says, “until a newer wave comes along.”

Jobing.com is riding the current wave.

“It’s a great company and it’s great that we have them headquartered in Arizona,” Schott says.

Matos, reflecting on the growth of Jobing.com, says, “When I look at what we’ve done, maybe we’ve only finished chapter one of a really long book.”

Visit jobing.com for more information.

 

Arizona Business Magazine February 2008