Tag Archives: Jobing.com Arena

Future location of As You Wish at Westgate Entertainment District.

Six new tenants coming to Westgate Entertainment District

Six new businesses will call Westgate Entertainment District home when they open at the booming Glendale center over the next several weeks including As You Wish, Fresh Healthy Café, OPA Life Greek Café, Crave Gourmet Waffle Sandwiches, Proliant and American Basketball Association.

These new additions to Westgate’s tenant mix brings the total number of new retail and office leases signed by owner iStar Financial to 18 since the company acquired Westgate Entertainment District.

As You Wish, a pottery painting place, will open a 2,109 square-foot store next to AMC Theatres in October. As You Wish was one of the first paint-your-own pottery studios in the nation and the first in Arizona. This will be the company’s seventh Valley location.

Three new dining destinations will complement the restaurant mix at Westgate including Fresh Healthy Café, which will open its first Arizona location offering smoothies and fresh-squeezed juices, along with other healthy fare. The restaurant company has restaurants in 10 states, Canada and five international countries. The 1,358 square-foot restaurant will open next to Buffalo Wild Wings this fall. Also opening this fall, OPA Life Greek Café, a Greek restaurant with a full-line coffee bar open for breakfast, lunch and dinner. OPA will open a 2,501 square-foot restaurant with a large patio overlooking Fountain Park in front of AMC, providing an exceptional indoor/outdoor environment. The newly launched brand, established by experienced restaurateurs, will bring the liveliness of Greek culture and combine it with the flavors of the Mediterranean within an affordable dining experience.

Opening in December next to Johnny Rockets, Crave Gourmet Waffle Sandwiches is a new gourmet Belgian waffle restaurant unlike anything in the Valley from the owner of Razzleberriez Frozen Yogurt, which opened its third Valley location at Westgate in 2013. Crave will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert and have a variety of savory and sweet waffle combinations including waffle sandwiches, salads, sweet waffle desserts and shakes.

Two notable companies have also recently signed leases for office space at Westgate.

Proliant, a national payroll services company headquartered in Atlanta, GA, opened its first Arizona office in July that will be among eight offices across the country including Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami and Raleigh, NC. The American Basketball Association, the largest professional sports league in the U.S. with more than 100 teams, chose Westgate Entertainment District as its headquarters. The ABA has opened a 2,509 square-foot office. Between the two new office tenants, Westgate will add approximately 15 new office jobs.

This summer, Westgate also welcomed Metro PCS to the kiosks surrounding Fountain Park.

Additionally, Just Sports, the Arizona-based sports apparel retailer with a flagship store at Westgate, is expanding to add an additional store on the WaterDance Events Plaza near Jobing.com Arena, catering to the football and hockey game-day crowds.

“We’re pleased with the continuation of our leasing momentum. OPA, Crave and Fresh Healthy Café bring added dimensions to our restaurant lineup, expanding upon what is already the best dining destination in the West Valley. The addition of a full coffee bar, Greek restaurant and a fast-casual smoothie and healthy café, adds to the attractiveness of Westgate for our office tenants, where employees can stay on-site and get virtually any kind of food for breakfast, lunch or dinner,” said Jeff Teetsel, development manager of Westgate. “We targeted As You Wish as a best-in-class, family friendly experiential store that fits perfectly next to AMC and Fountain Park, providing a great destination for families and kids throughout the year.”

“Westgate Entertainment District is the go-to destination in the West Valley for family fun and entertainment and it’s a natural fit for our seventh store,” said Scott Neff, owner of As You Wish. “We’re a locally owned and operated company celebrating 19 years of bringing out people’s ‘inner artist’. We look forward to becoming part of the Glendale community and reaching new customers and families to help them create special memories through pottery painting, glass fusing, clay and canvas painting.”

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Coyotes move closer toward having an owner

The prospective owners of the Phoenix Coyotes have signed their lease agreement for Jobing.com Arena.

Daryl Jones, partner with Renaissance Sports & Entertainment, tweeted on Monday that the lease agreement with the City of Glendale has been executed.

The Glendale City Council approved a 15-year, $225 million arena lease deal with RSE during a special session last week.

RSE still has to complete its purchase of the team and get approval from the NHL’s Board of Governors, but those are expected to be formalities.

The Coyotes have been run by the league the past four years after former owner Jerry Moyes took the team into bankruptcy in 2009.

triathlon store

Sporting events pump billions into Arizona economy

If you build it, they will come.

We did. And they have.

Over the last decade, the Valley has added Jobing.com Arena, University of Phoenix Stadium, built new spring training facilities, upgraded old ones and visiting sports fans have responded by pumping billions of dollars annually into the economy. And when the Super Bowl returns to Arizona in 2015, the big winner will be the Valley, which will score an economic impact $600 million.

“If you take a look at the economic-impact studies that have been done for events such as spring training and the Fiesta Bowl and the Phoenix Open, the numbers are impressive,” says Steve Moore, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Convention and Visitors Bureau. “For example, the last time the Super Bowl was here, in 2008, if you added its economic impact to that of annual events like Cactus League, the Phoenix Open, the Fiesta Bowl, and the NASCAR events at PIR, you’re looking at a number approaching $2 billion.”

But economic-impact studies alone don’t tell the whole story, Moore says.

“The enormous media value of hosting Super Bowls, college bowl games, NASCAR events, and NBA and (Majore League Baseball) all-star games simply cannot be purchased,” Moore says. “These big-time events also bring in corporate executives who use the games to entertain clients, and those executives and clients often return to town with their own corporate meetings.”

Arizona tourism leaders have utilized and marketed some its the state’s best features — sunny weather that guarantees no delays, desert scenery, excellent facilities and hotels — to become a major player in the world of sports. And the impact on the industry is staggering.

“Huge and immeasurable,” says Jesse Thompson, director of sales and marketing for Hotel Valley Ho in Scottsdale. “Every traveling team spends a night in town. Every team has loyal followers who travel to see their teams. And more than just the team travel, you have sportscasters, television crews, medical teams, referees, and not to mention the hundreds of employees at these venues that service everything from security to bathroom cleaning. Also, all the ancillary travel revenues from cabs and taxis, airlines and airports, food and beverage, entertainment, and retail are huge considerations.”

Consider this:

> Cactus League baseball will have an economic impact in excess of $350 million this year; the average stay for fans will be four days; and most will spend $350 a day while they are here. “Spring training typically offers the biggest sporting-related economic boost we see every year,” says Ron Simon, general manager of Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort.
> The 2012 Waste Management Phoenix Open pumped $222 million into Arizona’s economy — with direct sales tax revenue estimated to be $8.2 million — and non-local attendees spent an average of $300 per day.
> When the Super Bowl rolls back into town, 85 percent of the 73,000 fans at the game will be from out of state; 65 percent of them will be key company decision-makers; another 50,000 fans will visit without tickets; and the average Super Bowl visitor will spend $2,000 while they are here.
> Glendale alone draws between 4 million and 5 million people annually to sporting events that take place in Glendale’s Sports and Entertainment District, which contribute to the city’s increased hotel occupancy and sales tax collection throughout the year.

“The Fiesta Bowl and spring training are tremendous economic engines for Glendale and the West Valley,” says Lorraine Pino, manager of the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Both of these events bring hundreds of thousands of fans to the region. The hotel occupancy rate also reaches near capacity during spring training.”

But it’s not just high-profile athletes that drive sports tourism in Arizona. Beyond being known as a mecca for golfers, the Valley hosts high-profile events for amateur athletes that translate to big bucks for the tourism industry.

Events like Ironman Arizona and the P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon are huge economic drivers because they bring not only the athletes, but their families and friends out for support which drives room nights and retail dollars for the entire community,” says Tori McLaughlin, regional director of sales and marketing, West Coast for Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, which includes both Hotel Palomar and FireSky Resort & Spa.

But beyond the beautiful golf courses, hiking trails and weather, Arizona has built its sports tourism empire by creating its own “Field of Dreams” story and epitomizing the “If you build it, they will come” strategy.

“There has been a major investment in the construction of spring training stadiums, including the development of new stadiums and enhancements to existing ones,” Simon says. “We’ve also seen great development and growth of the entertainment and shopping areas surrounding Chase Field in downtown Phoenix and Jobing.com Arena and University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.”

With improving infrastructure and venues, Phoenix is extremely well positioned to successfully bid for even more mega sporting events in the future, experts predict.

“Arizona’s success has created destination envy, particularly in Texas, which actually enjoys an advantage over us because they have legislation in place that allows them to provide hosting-obligation funds based on incremental visitor spending at these events,” Moore says. “In fact, both Houston and Dallas were chosen over the Valley during the last bids for the NCAA Final Four. But we’ve become a better competitor due to the metamorphosis of downtown Phoenix. We stressed this in our most recent Super Bowl bid. The fully expanded convention center, the 1,000-room Sheraton, light rail, CityScape, the new Westin and Hotel Palomar — none of these things were around in ’08, when the Super Bowl was last in Arizona. The NBA and MLB got a taste of the new downtown when they held their All-Star festivities here, and the NFL will get an even bigger taste in 2015.”

Goldwater Institute - Phoenix Coyotes

Goldwater Institute Seeks To Stop Coyotes Vote

A conservative watchdog group, Goldwater Institute, plans to ask a judge for a temporary restraining order Friday to prevent a Glendale City Council vote on a lease agreement that would clear the way for the sale of the NHL’s Phoenix Coyotes.

The Goldwater Institute said Thursday that its request will be filed at 8:30 a.m. Friday in Maricopa County Superior Court. The institute bases its request on its contention that the city violated the Arizona open meetings law by failing to make public all documents related to the lease.

The seven-member council is scheduled to convene at 10:15 a.m. Friday to vote on a lease that would pay prospective owner Craig Jamison $17 million a year for arena operation costs and other items. The NHL has owned the team for three seasons after buying it in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.

Goldwater officials said they question the timing of the council’s vote.

“The city of Glendale plans to consider what is estimated to be a $425 million arena management deal for Jobing.com Arena,” Goldwater Institute president Darcy Olsen said in a statement. “Arizona’s Open Meetings Law and multiple court orders require the city to make public all documents related to the proposed contract at least 24 hours before a council vote is taken, which it has not done.

“The 100-page deal released on Monday refers to a number of exhibits that are central to analyzing the impact of the deal on Glendale’s finances, which the city must make public,” Olsen added.

Messages left with officials with Glendale and the Coyotes for comment on the Goldwater Institute’s planned action weren’t immediately returned Thursday night.

A proposed sale of the Coyotes last year to Chicago businessman Matthew Hulsizer was derailed by the threat of a lawsuit by the Phoenix-based Goldwater Institute.

The threat held up the city’s sale of bonds necessary to fill the requirements of the lease agreement reached with Hulsizer. The watchdog group argued that Glendale’s deal with Hulsizer violated the state’s anti-subsidy law.

The NHL bought the Coyotes out of bankruptcy in September 2009 with the intention of finding a buyer to keep the team in Arizona. The franchise never has made a profit since moving from Winnipeg in 1996.

This year, the Coyotes won the final five games of the regular season to capture their first division title in 33 years as an NHL franchise. They got past the first round of the playoffs for the first time in 25 years by beating Chicago and then defeated Nashville before losing to Los Angeles in the Western Conference finals.

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman announced before Game 5 of Phoenix’s second-round series with Nashville that the league had reached a preliminary agreement to sell the team to a group headed by Jamison, a former San Jose Sharks CEO. But the deal hinged on working out a lease agreement with Glendale.

For more information on the Goldwater Institute visit their website at goldwaterinstitute.org.

Glendale CVB - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Glendale CVB Expands Its Mission, Scope By Serving Entire West Valley

Glendale CVB – Whether travelers are visiting for leisure or business, Glendale has blossomed from being considered a one-day destination to a highly sought-after travel experience both nationally and internationally in a single decade. And to successfully market Glendale’s increasing expansion as the host city of sporting and mega-events — as well as the entire West Valley — the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau (CVB) was formed in July 2010.

The first incarnation of the CVB was formed in 2007, with partners comprised of representatives from Glendale, Westgate City Center, University of Phoenix Stadium and Jobing.com Arena. This group was called the West Valley Events Coalition and eventually grew to 300 members. Its growth led to the creation of the CVB within three years.

“As a brand new CVB, one of our primary focuses is to increase awareness and exposure of our region through various activities that showcase the West Valley,” says Lorraine Pino, manager of the CVB.

The Glendale CVB promotes Glendale are through a regional visitors guide and sponsoring events to media buyers in national and international markets.

With venues such as the Phoenix International Raceway in Peoria, Jobing.com Arena in Glendale and spring training sites across the region, the Glendale CVB has successfully collaborated with businesses and West Valley cities to make these events possible and boost tourism.

According to Pino, the spring training facilities generate $328 million annually, and the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl in Glendale generates $200 million per year. In addition, there is revenue from concerts, Arizona Cardinals and Phoenix Coyotes games and NASCAR events. As a result, hotel room count in Glendale alone has more than tripled from 400 rooms in 2007 to nearly 1,500.

“The West Valley is the real hub of spring training in Arizona, showcasing nine of 15 teams in the Cactus League,” says Frank Ashmore, director of sales and marketing for The Wigwam in Litchfield Park.

Because the CVB has been able to bring sporting events to the area, in turn attracting visitors, businesses in the region are benefiting.

The events have made a huge impact on all neighboringbars and restaurants, says Michelle Sniegowski, sales and marketing manager for The Shout! House in Glendale.

“The events bring in thousands of people; they fill our venue and in turn boost our economy,” she says.

One attraction vitally important to the Glendale area, according to Pino, is Westgate City Center. It generates tax revenue by drawing visitors from around the world.

Paul Corliss, director of communications for the Phoenix International Raceway, says “the West Valley certainly deserves attention.”

“It’s the quality of dining, shopping, hotel rooms, spas, convention space and more that keep (tourists) coming back,” says Nicole Traynor, director of public relations for Westgate City Center.

As West Valley tourism increases, The Wigwam is receiving a facelift from its new owner, the development company JDM Partners. Headed by former Phoenix Suns owner Jerry Colangelo and his partners Mel Shultz and David Eaton, JDM Partners is investing in the multimillion-dollar restoration, with Phase I recently completed.

It seems to be making a difference. “Group markets are up nearly 50 percent over the last year,” Ashmore says.

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

The Wigwam, litchfield Park, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona’s Tourism Industry Has A Legacy Going Back More Than 100 Years

As one of the largest economic drivers, tourism has helped to shape Arizona’s culture and lifestyle long before it even became a state in 1912.

The Arizona Office of Tourism won’t be releasing 2010s tourism economic impact numbers until July, but in 2009, more than 35 million visitors spent $16.6 billion in Arizona. In addition, the industry generates an estimated $2.4 billion in local, state and federal tax revenues.

To trace the beginning of this industry’s roots, you must go back to the late 1800s, when the railroad finally crossed Arizona (it crossed Southern Arizona in 1881 and Northern Arizona in 1883). Jim Turner, historian and author of “Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State,” says that during this time, the Fred Harvey Company and Santa Fe Railway began marketing tours of Pueblo Indian villages in New Mexico and the Hopi villages in Arizona. Harvey’s stamp on Arizona is still evident today, most notably at the Grand Canyon with the continued operation of his El Tovar Hotel, wGrand Canyon Hotel, Williams, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011hich opened in 1905.

The Grand Canyon Hotel in Williams was also popular during this time, because for several years it was the closest hotel to the Grand Canyon at 65 miles away. Built in 1891, the hotel is considered the oldest in the state still in operation. It sat vacant for more than 30 years until 2004, when Oscar and Amy Fredrickson bought it and performed extensive renovations following decades of neglect.

“There’s such a niche for this type of business with the historic aspect of Route 66 and the hotel itself,” Fredrickson says.

The tourism market changed drastically in the 1920s. Factories began offering employees two-weeks paid time off, and with the advent of affordable cars and roads crossing the United States, such as Route 66 in 1926, more people began taking cross-country vacations. This was the start of automobile tourism in Arizona, Turner explains, with auto camps and motor hotels popping up every few miles along the entire highway.

Dude ranches also began operating throughout Arizona, especially in Wickenburg, where at the height of dude ranching popularity there were 13, says Julie Brooks, executive director of Wickenburg’s Chamber of Commerce. Today that number is down to four. Some of the closed dude ranches, she says, have reverted back to private family homes, while others have actually taken on the needs of other industries, such as the transition of Slash Bar K Ranch into The Meadows, a treatment center for addiction and trauma.

Among those dude ranches still operating is the Flying E Ranch, a 19,500-acre working ranch that transitioned into a dude ranch in 1946. In its infancy, the ranch had eight guest rooms, but that has now increased to 17 rooms, including two family houses, for a total occupancy of 34. The original guest rooms still contain their original chairs and lamps.

Many of the Flying E Ranch’s guests are repeat customers, says general manager Andrea Taylor, adding that one of the lessons she’s learned over the years is that guests don’t want anything at the ranch to change.

“I find that I can’t pull away from tradition,” she says. “People have grown to love what they have here. It’s like coming home to grandma’s house.”

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix, which first opened in 1929, also has evolved with the ever-changing needs of tourists. Celebrities were often found at the resort. Marilyn Monroe was quoted as referring to the pool there as her favorite, and Irving Berlin wrote his famous “White Christmas” while sitting by the same pool. The resort has had several additions and renovations since then, especially during the 1970s and 1980s. One of the most recent changes came in 2009, when the Arizona Wing was renovated and renamed Ocatilla at Arizona Biltmore. This “hotel within a hotel” offers even more amenities and elite service for those looking for the ultimate in a pampered vacation.

Tourism died down during World War II, Turner says, as everyone was involved in the war effort. But after the war, thanks to savings bonds and the GI Bill, people could afford to travel again. For the next several decades, motor hotels continued to thrive, but the fascination with the Western lifestyle slowly dissipated as destination tourism rose. Picking up in the 1970s and strengthening even today, tourists now seek the ultimate destination vacation experience, especially in areas that promote golf and spas, Turner says.

As the needs and wants of travelers evolved, hotels throughout the state also changed to accommodate them. The Westward Look Resort in Tucson, which was originally built as a family home in 1912, transitioned into a guest ranch in the 1920s, and evolved once again in the 1960s, when it became Tucson’s first resort. Today, in addition to deluxe accommodations and luxurious spa activities, the resort also encourages guests to engage in recreational tourism through its nature programs, which include horseback riding and hiking trails.

A more recent example of the continuing evolution of hotels is The Wigwam in Litchfield Park. The Wigwam’s identity has altered several times during its history. Originally built as an organizational house for Goodyear Tire and Rubber executives in 1918, it became a dude rancThe Wigwam, Litchfield Park, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011h in 1929, and as with The Westward Look Resort, it later added more deluxe amenities including golf and spa activities. The Wigwam just completed a $7 million renovation in January, a process that was necessary to not only stay current with today’s tourists, but also to prepare for the next generation.

“The Wigwam has been here for almost 100 years because it’s always been the type of property that adapted to different generations and different travelers and how those needs are ever changing,” says Frank Ashmore, director of sales and marketing at The Wigwam.

Sedona has always been a popular city for tourists, as well, due to its red mountain scenery. But in the late 1980s, it became even more well known when it was decided that Sedona had more metaphysical spiritual centers than anywhere else in the world, Turner says. Suddenly people were flocking to Sedona to discern this phenomena for themselves. This continues to be a draw for tourists today and many books can be found on the subject.

Business tourism also has had a large impact on Arizona, especially in the Greater Phoenix area. George Munz, general manager at the Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix, says 85 percent of the hotel’s guests are staying in town for business. The needs of business travelers, he says, are different from leisure travelers, especially in terms of speed and efficiency. And business tourism, Munz adds, helps boost leisure tourism as well.

“While (a guest) may come to my hotel for business, they may come back and go to the Royal Palms or Camelback Inn or The Phoenician,” Munz explains.

Even sports have played a part in Arizona’s tourism growth. While MLB spring training camps can be found throughout Greater Phoenix, the impact of sports tourism is probably most apparent in Glendale. After the opening of Westgate City Center, Jobing.com Arena and the University of Phoenix stadium, the number of Glendale’s hotels doubled and its occupancy more than tripled, says Lorraine Pino, tourism manager at the Glendale Convention and Visitors Bureau.

It was thanks in part to this sports surge that Glendale took the steps necessary to change its tourism office into an official CVB.

“Our tourism literally exploded over the past few years and with that we really needed to have that official designation,” Pino says.

Tourism in the entire West Valley will get to reap the benefits of the Glendale CVB, as Pino and her team will now work to promote all 13 cities in the region.

Debbie Johnson, president and CEO of the Arizona Hotel and Lodging Association, says that the efforts of hotels and tourism leaders throughout Arizona has helped mold the state into what it is today and where it will go in the future.

“Arizona wouldn’t be where we are today if we didn’t have the tourism industry we have,” she says. “I really believe (tourism) is what makes Arizona so special.”

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011