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John C Lincoln

John C. Lincoln Sonoran Health and Emergency Center Opens Dec. 9

John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center, located on 22 acres south of Carefree Highway and Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix, will open to the public on Monday, Dec. 9.

The $18M Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is a 40,000 SF facility with emergency services, medical imaging and breast health screening with lower dose 3-D mammography. The Center will employ approximately 40 staff members.

Designed by the Devenny Group, Ltd., the medical complex was built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5.6M.

Ground was broken and construction began during the first week of December 2012. Santa Monica, Calif.-based Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development. Macerich still owns an adjacent 55 acres in the development along I-17 south of the Carefree Highway.

The $18M funds site work, all construction and purchase of furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include future construction of a 120-bed hospital, which is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time to be determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix. The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 33 primary care and specialty physician practices including 22 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for under- and uninsured members of the community.

JCL Surgery

Partnership Creates New Valley Medical Resources

At a time when healthcare dominates the national news, Midwestern University in Glendale and John C. Lincoln Hospitals, Phoenix, are working together to augment local medical resources by creating a general surgery training program for osteopathic medical school graduates.

The new osteopathic general surgery residency program, accredited by the American Osteopathic Association, was jointly developed by Midwestern and John C. Lincoln. The program was approved for two residents to begin each year, for a total of 10 residents in the program.

Residents will be trained at both John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, 250 East Dunlap, Phoenix, and John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, 19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix. John C. Lincoln Hospitals are not-for-profit acute care community medical centers that have been nationally recognized for their quality of patient care and medical technology.

“Midwestern University is committed to the development of quality postdoctoral residency programs in the State of Arizona and around the country,” said Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwestern University. “Our mission is to provide our communities with well-trained physicians and other much-needed healthcare providers both now and in the future.”

“John C. Lincoln brings a vast array of surgical experience to this program,” noted Alicia Mangram, M.D., FACS, Medical Director of the Level 1 Trauma Services program at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital and Program Director of the new General Surgery Residency Program. “We have 20 general surgeons who will be associated with the residency program with experience in trauma surgery, advanced laparoscopic, and robotic procedures.”

Projected physician shortages have made establishing new Arizona-based osteopathic surgical residency opportunities a top priority for Midwestern University’s Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) and the University’s Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institute (MWU/OPTI). According to Midwestern statistics, 97 percent of Arizona-native AZCOM students who receive postdoctoral training in-state remain in Arizona to practice, reducing the state’s physician shortage.

Any graduate of an accredited osteopathic medical school may apply to participate in the surgical residency program, Dr. Mangram explained. Residents selected to participate in the program will complete training in basic general surgery, advanced laparoscopic, robotic, colorectal, trauma, surgical critical care, endoscopy, vascular, and cardiothoracic procedures. Training in burns and pediatrics will be provided offsite.

stroke

Deer Valley Hospital Now Primary Stroke Center

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in North Phoenix has become the Valley’s newest hospital certified as a Primary Stroke Center by DNV Healthcare, an international certifying agency approved by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to John Harrington Jr., hospital CEO and senior vice president, Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network.

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital was accredited as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations in 2007 and by DNV Healthcare in 2011.

“Deer Valley Hospital demonstrated that its stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcomes for stroke patients,” said Chief Medical Officer Mary Ann Turley, DO, Deer Valley Hospital, who led the stroke certification task force that started preparing the hospital for stroke certification last year.

“We received only one finding when the surveyors visited from DNV and awarded John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital certification as a Primary Stroke Center,” Turley added. “I could not be more proud of our entire stroke certification team and hospital co-workers who all jumped at the opportunity to earn this recognition for our caregiving capability.”

Strokes are the third most prevalent cause of death, the leading cause of adult disability, and affect 700,000 Americans every year. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted by a blood clot (ischemic) or by bleeding from a burst blood vessel (hemorrhagic), either of which impairs the brain’s ability to function, but which require opposite treatments.

Because diagnosing the cause is key to ensuring appropriate and effective care, it’s important for patients and families to insist that EMS providers take them to a Primary Stroke Center, said Donna Sells, administrator for the Health Network’s Neurosciences/Orthopedic Service Line. “A Primary Stroke Center is where staff is trained not only to recognize symptoms of stroke, but more importantly, to correctly identify the cause,” she explained.
When people have strokes, time is of the essence. Rapid medical treatment – started less than 3 hours after onset of symptoms and completed within 45 minutes of the patients arrival at the hospital – can save many stroke patients from a lifetime of disability.
“Time loss equals brain loss,” said Sells. When stroke symptoms begin, people should call 9-1-1 without delay.

DNV Primary Stroke Center certification is based on submitted documentation and a site visit by DNV surveyors, during which the hospital staff demonstrates its commitment to excellence, Harrington said. DNV’s PSC Certification program incorporates elements from federal CMS hospital standards as well as requirements from the guidelines of the Brain Attack Coalition and recommendations of the American Stroke Association.

Members of the Deer Valley Stroke Team Include: Alice Montoya, RN, Nelson Faux, MD, Anil Goud, MD, Patrick Sciara, MD, Clark York, DO, Bonnie Fuerst, MT, Kevin Veale, DO, Patty Erickson, RN, Danny Blanco, RN, Lalit Mansukhani, PharmD, Peter Burrows, RT, Linda DeLuca, RN, Lawrence Finkel, MD, Renee Featherly, David Price, Linda Ott, RN, Donna Sells, RN, Karrie Smith, RN, Lisa Hughes, RN, Susan Hoffmeister, RN, Holly Grems, RN, Maria Soriano, MD, Tracy Moroney, RN, Jennifer Gallegos, MA, Mary Ann Turley, DO, Victor Zach, MD, Jessica Rivas, MSN, Matt Sainsbury, MHA, and Joanne Motley, RN.

AHCCCS Alternative - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

John C. Lincoln’s transition specialist program honored

MGMA-ACMPE, the premier membership association for professional administrators and leaders of medical group practices, has presented its Fred Graham Award to the John C. Lincoln Physician Network for activities and solutions to advance the effectiveness of healthcare delivery and improve community health.

The award was received by Nathan Anspach, FACMPE, FACHE, Senior VP and CEO, John C. Lincoln Physician Network and Accountable Care. Anspach and his administrative team created a program that recruits combat medics and corpsmen returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and trains them as transition specialists to serve the patients of the John C. Lincoln Accountable Care Organization.

“This is a wonderful honor,” Anspach said, “and all of us at John C. Lincoln are grateful to the MGMA-ACMPE for recognizing our efforts.”

Transition specialists work with recently hospitalized frail elderly patients diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or heart failure in an effort to improve post-discharge outcomes and reduce unnecessary readmissions.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) mandated hospitals to maintain the health of Medicare hospital patients with those diagnoses, so fewer are readmitted within 30 days after discharge. CMS offers financial incentives for readmission reduction and levies penalties for increases.

National average for designated Medicare readmissions is 20 percent, costing CMS some $17 billion annually. The work of the transition specialists slashed Lincoln’s readmission rates to an astonishing 6 percent.

John C. Lincoln achieved those stunning results by mobilizing their cadre of transition specialists to provide their Medicare patients with a personal touch – treating them like beloved grandparents and helping them with medical instructions, prescriptions, doctor appointments, nutrition, transportation and safety.

The program also encourages and supports transition specialists to return to school to pursue RN, PA, MD, or DO degrees.

breast.cancer

John C. Lincoln offers state’s 1st Low Dose 3D mammograms

John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health and Research Center in North Phoenix is now Arizona’s first site to offer low dose 3-D mammography, the latest innovation in breast cancer screening.

The new low dose 3-D system from Hologic requires less compression time and reduces radiation exposure. It does this by creating 2-D images from the 3-D data set, thus eliminating the separate digital X-ray that was part of the original 3-D imaging process.

“Even though groundbreaking 3-D mammograms met FDA safety standards while providing never-before seen image clarity, some patients worried about the level of exposure,” said breast radiologist Linda Greer, MD, medical director of the John C. Lincoln Breast Health and Research Center. “This new low dose technology completely eliminates that concern.”

Hologic’s new ‘C-View’ imaging software was approved May 16 by the FDA. The new, low dose 3-D mammograms are now available at the same cost as conventional 2-D mammography at John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health and Research Center, 19646 N. 27th Ave., #205. Also, the new technology is clinically proven to significantly reduce unnecessary patient recalls while simultaneously improving cancer detection.

“Lower dose 3-D mammography is an important evolution in breast cancer screening,” Dr. Greer says. “Large-scale clinical studies in the U.S. and Europe have shown that screening with 3-D mammography allows radiologists to visualize the breast in greater detail than with 2-D mammography alone. That results in earlier detection of cancers, while at the same time reducing the false positives associated with conventional 2-D mammography.”

False positives are unclear results that require patients to return for additional medical imaging to rule out cancer and can cause unnecessary anxiety and cost. “No matter how you look at it,” Dr. Greer said, “lower dose 3-D breast cancer screening provides a better patient experience.”

Being first to offer low dose 3-D mammography is typical for John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health Center, which has a history of being at the forefront of breast cancer screening. It was first in the Valley to offer breast imaging in a spa-like setting; first in Arizona to offer 3-D screening that is rapidly becoming the worldwide standard of care; and one of the first in the nation designated a Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology.

For more information, visit JCL.com/breasthealth.

breast.cancer

John C. Lincoln offers state's 1st Low Dose 3D mammograms

John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health and Research Center in North Phoenix is now Arizona’s first site to offer low dose 3-D mammography, the latest innovation in breast cancer screening.

The new low dose 3-D system from Hologic requires less compression time and reduces radiation exposure. It does this by creating 2-D images from the 3-D data set, thus eliminating the separate digital X-ray that was part of the original 3-D imaging process.

“Even though groundbreaking 3-D mammograms met FDA safety standards while providing never-before seen image clarity, some patients worried about the level of exposure,” said breast radiologist Linda Greer, MD, medical director of the John C. Lincoln Breast Health and Research Center. “This new low dose technology completely eliminates that concern.”

Hologic’s new ‘C-View’ imaging software was approved May 16 by the FDA. The new, low dose 3-D mammograms are now available at the same cost as conventional 2-D mammography at John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health and Research Center, 19646 N. 27th Ave., #205. Also, the new technology is clinically proven to significantly reduce unnecessary patient recalls while simultaneously improving cancer detection.

“Lower dose 3-D mammography is an important evolution in breast cancer screening,” Dr. Greer says. “Large-scale clinical studies in the U.S. and Europe have shown that screening with 3-D mammography allows radiologists to visualize the breast in greater detail than with 2-D mammography alone. That results in earlier detection of cancers, while at the same time reducing the false positives associated with conventional 2-D mammography.”

False positives are unclear results that require patients to return for additional medical imaging to rule out cancer and can cause unnecessary anxiety and cost. “No matter how you look at it,” Dr. Greer said, “lower dose 3-D breast cancer screening provides a better patient experience.”

Being first to offer low dose 3-D mammography is typical for John C. Lincoln’s Breast Health Center, which has a history of being at the forefront of breast cancer screening. It was first in the Valley to offer breast imaging in a spa-like setting; first in Arizona to offer 3-D screening that is rapidly becoming the worldwide standard of care; and one of the first in the nation designated a Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology.

For more information, visit JCL.com/breasthealth.

Medical Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Del Webb Gives $500,000 to cut John C. Lincoln readmissions

Love, they say, makes the world go round. Apparently, at John C. Lincoln Hospitals in Phoenix, love also reduces hospital readmissions by frail Medicare patients.

A program that hires military combat medics and corpsmen to care for discharged elderly patients like beloved grandparents has slashed the John C. Lincoln Hospitals’ Medicare patient readmission rates to an astonishing 6 percent.

It’s not that the rates were bad to begin with. Before the program started last October, the Medicare readmission rates at John C. Lincoln Hospitals hovered around a respectable 18 percent – the national average is 20 percent. Those readmissions cost the federal government more than $17 billion annually.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) launched a campaign to encourage hospitals to do whatever necessary to maintain the health of discharged Medicare hospital patients with congestive heart failure, heart attacks or pneumonia, so fewer of them would be readmitted within the first 30 days after leaving the hospital. Financial incentives for readmission rate reduction and penalties for readmission rate increases were built into the CMS campaign.

John C. Lincoln’s innovative response to the CMS challenge mobilizes a cadre of veterans as transition coaches who provide designated Medicare patients with a personal touch along with support and guidance – to help them with follow-up medical instructions, prescription drugs, doctor appointments, nutrition and costs of care.

In the long run, reduced readmissions generated by the transition coaches produce significant savings for John C. Lincoln that far exceed program costs. But initial assistance to maximize the program’s effectiveness was needed.

The Del E. Webb Foundation stepped into that gap and awarded a $500,000 two-year grant to John C. Lincoln Health Foundation to support and expand the Health Network’s transition coach services. The grant will provide $250,000 this year to hire an additional five coaches, plus an additional $250,000 in July 2014 to hire five more, bringing the total number of John C. Lincoln transition coaches to 14.

The additional coaches make it possible to provide transition services not only to designated Medicare inpatients, but to all frail elderly patients being discharged from both hospitals, regardless of Medicare status or membership in John C. Lincoln’s Accountable Care Organization.

“But our primary goal is not to chase statistics,” says Transition Coach Program medical director John Lees, DO. “It is to reduce readmissions by helping at risk patients.

“Our first goal is to take care of discharged patients the way their own children or grandchildren would take care of them . . . to love on them and make sure their food, safety, medication, follow-up doctor visits, transportation or other everyday needs get taken care of, so their health is maintained, so they don’t relapse for preventable reasons,” Dr. Lees said. “Our goal is their optimal health.”

A key component, Dr. Lees said, is hiring transition coaches from the pool of trained military medics and corpsmen returning from active service in the Mideast. In spite of their rigorous training and experience, these soldiers are considered unqualified for most civilian health care positions. John C. Lincoln is providing employment relevant to the work they did in the field while harnessing their abilities, knowledge and disciplined initiative to address the needs of discharged Medicare patients.

Using the strategic, creative and responsive skills learned during military service, the transition coaches work with patients in the following major areas:

·         Medication self management – Making sure patients have access to pharmacies, can afford to their prescriptions, know how and when to take their medications, and understand the drugs’ purpose and potential side effects.
·         Physician follow-up – Making sure the patients know when to see primary or specialty physicians for follow-up care, that such visits are scheduled and that the patient has needed transportation.
·         Patient-centered health records – Teaching the patient to use a personal health record with a computer or smart phone to facilitate communication and continuity of care.
·         Nutrition and home safety – Making sure the patient and pets have adequate healthy food so that malnutrition doesn’t impair recovery; checking the home for hazards that can lead to falls or other injuries.
·         Red flags – Making sure the patient recognizes symptoms that indicate his or her condition is worsening and knows what to do to get help.

These services, none of which involve medical care, are essential to the preservation of patients’ health, Dr. Lees said.

“Many have asked why our program is so much more successful than other hospitals’ efforts to maintain the health of their discharged Medicare patients,” Dr. Lees said. “We’re still evaluating our experience to find out why.”

However, some factors the transition team believes are crucial to their success include:

·         Veterans relate well with patients.
·         Veterans are geared to recognize and solve problems, traditionally or out-of-the-box, creatively and immediately.
·         Transition coaches with access to John C. Lincoln’s electronic health records system don’t have to rely on their patients for health history, medication review or other information, because all that can be accessed on a computer, laptop, tablet, iPhone or Android. Follow-up doctor appointments or prescription refills can be made expediently online.

“We are enthusiastic about our initial success,” Dr. Lees said, “and we hope that our program, the national winner of the 2012 White House Healthcare Policy Challenge, will be recognized as a best practice that will become a model for the nation.

“There are currently more than 20,000 military combat medics and corpsmen returning from Iraq and Afghanistan who need jobs and who could help preserve the health of Medicare patients released from hospitals across America,” Dr. Lees said. “Wouldn’t it be ideal if they could do what our transition coaches are doing?”

teeth

Henkel Makes Impact Children’s Dental Clinic Grant

More than 5,000 North Phoenix schoolchildren – some of whom have never even seen a toothbrush – will receive their own dental health kits during the 2013-14 school year, thanks to the generosity of Henkel, an international manufacturing corporation with offices in Scottsdale.

Through their MIT corporate project, Making an Impact upon Tomorrow, Henkel awarded $7,500 to John C. Lincoln’s Desert Mission Children’s Dental Clinic. It is the first time Henkel has supported John C. Lincoln’s community services.

The funds will be used to purchase the components of Desert Mission’s SMILE kits that include a toothbrush, dental floss, toothpaste and dental hygiene education in both English and Spanish.

The kits, assembled by John C. Lincoln volunteers, are distributed by a dental hygienist who visits 15 elementary schools in the John C. Lincoln service area and screens children for dental health.

Children with dental health issues – which can range from cavities to serious abscesses – are referred to the Children’s Dental Clinic for care if they are uninsured or underinsured. Approximately 8,000 children are screened during the school year.

“This grant will make a huge difference for children in our service area, some of whom have urgent dental needs,” said John C. Lincoln Health Foundation CEO Marcia Mintz. “We are extremely grateful to Henkel for their generosity.”

Health Insurance

Scottsdale Healthcare, John C. Lincoln form affiliation

Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network have endorsed a letter of intent to form a system-wide affiliation to better meet the healthcare needs and thus improve the health of the communities they serve.

The nonbinding agreement between the two non-profit organizations allows both to pursue an exclusive negotiation during a due diligence period in order to create a combined health system. Discussions are anticipated to be complete by July 31.

The new non-profit system, which would be called Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, would include five hospitals with approximately 10,500 employees, 3,700 affiliated physicians and 3,100 volunteers. Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network would also include an extensive primary care physician network, urgent care centers, clinical research, medical education, an inpatient rehabilitation hospital, an Accountable Care Organization, two foundations and extensive community services.

Both John C. Lincoln and Scottsdale Healthcare have a strong reputation and history of providing high quality care for the residents of Phoenix and greater Scottsdale. The non-profit health systems share similar visions and cultures, and both are Magnet organizations, a national recognition of providing the highest standards of patient care.

“This affiliation will provide resources to further develop the current high quality care in the hospitals and community healthcare facilities, enhance our geographic presence and honor the legacy of each organization. Our shared vision is to become a fully integrated, locally controlled, world-class health system,” said Scottsdale Healthcare President & CEO Tom Sadvary.

John C. Lincoln Health Network and Scottsdale Healthcare are financially strong, operationally successful and committed to meeting local health needs. Both organizations have been developing integrated delivery systems to expand services beyond acute care.

“Each of our organizations is known for quality and collaboration with community partners to promote the well-being of the communities we serve. The combined Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network will allow us to provide more cost effective healthcare and to thrive during this period of rapid change as a result of national and local health reform as we continue to develop a full continuum of  services beyond acute care,” added John C. Lincoln Health Network President & CEO Rhonda Forsyth.

Upon completion of the affiliation agreement, the Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network governance will be focused on their shared vision which includes:

·         More convenient access to acute and preventive care.
·         Increased coordination of medical care.
·         An expanded network of high quality primary care and specialty physicians.
·         Creation of a single electronic health record that can be accessed at all levels of care throughout the affiliated health network.
·         Improved patient outcomes through shared best practices.

“This affiliation will attract top medical talent by providing opportunities for physicians and other providers to lead the transformation of care delivery, and will enhance our leadership role in medical education and clinical research,” said Scottsdale Healthcare Board Chair Steven Wheeler. “Together we can provide a more comprehensive array of services by applying our combined resources to strengthen our clinical capabilities.”

Forsyth added that maintaining Magnet designation of the system hospitals provides a work environment that attracts top talent.

“As major provisions of the Affordable Care Act continue to take effect, we have the opportunity to shape the future of healthcare in the Valley by cost effectively using our respective resources to enhance our impact in the communities we serve,” said Forsyth.

“We want to maximize our ability to improve the health of our community and create more access to care. A more robust health network with primary care physicians, specialists and partnerships with other healthcare organizations will add capabilities for providing patients with a full continuum of coordinated healthcare services,” said John C. Lincoln Health Network Board Chair Frank Pugh.

 

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John C. Lincoln Sonoran Health and Emergency Center Construction Visible

 

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5M.

Initially, the $18M Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000 SF facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix.

The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development.

The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

 
Sonoran Const 2[30]

JCL building Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix. The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

Initially, the $18 million Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000-square-foot facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix. The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group, Ltd., and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5.6 million.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development. Santa Monica, Calif.-based Macerich still owns an adjacent 55 acres in the development along I-17 south of the Carefree Highway.

rsz_ssc_room_with_a_view-2

John C. Lincoln N. Mountain SCC Renovation Wins National Award

 

In recognition of the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital’s completely reimagined and rebuilt Specialty Surgical Care third floor, the American Society of Hospital Engineering (ASHE) selected the hospital as recipient of its annual Vista Award for the year’s most outstanding renovation project.

Only one of the nation’s 6,000 hospitals is so honored each year by ASHE, a division of the American Hospital Association.

The $9M, 21,350 SF North Mountain hospital floor was completely gutted and then transformed into a new facility that is now the standard for future construction design throughout the Health Network. DPR Construction was the general contractor; Orcutt | Winslow was the architect.

The groundbreaking model was based on input from a hospital team of nursing and other patient care staff members regarding concepts that worked well in other hospital units and additional features to improve the patient experience.

“The team approach was the key to the success of the project,” said Sheila Gerry, senior vice president for Real Estate and Facilities Development. “More than 100 people worked closely together to find consensus solutions and make decisions to create an environment for the highest patient satisfaction, and to do all this within a very brief 10-month window, a tight timeline and budget.

“They succeeded because they believed in the project and in each other,” she added.

During conception and construction, hospital team members met weekly with the architects, engineers, contractors and interior designers. The result was a unit with 28 larger-than-average private rooms for elective orthopedic, neuro, spine and urology surgical patients.

Adding elegance to medical excellence, the timeless design allows John C. Lincoln’s state-of-the-art medical technology to be delivered in an atmosphere of comfort and convenience, complete with a “wow” factor for patients and visitors.

At each end of the floor, 14 rooms encircle the interdisciplinary clinical collaboration stations in order to increase visibility of staff. Each station includes designated dictation and charting areas to support better communications between doctors and clinical staff.

Patient rooms are not only high-touch with personal comfort in mind, but are also high tech for medical management functions. Room flow and efficiency is enhanced through proximity of necessary medical supplies and equipment, electronic health records, hand-washing and other evidence-based design applications.

“I wanted to create a unit that is collaborative and addresses the viewpoints of all staff members so that it will help us do our jobs even better,” said Erin Kennedy, RN, SSC charge nurse and nursing staff liaison to the SSC planning team. “Input from nurses, clinical staff and doctors made sure that everything necessary to excellent patient care and experiences was included.

“After a year of experience working in the SSC, I can say without hesitation that we have the ideal unit that we wanted to create.”

“From the personal welcome upon arrival to the individual get well card delivered upon discharge, Specialty Surgical Care wraps each patient’s high tech health care in layers of medical caring and personal attention unique in the Valley,” said Judy Bernhardt, SSC clinical director. “We are proud that our patient satisfaction scores top the charts.”

The 2013 Vista Award for Renovation will be presented to John C. Lincoln on Feb. 25 during the opening session of ASHE’s 2013 International Summit and Exhibition for Health Facility Planning, Design and Construction in San Francisco.

 

Anika and Bear Patrol

Highway Patrol Brings Bears to Delight Hospitalized Kids

The 19th Annual Arizona Highway Patrol Christmas Bear Program for hospitalized Arizona children kicked off this week in the Pediatric Emergency Center, Mendy’s Place, and the inpatient pediatric unit, KidsZone, at John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, 19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix.

In the playroom at KidsZone, four-year-old Anika Suarez had little to say to the officers offering her a choice of teddy bears, but her sparkling eyes and mischievous grin spoke volumes as she carefully considered her ursine options. Finally, she chose the fluffy white one.

Arizona Highway Patrol Association (AHPA) members, who are celebrating almost two decades of bringing Christmas joy to children receiving treatment in various medical centers across the state, have been bringing bears to children at the Deer Valley Hospital since Mendy’s Place opened in 1998.

“The bears serve as communication mechanisms to help children better understand that police officers are to help and protect them,” state Jimmy Chavez, President of the AHPA. “Witnessing the faces of those receiving the teddy bears is all that one needs to know the program is making a positive difference in many lives.”

The mission of the program is to demonstrate children are the association’s most important responsibility. AHPA collects new stuffed animals all year round for children.  Many DPS Officers keep bears in their patrol cars, so they are always prepared to comfort a child they encounter.

Since 1993, the program has expanded to provide the stuffed teddy bears to both children and adults at their bed or road sides. The success is attributed to the efforts and talents of volunteers giving countless hours of their time to make the Christmas Bear Program an overwhelming success.  Generous donations from Arizona’s community have helped fund the bears each year.

In 2011, AHPA’s volunteers distributed over 2,000 bears to hospitals throughout the state of Arizona. The 2012 program will give away bears to patients in statewide medical centers, domestic violence shelters and hospice locations.

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John C. Lincoln Unveils North Mountain Hospital Entrance Renovation

A $5M reconstruction project to redesign and rebuild the entrance of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital at Dunlap Ave. and 2nd St. in Phoenix will be unveiled Nov. 29.

The renovation was made possible when David and Joan Lincoln and his sister, Lillian Lincoln Howell – descendants of John C. Lincoln – donated $4M to upgrade and reconstruct the entrance.

Additional major contributors include the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Guild, Lincoln GIVES, the Health Network employee giving program and the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Auxiliary.

Construction began in January 2012 as part of a larger renovation at the North Mountain Hospital. DPR Construction is the general contractor and Orcutt | Winslow is the architect.

Areas to be unveiled include the hospital’s main entrance, lobby, gift shop, spiritual center, admitting, coffee bistro and newly designed donor wall. The final phase of renovations will begin on Nov. 30 and include enhanced indoor public dining and the addition of outdoor and staff dining areas.

“This gift will allow us to re-invent the patient and visitor experience at the North Mountain Hospital,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “We’ll create a welcoming and warm entry lobby that is the pathway to healing for patients, visitors, staff and the community.”

The transformation of the 12,840 SF areas of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital creates a soothing and calming environment for patients and visitors. The journey to wellness begins here – on the Pathway to Healing – with a welcoming and inviting experience on par with the quality of care provided by nurses, physicians and staff throughout the John C. Lincoln Health Network.

“The hospital is dear to our family’s hearts, and it is important that the lobby reflect the quality of care received inside the hospital,” David Lincoln said shortly after the donation was made. “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression, and this is our chance to make a great first impression to our patients and visitors.”

Marcia Mintz, CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation, noted that “this gift demonstrates the philanthropic leadership of the Lincoln family and serves as a principal gift model for the Foundation and our developing donor base.

“We are grateful for the generous support of the Lincoln family whose governance and philanthropic support have been steadfast for more than 80 years. This is a reflection of their continuing pride in the direction and mission of this organization.”

>> John C. Lincoln Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division sold 22 acres of land on October 15 for $5.6M to John C. Lincoln Health Network. Macerich still owns 55 acres at the Sonoran Crossing development along Interstate 17 near Carefree Highway.

“We plan to start with a free-standing emergency center, primary care offices and diagnostic imaging, including 3D mammography. We will eventually expand to build a hospital and add medical office buildings in the future,” Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of John C. Lincoln Health Network, said in astatement.

The master plan for the Emergency Center and Diagnostic Imaging has been completed.

Devenney has been selected as architect to design the first building, which will include an Emergency Department, Diagnostic Imaging Services and Medical Offices.

DPR has been selected as the general contractor. Ground will break/construction will start on the North Valley facility during the first week of December.

John C. Lincoln’s investment in building construction and equipment is approximately $18M, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln Senior Vice President, Real Estate and Facilities Development.

The cost does not include construction of the 120-bed hospital which ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The $18M funds site work for a 40,000 SF building; construction of the Emergency Department, Diagnostic Imaging and medical offices; and purchase of medical equipment.

A new 120-bed hospital and medical campus will be developed on the site at a time to be determined based on future developments in the area economy and population growth

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in north central Phoenix.

 

 

6588-Lobby Overview

Lincoln unveils new $5 million entrance

A $5 million reconstruction project to redesign and rebuild the entrance area of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital at Dunlap Avenue and Second Street, Phoenix, is nearing completion, with the a dedication event scheduled for Nov. 29.

The renovation was made possible when David and Joan Lincoln and his sister, Lillian Lincoln Howell – descendants of John C. Lincoln – donated $4 million to upgrade and reconstruct the entrance. Additional major contributors include the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Guild, Lincoln GIVES, the Health Network employee giving program and the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Auxiliary.

Construction began in January 2012 as part of a larger renovation at the North Mountain Hospital.  Areas to be unveiled Nov. 29 include the hospital’s main entrance, lobby, gift shop, spiritual center, admitting, coffee bistro and newly designed donor wall. The final phase of renovations will begin on Nov. 30 and include enhanced indoor public dining and the addition of outdoor and staff dining areas.

“This gift will allow us to re-invent the patient and visitor experience at the North Mountain Hospital,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “We’ll create a welcoming and warm entry lobby that is the pathway to healing for patients, visitors, staff and the community.”

The transformation of the 12,840 square-foot areas of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital creates a soothing and calming environment for patients and visitors. The journey to wellness begins here – on the Pathway to Healing – with a welcoming and inviting experience on par with the quality of care provided by nurses, physicians and staff throughout the John C. Lincoln Health Network.

“The hospital is dear to our family’s hearts, and it is important that the lobby reflect the quality of care received inside the hospital,” David Lincoln said shortly after the donation was made. He added, “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression, and this is our chance to make a great first impression to our patients and visitors.”

Marcia Mintz, CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation, noted that “this gift demonstrates the philanthropic leadership of the Lincoln family and serves as a principal gift model for the Foundation and our developing donor base. We are grateful for the generous support of the Lincoln family whose governance and philanthropic support have been steadfast for more than 80 years. This is a reflection of their continuing pride in the direction and mission of this organization.”

Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit

Lincoln North Mountain’s Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit Earns Award

The Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit (CVICU) at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital has earned a silver-level Beacon Award for Excellence in Critical Care from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), according to Susan Snyder, RN, MBA, CCRN, clinical director of the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.

The AACN created the Beacon Award to recognize individual units that distinguish themselves by improving every facet of patient care. The silver-level Beacon Award for Excellence earned by the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit signifies continuous learning and effective systems to achieve optimal patient care.

The Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit at JCL earned its silver award, Snyder said, by meeting the following evidence-based Beacon Award criteria:

  • Leadership Structures and Systems – Reward and recognition, interdepartmental relationship building and effective strategic planning for growth and continual improvement were key among these programs.
  • Appropriate Staffing and Staff Engagement – RN-to-patient ratios were balanced by providing highly educated and competent nurses at the bedside to ensure patient safety and effective care.
  • Effective Communication, Knowledge Management, Learning and Development, Best Practices – Collegial relationships between physicians and nurses promote effective communication regarding patient care. The unit also employs educators and clinical nurse specialists who continually evaluate and work to improve the quality of health care provided in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.
  • Evidence-Based Practice and Processes – These infuse the newest information and technology into practice on the units through ongoing staff education, training and development and the use of rapid process improvement.
  • Patient Outcomes – These consistently exceed national benchmarks.

“The nurses in the CVICU here form a top notch team,” Snyder said. “They have a heart for the patient, and they continually strive to provide excellent care. This unit truly deserves to be recognized with this award.”

“As the CVICU medical director,” said interventional cardiologist Gary Kauffman, MD, FACC, “I am so very proud to be part of such a wonderful group of hard-working, dedicated personnel who exemplify the very best in high-quality care for their patients.”

The Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit won its first Beacon Award for Excellence – a significant milestone on the path to exceptional patient care and a healthy work environment – in 2010 under the leadership of Robbi Johnson, RN, MSN, CCRN, who then was clinical director of CVICU and the Intensive Care Unit. Johnson, now clinical director of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Dialysis at the hospital, led the ICU teams who earned the first Beacon Award in Arizona in 2007 and again in 2009.

“The Beacon Award for Excellence recognizes caregivers in stellar units whose consistent and systematic approach to evidence-based care optimizes patient outcomes. Units that receive this national recognition serve as a role model to others on their journey to excellent patient and family care,” explained AACN President Kathryn E. Roberts, RN, MSN, CNS, CCRN, CCNS.

“Congratulations to the staff of North Mountain’s CVICU. Great job everyone!” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of John C. Lincoln Health Network.”

North Mountain Hospital is part of John C. Lincoln Health Network, an organization of hospitals, health care facilities and community programs in North Phoenix dedicated to high-quality patient care, medical education and human services. North Mountain has been recognized by experts for the quality of both its health care delivery and its business practices.

deer valley hospital

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital Earns Revenue Performance Award

The Healthcare Financial Management Association named John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital among nine health care organization winners of the 2012 MAP Award for High Performance in Revenue Cycle. More than 160 organizations from all parts of the nation applied for the award, considered an “Academy Award” by the finance industry.

Deer Valley Hospital was the only Arizona hospital included among the winners.

Hospitals must be in the top 10 percent in Revenue Cycle performance to even submit an application for the award. As a national award winner, the Deer Valley Hospital has met or exceeded stringent evaluation criteria addressing critical performance factors such as revenue cycle processes, financial performance, innovation, adoption of Patient Friendly Billing principles, and patient satisfaction.

The 250-person Revenue Cycle department at John C. Lincoln handles many diverse administrative functions that help to insure the hospital is paid for care provided while also helping patients get the most out of their insurance and manage their financial obligations.

“The Revenue Cycle process is a complex system, but absolutely essential for keeping our doors open and assisting our patients,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the Deer Valley Hospital’s parent organization, John C. Lincoln Health Network.

Revenue Cycle team members, who include registration and admitting staff, are usually the first contacts a patient has with the John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital system. Often Revenue Cycle team members are also the last contact patients have with John C. Lincoln, because they assist people with their insurance plans and provide those without insurance with ways to qualify for assistance.

The Revenue Cycle team are responsible for clinical and account coding, claims and posting account payments. They also manage our government and commercial insurance relationships and audit for compliance.

Winners of HFMA’s MAP award are evaluated with 25 comprehensive, definitive metrics of revenue cycle performance called MAP Keys. MAP stands for measure performance, apply evidence-based strategies for improvement, and perform to the highest standards in today’s challenging healthcare environment.

The MAP Award recognizes health care organizations that demonstrate excellence across all MAP Key categories: patient access, revenue integrity, claims adjudication and management.

“Winners have shown innovative and effective revenue cycle practices that deliver sustainable financial performance, set the bar for the industry and, ultimately, enable better patient care,” said Richard L. Clarke, HFMA president and CEO.

MAP winners were recognized during ANI: The HFMA National Institute, June 24-27, in Las Vegas.

For more information on John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, visit their website at jcl.com/hospitals/deer-valley.

Deer Valley Hospital - new CEO

Harrington Jr. Named CEO Of John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital

Long-time Valley hospital executive John Harrington Jr. begins service as CEO of John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital Monday, May 14. Harrington started his career in health care administration 33 years ago as the assistant vice president of operations at the hospital’s former parent facility, then known as Phoenix General.

Harrington comes to John C. Lincoln from Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City, where he was CEO. His previous leadership experience includes serving as the CEO at Banner Heart Hospital, Paradise Valley Hospital and the Arizona Heart Hospital.

In March, Harrington was one of four hospital executives in the United States named to serve a three-year term on the Board of Governors of the 46,000-member American College of Healthcare Executives. He also spent 10 years on the board of directors of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association, including service as chairman of the board.

“John brings a wealth of knowledge and experience – both locally and nationally – to Deer Valley.  He is well known as a dynamic and compassionate leader,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “I am confident that John is the right fit for our organization – our mission, culture and vision.”

“I am really excited about this new opportunity. I live in Moon Valley so the two John C. Lincoln hospitals are my neighborhood hospitals,” he said. “John C. Lincoln always has had a great reputation. I look forward to supporting an already strong culture and developing a fulltime senior team to continue to move us forward.”

Harrington earned a BS in microbiology with a minor in business from the University of Pittsburgh. He earned a master’s in public health with a specialty in hospital administration in 1980.

For more information on John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, visit John C. Lincoln Deer Valley’s website at jcl.com/hospitals/deer-valley.

health network

John C. Lincoln Health Network Names 2012 Physicians Of The Year

A physician from each of John C. Lincoln’s two hospital medical staffs and one from the Network’s physician medical practices have been honored for Distinguished Medical Service and named the Health Network’s three “Physicians of the Year” for 2012.

They are John C. Lincoln Breast Health and Research Center medical director Linda Greer, MD, representing the Deer Valley Hospital; John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital orthopedic trauma surgeon Laura Prokuski, MD; and family physician Jim Dearing, DO, representing John C. Lincoln’s Physician Network of primary care and specialty medical practices.

Chosen from more than 1500 physicians who are affiliated with the Health Network, each was presented with a crystal and granite award engraved with their name, affiliation and the 2012 John C. Lincoln Physician of the Year logo.

Physician of the Year candidates are nominated by John C. Lincoln co-workers, reviewed by a committee of hospital administrators and presented to the Health Network Board of Directors, who choose the winners because they represent the Health Network’s best in:
• professional competence;
• collaborative relationship with other physicians and hospital co-workers;
• caring attitude toward patients, families and co-workers; and
• honesty and ethical behavior which fosters respect, loyalty and compassion.

John C. Lincoln Health Network CEO Rhonda Forsyth said that nominators called radiologist and breast imaging specialist Dr. Greer a “five-star doctor and a wonderful person.” More than a dozen different nominations on behalf of Dr. Greer were received this year.

Among other comments by nominators were: “She exudes a genuine concern for everyone she encounters and magically molds to the needs and concerns of patients and others, making each feel cared for like family,” and “Her sense of humor takes away some of the stress patients experience during biopsies or other procedures. She is one of the kindest people I’ve met and has an amazing laugh and a heart of gold.”

Nominators also cited Dr. Greer’s local, national and international leadership in the latest breast imaging technology, including 3-D mammography, which she has traveled internationally to promote in medical educational seminars.

John C. Lincoln Hospitals CEO Bruce Pearson noted that North Mountain Hospital colleagues who nominated Dr. Prokuski wrote: “She is highly trained and remarkably skilled and, just as impressively, she is a warm, compassionate and approachable person. She adeptly shares her knowledge to assure that we have the most up to date information on the care of complex orthopedic trauma patients. She is collaborative and helpful in her approach.

“Dr. Prokuski always has the patient’s best interest at heart,” the nominations said. “She is passionate about patient safety and prevention of surgical site infections. She delivers excellent care and treats her patients with genuine compassion and concern.”
Nathan Anspach, Senior Vice President for John C. Lincoln’s network of physician practices announced that colleagues nominating Dr. Dearing wrote: “Dr. Dearing has made a commitment to meeting the needs of patients in our community for more than 25 years, delivering family medical care of the highest quality. In the past year, he has served as chief medical officer for the Physician Network and has led the development of new programs and relationships that will serve our patients in the future.

“Dr. Dearing represents our community and has helped shape public health policy in a number of prestigious national roles including the American Osteopathic Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Arizona Academy of Family Physicians.”
The Physician of the Year trophies are presented annually by John C. Lincoln Health Network in conjunction with National Doctors’ Day.

Alter Group's Arizona Health and Technology Park, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Mixed Use Medical Buildings in Arizona

Mixed Use Medical Buildings

Banner Health Systems’ 60-acre Gateway campus in Gilbert is buzzing with activity. The 120,000 SF MD Anderson Cancer Center is rising from the construction dust, a new mixed use medical office building was just completed, and an older office complex is being renovated and expanded.

The same healthcare giant just announced plans to build the Banner Health Center, housing doctors offices plus a variety of medical and lab services, on 11 acres in the Wells Retail Center in Maricopa.

And in one of the most unusual mixed use medical pairings, Arizona’s most prolific retail developer, Westcor (owned by Macerich), is teaming up with venerable healthcare provider John C. Lincoln to plot out 84 acres in northwest Phoenix for a community hospital/medical office/retail center/auto mall.

Healthcare-anchored, mixed use developments seem to be the current real estate trend. There are dozens around the state. Some are hospital centered, and others, such as the proposed Maricopa project and the 50-acre Arizona Health & Technology Park in Mesa, are designed to combine medically focused businesses and other community services.

The Mesa project’s plans include space for a dental clinic to serve the nearby Arizona School of Dentistry, other specialty outpatient service facilities, offices, and biotech research and development facilities.

Hamilton Espinosa, national healthcare specialist for DPR Construction, says clustering a variety of medical uses and complementary services is a national trend, not just a local one.

New hospitals are seldom designed as stand-alones. Campuses are master planned to grow as the surrounding community does, with room for expansion of inpatient beds, outpatient services and other ancillary services from specialized clinics to doctors’ offices to pharmacies and even restaurants and hotels.

It’s a natural progression, Espinosa says. Evolving medical technology has transformed many treatments that previously required a hospital stay into outpatient procedures. Add to the mix the need to rein in healthcare costs and — in Arizona, at least — a bounty of land.

Purchasing and master planning a big chunk of property, but building components as population and changing medical needs progress, makes sense in a cost-conscious and rapidly changing environment, Espinosa says.

He compares the mega-campus evolution to Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) planning of the state’s freeway needs.

“Healthcare providers have to be much more judicious in capital spending. There is more apprehension,” Espinosa says. “Like ADOT, they build what they can afford now and add later when they can afford it and as the census dictates (demand).”

Mixed-Use Medical,  AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

But far from being something new, master planning a campus that blends medical and other business services is old hat to Plaza Companies, says Sharon Harper, president of the Arizona-based real estate company.

Plaza pioneered the first mixed use, medically-anchored community in Peoria in 1982, Harper says. Plaza del Rio’s 185-acre campus was originally designed to meet all the needs of an active senior living complex and grew over time to also meet the needs of the thousands of employees who work in the ever-expanding community, Harper says.

It includes senior residences, skilled nursing facilities, dozens of doctors and dentists offices, several specialty hospitals, clinics and other outpatient medical centers, condos, apartments, shops, restaurants, schools, offices, science and research facilities. But there’s not a traditional inpatient hospital in the mix.

Next on the drawing board, according to Harper, are single-family homes.

Plaza del Rio is a hugely successful one-of-a-kind model of a medically-anchored, mixed use development, but Harper says big hospital-anchored campuses and small neighborhood-focused complexes are essential to the future of healthcare delivery.

Jason Meszaros, vice president for Irgens Healthcare Development Partners, which just completed Mercy Medical Commons, a medical office project adjacent to the Mercy Gilbert Medical Center campus, agrees that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Arizona is relatively saturated with hospital beds, Meszaros says.

“The trend is we are done building hospitals for a while,” he adds.

The Desire For Mixed Use Medical Buildings

The focus for the foreseeable future will be filling out space on existing campuses with other services that make a hospital more competitive as a destination for patients, as well as for doctors and surgeons who want on-campus offices to cut daily commute times from inpatient to outpatient visits, he says.

“A hospital becomes an anchor for all types of real estate needs,” Meszaros says. “You most likely have hospitality needs, places for a family to stay. And you have lots of people who work there and in offices, and that drives retail. You need some place to eat lunch.”

But a bounty of available land on hospital campuses is only one motivation for mixing up healthcare real estate and other uses.

The changing needs and desires of aging baby boomers and new healthcare reform measures are also factors driving how and where medical services are provided now and into the future, says John Driscoll, president of Alter+Care, the healthcare division of the Alter Group. The company is developing the Arizona Health & Technology Park in Mesa.

“Boomers have been market changers over the years,” Driscoll says. “And the first boomers will be retiring this year.”

Lifestyle demands and the bubble of people moving to Medicare during the next two

Mixed-Use Medical,  AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

decades will require medical services that are more “competitive, attractive and affordable,” he says. And another 30 million insured people, many on Medicaid-like systems, means cost-effective real estate solutions will be key.

“There is no question in the future that healthcare providers will have to be more efficient,” Driscoll says.

Rather than a single model for healthcare real estate in the foreseeable future, there are several scenarios likely to emerge simultaneously based on a community’s needs and assets, he continues.

The giant, hospital-anchored campuses make sense for regional medical services, but the future focus will emphasize bringing healthcare closer and making it more convenient to those who use it on a regular basis.

Driscoll envisions smaller neighborhood-based destinations with a range of services such as medically-based fitness centers, post-surgery rehabilitation facilities, sports performance centers — “health villages with different kinds of services for people who are sick and to keep people well.”

“We’re seeing more co-mingling of medical and wellness services,” he says.

Future development also will be real estate-driven and may include adapting empty big boxes retailers to house medical services, he adds. Picture the shell of a former Borders Books or Ultimate Electronics housing a host of medical providers, such as acute care clinics, labs and medical imaging services.

Randy McGrane, managing director for Ensemble Real Estate, has already imagined that as the future of outpatient healthcare delivery. He adds that off-campus medical services are a bigger trend than the expansive hospital-centered developments.

The ratio of inpatient to outpatient medical services is about 60/40 now, McGrane says, but he predicts the numbers will reverse within 10 years.

Communities want medical services in their own neighborhoods, and retail centers are suffering from curtailed discretionary spending during the recession, he says. So, the empty retail anchor spaces are obvious and cost-effective solutions for both real estate segments.

In smaller neighborhood strip centers abandoned by a supermarket anchor, adding a clinic or urgent care facility could change the whole dynamic of the center. It could spawn new medical and/or retail services such as pharmacies or health-food shops, and the same type of services — dry cleaners, casual eateries and coffee shops, for example — that cluster around a supermarket to make a neighborhood commercial center a one-stop convenience for employees and customers, McGrane says.

And adding medical outpatient facilities to a big box-laden power center can re-energize flagging retail, bringing in new foot traffic and boosting business for all tenants, he says.

So who are the visionaries on top of the trends in changing healthcare delivery systems? Savvy industry giants already are planning multi-faceted networks that add satellite services in diverse locations, as well as boosting hospital campuses with a variety of services to remain competitive, according to the local industry experts.

The major players plotting out Arizona’s healthcare delivery systems of the future are the top hospital names, such as Scottsdale Healthcare, Banner Health, Catholic Healthcare West, John C. Lincoln and Abrazo Health Care, according to industry experts.

And the on-the-ball real estate developers, designers and construction companies have healthcare divisions in place ready to make it happen.

“There is growth in healthcare and in more sophisticated delivery of healthcare services,” Harper of Plaza Companies says. “It’s an exciting industry.

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AZRE Magazine May/June 2011