Tag Archives: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital

Neurologist Victor Zach, MD demonstrates the telerobot he uses to coordinate care for stroke patients at John C. Lincoln Hospitals. The telerobot spans the miles between patient and specialist.

John C. Lincoln Recertified as Primary Stroke Center

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in North Phoenix has been recertified as a Primary Stroke Center by DNV Healthcare, an international certifying agency approved by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to hospital CEO John Harrington Jr.

“Deer Valley Hospital demonstrated that its stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcomes for stroke patients,” said Chief Medical Officer Mary Ann Turley, DO, who led the stroke certification task force.

“We received only the highest marks when the surveyors visited from DNV and awarded John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital recertification as a Primary Stroke Center,” Turley added. “I could not be more proud of our entire stroke certification team and hospital co-workers who all jumped at the opportunity to earn this recognition for our caregiving capability.”

Strokes are the third most prevalent cause of death, the leading cause of adult disability, and affect 700,000 Americans every year. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted by a blood clot (ischemic) or by bleeding from a burst blood vessel (hemorrhagic), either of which impairs the brain’s ability to function, but which require opposite treatments.

“Because diagnosing the cause is key to ensuring appropriate and effective care, it’s important for patients and families to insist that EMS providers take them to a Primary Stroke Center, said Turley.” A Primary Stroke Center is where staff is trained not only to recognize symptoms of stroke, but more importantly, to correctly identify the cause,” she explained.

When people have strokes, time is of the essence. Rapid medical treatment – started less than three hours after onset of symptoms and completed within 45 minutes of the patient’s arrival at the hospital – can save many stroke patients from a lifetime of disability.

“Time loss equals brain loss,” said Turley. “When stroke symptoms begin, people should call 9-1-1 without delay.”

stroke

Deer Valley Hospital Now Primary Stroke Center

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in North Phoenix has become the Valley’s newest hospital certified as a Primary Stroke Center by DNV Healthcare, an international certifying agency approved by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to John Harrington Jr., hospital CEO and senior vice president, Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network.

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital was accredited as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations in 2007 and by DNV Healthcare in 2011.

“Deer Valley Hospital demonstrated that its stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcomes for stroke patients,” said Chief Medical Officer Mary Ann Turley, DO, Deer Valley Hospital, who led the stroke certification task force that started preparing the hospital for stroke certification last year.

“We received only one finding when the surveyors visited from DNV and awarded John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital certification as a Primary Stroke Center,” Turley added. “I could not be more proud of our entire stroke certification team and hospital co-workers who all jumped at the opportunity to earn this recognition for our caregiving capability.”

Strokes are the third most prevalent cause of death, the leading cause of adult disability, and affect 700,000 Americans every year. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted by a blood clot (ischemic) or by bleeding from a burst blood vessel (hemorrhagic), either of which impairs the brain’s ability to function, but which require opposite treatments.

Because diagnosing the cause is key to ensuring appropriate and effective care, it’s important for patients and families to insist that EMS providers take them to a Primary Stroke Center, said Donna Sells, administrator for the Health Network’s Neurosciences/Orthopedic Service Line. “A Primary Stroke Center is where staff is trained not only to recognize symptoms of stroke, but more importantly, to correctly identify the cause,” she explained.
When people have strokes, time is of the essence. Rapid medical treatment – started less than 3 hours after onset of symptoms and completed within 45 minutes of the patients arrival at the hospital – can save many stroke patients from a lifetime of disability.
“Time loss equals brain loss,” said Sells. When stroke symptoms begin, people should call 9-1-1 without delay.

DNV Primary Stroke Center certification is based on submitted documentation and a site visit by DNV surveyors, during which the hospital staff demonstrates its commitment to excellence, Harrington said. DNV’s PSC Certification program incorporates elements from federal CMS hospital standards as well as requirements from the guidelines of the Brain Attack Coalition and recommendations of the American Stroke Association.

Members of the Deer Valley Stroke Team Include: Alice Montoya, RN, Nelson Faux, MD, Anil Goud, MD, Patrick Sciara, MD, Clark York, DO, Bonnie Fuerst, MT, Kevin Veale, DO, Patty Erickson, RN, Danny Blanco, RN, Lalit Mansukhani, PharmD, Peter Burrows, RT, Linda DeLuca, RN, Lawrence Finkel, MD, Renee Featherly, David Price, Linda Ott, RN, Donna Sells, RN, Karrie Smith, RN, Lisa Hughes, RN, Susan Hoffmeister, RN, Holly Grems, RN, Maria Soriano, MD, Tracy Moroney, RN, Jennifer Gallegos, MA, Mary Ann Turley, DO, Victor Zach, MD, Jessica Rivas, MSN, Matt Sainsbury, MHA, and Joanne Motley, RN.

Sonoran Const 2[30]

JCL building Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix. The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

Initially, the $18 million Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000-square-foot facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix. The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group, Ltd., and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5.6 million.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development. Santa Monica, Calif.-based Macerich still owns an adjacent 55 acres in the development along I-17 south of the Carefree Highway.

Trauma Program Manager Lori Moxon, RN, left, with (from left) John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital CEO John Harrington Jr., Level III Trauma Medical Director Ian Thomas, DO, ADHS Trauma Development Section Chief Daniel Didier, John C. Lincoln Trauma Services Medical Director Alicia Mangram, MD, and Deer Valley Hospital Medical Director Mary Ann Turley, DO, celebrate the presentation of the hospital’s Level III Trauma Center designation from the State of Arizona.

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital now Level III Trauma Center

The Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma Systems Monday granted John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital’s application to be designated as a Level III Trauma Center, hospital CEO John L. Harrington Jr. announced.

The first trauma patient arrived just hours later.

Patient care services in the Deer Valley Emergency Department have been expanded to qualify for the higher Level III Trauma Center designation and to better serve people injured in the North Valley. Emergency care for traumatically injured patients at the Deer Valley Hospital has been upgraded with additional resources and staff education.

“My goals are to enhance the quality of care patients already receive at the Deer Valley Hospital by using my 15 years of trauma experience to develop a core team of specially-trained trauma staff,” said trauma program manager Lori Moxon, RN, BSN.

The Level III designation requires that surgeons on call have Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) accreditation from the American College of Surgeons. ATLS teaches a standard approach for trauma assessment and treatment so the most time-critical interventions are performed first.

“Our program will be even better than that,” said hospital Medical Director Mary Ann Turley, DO. “At Deer Valley, our trauma doctors –  available within  30 minutes – will be the same board certified trauma surgeons who care for patients at the Level I Trauma Center at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital.”

John C. Lincoln’s trauma surgeons hold dual board certification in both critical care and trauma surgery. Trauma orthopedic surgeons and anesthesiologists will be on call.

According to Alicia Mangram, MD, care at the Level III Trauma Center at Deer Valley will be coordinated with higher acuity medical services available at North Mountain’s Level I Trauma Center, where she is medical director.

“This is the first time that a Level I Trauma Center has collaborated with a Level III Center to ensure the same quality and best clinical practice for our patients,” Harrington said. “It is a very exciting resource, not only for our patients, but also for the EMS crews who provide emergency response service for our community.”

With its plans to transform itself into a Level III Trauma Center, Deer Valley is launching a G-60 program for trauma patients aged 60 and older. The program, instituted last year at North Mountain, is designed to improve outcomes and reduce mortality and morbidity for older trauma patients by providing more intensive and coordinated inpatient care.

The Level III Trauma Center will also offer injury prevention community outreach programs similar to those presented by North Mountain’s Level 1 Trauma Center, Moxon said. “Since this will be a network endeavor,” she explained, “our plans are to incorporate the many excellent community educational programs developed by injury prevention/outreach coordinator Kim Shatto, RN BSN, that focus on the cause and prevention of our major traumatic injuries.”

The facility will also provide data about patients, their diagnoses, care and outcomes to the state Department of Health Services Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma Systems.

Anika and Bear Patrol

Highway Patrol Brings Bears to Delight Hospitalized Kids

The 19th Annual Arizona Highway Patrol Christmas Bear Program for hospitalized Arizona children kicked off this week in the Pediatric Emergency Center, Mendy’s Place, and the inpatient pediatric unit, KidsZone, at John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, 19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix.

In the playroom at KidsZone, four-year-old Anika Suarez had little to say to the officers offering her a choice of teddy bears, but her sparkling eyes and mischievous grin spoke volumes as she carefully considered her ursine options. Finally, she chose the fluffy white one.

Arizona Highway Patrol Association (AHPA) members, who are celebrating almost two decades of bringing Christmas joy to children receiving treatment in various medical centers across the state, have been bringing bears to children at the Deer Valley Hospital since Mendy’s Place opened in 1998.

“The bears serve as communication mechanisms to help children better understand that police officers are to help and protect them,” state Jimmy Chavez, President of the AHPA. “Witnessing the faces of those receiving the teddy bears is all that one needs to know the program is making a positive difference in many lives.”

The mission of the program is to demonstrate children are the association’s most important responsibility. AHPA collects new stuffed animals all year round for children.  Many DPS Officers keep bears in their patrol cars, so they are always prepared to comfort a child they encounter.

Since 1993, the program has expanded to provide the stuffed teddy bears to both children and adults at their bed or road sides. The success is attributed to the efforts and talents of volunteers giving countless hours of their time to make the Christmas Bear Program an overwhelming success.  Generous donations from Arizona’s community have helped fund the bears each year.

In 2011, AHPA’s volunteers distributed over 2,000 bears to hospitals throughout the state of Arizona. The 2012 program will give away bears to patients in statewide medical centers, domestic violence shelters and hospice locations.