Tag Archives: John C. Lincoln Health Network

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John C. Lincoln Named to U.S. News’ Best Hospitals List

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital is included in the 2014-2015 Best Regional Hospitals rankings released by the editors of U.S. News & World Report. It was recognized as high performing in geriatrics, nephrology, orthopedics, pulmonology, urology and gastroenterology and gastrointestinal (GI) surgery.

“John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital is proud of our excellent physicians, compassionate staff and volunteers who are dedicated to providing world-class patient care. We are honored by this recognition, which reflects our commitment to delivering high quality, compassionate care and a satisfying healthcare experience for our patients and their families,” said John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital CEO Maggi Griffin.

In 2004, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital became the first Phoenix hospital to achieve Magnet recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Magnet recognition represents high-quality patient care, innovation, technology and evidenced-based practice. The designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site inspection and extensive documentation of nursing practices. John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital was redesignated Magnet in 2009 and 2013.

U.S. News evaluated approximately 4,700 hospitals, which were ranked on 16 specialties. The 12 data-dependent specialties are cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, gynecology, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology. The four reputation-only specialties are ophthalmology, psychiatry, rehabilitation and rheumatology.

According to U.S. News, nearly two million hospital patients every year face surgery or care that poses technical challenges or an increased risk of death or harm because of age, physical condition or infirmities. The rankings provide a tool to help such patients find unusually skilled inpatient care.

For more information, visit JCL.com.

Griffin Appointed CEO of John C. Lincoln North Mountain

Maggi Griffin, RN, MS, was recently appointed chief executive officer (CEO) of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital. She also serves as the John C. Lincoln Health Network chief nursing officer (CNO).

Griffin joined the John C. Lincoln Health Network four years ago, and has an extensive background in nursing, hospital management and leadership. She first worked at the John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital as a vice president and then served as the CNO.

During Griffin’s time as CNO of the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, she introduced a daily management system in the inpatient units and the Emergency Department. This system was essential in engaging staff and improving quality, safety and financial performance. In 2013 John C. Lincoln North Mountain hospital received its third Magnet status recognition. Magnet status is based on documented exemplary practice and outcomes for patient care and is considered the nation’s gold standard for nursing quality. It is bestowed upon qualified hospitals by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, an arm of the American Nurses Association – the nation’s foremost authority on the quality of patient care.

“Please join me in congratulating Maggi as she transitions during this period of change and continuous improvement in health care,” said Bruce Pearson, senior vice president of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, who holds overall responsibility for North Mountain Hospital and Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center. “Maggi has extensive leadership experience and a strong background of success in providing and improving quality and safety for hospital patients.”

“The four years I have spent at the John C. Lincoln Health Network have been some of the most rewarding years in my career. I am so delighted that I have the opportunity to continue to serve in a different capacity,” Griffin said.

Before joining the John C. Lincoln Health Network, Griffin was the CNO/vice president of Patient Care Services at Advocate Condell Medical Center in Illinois, where she spent part of her tenure as acting president for the hospital. She has had many years’ experience as a senior nursing officer, consultant and staff nurse in Illinois, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Ohio and England. Her experience includes four years in Beijing, China, where she was president and CEO of the Beijing International Heart Hospital.

Sun Health

Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network affiliation finalized

Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network, two of the Valley’s most respected locally-based non-profit health systems, have completed the closing documents for a system-wide affiliation to improve the health of communities served by the respective organizations.

The affiliation creates a new non-profit corporate entity, Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, which will oversee the Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln hospitals, clinics, outpatient centers and related services. A Letter of Intent to affiliate was approved by both organizations in April, followed by customary regulatory review processes after a definitive agreement was reached by both organizations in August.

The affiliation does not include the combination of assets and thus is not considered a merger. However management of the affiliated assets will now be vested in a board made up of Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln directors.

Both Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network have long histories of high quality care and innovation, are financially sound and now will move forward to create the healthcare organization of the future. What this means for the communities served by John C. Lincoln and Scottsdale Healthcare includes:

·         More convenient access to acute and preventive care.
·         Increased coordination of medical care.
·         An expanded network of high quality primary care and specialty physicians.
·         Creation of a single electronic health record that can be accessed at all levels of care throughout the affiliated health network.
·         Shared best practices.

The new Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network encompasses five acute care hospitals with approximately 10,500 employees, 3,700 affiliated physicians and 3,100 volunteers, an extensive primary care physician network, urgent care centers, clinical research, medical education, an inpatient rehabilitation hospital, an Accountable Care Organization, two foundations and extensive community services.

Tom Sadvary is chief executive officer and Rhonda Forsyth is president of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network. Steve Wheeler is chairman and Frank Pugh is vice chairman of the Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network Board of Directors.

“Our communities will still receive the same world-class patient care you’ve come to expect from Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network. Our goal is provide excellent, cost-effective care and a patient experience that exceeds your expectations,” said Sadvary.

“The shared vision for our new system is to become a fully integrated, locally controlled, world-class non-profit health system that works effectively to improve our community’s health,” added Forsyth.

Completion of the agreement to affiliate creates a geographically dispersed non-profit healthcare system positioned to             successfully deliver high quality, cost-effective healthcare, according to network leaders.

“Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network both share a commitment to continuing their longstanding support of community health services, health education, disease prevention, screenings and other services,” explained Wheeler.

The combined health organizations are well-positioned to thrive in a rapidly changing healthcare environment, and to embrace the transformation of healthcare delivery that transcends the traditional acute care-centric orientation.

“The affiliation adds value to our ability to serve our patients, and allows us to develop a clinically integrated system of care where physicians, hospitals and other clinicians work in partnership to ensure that patients receive the services they need for the best outcomes,” said Pugh.

Integration planning for the new Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network will continue during the next several months to develop an outline of key priorities, noted Sadvary. The board and senior leadership of the affiliated organization will take a thoughtful and methodical approach to integration planning.

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The changing role of nurses

They are the healthcare providers that will see 22 percent job growth – more than any other occupation – through 2018. They are the communicators. They bridge the gap in the medical industry. They are the part of the healthcare team that makes sure that the right patient is in the right place getting the right thing done.

They are nurses and they are now taking on more specialized roles, applying advanced technologies and filling voids created by an anticipated shortage of primary care physicians.

“We are encouraging our nurses to return to school to advance their degree,” said Deborah Martin, senior director of professional practice at Banner Health. “Patients are much more complex in our hospitals, as well as in the home and our communities … Nurses need to have higher levels of education to manage these complexities in all settings where nurses practice. Advanced degrees are now required for our upper level nursing managers.”

About 10,000 Baby Boomers reach retirement age every day, fueling the long-term demand for specialized nurses. To help fill that need, Arizona State University implemented the Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) concentration.

“It will prepare nurse practitioners to deliver primary care to adults throughout their lifespan with increased emphasis on care of the aging population,” says Katherine Kenny, clinical associate professor and director of the DNP program at ASU.

Johnson & Johnson’s website lists more than 3,000 capacities in which nurses can be employed — from school nurses to jailhouse nurses. Nurses practice in hospitals, schools, homes, retail health clinics, long-term care facilities, battlefields, and community and public health centers. Everywhere there are people, there are patients, and everywhere there are patients, there are nurses.

“Nurses are becoming more influential in the policy changes that are occurring with the Affordable Care Act,” Kenny says. “More nurses are practicing in ambulatory care settings and public and community health.”

Arizona educational institutions are now offering a wide range of educational opportunities which support the nursing profession’s challenge to improve patient care outcomes for individuals, systems, and organizations. And because of skyrocketing healthcare costs, preventative care and education have become integral elements in reducing chronic illness and minimizing re-hospitalization.

“Nurses are now specializing in everything from palliative care and managing chronic illness, to maintenance and preventative care,” says Ann McNamara, dean of Grand Canyon University’s College of Nursing. McNamara says students at GCU are spending more time concentrating on home healthcare and hospice in their new hands-on simulation labs, complete with live actors, computer-operated mannequins, and dynamic patient scenarios.

Angel MedFlight provides air medical transportation services from bedside to bedside.  The company’s CEO, Jeremy Freer, says “[Our] nurses are able to put all the components of the puzzle together and make the medical flight process more efficient, effective and compassionate.”

Nurses are also assessing the long-range healthcare needs of patients.

“Where once the hospital nurse’s prime responsibility was to provide the best care possible that the patient needed at that moment, now the nurse is also focused on what happens next,” explains Maggi Griffin, vice president of patient care services at John C. Lincoln Health Network.

Griffin says that patient discharge planning and post-hospitalization follow up are other key roles of the evolving nursing profession.

Advancements in technology have significantly enhanced patient care in recent years.  Nurses now have the ability to monitor patient conditions remotely, and electronic health records enable nurses to track, evaluate, and document patient information.

“Technology is opening doors to deliver nursing care in new and innovative ways, often serving as a second set of eyes to enhance patient safety or monitoring patients from their homes,” says Deborah Martin, senior director of professional practice at Banner Health. Martin adds that Medication Bar Coding is another example of how technology is helping nurses be more effective and prevent errors.

Due to the skyrocketing cost of healthcare in general, nurses are becoming more involved in a patient’s primary care.

“As advanced practice providers of healthcare, nurses with master’s and doctoral degrees are able to deliver high quality care to patients in their own individual practice,” Martin says, “as well as work side by side with physicians to provide care in a more cost effective manner.”

“As the major component of hospital rosters, nurses’ salaries account for a significant part of any hospital budget,” Griffin adds. “With financial stresses coming from the economy, from government healthcare program budget cuts and from other areas, nursing is much more tightly controlled.”

A decade ago, nursing shifts were scheduled regardless of room occupancy. Currently, industry experts say those staffing schedules fluctuate based on patient population in each unit.

The other major shift is in the demand for specialized nurses. Julie Ward, chief nursing officer at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, says specialties have nurses working in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.

“We are also exploring roles for nurses to shepherd groups of patients through the maze of care,”  Ward says. St. Joseph’s nurses make follow-up phone calls to patients to ensure the patient is safe and able to follow their discharge instructions, Ward says.

Still, the primary evolution of the nursing industry has been in higher education. Gone are the days when nurses were simply bedside attendants. Now, they are replacing the expensive medical doctors and are running their own practices as Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) and in other upper level specialties. Most hospitals are encouraging their nurses to return to school to improve their knowledge base and advance their degrees.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (IOM) launched a two-year initiative to respond to the need to assess and transform the nursing profession. The IOM appointed a Committee on the RWJF Initiative on the Future of Nursing for the purpose of producing an action-oriented blueprint for the future of nursing. Through its deliberations, the committee developed four key messages:

* Nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training.

* Nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.

* Nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the United States.

* Effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and information infrastructure.

“We are encouraging our nurses to return to school to advance their degree,” Martin says. “Patients are much more complex in our hospitals, as well as in the home and our communities. As noted by the IOM, nurses need to have higher levels of education to manage these complexities in all settings where nurses practice. Advanced degrees are now required for our upper level nursing managers.”

Health Insurance

Scottsdale Healthcare, John C. Lincoln form affiliation

Scottsdale Healthcare and John C. Lincoln Health Network have endorsed a letter of intent to form a system-wide affiliation to better meet the healthcare needs and thus improve the health of the communities they serve.

The nonbinding agreement between the two non-profit organizations allows both to pursue an exclusive negotiation during a due diligence period in order to create a combined health system. Discussions are anticipated to be complete by July 31.

The new non-profit system, which would be called Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, would include five hospitals with approximately 10,500 employees, 3,700 affiliated physicians and 3,100 volunteers. Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network would also include an extensive primary care physician network, urgent care centers, clinical research, medical education, an inpatient rehabilitation hospital, an Accountable Care Organization, two foundations and extensive community services.

Both John C. Lincoln and Scottsdale Healthcare have a strong reputation and history of providing high quality care for the residents of Phoenix and greater Scottsdale. The non-profit health systems share similar visions and cultures, and both are Magnet organizations, a national recognition of providing the highest standards of patient care.

“This affiliation will provide resources to further develop the current high quality care in the hospitals and community healthcare facilities, enhance our geographic presence and honor the legacy of each organization. Our shared vision is to become a fully integrated, locally controlled, world-class health system,” said Scottsdale Healthcare President & CEO Tom Sadvary.

John C. Lincoln Health Network and Scottsdale Healthcare are financially strong, operationally successful and committed to meeting local health needs. Both organizations have been developing integrated delivery systems to expand services beyond acute care.

“Each of our organizations is known for quality and collaboration with community partners to promote the well-being of the communities we serve. The combined Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network will allow us to provide more cost effective healthcare and to thrive during this period of rapid change as a result of national and local health reform as we continue to develop a full continuum of  services beyond acute care,” added John C. Lincoln Health Network President & CEO Rhonda Forsyth.

Upon completion of the affiliation agreement, the Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network governance will be focused on their shared vision which includes:

·         More convenient access to acute and preventive care.
·         Increased coordination of medical care.
·         An expanded network of high quality primary care and specialty physicians.
·         Creation of a single electronic health record that can be accessed at all levels of care throughout the affiliated health network.
·         Improved patient outcomes through shared best practices.

“This affiliation will attract top medical talent by providing opportunities for physicians and other providers to lead the transformation of care delivery, and will enhance our leadership role in medical education and clinical research,” said Scottsdale Healthcare Board Chair Steven Wheeler. “Together we can provide a more comprehensive array of services by applying our combined resources to strengthen our clinical capabilities.”

Forsyth added that maintaining Magnet designation of the system hospitals provides a work environment that attracts top talent.

“As major provisions of the Affordable Care Act continue to take effect, we have the opportunity to shape the future of healthcare in the Valley by cost effectively using our respective resources to enhance our impact in the communities we serve,” said Forsyth.

“We want to maximize our ability to improve the health of our community and create more access to care. A more robust health network with primary care physicians, specialists and partnerships with other healthcare organizations will add capabilities for providing patients with a full continuum of coordinated healthcare services,” said John C. Lincoln Health Network Board Chair Frank Pugh.

 

volunteers

John C. Lincoln Desert Volunteers honored

In recognition of the significant difference they make in the community, the Desert Mission volunteers of the John C. Lincoln Health Network have been chosen as a winner of the 2013 American Hospital Association’s Hospital Awards for Volunteer Excellence (HAVE).

The national HAVE Award recognizes volunteers who provide leadership in community outreach, particularly with innovative and measurable programs with external partners to address challenges in the community.

Desert Mission’s volunteers – about 500 of the almost 2,000 Network volunteers – were also recognized for demonstrating measurable contributions to the effectiveness of an existing community outreach and for achieving success by overcoming barriers.       Desert Mission’s volunteers work at the Food Bank, Children’s Dental Clinic, Lincoln Learning Center, Marley House Behavioral Health Clinic, Community Health Center and in Neighborhood Renewal.

“For 30 years, these awards have celebrated the contribution and value of hospital volunteers – women and men who go the extra mile for their patients and communities,” said Rich Umbdenstock, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association based in Washington, DC.

Desert Mission, founded in 1927, remains an integral part of the mission of the John C. Lincoln Health Network, and the depth of community outreach offered is unusual among hospital and health care systems in the United States.

That couldn’t happen without the volunteers who provide hours of service along with in-kind donations and monetary donations, said Cindy Hallman, executive director of Desert Mission and a vice president in the John C. Lincoln Health Network. At a minimum each day, volunteers provide the equivalent of 18 full-time positions across the spectrum of Desert Mission services.

“It’s so inspiring to me to see how warm and welcoming our volunteers are with our clients, and just to know they want to be here to support us because they believe in our work at Desert Mission,” Hallman said. “They are here every day with smiles on their faces, helping our clients, and that energizes me and my staff to help our clients meet their challenges.”

Linda Llewellyn, director of Volunteer Services for the John C. Lincoln Health Network, added “I am so proud of our volunteers! Their service improves the quality of life for so many people.”

Phoenix City Councilman Bill Gates noted that “Desert Mission has a long, successful history of partnering with the City of Phoenix to provide the basics for people in need of a little help to get back on their feet. The work has been especially vital during these tough economic times, serving as many as 35,000 people each year. I commend the hundreds of Desert Mission volunteers who dedicate their time to making a difference in our community.”

“To build a healthy community takes an integrated approach,” Hallman said. “You can’t just give a family a food box at Thanksgiving or just give children vaccinations, although Desert Mission does both. You need to get to know each family and work together toward success at every level. Integrated care is positively correlated with improved outcomes and service.

“We work together with our clients to help guide them to the right combination of resources – food, dental help, housing help, behavioral intervention and early childhood education – to meet their needs, including public benefits and other human services programs available in the community, and to pursue self-sufficiency and success,” Hallman said.

Desert Mission clients come from the immediate service area of the North Mountain hospital, where the household income ranges between $16,000 and $123,000, and from 30 to 45 percent of the population is at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Nearly 100 percent of Desert Mission clients are at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.”

In recent years, during the economic downturn, Desert Mission has seen significant increases in a different type of client – families in crisis who are from a higher socio-economic and education level and who historically have been self-sufficient. Ironically, this group includes former Desert Mission donors who now turn to Desert Mission for assistance.

health network

John C. Lincoln Health Network Names 2012 Physicians Of The Year

A physician from each of John C. Lincoln’s two hospital medical staffs and one from the Network’s physician medical practices have been honored for Distinguished Medical Service and named the Health Network’s three “Physicians of the Year” for 2012.

They are John C. Lincoln Breast Health and Research Center medical director Linda Greer, MD, representing the Deer Valley Hospital; John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital orthopedic trauma surgeon Laura Prokuski, MD; and family physician Jim Dearing, DO, representing John C. Lincoln’s Physician Network of primary care and specialty medical practices.

Chosen from more than 1500 physicians who are affiliated with the Health Network, each was presented with a crystal and granite award engraved with their name, affiliation and the 2012 John C. Lincoln Physician of the Year logo.

Physician of the Year candidates are nominated by John C. Lincoln co-workers, reviewed by a committee of hospital administrators and presented to the Health Network Board of Directors, who choose the winners because they represent the Health Network’s best in:
• professional competence;
• collaborative relationship with other physicians and hospital co-workers;
• caring attitude toward patients, families and co-workers; and
• honesty and ethical behavior which fosters respect, loyalty and compassion.

John C. Lincoln Health Network CEO Rhonda Forsyth said that nominators called radiologist and breast imaging specialist Dr. Greer a “five-star doctor and a wonderful person.” More than a dozen different nominations on behalf of Dr. Greer were received this year.

Among other comments by nominators were: “She exudes a genuine concern for everyone she encounters and magically molds to the needs and concerns of patients and others, making each feel cared for like family,” and “Her sense of humor takes away some of the stress patients experience during biopsies or other procedures. She is one of the kindest people I’ve met and has an amazing laugh and a heart of gold.”

Nominators also cited Dr. Greer’s local, national and international leadership in the latest breast imaging technology, including 3-D mammography, which she has traveled internationally to promote in medical educational seminars.

John C. Lincoln Hospitals CEO Bruce Pearson noted that North Mountain Hospital colleagues who nominated Dr. Prokuski wrote: “She is highly trained and remarkably skilled and, just as impressively, she is a warm, compassionate and approachable person. She adeptly shares her knowledge to assure that we have the most up to date information on the care of complex orthopedic trauma patients. She is collaborative and helpful in her approach.

“Dr. Prokuski always has the patient’s best interest at heart,” the nominations said. “She is passionate about patient safety and prevention of surgical site infections. She delivers excellent care and treats her patients with genuine compassion and concern.”
Nathan Anspach, Senior Vice President for John C. Lincoln’s network of physician practices announced that colleagues nominating Dr. Dearing wrote: “Dr. Dearing has made a commitment to meeting the needs of patients in our community for more than 25 years, delivering family medical care of the highest quality. In the past year, he has served as chief medical officer for the Physician Network and has led the development of new programs and relationships that will serve our patients in the future.

“Dr. Dearing represents our community and has helped shape public health policy in a number of prestigious national roles including the American Osteopathic Association, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Arizona Academy of Family Physicians.”
The Physician of the Year trophies are presented annually by John C. Lincoln Health Network in conjunction with National Doctors’ Day.

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

The Healthcare Issue

Michael Gossie profileGrowing up as the older brother to one sister with mental disabilities and another who passed away far too early, I spent way too much time in hospitals when I would have rather been doing ANYTHING other than waiting for my sisters to see yet another doctor. What I did
accomplish, though, was gaining a tremendous amount of respect for the men and women who devote their lives to making our lives better.

So it’s only natural that our healthcare issue, where Arizona Business Magazine honors the
recipients of our Healthcare Leadership Awards, is very dear to my heart. This year, a year in which our state turns 100 and the Maricopa Medical Society turns 120, it’s only fitting that the Healthcare Leadership Awards bestows its first Lifetime Achievement Award.

Inside this issue, you can read about David Lincoln — whose family name is synonymous with healthcare and philanthropy in the Valley — and the exceptional men, women and institutions who earned Healthcare Leadership Awards. They lead an amazing field of extraordinary
and accomplished candidates.

The last place most of us want to be is at a hospital. But knowing there are exceptional professionals like our Healthcare Leadership Award winners eases the pain.

Michael Gossie Signature

Michael Gossie, managing editor

Read more articles from this issue on AZNow.Biz.

 Take it with you! On your mobile, go to m.issuu.com to get started.

HCL Awards 2012 - David Lincoln

HCL Awards 2012: Lifetime Achievement Award, David Lincoln And The Lincoln Family


Lifetime Achievement Award

David Lincoln And The Lincoln Family

HCL Awards 2012 - Joan and David LincolnDavid Lincoln and the Lincoln family are more than the namesake of the John C. Lincoln Health Network, with its two hospitals, multiple physician practices, and community services programs, which include a children’s dental clinic, a food bank and a community health clinic. The Lincoln family has nurtured an organization that grew out of a church mission to help Sunnyslope’s neediest residents in the 1930s into today’s locally owned, not-for-profit health care network.

For more than 45 years, David Lincoln has worked diligently to preserve and perpetuate the community healthcare philanthropic legacy of his parents, John C. and Helen Lincoln, and to create his own legacy that is being passed on to his adult children and grandchildren.

David Lincoln has been on the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Board for 33 years and recently became an emeritus board member of the John C. Lincoln Health Network board, marking 45 years of service there. Now in his 80s, he continues to take his day-to-day board responsibilities seriously, reading every document and offering sound advice and wisdom on the future of the Network. He walked with the John C. Lincoln team in the October Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, and he and other family members attend fund-raising events and other hospital events as well.

The Lincoln family’s unparalleled financial commitment to healthcare in the Valley continued in 2011, when they donated $4 million to renovate the lobby of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, which was built in the 1950s.

Employees of the John C. Lincoln Health Network take pride in a family that continues to take interest and care in their achievements and in the health of the community. More importantly, David Lincoln and his family continue to set the tone for the Network’s ethical practice. At a time when hospitals face intense financial pressures in caring for patients, there was no question about whether the Network would continue to respond to the broader needs of the community through its food bank and other community services.

jcl.com


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012