Tag Archives: John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital

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John C. Lincoln Named to U.S. News’ Best Hospitals List

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital is included in the 2014-2015 Best Regional Hospitals rankings released by the editors of U.S. News & World Report. It was recognized as high performing in geriatrics, nephrology, orthopedics, pulmonology, urology and gastroenterology and gastrointestinal (GI) surgery.

“John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital is proud of our excellent physicians, compassionate staff and volunteers who are dedicated to providing world-class patient care. We are honored by this recognition, which reflects our commitment to delivering high quality, compassionate care and a satisfying healthcare experience for our patients and their families,” said John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital CEO Maggi Griffin.

In 2004, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital became the first Phoenix hospital to achieve Magnet recognition from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Magnet recognition represents high-quality patient care, innovation, technology and evidenced-based practice. The designation is awarded after a rigorous on-site inspection and extensive documentation of nursing practices. John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital was redesignated Magnet in 2009 and 2013.

U.S. News evaluated approximately 4,700 hospitals, which were ranked on 16 specialties. The 12 data-dependent specialties are cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, ear, nose and throat, gastroenterology and GI surgery, geriatrics, gynecology, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology. The four reputation-only specialties are ophthalmology, psychiatry, rehabilitation and rheumatology.

According to U.S. News, nearly two million hospital patients every year face surgery or care that poses technical challenges or an increased risk of death or harm because of age, physical condition or infirmities. The rankings provide a tool to help such patients find unusually skilled inpatient care.

For more information, visit JCL.com.

NM Gold Plus Stroke Award

John C. Lincoln receives stroke award

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital received the Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Gold-Plus Quality Achievement Award for implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for the treatment of stroke patients.

Get With The Guidelines Stroke helps hospital teams provide the most up-to-date, research-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing death and disability for stroke patients. John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital earned the award by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include aggressive use of medications and risk-reduction therapies aimed at reducing death and disability and improving the lives of stroke patients.

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital also received the association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll for meeting stroke quality measures that reduce the time between hospital arrival and treatment with the clot-buster tPA, the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. People who suffer a stroke who receive the drug within three hours of the onset of symptoms may recover quicker and are less likely to suffer severe disability.

“Our health care providers are dedicated to improving the quality of stroke care,” said Donna Sells, orthopedic/neurosciences service line administrator. “Patients can trust that they are receiving the highest quality care based on internationally-respected clinical guidelines.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the number four cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

For more information on stroke, visit JCL.com/stroke.

Griffin Appointed CEO of John C. Lincoln North Mountain

Maggi Griffin, RN, MS, was recently appointed chief executive officer (CEO) of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital. She also serves as the John C. Lincoln Health Network chief nursing officer (CNO).

Griffin joined the John C. Lincoln Health Network four years ago, and has an extensive background in nursing, hospital management and leadership. She first worked at the John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital as a vice president and then served as the CNO.

During Griffin’s time as CNO of the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, she introduced a daily management system in the inpatient units and the Emergency Department. This system was essential in engaging staff and improving quality, safety and financial performance. In 2013 John C. Lincoln North Mountain hospital received its third Magnet status recognition. Magnet status is based on documented exemplary practice and outcomes for patient care and is considered the nation’s gold standard for nursing quality. It is bestowed upon qualified hospitals by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, an arm of the American Nurses Association – the nation’s foremost authority on the quality of patient care.

“Please join me in congratulating Maggi as she transitions during this period of change and continuous improvement in health care,” said Bruce Pearson, senior vice president of Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network, who holds overall responsibility for North Mountain Hospital and Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center. “Maggi has extensive leadership experience and a strong background of success in providing and improving quality and safety for hospital patients.”

“The four years I have spent at the John C. Lincoln Health Network have been some of the most rewarding years in my career. I am so delighted that I have the opportunity to continue to serve in a different capacity,” Griffin said.

Before joining the John C. Lincoln Health Network, Griffin was the CNO/vice president of Patient Care Services at Advocate Condell Medical Center in Illinois, where she spent part of her tenure as acting president for the hospital. She has had many years’ experience as a senior nursing officer, consultant and staff nurse in Illinois, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Ohio and England. Her experience includes four years in Beijing, China, where she was president and CEO of the Beijing International Heart Hospital.

Sonoran Const 2[30]

JCL building Sonoran Health and Emergency Center

Visible construction of John C. Lincoln’s Sonoran Health and Emergency Center is rising on 22 acres south of Sonoran Boulevard near Interstate 17 in North Phoenix. The medical complex remains on target to open in December 2013.

Initially, the $18 million Sonoran Health and Emergency Center will be a 40,000-square-foot facility housing emergency and medical imaging services and breast health with 3-D mammography. It will employ approximately 40 staff members.

The facility cost funds site work, construction, furnishings and medical equipment. The cost does not include a 120-bed hospital that ultimately is planned to be built on the site. The hospital and additional medical office buildings will be developed at a later time determined by developments in the area’s economy and population growth.

John C. Lincoln already has two hospitals under its umbrella: John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital at the Loop 101 and I-17 and John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital on Dunlap in North Central Phoenix. The Health Network also includes the John C. Lincoln Health Center with Urgent Care at Anthem, 27 primary care physician practices including 12 in the North Valley, and the Desert Mission health and human services for the under- and uninsured members of the community.

The medical complex was designed by the Devenny Group, Ltd., and is being built by DPR Construction, according to Sheila Gerry, John C. Lincoln senior vice president, Real Estate and Facilities Development. The Health Network acquired the site in October 2012 from shopping mall developer Macerich and its Westcor division for $5.6 million.

Ground was broken and construction began on the Sonoran Health and Emergency Center during the first week of December 2012. Macerich put in road and water infrastructure to accommodate the medical complex development. Santa Monica, Calif.-based Macerich still owns an adjacent 55 acres in the development along I-17 south of the Carefree Highway.

Trauma Program Manager Lori Moxon, RN, left, with (from left) John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital CEO John Harrington Jr., Level III Trauma Medical Director Ian Thomas, DO, ADHS Trauma Development Section Chief Daniel Didier, John C. Lincoln Trauma Services Medical Director Alicia Mangram, MD, and Deer Valley Hospital Medical Director Mary Ann Turley, DO, celebrate the presentation of the hospital’s Level III Trauma Center designation from the State of Arizona.

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital now Level III Trauma Center

The Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma Systems Monday granted John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital’s application to be designated as a Level III Trauma Center, hospital CEO John L. Harrington Jr. announced.

The first trauma patient arrived just hours later.

Patient care services in the Deer Valley Emergency Department have been expanded to qualify for the higher Level III Trauma Center designation and to better serve people injured in the North Valley. Emergency care for traumatically injured patients at the Deer Valley Hospital has been upgraded with additional resources and staff education.

“My goals are to enhance the quality of care patients already receive at the Deer Valley Hospital by using my 15 years of trauma experience to develop a core team of specially-trained trauma staff,” said trauma program manager Lori Moxon, RN, BSN.

The Level III designation requires that surgeons on call have Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) accreditation from the American College of Surgeons. ATLS teaches a standard approach for trauma assessment and treatment so the most time-critical interventions are performed first.

“Our program will be even better than that,” said hospital Medical Director Mary Ann Turley, DO. “At Deer Valley, our trauma doctors –  available within  30 minutes – will be the same board certified trauma surgeons who care for patients at the Level I Trauma Center at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital.”

John C. Lincoln’s trauma surgeons hold dual board certification in both critical care and trauma surgery. Trauma orthopedic surgeons and anesthesiologists will be on call.

According to Alicia Mangram, MD, care at the Level III Trauma Center at Deer Valley will be coordinated with higher acuity medical services available at North Mountain’s Level I Trauma Center, where she is medical director.

“This is the first time that a Level I Trauma Center has collaborated with a Level III Center to ensure the same quality and best clinical practice for our patients,” Harrington said. “It is a very exciting resource, not only for our patients, but also for the EMS crews who provide emergency response service for our community.”

With its plans to transform itself into a Level III Trauma Center, Deer Valley is launching a G-60 program for trauma patients aged 60 and older. The program, instituted last year at North Mountain, is designed to improve outcomes and reduce mortality and morbidity for older trauma patients by providing more intensive and coordinated inpatient care.

The Level III Trauma Center will also offer injury prevention community outreach programs similar to those presented by North Mountain’s Level 1 Trauma Center, Moxon said. “Since this will be a network endeavor,” she explained, “our plans are to incorporate the many excellent community educational programs developed by injury prevention/outreach coordinator Kim Shatto, RN BSN, that focus on the cause and prevention of our major traumatic injuries.”

The facility will also provide data about patients, their diagnoses, care and outcomes to the state Department of Health Services Bureau of Emergency Medical Services and Trauma Systems.

6588-Lobby Overview

Lincoln unveils new $5 million entrance

A $5 million reconstruction project to redesign and rebuild the entrance area of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital at Dunlap Avenue and Second Street, Phoenix, is nearing completion, with the a dedication event scheduled for Nov. 29.

The renovation was made possible when David and Joan Lincoln and his sister, Lillian Lincoln Howell – descendants of John C. Lincoln – donated $4 million to upgrade and reconstruct the entrance. Additional major contributors include the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Guild, Lincoln GIVES, the Health Network employee giving program and the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Auxiliary.

Construction began in January 2012 as part of a larger renovation at the North Mountain Hospital.  Areas to be unveiled Nov. 29 include the hospital’s main entrance, lobby, gift shop, spiritual center, admitting, coffee bistro and newly designed donor wall. The final phase of renovations will begin on Nov. 30 and include enhanced indoor public dining and the addition of outdoor and staff dining areas.

“This gift will allow us to re-invent the patient and visitor experience at the North Mountain Hospital,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “We’ll create a welcoming and warm entry lobby that is the pathway to healing for patients, visitors, staff and the community.”

The transformation of the 12,840 square-foot areas of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital creates a soothing and calming environment for patients and visitors. The journey to wellness begins here – on the Pathway to Healing – with a welcoming and inviting experience on par with the quality of care provided by nurses, physicians and staff throughout the John C. Lincoln Health Network.

“The hospital is dear to our family’s hearts, and it is important that the lobby reflect the quality of care received inside the hospital,” David Lincoln said shortly after the donation was made. He added, “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression, and this is our chance to make a great first impression to our patients and visitors.”

Marcia Mintz, CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation, noted that “this gift demonstrates the philanthropic leadership of the Lincoln family and serves as a principal gift model for the Foundation and our developing donor base. We are grateful for the generous support of the Lincoln family whose governance and philanthropic support have been steadfast for more than 80 years. This is a reflection of their continuing pride in the direction and mission of this organization.”

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011