Tag Archives: Jr.

Broome

Broome taking part in Global Cities Initiative

As part of the Global Cities Initiative, a joint project of Brookings and JPMorgan Chase, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council president and CEO Barry Broome, will join various business and elected leaders for a discussion on the development of a metropolitan export strategy.

“The mayors and business leaders from the region have led in the transformation of our economy” said Broome. “Developing a metropolitan export strategy through the Global Cities Initiative is a critical step toward ensuring our economic future.”

The forum, Going Global: Boosting Greater Phoenix’s Economic Future, taking place today at ASU Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication, will feature many speakers, including Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, former U.S. Secretary of Commerce William M. Daly, Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program co-directors Bruce Katz and Amy Liu, and Chase market manager for Arizona and Nevada Curtis Reed, Jr.

The half-day event will center on preliminary market assessment findings on how the Greater Phoenix region can better position its global competitiveness. The city of Phoenix is part of a network of regions across the nation participating in the Global Cities Initiative’s Exchange to help develop global engagement strategies

Closing out the forum, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker will join the program via satellite to make an announcement regarding the National Export Initiative.

The event will begin at 9:30 a.m. and conclude at 12:15 p.m.

Arizona’s 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders

What would you do it you opened the pages of this magazine and saw Jerry Colangelo listed as one of the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona? You’d do a double take, but it’s not out of the realm of possibilities.

Consider this: Among 439,633 Arizonans under age 5 in 2012, this is how the Census broke down those numbers:

• Hispanic: 196,776 (44.8 percent)
• Non-Hispanic white: 171,888 (39.1 percent)
• American Indian and Alaska Native: 22,198 (5 percent)
• Black: 18,617 (4.2 percent)
• Asian: 11,311 (2.6 percent)
• Two or more races: 18,088 (4.1 percent)
• Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 755 (0.17).

If you combine numbers like that with the fact that 91.7 percent of the nation’s population growth between 2000 and 2010 was attributed to racial and ethnic minorities, with the largest segment of population growth occurring in the Hispanic community, lists like this — the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona of 2014 — could become obsolete in our lifetimes.

Until we get there and as our state’s minority population moves toward majority status, it’s important to notice that the state’s most dynmanic business leaders have helped fuel our economic recovery and growth … and many of them just happen to be minorities. And while the future looks bright, we still have work to in overcoming outdated perceptions. According to a 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Report commissioned by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a significant portion of minority-owned businesses in Arizona have had problems earning the trust of their customers, suppliers, peers and lenders and need support from within the business community to help break down some of these misconceptions and stigma.

The 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona, whom you will meet below, have changed that perception.


Benito AlmanzaBenito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Heritage: Mexican-American
A graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara, Almanza has been with Bank of America for 34 years. He is a member of the Teach for America Arizona Board.
His hope for professional legacy: “Working every day with great teammates to make our community better and surrounding myself with strong leaders and developing them to replace me.”

Glynis BryanGlynis Bryan
CFO
Insight Enterprises Inc.
Heritage: Jamaican
Bryan is responsible for setting the company’s financial strategies; ensuring the company has the appropriate financial and operating controls and systems in place to support future growth; and serving as a financial and business advisor to the leadership team.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Setting a standard of excellence in an organization and helping teammates reach their full potential.”

Debbie CottonDebbie Cotton
Director
Phoenix Convention Center
Heritage: African American
Cotton manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Throughout my career, I’d like to be remembered for adhering to high ethical standards and inspiring individuals to pursue careers within public service.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Heritage: Peruvian and Mexican
De la Melena, who directs the state’s leading advocate representing more than 60,000 Hispanic business enterprises, has 20 years of global brand management, business development and Latino marketing experience gained from conducting business in more than 30 countries.
His hope for professional legacy: “For helping the lifeblood of our economy, small businesses, prosper – especially minority-owned businesses, now one-fourth of Arizona’s total. Our future global competitiveness depends on it.”

Diane EnosDiane Enos
President
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
Enos is the 23rd president of the Salt River Community and the second women elected to the office. Enos is the first member of the Community to become a lawyer and practiced in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office for 11 years.
Heritage: Onk Akimel O’Odham, or one of the River People otherwise known as Pima
Her hope for professional legacy: “The top qualities I’d like to be remembered for is someone who was unafraid to try something new and to do it with integrity for the good of my people.”

rufusRufus Glasper
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges
Heritage: African American
As the CEO of one of the nation’s largest systems of community colleges, he is leading MCCCD to address the community’s education and workforce training needs.
His hope for professional legacy: “An educator who focused on human rights and education for first-generation college students, quality healthcare, workforce and jobs, and re-framing an institution for the future.”

Deborah GriffinDeborah Griffin
President of the board of directors
Gila River Casinos
Heritage: Gila River Indian Community member and Mexican-American
Griffin leads Arizona’s largest minority-run business with more that 2,500 employees.
Her hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered for creating a legacy of self-sufficiency and volunteerism in my community. My Tribe needs only to seek within themselves and have confidence in the beauty of their abilities to continue this legacy.”

Edmundo HidalgoEdmundo Hidalgo
President and CEO
Chicanos Por La Causa
Heritage: Mexican-American
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the community. The Hispanic community is at a breakaway point because of our demographics and the opportunities we establish for our youth will have a tremendous impact on our state. As the Hispanic community goes, so will the State of Arizona. My focus has always been in support of education and ensuring that young people get the opportunities I received as I was beginning my career. I am blessed to have been mentored by many individuals who were willing to invest in me and I have the responsibility to do the same.”

leezieLeezie Kim
Partner
Quarles & Brady
Heritage: Korean-American
Kim returned to Quarles & Brady after four years of service as a White House appointee to the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano.
Her hope for professional legacy: “As a trusted counselor to and partner with leaders in business, government and politics who found new ways to get things done that make life a little better for us all.”

david_kongDavid Kong
President and CEO
Best Western International
Since he was named president and CEO in 2004, Kong has guided Best Western International through a brand resurgence, winning numerous awards for training, social media and ecommerce initiatives. Brand Keys ranked Best Western No. 1 in customer loyalty for four consecutive years.
Heritage: Asian
His hope for professional legacy: “I’d like to be remembered for having made a positive difference – in Best Western, in the industry and the lives of all our associates and our hotel staff.”

paulPaul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”

steve_maciasSteve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias serves on the Governor’s Council on Small Business and is co-chair of the Supply Chain/Buy Arizona Committee, which is exploring ways government can help promote Arizona businesses.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “Someone who made a positive impact in promoting manufacturing as a worthwhile and valuable industry that provides quality jobs to the community.”

louis_manuelLouis J. Manuel, Jr.
Chairman
Ak-Chin Indian Community
Heritage: Tohono O’odham Nation and Ak-Chin Indian Community
Manuel has diversified his Community’s economy with Ak-Chin Farms, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, Santa Cruz Commerce Center and a partnership with the Super Bowl Host Committee.
His hope for professional legacy: “That my decision making gave value and sustainability in promoting a strong future and self-reliance for the people I serve.”

clarenceClarence McAllister
President and CEO
Fortis Networks
Heritage: Black Latino
McAllister was born in Panama and earned degrees in electrical engineering from ASU and an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. In 2000, he and his wife Reyna started Fortis, a certified 8a and HUBZone government contractor specialized in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an immigrant who came to this country in search of the American Dream, and built a business that employs more than 100 Americans.”

alfred_molinaAlfredo Molina
Chairman
Molina Jewelers
Heritage: Hispanic
Molina went from fleeing Cuba as a boy without a change of clothes to rocking the jewelry world by selling the Archduke Joseph diamond for $21.5 million, the most ever paid at auction for a colorless diamond.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference. I believe that every individual is a precious jewel and it is my commitment and social responsibility to ensure they become brilliant.”

rodolfo-pargaRodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
Heritage: Mexican
Parga has been named in multiple editions of Southwest Super Lawyers®, including in 2014. He also serves on the doard of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading nonprofit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as always trying my best to do the right thing, and being fair and loyal.”

Dan PuenteDan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Heritage: Hispanic
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck and has built it into the largest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an individual who created a company that set industry standards, gave back to an industry generous with opportunity and helped people grow personally and professionally.”

terry_ramblerTerry Rambler
Chairman
Arizona Indian Gaming Association
Heritage: San Carlos Apache Tribe
In addition to his AIGA leadership role, Rambler is chariman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe and president of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “Strong vision, consistent oversight, yet humble leadership that helped build successful partnerships in economic development, cultural preservation, and the expansion of tribal sovereignty.”

Terence-RobertsTerence Roberts, M.D., J.D.
Radiation oncologist
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center
Heritage: African-American
Roberts specializes in stereotactic radiosurgery and tumors of the brain, spine, and prostate. He also received a law degree from Stanford University and practiced corporate law in the Silicon Valley for start-up companies.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered professionally as compassionate, knowledgeable and having integrity. Also as someone who innovated in an era of health care reform.”

Steve SanghiSteve Sanghi
Chairman, CEO and president
Microchip Technology
Heritage: Indian
Sanghi, named president of Microchip in 1990, CEO in 1991 and chairman in 1993, is the author of “Driving Excellence: How The Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader.”
His hope for professional legacy: “For building Microchip Technology into one of the most successful semiconductor companies, which achieved an unprecedented 100 consecutive profitable quarters in a brutally competitive industry.”

roxanne_song_ongRoxanne K. Song Ong
Chief presiding judge
Phoenix Municipal Court
Heritage: Chinese American
Song Ong, who chair the Arizona Supreme Court Commission on Minorities, was the first Asian female judge in Arizona and first minority to be named as Phoenix chief judge.
Her hope for professional legacy: “It would be my great honor to be remembered for three primary things: (1) my work in judicial and civics education, (2) the promotion of cultural competency and diversity in the judicial and legal profession, and (3) promoting access to justice for all Arizonans through legal services and education.”

Charlie-ToucheCharlie Touché
Chairman and CEO
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
In 2004, Touché became chairman and CEO of one of the largest insurance agencies in the United States, with nearly 200 employees in three offices and more than $300 million in total premiums.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “I’m proud to say that during this entire century, we’ve remained a client-driven, hands-on kind of company with people who will roll up their sleeves and jump in the trenches to help those we do business with.”

lisa_uriasLisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
Heritage: Mexican
Urias has built an award-winning advertising, marketing and public relations agency that specializes in the diverse markets of the American Southwest, particularly the Hispanic market.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Having a nationally-known agency that successfully connects corporations to multicultural markets through ad campaigns, public relations and community outreach for mutual benefit and respect.”

lonnie_williamsLonnie J. Williams, Jr.
Partner
Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Heritage: Black
The Yale graduate’s practice focuses on commercial business and employment-related matters. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in America.
His hope for professional legacy: “Martin Luther King said, ‘if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.’ Professionally, I would like to be remembered like that street sweeper.”

kuldip_vermaKuldip Verma
CEO
Vermaland
Heritage: East Indian
Vermaland, founded by Verma, holds more than 24,000 acres of land in Arizona with a portfolio valued at $500 million. Nabha, the tiny Indian village Verma was born in, could fit many times into the acreage he now controls in the desert Southwest.
His hope for professional legacy: “I saw a dream and pursued it. Success without humility is a curse, but Success with your values intact is a blessing.”

Jones

Jones Selected as 2014 Lawyer of the Year

Best Lawyers has selected William R. Jones, Jr. as the 2014 “Lawyer of the Year” for Medical Malpractice Law in Phoenix, Arizona. According to Best Lawyers, when an attorney is selected as “Lawyer of the Year,” it “reflects the high level of respect a lawyer has earned among other leading lawyers in the same communities and the same practice areas for their abilities, their professionalism, and their integrity.”

William R. Jones, Jr. is one of the founding attorneys at Jones, Skelton & Hochuli, P.L.C., which began in 1983. Mr. Jones has been practicing law for 52 years and has tried over 250 civil jury cases in Arizona and other states. While he currently concentrates his practice in the medical malpractice area, Mr. Jones is still involved in litigating and trying other types of civil liability cases on an active and ongoing basis. He has served as both the Arizona Court of Appeals Judge Pro Tem and the Superior Court of Arizona Judge Pro Tem.

Jones has passed along the knowledge he has gained throughout his legal career by speaking as a guest lecturer at Harvard University, Arizona State University and the University of Arizona College of Law. He has been listed as one of the Top 50 Lawyers in Arizona since 2007 by Southwest Super Lawyers.

celebrity-fight-night

Buble, De Niro and More at Celebrity Fight Night

Celebrity Fight Night, one of the nation’s most impactful charity events held each year in honor of featured guest Muhammad Ali, will mark its 20th anniversary on Saturday, April 12 at JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort & Spa in Phoenix.

Joining Ali for this special milestone will be memorable performances from Michael Bublé, The Band Perry and Kenny Rogers. A significant beneficiary of Celebrity Fight Night is the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center at Barrow Neurological Institute, offering the most comprehensive Parkinson’s Center in the country.

International superstar Michael Bublé has won four Grammy Awards and multiple Juno Awards.  With four No.1 albums on the Billboard 200 topping the charts for five weeks, he has become an international favorite. Additionally, guests will have the chance to bid on a live auction package to enjoy a private dinner with Bublé.

The legendary Kenny Rogers, a Country Music Hall of Fame member, has sold more than 100 million records worldwide. He has been voted “Favorite Singer of All Time” by USA Today and People. Rogers was the first musical performer ever at Celebrity Fight Night in 1996.

Joining Bublé and Rogers on the stage will be a high energy performance from Grammy®-Award winning country music group, The Band Perry; along with other surprise guests.

“We’re honored to have these stars join us for this special 20th anniversary of Celebrity Fight Night,” said Jimmy Walker, founder of Celebrity Fight Night and close friend of Ali. “Over the years, so many memorable moments have occurred and we look forward to what April 12th brings.”

During the gala, Bublé, entertainment icon Robert De Niro as well as philanthropist John Paul DeJoria will be honored with Muhammad Ali Celebrity Fight Night Awards. Billy Crystal will make a special introduction for De Niro; and Bobby Kennedy, Jr. will introduce DeJoria. These awards acknowledge leaders in the sports, business or entertainment community who have achieved extraordinary accomplishments and have been instrumental in giving back to charity – key attributes Ali has long been known for.

Celebrity Fight Night premiered in the Valley in 1994 when local celebrities donned oversized boxing gloves for a comedic fight in the ring before 400 attendees. Today, more than 1,200 guests attend the event to accompany Muhammad Ali and other A-List celebrities. Celebrity Fight Night no longer features celebrity boxing, but by attending the event and bidding on live and silent auction items, each guest does their part to join Ali in winning the fight for charities.

“There are so many amazing moments that have taken place over the years,” said Sean Currie, executive director of Celebrity Fight Night. “One of my favorite memories was when Jim Carrey and Robin Williams did an impromptu comedic performance from their seats before the beginning of the show eight years ago. Of course who can forget when 300 women in the audience joined Kelly Clarkson during her closing song onstage; or the live auction package featuring dinner and concert with Andrea Bocelli in Tuscany that sold for $1.4 million. We look forward to a successful night of fundraising and more once-in-a-lifetime memories.”

Grammy® Award-winning leading lady of country music, Reba McEntire will also join featured guest Muhammad Ali at the star-studded gala. McEntire will return as the evening’s emcee for her ninth consecutive year. Also returning will be 16-time Grammy® Award-winning songwriter and producer, David Foster who will serve as Musical Director for his 15th year.

Over the past 19 years, Celebrity Fight Night has raised $87 million for the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center and other charities. At the personal request of Andrea Bocelli, Celebrity Fight Night is expanding globally. September 2014 will mark the first time the event will take place outside of Phoenix in Florence, Italy.

Celebrities and professional athletes from around the U.S. join Muhammad Ali each year in Phoenix for this celebrity-filled night complete with live auction items and musical performances by many of today’s brightest stars. Previous guests have included Andrea Bocelli, Jennifer Lopez, Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Billy Crystal, Kevin Costner, Garth Brooks, Matchbox Twenty, Kelly Clarkson, Jon Bon Jovi, Robin Williams, Rascal Flatts, Jim Carrey, Larry King, Donald Trump, Celine Dion, Faith Hill, Randy Jackson, Sharon Stone, Lionel Richie, Bo Derek, Rod Stewart, Michael Bublé, Josh Groban, John Mellencamp, Chris Tucker, Forest Whitaker, Arnold Schwarzenegger and many more.

Individual tickets range from $1,500 to $10,000 each and tables of 10 are priced from $15,000 to $100,000 each. For reservations, please call (602) 956-1121.

Celebrity Fight Night XX sponsors include USA Today Sports, Patrón, GoDaddy, PRO EM, and M Group Scenic Studios.

parga

Leadership spotlight: Rodolfo Parga, Jr.

Rodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
rcalaw.com

Parga, elected managing shareholder in 200, is recognized as an accomplished trial attorney and has been named as one of the Valley’s most admired CEOs. He is also a community leader, recently serving as chairman of the board of Chicanos Por La Causa.

Biggest challenge: “Navigating the Great Recession has been the biggest challenge I have faced.  The traditional model of the practice of law has been fundamentally changed.  Fortunately, well before the Great Recession, our firm had already embraced different business models with the continued focus of providing exceptional legal services while providing the best value for our clients.”

Best advice received: “The best business advice I ever received was from my parents. They told me do the right thing, treat people with respect and good things will follow.”

Best advice to offer: “Do not allow the fear of failure to dictate the vision of your business.”

Greatest accomplishment: “Every day, we provide creative legal solutions to our clients and help them reach their business objectives, and we do this while fostering a vibrant, inclusive workplace where people can develop and succeed.   never forget how much our clients, and our people, rely on us to perform our jobs at the highest level.”

Test

Andy Landeen joins Ryley Carlock

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite added attorney Andrea (Andy) Landeen to the firm’s Creditors’ Rights and Bankruptcy, Lending and Commercial Litigation practice groups, where she will continue her practice of representing lenders and other creditors in pre- and post-judgment litigation.

“We’re very excited about what Andy brings to the firm as well as our creditors’ rights and bankruptcy team,” said Scott Jenkins, Jr. who leads the firm’s lending, creditor’s rights and bankruptcy group.  “With Andy’s diverse experience, she will help us better serve our expanding client base.”

Prior to joining the firm, Andy also represented debtors in litigation in involving commercial real estate transactions arising from judicial and non-judicial foreclosures, as well as representing sub-contractors and materialmen in construction defect and/or mechanics’ lien dispute in both state and federal courts, and the Arizona Registrar of Contractors.

“I am so excited to join Ryley Carlock & Applewhite not only because of the culture of professionalism, teamwork and commitment to excellence for which the firm is known, but also because of the balanced approach and high regard this firm has towards its attorneys as well as its clients.  I look forward to working with my team and growing with the firm.”

Landeen attained her law degree, cum laude from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University and her undergraduate summa cum laude from Smith College.

lrr

Lewis Roca Rothgerber Phoenix Office Honored

Lewis Roca Rothgerber announced that Partner Kenneth Van Winkle, Jr., Partner Richard N. Goldsmith and Paralegal Manager Christine Anderson will be honored with the Department of Defense Patriot Award for their support of the Guard and Reserve.

The Patriot Award is given to supervisors in recognition of the support they provide individual soldiers/employees during their Reserve Training and Deployment. The award will be presented by a representative of the Arizona Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) program. National Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week runs September 22 – 28.

Van Winkle, Managing Partner and a member of the firm’s Business Transactions Practice Group, focuses his practice on real estate leasing, real estate equity and debt financing, and real estate sales and acquisitions.

Goldsmith, a partner in the firm’s Business Transactions Practice Group, practices primarily in the areas of lending, equipment leasing and sales, real estate, general contract drafting, and alternative dispute resolution.

Anderson is the firm’s Paralegal Manager and manages all paralegal-related matters. She worked as a paralegal for 23 years including 17 years in the firm’s litigation and regulatory practices.

iPhone Business Apps

‘Bring Your Own Device’ trend a growing concern

The rise in popularity of smart phones, tablets and laptops has blurred the increasingly thin line between professional and personal life, between work time and personal time. But it’s is also creating security concerns for business owners who let their employees use those tech toys for work.

“Employers need to address the question of how to react to the inevitable or current use of personal or shared devices by their employees,” said Cheri Vandergrift, a staff attorney for Mountain States Employers Council, a leader in human resource and employment law services for the business community. “From IT issues to privacy and litigation concerns, companies that ignore the rising ‘Bring Your Own Device’ tide may find that BYOD brought nothing but disaster.”

While an AccelOps Cloud Security Survey of IT security personnel ranked BYOD as the top source for fear of incurring data loss, there are also concerns regarding employee privacy should litigation ensue and the question of using personal devices goes into the courtroom. The use of personal devices in the workplace stirs questions within the IT, legal and human resources departments of companies.

“Data access and ownership are significant legal issues that surround the BYOD trend,” said John Balitis, director at Fennemore Craig. “Employees accessing employer systems with personal devices can create major network security risks and employer IT staff accessing the devices to support them can infringe on employee privacy. Further, how to define who owns what information on the devices is challenging.”

Laurent Badoux, a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Phoenix office, said there are a number of legal issues that could arise from the BYOD trend. Among them:

* Breach of confidentiality — especially with medical or financial data.
* Commercial espionage or unfair competition.
* Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) claims of unreported or unpaid time.
* Dispute as to ownership of data stored on personal devices.
* Claims of harassment, defamation, invasion of privacy, etc. from improper social media posting of workplace conduct.
* Negligence torts if an exployee tries to answer a work text or email while driving and causes an accident.

“The most glaring risk (an employer takes) is that sensitive confidential corporate data becomes compromised, either because an outsider is able to access that data through an employee’s device or to copy data stored on that device,” Badoux said. “When their sensitive data becomes compromised, companies face damage to the bottom lines and public image.”

According to Travis Williams, senior counsel at the Frutkin Law Firm, if a company believes information is jeopardized, or upon termination of an employee’s employment, the employer may have the right to seize the device for a short time to ensure proper protection or removal of company’s sensitive information.

“Employees need to understand that business information on their device is the property of the employer,” Williams said. “The employer has the right to protect the information. The protection may allow the employer to seize or force ‘wipe’ the device to ensure proper removal of the information.”

While there is no doubt that the BYOD trend has given tech-savvy employees the opportunity to create a more flexible schedule and therefore increase their productivity, experts said it’s imperative that companies find a balance between protecting sensitive work data, while still providing employees flexibility and independence.

“Have a policy that specifically addresses what employees can and cannot do with PEDs (personal electronic devices) used for work-related purposes and enforce that policy,” said Tibor Nagy, Jr., a shareholder at the Tucson office of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart. “Be sure the policy addresses what happens to employer data when the employee leaves employment.”

Experts said companies who worry about issues related to the BYOD trend should look to impose tighter security constraints, develop technology guidelines and policies or employ mobile-device management tools, services and systems.

“An employer absolutely should implement a BYOD policy if the employer allows or encourages employees to use personal devices for work,” Balitis said.

Badoux said an effective BYOD program should include:

1. Mandatory Mobile Device Management software
2. Clarification of expectations on ownership of data, privacy and access to dual-use devices.
3. “Acceptable Use” procedures harmonized with the employee handbook or agreement).
4. A well-crafted social media policy.

“Do not allow highly sensitive employer, personnel, health information, or customer data to be stored on an employee’s PED, unless you are certain that device will be used and protected to the same degree as an employer-owned device,” Nagy said. “Only allow PEDs that are ‘enterprise; enabled. Enterprise requirements include encryption of storage media; the ability to remotely wipe or clean a device; the ability to enforce password changes and password complexity; the ability to apply upgrades and patches; and the ability to revoke rights to data or corporate network access.”

Michael Patten

Roshka DeWulf & Patten attorneys earn Honors

Roshka DeWulf & Patten, a Phoenix-based business law firm representing clients in litigation and regulatory issues, announced that four attorneys have been honored as 2014 Best Lawyers®.

The Best Lawyers in America is the longest-running peer-review publication in the legal profession, now in its 20th edition. Attorneys who are recognized as Best Lawyers® are confidentially evaluated by their peers. Attorneys from Roshka DeWulf & Patten who received the 2014 honor are:

Michael Patten – communications law, energy law, and administrative/regulatory law. Additionally, Patten was named Best Lawyers’ 2014 Phoenix Communications Law “Lawyer of the Year.”

Paul Roshka, Jr. – commercial litigation, litigation – regulatory enforcement (SEC, Telecom, energy), and litigation – securities.

John DeWulf – bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, and litigation – securities.

J. Matthew Derstine – bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, and litigation – bankruptcy.

“We’re very proud that each member has been able to achieve this recognition year after year. Our attorneys possess very deep knowledge within their practice areas. This honor is a testament to their hard work, passion and expertise,” said Patten.

To learn more about Roshka DeWulf & Patten attorneys and practice areas, visit www.rdp-law.com.

Michael Patten

Roshka DeWulf & Patten attorneys earn Honors

Roshka DeWulf & Patten, a Phoenix-based business law firm representing clients in litigation and regulatory issues, announced that four attorneys have been honored as 2014 Best Lawyers®.

The Best Lawyers in America is the longest-running peer-review publication in the legal profession, now in its 20th edition. Attorneys who are recognized as Best Lawyers® are confidentially evaluated by their peers. Attorneys from Roshka DeWulf & Patten who received the 2014 honor are:

Michael Patten – communications law, energy law, and administrative/regulatory law. Additionally, Patten was named Best Lawyers’ 2014 Phoenix Communications Law “Lawyer of the Year.”

Paul Roshka, Jr. – commercial litigation, litigation – regulatory enforcement (SEC, Telecom, energy), and litigation – securities.

John DeWulf – bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, and litigation – securities.

J. Matthew Derstine – bankruptcy and creditor debtor rights/insolvency and reorganization law, and litigation – bankruptcy.

“We’re very proud that each member has been able to achieve this recognition year after year. Our attorneys possess very deep knowledge within their practice areas. This honor is a testament to their hard work, passion and expertise,” said Patten.

To learn more about Roshka DeWulf & Patten attorneys and practice areas, visit www.rdp-law.com.

kid_rock

Amphitheatre renamed Ak-Chin Pavilion

Live Nation announced a partnership agreement with the Ak-Chin Indian Community that includes the naming rights for Desert Sky Pavilion in Phoenix.  The building will now be called Ak-Chin Pavilion. The venue will be host to an all-star lineup of performers this year including Pitbull & Ke$ha tomorrow night, Big Time Rush & Victoria Justice (6/25), Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival (7/5), Kid Rock (7/24), Luke Bryan (7/27), Train (8/7), Rascal Flatts (9/12), Keith Urban (9/29), John Mayer (10/2), Depeche Mode (10/8), Jason Aldean (10/17) and more to be announced in the coming weeks.

“The Ak-Chin Indian Community has long standing roots in Arizona and have always believed that investing in our community is the right thing to do,” said Ak-Chin Tribal Chairman Louis J. Manuel, Jr. “We are excited about this partnership with Live Nation and working together to bring quality live entertainment to the Valley.”

“We couldn’t be happier to enter into this marketing relationship with the Ak-Chin Indian Community at our premier live entertainment venue in Phoenix,” said Maureen Ford, president of Live Nation’s Venue Network. “Their community and entrepreneurial spirit makes this sponsorship alliance a great fit, enabling them to reach, engage and connect with live music fans at our venue.”

Desert Sky Pavilion, which is operated by Live Nation, first opened in November of 1990 with a concert by Billy Joel. The 20,000-seat amphitheatre is used mainly for concerts but is also available for other functions and has hosted events such as graduations, seminars, speaking engagements & company outings. It also recently served as additional parking for the NASCAR race fans. The Pavilion is also the only Phoenix Point of Pride in Maryvale.

Two attorneys become shareholders

25 Squire Sanders attorneys earn distinction

Squire Sanders announced that 25 of its lawyers were recognized in the 2013 edition of Southwest Super Lawyers, among them are:

* George Brandon, Business Litigation
* Brian Cabianca, Business Litigation, Intellectual Property Litigation, Class Action/Mass Torts
* D. Lewis Clark, Jr., Employment & Labor, Employment Litigation: Defense
* Joseph M. Crabb, Securities & Corporate Finance, Mergers & Acquisitions, Business/Corporate
* Peter W. Culp, Environmental, Energy & Natural Resources
* Craig D. Hansen, Bankruptcy & Creditor/Debtor Rights
* Charles E. James, Jr., Bonds/Government Finance
* Christopher D. Johnson, Mergers & Acquisitions, Securities & Corporate Finance, Bankruptcy & Creditor/Debtor Rights
* DavidW. Kreutzberg, Real Estate, Business/Corporate, Land Use/Zoning
* Jordan A. Kroop, Bankruptcy & Creditor/Debtor Rights
* Steven L. Lisker, Real Estate
* Daniel Pasternak, Employment & Labor
* Timothy E. Pickrell, Mergers & Acquisitions
* Frank M Placenti, Securities & Corporate Finance, Mergers & Acquisitions, Corporate Governance & Compliance
* Lawrence J. Rosenfeld, Employment & Labor, Health Care
* Thomas J. Salerno, Bankruptcy & Creditor/Debtor Rights, International, Alternative Dispute Resolution
* Christopher D. Thomas, Environmental, Environmental Litigation

Rising Stars Include:

* Jamie Daddona Brennan, Business/Corporate, Securities & Corporate Finance
* Jennifer R. Cosper, Bonds/Government Finance
* Gregory A. Davis, General Litigation
* Matthew M. Holman, Securities & Corporate Finance, Mergers & Acquisitions, Business/Corporate
* Laura Lawless Robertson, Employment & Labor
* Matthew Ohre, Business Litigation
* Sara K. Regan, Business Litigation
* Jacob B. Smith, Tax, Business/Corporate

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Managing Shareholder Rodolfo Parga.

Ryley Carlock's Parga Featured in 'Legal Visionaries'

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Managing Shareholder, Rodolfo Parga, Jr. was featured in the newly published book, “Legal Visionaries, How to Make their Innovations Work for You”.  In partnership with 27 legal visionaries from around the country, Authors David Galbenski and David Barringer interviewed this team of innovators to provide a guide to legal practitioners how others have dealt with record economic challenges, changes in the legal profession, and the formulation of new ways to achieve success.  The authors say it best, “The visionaries whose interviews were collected  … have taken significant steps to improve the business of law … .” The book provides different perspectives from within the legal community about dealing with change and risk in the legal profession.  As Rudy Parga, Managing Shareholder of Ryley Carlock, observed:

“Lawyers are always assessing risk and finding ways to limit it, but sometimes being a good entrepreneur is not about that.  It’s about taking a leap of faith and forging ahead on some of these fronts.  All of us have to deal with a new reality.  That reality includes alternative fees, new operating models, unbundling, and defining and building new client relationships.” Parga states.

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Managing Shareholder Rodolfo Parga.

Ryley Carlock’s Parga Featured in ‘Legal Visionaries’

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Managing Shareholder, Rodolfo Parga, Jr. was featured in the newly published book, “Legal Visionaries, How to Make their Innovations Work for You”.  In partnership with 27 legal visionaries from around the country, Authors David Galbenski and David Barringer interviewed this team of innovators to provide a guide to legal practitioners how others have dealt with record economic challenges, changes in the legal profession, and the formulation of new ways to achieve success.  The authors say it best, “The visionaries whose interviews were collected  … have taken significant steps to improve the business of law … .” The book provides different perspectives from within the legal community about dealing with change and risk in the legal profession.  As Rudy Parga, Managing Shareholder of Ryley Carlock, observed:

“Lawyers are always assessing risk and finding ways to limit it, but sometimes being a good entrepreneur is not about that.  It’s about taking a leap of faith and forging ahead on some of these fronts.  All of us have to deal with a new reality.  That reality includes alternative fees, new operating models, unbundling, and defining and building new client relationships.” Parga states.

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite Managing Shareholder Rodolfo Parga.

Ryley Carlock Attorneys Named to Southwest Super Lawyers

Ryley Carlock & Applewhite had 15 attorneys from its Phoenix office selected for inclusion in the 2013 Southwest Super Lawyers and Rising Stars.

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service of outstanding lawyers from more than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual selections are made using a patented multiphase process that includes a statewide survey of lawyers, an independent research evaluation of candidates and peer reviews by practice area. The result is a credible, comprehensive and diverse listing of exceptional attorneys.

Each year, no more than five percent of the Southwest Super Lawyers in the state are selected by the research team at Super Lawyers to receive the honor of Super Lawyers.  Additionally, the designation of Rising Stars is no more than 2.5 percent of lawyers in Arizona and New Mexico who are 40 years of age or younger, and in practice for 10 years or less. The list of Southwest Super Lawyers® includes shareholders:

• Fredric D. Bellamy – Intellectual Property/Litigation
• James E. Brophy, III – Banking
• John J. Fries – Bankruptcy
• John C. Lemaster – Business Litigation
• Michael D. Moberly – Labor and Employment
• Nathan R. Niemuth – Labor and Employment
• Rodolfo Parga, Jr. – Business Litigation
• Michael P. Ripp – Banking

The following attorneys were selected for inclusion as Southwest Super Lawyers Rising Stars:

• Albert H. Acken – Environmental
• Jessica Benford – Business/Corp
• Charitie L. Hartsig – Labor and Employment
• William S. Jenkins, Jr. – Bankruptcy
• Andrew M. Kvesic – Business Litigation
• Andrea G. Lovell – Labor and Employment
• Samuel L. Lofland – Energy

Squire Sanders attorney Brian Cabianca

26 Squire Sanders attorneys named Southwest Super Lawyers

Squire Sanders announced that 26 of its lawyers were recognized in the 2013 edition of Southwest Super Lawyers, among them are:

George Brandon (Super Lawyer)
Business Litigation

Brian Cabianca (Super Lawyer)
Business Litigation
Intellectual Property Litigation
Class Action/Mass Torts

D. Lewis Clark, Jr. (Super Lawyer)
Employment & Labor
Employment Litigation: Defense

Jamie Daddona Brennan (Rising Star)
Business/Corporate
Securities & Corporate Finance

Joe Clees, Tibor Nagy, Jr., and Mark Kisicki

Ogletree Deakins Attorneys Ranked in Chambers USA

Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. (Ogletree Deakins), one of the largest labor and employment law firms representing management, announced that Joe Clees and Mark Kisicki, from the firm’s Phoenix office, and Tibor Nagy, Jr., from the firm’s Tucson office, have been included in the 2013 edition of Chambers USA, an annual ranking of law firms and lawyers comprising an extensive range of practice areas. Ogletree Deakins’ Arizona offices also earned a Band 1 ranking, the highest possible, in the Labor & Employment practice area. This is the fifth consecutive year that the Arizona offices have earned a Band 1 ranking. In total, the firm’s offices in 19 states and the District of Columbia along with 72 of the firm’s attorneys have been included in the 2013 edition.

Chambers USA is widely used by firms and businesses for referral purposes and many utilize the rankings and profiles of firms to find appropriate legal counsel. Firms and individuals are ranked in bands and the rankings are developed through research and thousands of in-depth interviews with clients and peers in order to assess their reputations and knowledge across the United States. The guide reflects a law firm’s high level of performance in key areas including technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial astuteness, diligence, commitment, and other various qualities stated as most valued by the client.

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Ak-Chin Indian Community Invests $10M in Maricopa

During the May 7 Maricopa City Council meeting, Mayor Christian Price announced that the Ak-Chin Indian Community would be making an investment of $10 million in Maricopa. Of the $10 million investment, $2.6 million will support the Maricopa Unified School District and $7.4 million will be allocated to the operation of the City of Maricopa’s Copper Sky Recreational Complex, a multigenerational/aquatic center and regional park, currently under construction.

The Community’s investment in the District will assist with the short fall within the budget and the failure of the previous tax initiative.   Ak-Chin Tribal Chairman Louis J. Manuel, Jr. has long valued the importance of education and has made it a priority for the Tribal Council to find ways to improve upon it, not only for the Tribal community, but for the City of Maricopa as well.

“As true leaders to those our youth look to for guidance, we need to invest in them to promote and partake in a future yet to be determined but with the belief of opportunities,” said Chairman Manuel.  “The Ak-Chin Indian Community believes a partnership like this goes beyond the boundaries and creates a relationship to forge a strong future for everyone.”

The Copper Sky Recreational Complex, slated to open in spring 2014, includes a multigenerational/aquatic center and a regional park.  The 52,000-square-foot center will have many amenities, such as a gymnasium with two full-size basketball courts, a fitness area, an indoor running track, a competitive pool, a recreational pool, and a splash pad.  The regional park is approximately 120 acres and will be comprised of a five-acre lake, tennis, basketball and volleyball courts, a skate park, multi-use fields, a baseball/softball field, a dog park, and bike and multi-use trails.

“I am ecstatic to see the countless benefits that come from building positive and valuable relationships with our wonderful neighbors, the Ak-Chin Indian Community,” said Maricopa Mayor Christian Price.  “As we embark on this new era of collaboration, I look forward to seeing our partnerships continue to develop and our communities continue to thrive. I am encouraged that, together, we will continue to construct a highly-prized and decidedly-successful region.  The City of Maricopa is extremely grateful for the outstanding generosity of the Ak-Chin Community and we look forward to building a prosperous future together.”

The Community’s $10 million investment will be made in one payment to the City, who will serve as the grantor of the $2.6 million to the District.

“We have a life-long relationship with the City of Maricopa; we have shared in each other’s growth and helped when called upon.  We hope to continue our partnership into the future,” said Chairman Manuel.

guerra

Hispanic Chamber names Guerra Woman of the Year

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce is honoring BioAccel CEO and Co-Founder MaryAnn Guerra as the Woman of the Year on Saturday at its 55th Annual Black & White Ball and Business Awards.

Guerra is being recognized for BioAccel’s leadership role in economic development and its ongoing effort to start new companies and create jobs in Arizona. The gala, which honors three other community leaders and a business, is being held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Saturday at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel, 330 N. Third Street.

“The centerpiece attraction of our gala is the Hispanic Chamber’s prestigious business awards, and we’re extremely proud this year to salute the achievements of MaryAnn Guerra, one of our the state’s innovative figures, by awarding her the 2013 Woman of the Year Award,” said AZHCC President & CEO Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr.

Guerra is known for creating novel programs to accelerate the transfer of technology from the lab into new business opportunities. She has spent much of her career operating successful and progressive health, science and technology businesses. Guerra is an expert at business development initiatives that create organizations poised to deliver commercial outcomes. Since the launch of BioAccel in April 2009, 10 companies have been successfully launched with products close to commercial availability. Additionally, BioAccel recently partnered with the City of Peoria to create the first medical device accelerator, embedding the BioAccel model into its operations to ensure positive economic impact.

“I’m honored and humbled by this award,” Guerra said. “BioAccel is a new kind of accelerator model in Arizona dedicated to creating knowledge-industry jobs and new companies that drive our state’s economy. It’s inspiring and invigorating work, and a privilege to work with a staff, board and industry leaders committed to realizing a big bio vision for Arizona.”

Prior to founding BioAccel, Guerra served as President of TGen Accelerators, LLC, and Chief Operating Officer at TGen. While at TGen, she facilitated the start-up of six companies and was involved in the sale of three of those yielding significant profits for the organization. As TGen’s former COO, she grew the organization from $30 million to $60 million in fewer than three years.  Guerra also served as the executive vice president of Matthews Media Group where she was responsible for developing and implementing commercial strategic business plans that expanded and enhanced services and extended relationships with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. She had an impressive career at the National Institutes of Health in various senior level positions including executive officer at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and deputy director of management & executive officer at the National Cancer Institute.

Guerra has received numerous awards for her work including Arizona Business Magazine’s 2013 Fifteen Women to Watch. Last year, BioAccel received the State Science and Technology Institutes’ Most Innovative New Initiative Award, a first time national recognition for BioAccel and the state of Arizona. Currently Guerra is a board member of Planned Parenthood of Arizona and the Mollen Foundation as well as a Commissioner of the Arizona Skill Standard Commission. In addition, she serves on the advisory board for ASU School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Guerra earned an undergraduate degree from The Ohio State University and an MBA from George Washington University in Science, Innovation and Commercialization.

The Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 55th Annual Black & White Ball and Business Awards event is the state’s longest running formal gala and honors the achievements of business and community leaders statewide. More than 1,200 of Arizona’s most notable business and community leaders attend every year.

The Chamber will present awards during the gala in four other categories. This year’s winners are:

• Lattie F. Coor, Legacy Award

• Alfredo J. Molina, Man of the Year

• Israel G. Torres, Entrepreneur of the Year

• Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Corporation of the Year Award

molina

Hispanic Chamber honors leaders

The Center for the Future of Arizona’s founder and CEO is among the five award recipients to be honored at the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s 55th Annual Black & White Ball and Business Awards later this month.

“Dr. Lattie Coor is one of our state’s most iconic and beloved figures, and we’re honored to present him the 2013 Legacy Award,” said AZHCC President & CEO Gonzalo A. de la Melena, Jr. “The awards ceremony is the highlight of the evening, and this year’s slate of winners prove that people who succeed in business are also among the most generous individuals in our community.”

Awards also will be presented in four other categories:
MaryAnn Guerra, Woman of the Year;
Alfredo J. Molina, Man of the Year;
Israel Torres, Entrepreneur of the Year;
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Corporation of the Year Award.

The Black & White Ball is Arizona’s longest running formal gala. It honors the achievements of business and community leaders statewide. The gala also is the Hispanic Chamber’s largest annual fund-raiser. More than 1,200 of Arizona’s most notable business and community leaders are scheduled to attend.

Emceed this year by international celebrity Marco Antonio Regil, the gala takes place April 27, 2013, 6 to 9 p.m., at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel, 340 N. Third St. An “after-party” is scheduled at the same location from 9 p.m. to Midnight. Cox Communications continues its support as presenting sponsor for the event, which features an elegant dinner, the business awards, and live music and dancing at an after-dinner cocktail party.

Past Legacy Award winners include Governor Raul H. Castro, Senator John McCain, Jerry Colangelo, former Govenor Janet Napolitano and the late Eddie Basha, Jr., who will be honored with a special memorial tribute at this year’s dinner.

“In addition to the honor of presenting our business awards, the gala’s Brazilian Carnival theme this year promises to make it a great night out on the town,” said De la Melena. “I invite everyone to come and celebrate the good work of our award winners, and afterward relax and dance the night away.”

For information about ticket sales or sponsorship opportunities, contact Christina Arellano at 602-294-6085 or ChristinaA@azhcc.com or visit www.azhcc.com.

Dr. Lattie F. Coor / Legacy Award
Dr. Lattie F. Coor is President-Emeritus, Professor and Ernest W. McFarland Chair in Leadership and Public Policy in the School of Public Affairs at Arizona State University, and is Chairman and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona.

For the previous 26 years, Dr. Lattie Coor served as a University President. He was President of Arizona State University from 1990 to 2002, and President of the University of Vermont from 1976 to 1989.

Earlier in his career, Dr. Coor served as an assistant to the Governor of Michigan and held faculty appointments in Political Science at Washington University. His administrative responsibilities there included those of Assistant Dean of the Graduate School, Director of International Studies, and University Vice Chancellor.

He has held positions with a variety of higher education associations, board and commissions, having served as a founding member and Chairman of Division I of the NCAA President’s Commission. He held the position of Chairman of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges in 1992-93, and served on the Board of Directors of the American Council on Education from 1990 to 1993 and again from 1999 to 2002. He also served on the Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land Grant Universities from 1996 to 2002. He served as a Trustee of the American College of Greece, Athens, from 1988 to 1998, and has served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Deer Creek Foundation, St Louis, since 1983. He has honorary degrees from Marlboro College, American College of Greece, the University of Vermont and Northern Arizona University.

In Arizona, Dr. Lattie Coor serves on the Board of Directors of Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Arizona, and has served on the Board of Directors of Bank One Arizona, Samaritan Health Services, Greater Phoenix Economic Council, and is a member of the Greater Phoenix Leadership Council. He was a member of the Arizona State Board of Education from 1995 to 1999. He served as Chairman of the Education Section of the Valley of the Sun United Way Campaign from 1990 to 1993, and of the Public Sector of the United Way Campaign from 1999 to 2002.

Dr. Lattie Coor received the Anti-Defamation League’s Jerry J. Wisotsky Torch of Liberty Award in 1994, the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Individual Award from the Greater Phoenix Urban League in 2000, The American Academy of Achievement Golden Plate Award in 2000, The American Jewish Committee Institute of Human Relations Award in 2001 and the Center City Starr award from Phoenix Community Alliance in 2001. He was named Valley Leadership’s Man of the Year in 2006.
An Arizona native, Dr. Coor was born in Phoenix and graduated with high honors from Northern Arizona University in 1958. He pursued graduate studies in Political Science at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, earning a master’s degree in 1960 and a Ph.D. in 1964.

Alfredo J. Molina / Man of the Year

International jeweler Alfredo J. Molina is Chairman of The Molina Group, based in Phoenix, Arizona. The Molina Group is the parent company of Molina Fine Jewelers in Phoenix and New York and Black, Starr & Frost, America’s first jeweler since 1810, in Newport Beach and New York. Alfredo Molina is one of the nation’s most prestigious jewelers. His ability to secure the world’s rarest gems – such as the historic Archduke Joseph Diamond, the world’s twelfth largest historic perfect white diamond – has earned him guest appearances on numerous television programs, including CBS’ Early Show and NBC’s Today Show.

Mr. Molina’s education and experience in the jewelry industry is extensive. He is a graduate gemologist from the Gemological Institute of America and a Fellow Member of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain with distinction. He is a certified gemologist and appraiser from the American Gem Society. He is considered one of the world’s experts in the determination of country of origin of gemstones. He is past President of the American Society of Appraisers, Arizona Jewelers Association, and the GIA Alumni Association. He served as Vice-Chairman of the Jewelers of America Council and Co-Chairman of the Master Gemologist Appraiser program. Mr. Molina is also a qualified appraiser for the Internal Revenue Service and an alumni of the FBI Citizens Academy. He appears as keynote speaker at seminars and workshops on appraising gems, and discussing the latest gemological trends and developments. He assists law enforcement agencies in recovering stolen gems and serves as an expert witness for U.S. Customs Service as gems authority. In 2002, he was appointed to serve as Honorary Counsul of Spain for Arizona.

Alfredo, his wife Lisa and their four children devote time and many resources to the Arizona and California communities. The Molinas feel that The Molina Group is fulfilling their duty to their community, friends and supporters.

Lisa and Alfredo have chaired numerous charity events including the Arizona Cancer Ball, The Samaritan Foundation, The Symphony Ball, The Arizona Heart Ball, Crohn’s and Colitis, Women of Distinction Gala and Childhelp. They have supported Candlelite, JDRF Dream Gala, Susan G. Komen, the Pacific Symphony, Dodge College of Film and Media Arts and were honorary Chairs of 2009 Orange Country High School for the Arts Gala and the 2011 Banner Health Foundation Candlelight Capers. Lisa and Alfredo have dedicated their lives to the service of others and their children are following in their footsteps. Through their generous sponsorship and support of local and national charities, they seek to improve the lives of those less fortunate. Gratitude, selflessness, love and a firm belief in the legacies of sharing comprises the Molina way of life.

Alfredo was honored in Washington, DC as one of seven caring Americans and was inducted into the Frederick Douglass Museum & Hall of Fame for Caring Americans on Capitol Hill. He was named 2008 Outstanding Business Leader by Northwood University at the Breakers in Palm Beach and he was recently inducted into the National Jewelers, Retailer Hall of Fame in the single store independent category.

MaryAnn Guerra / Woman of the Year

MaryAnn Guerra, MBA is Chairman of the Board, CEO, and co-founder of BioAccel. Ms. Guerra is known for creating novel programs to accelerate the transfer of technology from the lab into new business opportunities. Ms. Guerra spent much of her career operating successful and progressive health, science and technology businesses. She is an expert at business development initiatives that create organizations poised to deliver commercial outcomes. Since the launch of BioAccel in April 2009, 10 companies have been successfully launched with products close to commercial availability. Additionally, BioAccel recently partnered with the City of Peoria to create the first medical device accelerator, embedding the BioAccel model into its operations to ensure positive economic impact.

Prior to founding BioAccel, Ms. Guerra served as President of TGen Accelerators, LLC and Chief Operating Officer at (TGen). While at TGen she facilitated the start-up of six companies and was involved in the sale of three of those yielding significant profits for the organization. As TGen’s former COO she grew the organization from $30M to $60M in less than three years. Ms. Guerra also served as Executive Vice President, Matthews Media Group, where she was responsible for developing and implementing commercial strategic business plans that expanded and enhanced services and extended relationships with the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. She has had an impressive career at the National Institutes of Health having held various senior level positions, including: Executive Officer, NHLBI and Deputy Director of Management & Executive Officer at the NCI.

Ms. Guerra has received numerous awards for her work, including the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2013 Woman of the Year and Arizona Business Magazine’s 2013 “Fifteen” Women to Watch. Last year BioAccel received the State Science and Technology Institutes’ most Innovative New Initiative Award, a first time national recognition for BioAccel and for the State of Arizona. She has received the Phoenix Business Journal’s “Top 25 Women in Business” award, as well as their “Power People” award, the Girl Scouts “Women of the Future World” award. Ms. Guerra has served on numerous Boards throughout her career. Currently she is a Board member of Planned Parenthood of Arizona and the Mollen Foundation as well as a Commissioner of the Arizona Skill Standard Commission as well as many other board seats. Ms. Guerra holds an undergraduate degree from The Ohio State University and an MBA from George Washington University in Science, Innovation and Commercialization.

Israel G. Torres, Esq. / Entrepreneur of the Year

Israel G. Torres is Managing Partner of Torres Consulting and Law Group, LLC. The firm provides a variety of services, including regulatory compliance, law, and government relations, to clients in the construction trades throughout the United States. His firm has been recognized by the Phoenix Business Journal as one of the Best Places to Work in the Valley in 2011. Torres Consulting and Law Group was also named 2009 Service Firm of Year during the Minority Enterprise Development Week Awards, a program that is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Prior to establishing his firm, Mr. Torres was elected as the Democratic nominee for Arizona Secretary of State in 2006. He was the first Latino candidate in Arizona history to garner more than 600,000 votes statewide.

From 2003 to 2006, Mr. Torres served as Director of the Arizona Registrar of Contractors and as a member of Governor Napolitano’s Cabinet. As the director, Mr. Torres served as the chief regulator of Arizona’s construction industry, regulating the activities of more than 52,000 active commercial and residential construction licenses amidst a time of unparalleled construction activity in Arizona. In that role, he also served as an advisor to the Governor and State Legislature on construction- and development-related issues. Mr. Torres was a national leader in the advancement of regulatory initiatives.

Mr. Torres is a member of the Arizona Bar and is licensed to practice law in Arizona. His educational background includes a Juris Doctorate from the University of New Mexico School of Law and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Arizona State University. He also holds a Construction Management Certificate from the Del E. Webb School of Construction in the Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering at ASU.

Mr. Torres and his wife, Monica, live in Tempe and are raising two children, Cristian and Alysa. He enjoys outdoor sports, including mountain biking, hiking, boating, camping, and skiing.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona / Corporation of the Year

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona (BCBSAZ), an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, is the largest Arizona-based health insurance company. The not-for-profit company was founded in 1939 and provides health insurance products, services or networks to 1.3 million individuals. With offices in Phoenix, Flagstaff, Tucson and the East Valley, the company employs more than 1,300 Arizonans. Follow BCBSAZ at www.facebook.com/bcbsaz or on Twitter at @bcbsaz to get information on health and wellness, a knowledgeable perspective on health insurance reform, and become a part of what BCBSAZ is doing in your community.

law

2013 Top Lawyers list: Employment and labor

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Adrian L. Barton
Sacks Tierney P.A.
480-425-2629
www.sackstierney.com
Barton has several labor-related publications, including “Employee Voting Rights: Arizona Employer Obligations,” “Social Networking and the Workplace,” and “Reducing the Risk of Wrongful Termination.”

James L. Blair
Renaud Cook Drury Mesaros, PA
602-256-3020
www.rcdmlaw.com
Blair is his firm’s chair of the Employment Law and Litigation Practice Group and was a contributor to the “Compendium of Significant Employment-Related Case Law and Statutes,” ALFA International, from 2003-2009.

Joseph T. Clees
Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.
602-778-3700
www.ogletreedeakins.com
Clees represents employers throughout the United States in discrimination and wrongful discharge cases and labor relations.

Scott Gibson
Davis Miles McGuire Gardner, PLL480-344-0918
www.davismiles.com
Over the years, Gibson has developed a reputation for his uncanny ability to quickly discern the most important issues in a case and to focus on ways to resolve rather than to expand litigation.

Donald Peder Johnsen
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8437
www.gknet.com
Johnsen practices exclusively in the area of employment and labor law and has been listed in “The Best Lawyers in America” from 2007-2013.

Pamela L. Kingsley
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-255-6015
www.tblaw.com
Kingsley’s counseling and advice often includes drafting and analyzing agreements for employment and severance, confidentiality, non-competition, and non-solicitation; policies for sexual harassment and oppressive or violent conduct, drug testing, safety, absences, and disabilities.

Michael D. Moberly
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
602-440-4821
www.rcalaw.com
Moberly is an elected Fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers, a national organization established to recognize those attorneys who have distinguished themselves as leaders in the fields of labor and employment law.

Tibor Nagy, Jr.
Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C.
520-575-7442
www.ogletreedeakins.com
Nagy represents employers in all facets of labor and employment relations law, including discrimination and wrongful discharge cases, wage and hour law, employment contracts and manuals, and labor-management relations.

Stephanie Quincy
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5230
www.steptoe.com
Quincy maintains a regular case load of employment litigation matters. Cases include civil rights (race, age, religion, gender and disability), wrongful termination, sexual harassment, defamation, and breach of contract claims.

Deanna Rader
Gordon Rees
602-794-2460
www.gordonrees.com
Rader has extensive experience advising public employers on constitutional matters, personnel issues, student rights, conflicts of interest, open meeting law, due process under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and public records issues.

Lawrence J. Rosenfeld
Squire Sanders
602-528-4886
www.squiresanders.com
Rosenfeld has more than 35 years of experience in the area of employment law and is a fellow of the College of Labor and Employment Lawyers.

Debora Verdier
Sanders & Parks, P.C.
602-532-5760
www.sandersandparks.com
Verdier counsels companies with an eye toward preventing disputes and providing pre-litigation solutions and has experience in defending employers against EEOC charges and in litigating employment disputes.

law

2013 Top Lawyers list: Bankruptcy/reorganization

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Joseph E. Cotterman
Andante Law Group of Daniel E. Garrison, PLLC
480-421-9449
www.andantelaw.com
Cotterman has more than 20 years of corporate restructuring, business bankruptcy, creditor’s rights, commercial litigation, and corporate and real estate transaction experience.

John R. Clemency
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8040
www.gknet.com
Clemency’s practice concentrates on workouts of troubled loans, business bankruptcies, and commercial litigation.

John Fries
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
602-440-4819
www.rcalaw.com
Fries’ practice focuses on bankruptcy and creditors’ rights issues, and includes representing banks and other creditors against debtors with respect to the enforcement of their loan and credit agreements and defending the rights of lenders against other creditors.

Daniel E. Garrison,
Andante Law Group of Daniel E. Garrison, PLLC
480-421-9449
www.andantelaw.com
Garrison has more than 15 years of corporate restructuring, business bankruptcy, commercial litigation, and corporate and real estate transaction experience.

John J. Hebert
Polsinelli
602-650-2011
www.polsinelli.com
Hebert has been involved in all aspects of bankruptcy and insolvency practice for 35 years.

Ronald Horwitz
Jaburg Wilk
602-248-1071
www.jaburgwilk.com
Client list includes national banking associations, mortgage companies, finance companies, equipment lessors, credit unions and companies that finance real estate, manufactured housing, automobiles, and equipment.

W. Scott Jenkins, Jr.
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
602-440-4890
www.rcalaw.com
The practice group Leader for the firm’s Bankruptcy, Creditors’ Rights, and Lending practice group, Jenkins is experienced in handling various types of commercial transactions and disputes.

Carolyn J. Johnsen
Jennings Strouss
602-262-5906
www.jsslaw.com
Johnsen is chair of the firm’s Business Restructuring & Reorganization Section and has extensive experience in every aspect of commercial reorganizations, representing both debtors and creditors

Christopher R. Kaup
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-255-6024
www.tblaw.com
Kaup’s practice is focused on the representation of creditors and debtors in complex commercial bankruptcy matters, creditors’ rights, and commercial litigation.

Joseph Wm. Kruchek
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4889
www.kutakrock.com
Kruchek provides advice on all aspects of bankruptcy, including enforcement of lenders’ rights, obtaining relief from the automatic stay to permit a lender to proceed with state law foreclosure rights and remedies, debtor-in-possession financing, adequate protection and plans of reorganization.

Alan Levinsky
Buchalter Nemer
480-383-1840
www.buchalter.com
Levinsky is a shareholder in the firm’s Insolvency and Financial Solutions Practice Group in Scottsdale. He focuses his practice on creditors’ rights, bankruptcy, collections, post-judgment enforcement, and replevin.

Lawrence Wilk
Jaburg Wilk
602-248-1000
www.jaburgwilk.com
Wilk represents secured and unsecured creditors and trustees in bankruptcy; creditors in state court proceedings, including foreclosure proceedings and state court receiverships; and debtors in complex Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceedings.

hispanic

The 25 Most Influential Hispanic Business Leaders

Benito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Born into a family of migrant workers, Almanza is now responsible for all lines of business efforts, community and civic activities in the state. The graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara has been with Bank of America for 30 years, working in California before moving to Arizona in 1992.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Hiring top talent and developing them to replace me someday.”
Surprising fact: “Growing up working with my family in the fields helped me better understand agribusiness banking.”

Marty Alvarez
CEO, principal in charge
Sun Eagle Corporation
Alvarez is founder of family-owned and operated Sun Eagle, one of the top minority-owned general contracting and construction management firms in the country. He has been a chair and officer for the Associated Minority Contractors of America since 1993.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That our well-constructed buildings improved the landscape, and our assistance to individuals and families improved lives.”
Surprising fact: “I have been involved with Shotokan Karate continuously for the past 39 years.”

Victor M. Aranda
Area president, Northern Arizona
Wells Fargo Arizona
Aranda manages six Wells Fargo Community Banking markets; Northeast Arizona, Central Arizona, White Mountains, North Phoenix, North Scottsdale and Scottsdale. He is responsible for 816 team members, 69 banking stores, and $4.1 billion in deposits. A 25-year financial services veteran, Aranda presently serves as a board member for Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and Valley Leadership Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “My passion in life is to add value to those I come in contact with.  What I would like to be remembered for is how I spent my life serving, helping and developing the leaders of tomorrow.”
Surprising fact: “I was involved and directed a church Spanish choir and I have also sang in Las Vegas at the Bellagio Hotel.”

Tony Astorga
Retired CFO
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
Astorga recently retired from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona where he served as the Senior Vice President, CFO & CBDO since 1988. He currently serves as chairman of the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Foundation and is a member of the board of directors for the Arizona Community Foundation, AZHCC, ASU Foundation, CSA General Insurance Agency, Phoenix Art Museum, and US Bank Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered in my profession as a CPA and CFO for being a good mentor and for helping develop my staff in their work ethic and level of growth.”
Surprising fact: “I have a sweet tooth for twinkies or that my favorite movie is ‘Planes, Trains and Automobiles’, I still laugh when I think about the movie”.

Miguel Bravo
Senior community development consultant
Arizona Public Service Company
Bravo is responsible for directing community development initiatives statewide to help serve diverse markets for APS. He also collaborates with economic development organizations to attract industry to Arizona. Bravo also serves the boards of Friendly House, Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Latino Center at Morrison Institute, Boys Hope Girls Hope and Jobs for Arizona’s Graduates.
His hope for his professional legacy: “For conducting business with integrity, purpose, passion; and for having a conviction for public service.”
Surprising fact: “I became a US Citizen in 2007. Having grown up in Arizona, this was one of my proudest moments.”

José Cárdenas
Senior vice president and general counsel
Arizona State University
Before joining ASU in 2009, Cárdenas was chairman at Lewis & Roca, where he became the first Hispanic to serve as managing partner of a major law firm in Arizona. A Stanford Law School graduate, Cárdenas has served on many boards and commissions and has received various awards.
His hope for his professional legacy: “As a good lawyer who served his clients and community well with the utmost integrity.”
Surprising fact: Cárdenas was involved with death penalty cases for more than 30 years.

America Corrales-Bortin
Co-founder
America’s Taco Shop
Corrales-Bortin grew up Culiacán in Sinaloa, Mexico, watching her mother prepare the dishes that would become the recipes for success at America’s Taco Shop. Founded in 2008, America’s authentic carne asada and al pastor quickly built a following that has led to rapid expansion and a partnership Kahala, a franchise development company. So far in 2013, America’s has already moved into California, Texas and Maryland.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As someone who has a passion for the food we serve at America’s Taco Shop.”
Surprising fact: “People would be surprised that I am named after a famous soccer team in Mexico.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
In addition to leading the Hispanic Chamber, de la Melena Jr. operates the Phoenix Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA), the state’s leading advocate representing more than 100,000 minority business enterprises. De la Melena is also the Founder of edmVentures, LLC a small business investment company with holdings in Phoenix airport concessions at Sky Harbor International.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Helping small businesses succeed.”
Surprising fact: “I had the opportunity to do business in more than 30 countries before the age of 30.”

Robert Espiritu
Acquisition marketing
American Express
Espiritu’s diversified professional experience includes working for small business enterprises as well as corporate 100 businesses in the areas of sales, marketing and financial management. He has also been actively involved with various nonprofit organizations; most recently as the former chairman of the board for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Innovative and focused leader who delivers with energy and is known for building successful relationships and high performing teams.”
Surprising fact: “As a first generation American, I am passionate about helping aspiring and under-privileged youth achieve their dreams and advocating for Hispanic career advancement, education and scholarships.”

Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick
Executive vice chancellor and provost
Maricopa Community Colleges
Harper-Marinick oversees all areas of academic and student affairs, workforce development, and strategic planning. She serves on several national and local boards including ABEC and AMEPAC, which she chairs.  Originally from the Dominican Republic, Harper-Marinick came to ASU as a Fulbright Scholar.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Passion for, and unwavering commitment to, public education as the foundation of a democratic society.”
Surprising fact: “The joy I get from driving fast cars.”

Julio Herrera
National Spanish Sales and Retention Director
Cox Communications
Herrera and his team work across markets and cross-functional departments to drive Spanish language sales and grow Cox’s Hispanic markets nationally. He also helped establish LIDER, a leadership program tailored for Hispanic team members looking for advancement opportunities in Phoenix and Southern Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Growing and improving the Hispanic customer experience and making a difference our communities.”
Surprising fact: “Spanish was my first language and I started my career in sales leadership at 18 ears old.”

Lori Higuera
Director
Fennemore Craig
Higuera defends, provides counsel and trains employers of all sizes. She’s a Southwest Super Lawyer, an employment law expert for the Arizona Republic/Arizona Business Gazette and is a recent recipient of the High-Level Business Spanish Diploma from the Madrid Chamber of Commerce.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A skilled lawyer who elevated the practice by integrating the diverse perspectives of our community.”
Surprising fact: “I was fired from my first job as a Santa’s helper for being too social!”

Ana María López, MD, MPH, FACP
Associate dean, outreach and multicultural affairs
Professor of medicine (Tenured) and pathology, College of Medicine
Medical director, Arizona Telemedicine Program
University of Arizona
López has a passion for addressing health inequities and human suffering. From clinical research with molecular targets to health services research, her work focuses on optimizing the health of individuals and communities.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Life is an opportunity to contribute. I hope to contribute, to make a difference.”
Surprising fact: “I love simple pleasures. Witnessing the daily miracle of the sun rising sustains me.”

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
His hope for his professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”
Surprising fact: “I’m seriously considering getting matching tattoos with my kids in the near future.”

Steve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias is a co-owner of Pivot Manufacturing, a Phoenix machine shop, chairs the Arizona Manufacturers Council, and is on the boards of the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber. He is an active proponent of manufacturing in Arizona and a proud father of three boys.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Contributed in some small way to the sustainment of manufacturing in Arizona.”
Surprising fact: “In high school, I was the school mascot – a Bronco.”

Mario Martinez II
CEO
360 Vantage
Martinez is responsible for the overall vision, strategy and execution of 360 Vantage, a leader in cloud-based sales and marketing technology solutions designed to solve the unique challenges of the mobile workforce in life sciences, healthcare and other industries.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I would most like to be remembered for truly changing the lives of our clients, employees and our community in great and meaningful ways.”
Surprising fact: “I hosted a radio show during my college years.”

Clarence McCallister
CEO
Fortis Networks, Inc.
McAllister was born in Panama and earned his master’s in electrical engineering from ASU. In 2000, he and his wife started Fortis Networks, Inc., a certified 8a and HUBzone government contractor specializing in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Building a world-class organization that always exceeds our customers’ expectations.”
Surprising fact: “I did an emergency landing on a City of Mesa street.”

Rodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
In addition to managing a law firm with 120 attorneys, Parga has been to Best Lawyers in America for the last four years. He also serves as Chairman of the Board of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading non-profit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for his professional legacy: “I want to be remembered as always trying to do the right thing and having led with integrity.”
Surprising fact: “I was bullied until age 11, which drove me not only to strengthen my body, but my resolve.”

Hector Peñuñuri
Senior planning analyst
SRP
Peñuñuri is an Arizona native and has spent most of the past 15 years in the Customer Services Division at SRP.  He has served on several boards including the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and LISC.  He was raised in the West Valley, and currently resides in Gilbert.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A trusted and valuable team member/leader; a communicator who understands the importance of sharing knowledge to help others.”
Surprising fact: “I’m a jack of all trades – woodworker, photographer, musician, outdoorsman and a decent cook when I put my mind to it.”

Dan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck. D.P. Electric now has more than 200 employees and generated more than $30 million in revenue in 2012, making it the biggest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for his professional legacy: “A guy that is fair, honest, hard-working and gives back both personally and professionally.”
Surprising fact: “Professionally, that I do not have a college degree and personally, that I am a Bikram Yoga junkie.”

Marie Torres
Founder
MRM Construction Services
Torres is an Arizona native and built her business in the community that she grew up in. With more than 30 years experience in the construction field, she started MRM in 2002 and currently has more than 50 employees. The focus of her company has been in government contracting and has self performed airfield work at Luke AFB, MCAS Yuma and Davis Monthan.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “As being technically competent.”
Surprising fact: “I don’t like to drive and I am happy as a passenger – even in my own car.”

Lisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
After 15 years in international marketing and communications, Urias founded Urias Communications to address the need for advertising and PR with a uniquely multicultural focus. Now an award-winning advertising, and PR agency, Urias Communications specializes in the multicultural markets of the U.S. Southwest, with concentration on the burgeoning Hispanic market.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Bridging the divide between corporations and the growing Hispanic community for mutual benefit and respect.”
Surprising fact: “I am a fourth-generation Arizonan whose grandfather was the first Hispanic city councilman.”

Dawn C. Valdivia
Partner, chair of the Labor & Employment Practice Group
Quarles & Brady
Valdivia is the chair of Quarles & Brady’s Labor and Employment Group in Phoenix. She regularly advises clients in all matters of labor and employment law and is skilled in complex litigation matters, including wage and hour class action litigation in Arizona and California.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “A creative problem solver, committed to her clients and to giving back to the community.”
Surprising fact: “I love adventure — sky diving, gliding, scuba diving, helicopters, etc.”

Lorena Valencia
CEO
Reliance Wire
Valencia is the founder and CEO of Reliance Wire Systems, a wire and tubing manufacturing company she founded in 2000. She is also the founder and president of Magin Corporation — an eco-friendly wood pallet alternative company — and the FRDM Foundation.
Her hope for her professional legacy: “Empowering children by building schools and libraries in impoverished countries through my FRDM Foundation.”
Surprising fact: “I put hot peppers on almost everything I eat. The hotter. the better.”

Roberto Yañez
Vice president and GM
Univision Arizona
Yañez is a 27-year broadcast television veteran, who has served 17 of those years with the Univision Television Group (UTG). Yañez has created various opportunities that helped build the station’s relationship with the community: Cadena de Gente Buena, El 34 Esta Aqui and Ya Es Hora.
His hope for his professional legacy: “Someone who used his craft to build bridges between the problem and the solution.”
Surprising fact: “Though Monday through Friday you will never see me without a suit and tie, I am most comfortable in boots, jeans and driving a pick-up truck.”

AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Centennial Series: Most Influential People In Arizona Commercial Real Estate

As part of AZRE magazine’s Centennial Series, find out who made the list of the most influential people in Arizona Commercial Real Estate.

Most Influential People In Arizona Commercial Real Estate


Roy P. Drachman Sr. (1906 – 2002)
Roy Drachman Realty Company, Real Estate Development

Roy Drachman, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Known as “Mr. Tucson,” Roy Drachman’s love for the city helped put Tucson on the map. A real estate tycoon who landed the Hughes Missile Systems Company site, Drachman also petitioned to build better streets, waterways and schools in his beloved city. He is responsible for bringing Major League Baseball teams to Arizona for spring training (the Cleveland Indians began training in Tucson in 1947). Throughout his career, Drachman donated generously to the University of Arizona, mostly for its cancer research. He funded a scholarship at the UA College of Architecture for upperclassmen who show proficiency in design. UA named its Institute for Land and Regional Development Studies after him. (Photo: Drachman family)


Grady Gammage, Jr.
Gammage & Burnham, Attorneys At Law, Real Estate Lawyer

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011For the past 20 years, Grady Gammage, Jr. has practiced law at Gammage & Burnham, taking on real estate projects such as redevelopment, high-rise buildings and planned communities. Gammage was a board member of the Central Arizona Project for two, six-year terms, beginning in 1996. Gammage’s urban mixed projects in Tempe won him three architectural awards. He is also affiliated with Arizona State University as an adjunct professor at the College of Law, the College of Architecture and Urban Design, as well as a Senior Fellow at the Morrison Institute. (Photo: Gammage & Burnham)


William Haug
Jennings Haug & Cunningham, Real Estate Lawyer

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011William Haug has dedicated much of his career to developing and establishing construction and surety law in Arizona. His leadership in the practice was recognized with his induction in the inaugural Maricopa County Bar Association Hall of Fame for his role in developing the practice of construction law. Haug developed his practice in complex dispute resolution in construction, fidelity and surety law. For more than 35 years, Haug has been an arbitrator and mediator. He joined the firm in 1981, became one of the original construction lawyers in Arizona, and paved the way for the practice to develop as construction across the state grew with its population. (Photo: Jennings Haug & Cunningham)


Sam Kitchell (1923 – 2006)
Kitchell Construction, General Contractor

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Originally named Kitchell Phillips Contractors, Sam Kitchell started the company in 1950 with then partner James B. Phillips. Its construction of Safeway stores and local schools helped Kitchell evolve into one of the top 10 largest private companies in Arizona and one of the top 75 construction companies in the country. One of Kitchell’s main focuses included healthcare projects, which led to the construction of Good Samaritan Hospital in Phoenix, the Mayo Clinic of Scottsdale, Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Scripps Memorial Hospital in California, to name a few. (Photo: Kitchell Construction)


J. Daryl Lippincott (1924 – 2008)
CB Richard Ellis (CBRE), Real Estate Broker

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Daryl Lippincott directed the CBRE Phoenix office from its opening in 1952. With retail stores such as Goldwater’s, Diamond’s, Leonard’s Luggage and Switzers, Lippincott helped build Arizona’s first shopping mall — Park Central. In 1957, Lippincott helped the Phoenix office expand to other services, including mortgage loans, property management and was later announced as the head of CBRE’s Southwest Division. Lippincott shaped both CBRE and the commercial real estate industry with his retail and commercial projects. (Photo: CBRE)


John F. Long (1920 – 2008)
John F. Long Properties, Homebuilder

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011John F. Long symbolizes the Phoenix transition from desert to urban city. His 1954 Maryvale project, named after his wife, established a base for all future affordable housing in the Valley. With an emphasis on quality, Long also built the Solar One housing development, getting a head start on sustainable practices. Long’s projects were built with everything in mind; hospitals, golf courses and shopping centers, giving homeowners whatever they needed within close reach. As one of Arizona’s most influential builders, Long is in the Arizona Business Hall of Fame and was awarded the first WESTMARC Lifetime Achievement Award, which has since been named after him. (Photo: John F. Long Properties)


Rusty Lyon
Westcor, Retail Development and Management

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011During his more than 40 years as CEO of Westcor, Rusty Lyon led the way in retail development and continues to contribute to the public’s shopping needs. Retailers have turned Westcor into the largest owner of commercial real estate properties, with projects such as Scottsdale Fashion Square, Chandler Fashion Center, San Tan Village, Flagstaff Mall & The Marketplace, Prescott Gateway Mall, Biltmore Fashion Park and The Boulders Resort. (Photo: Macerich)


M. M. Sundt (1863 – 1942)
Sundt Construction Co., General Contractor

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Sundt Construction was founded in 1890 by Mauritz Martinsen Sundt, a Norwegian ship carpenter who immigrated to the U.S. as a teenager. The company’s early projects were homes and farm structures in northern New Mexico. In 1929, Sundt built a Methodist Church in Tucson. The project was directed by John Sundt, one of Mauritz’s 12 children. John liked Tucson, and decided to stay. Sundt‘s clients today are industrial, commercial and government projects, both nationally and internationally. In 1936 the company was awarded a contract for six projects, one of which was the expansion of the University of Arizona’s Tucson campus. In 1956, Sundt began construction on one of its biggest military projects, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson. (Photo: Sundt Construction)


Frank Lloyd Wright (1867 – 1959)
Architect, Interior Designer

Arizona Commercial Real Estate, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Frank Lloyd Wright spent most of his life designing homes, buildings and museums that changed the world of architecture. Wright designed more than 1,000 projects and more than 500 were actually built. Thirteen are in Arizona and are some of his most famous designs. Wright’s summer home, Taliesin West in Scottsdale, is also home to the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation’s international headquarters, where an archive of all his sketches and projects is housed. ASU students have a constant reminder of Wright’s architectural genius with the Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium, named after Dr. Grady Gammage, ASU’s president from 1933 to 1959. (Photo: Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation)

AZRE Magazine May/June 2011