Tag Archives: junior achievement

Samantha Maracle

Maracle Named SCNM’s Director of Development

Samantha Maracle, CFRE, brings more than 20 years experience in nonprofit fundraising management to her new position as Director of Development at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine.

Most recently, Maracle handled responsibilities as a Development Analyst with the Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation.  Previously, she was Arizona Director of Development at the Devereaux Foundation.  Her experience also includes responsibilities as Vice President of Marketing and Development for Junior Achievement and as President of Performance Diagnostics, a consulting firm providing organizational assessment, development and program expertise to nonprofit agencies and businesses.

In addition to her designation as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE), Maracle holds a Bachelor of Science degree with specialties in plant physiology, mycology (the study of fungi) and biochemistry from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

“Samantha brings an incredible depth of knowledge and strategic development experience to SCNM that will be invaluable as the college continues its rapid growth,” said SCNM President Dr. Paul Mittman.  “Her diverse core competencies in all areas of nonprofit development include a strong history of success in the corporate, nonprofit and private sectors as well as an understanding of scientific principles that are the foundation of naturopathic medicine.  She brings tremendous value to the SCNM management team.”

For information about SCNM, visit www.scnm.edu.

Samantha Maracle

Maracle Named SCNM's Director of Development

Samantha Maracle, CFRE, brings more than 20 years experience in nonprofit fundraising management to her new position as Director of Development at the Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine.

Most recently, Maracle handled responsibilities as a Development Analyst with the Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation.  Previously, she was Arizona Director of Development at the Devereaux Foundation.  Her experience also includes responsibilities as Vice President of Marketing and Development for Junior Achievement and as President of Performance Diagnostics, a consulting firm providing organizational assessment, development and program expertise to nonprofit agencies and businesses.

In addition to her designation as a Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE), Maracle holds a Bachelor of Science degree with specialties in plant physiology, mycology (the study of fungi) and biochemistry from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

“Samantha brings an incredible depth of knowledge and strategic development experience to SCNM that will be invaluable as the college continues its rapid growth,” said SCNM President Dr. Paul Mittman.  “Her diverse core competencies in all areas of nonprofit development include a strong history of success in the corporate, nonprofit and private sectors as well as an understanding of scientific principles that are the foundation of naturopathic medicine.  She brings tremendous value to the SCNM management team.”

For information about SCNM, visit www.scnm.edu.

Financial Literacy Needs to be Taught Outside the Classroom

Financial Literacy Needs To Be Taught Outside The Classroom

As the spring school semester begins, one of the most valuable lessons that kids, especially teens, can learn isn’t being taught in a classroom setting: financial literacy.

Or, how not to graduate into financial problems.

But, aside from the birds and the bees talk, the money talk is probably the most uncomfortable for parents. To help ease this anxiety-ridden discussion, below are some key areas that should be discussed as we enter this new school year.

Where does money come from?

Turns out, money neither grows on trees nor out of parents’ wallets. And, not all money is meant to be for “fun,” such as at the movies, with a new girlfriend or on new iPod songs.

But how do you get a kid to understand this?

Why not focus on a “money in, money out” budget with them?

Often, children focus only on money going out. But where does it go? And when? And why? A budget, reviewed with and by a parent each month, can be an easy way to show the value of money on a regular basis.

For example, if a child gets a $40 allowance each month, have them develop a budget to make that money last for an entire month. This means saying “no” to spending all the “fun” money at once. It also helps children understand how to prioritize.

The lesson: Sometimes a lifestyle adjustment is required in order to ensure one does not exceed money going out versus money coming in.

Credit cards are supposed to be paid back?

Believe it or not, we actually recommend working with children on building credit at a young age, but only if they can do so without maxing out on their available balance, straining to make payments or, worse, defaulting.

This is an especially important lesson to be instilling before college. Why?

Credit card companies generally offer low limits to young adults entering college. This typically allows for more freshmen to apply and get approved as soon as possible. Some offer incentives to apply. Many companies simply place applications on college desks and in dorms — and freshmen apply by the thousands, not realizing that every penny spent on that credit card is owed back, with interest.

By working with children on credit starting from a young age, parents can help them grow to understand the impact of good or bad credit on one’s life. In addition, just as bad spending is habit-forming, so are good spending and saving.

Don’t do it alone!

Sure, parents are the first — and best — figures to talk about money with children and teens. However, you are not alone! There are resources to help reinforce your messages and lessons. For example, Junior Achievement is available to  most high school students in Arizona – Junior Achievement.

“Junior Achievement of Arizona has been educating K-12 students about entrepreneurship, work readiness and financial literacy since 1957,” says Joyce Richards, president of Junior Achievement of Arizona. “This year alone, we will engage more than 72,000 Arizona students in our programs.”

The organization, known as JA to most Arizona educators and business leaders, offers supplemental programs to elementary, middle and high schools statewide as well as after-school programs and on-site education opportunities.

The JA Finance Park enables students to build foundations for making intelligent, life-long personal finance decisions. The program, focused on middle school-age kids, consists of 19 teacher-led lessons at school, and is coupled by a half-day on-site simulation in the Finance Park, which is located in Tempe and done as a field trip in most cases. This on-site simulation takes kids on a journey to create a personal budget including rent/mortgage, car payments, insurance, savings, entertainment, groceries and more. They are even given simulated careers and salaries.

“As students strive to create a balanced budget, they begin to understand the value of money, and make the connection between hard work, education, and their future earnings,” Richards says.

For more information about Junior Achievement of Arizona and any of its programs on financial literacy, please visit jaaz.org.

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Valley High School Students Compete at JA Stock Market Challenge

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and more than 400 high schools students from nearly 20 Arizona schools will come together for Junior Achievement of Arizona’s Sixth Annual Student Stock Market Challenge, in which teams compete to see who can grow their mock-stock portfolio and create the highest net worth. The event will be held at the Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel on Thursday, Nov. 1.

Mayor Stanton will sound the closing bell at the event and congratulate the winning team.
Students have been preparing for the Challenge the past two months by participating in lessons designed to help them grasp the concepts they’ll need in stock trading, led by Junior Achievement (JA) volunteer instructors and our partner teachers. The JA Student Stock Market Challenge gives students a chance to practice those skills in a fun and dynamic environment. Particularly pertinent is that lessons learned during the Challenge are the focus of reflection exercises that will help today’s youth make smart financial choices as adults.

“Bestowing financial knowledge into high school students is crucial for our economic future,” said Joyce Richards, president of Junior Achievement of Arizona.  “Through the Stock Market Challenge and other JA programs, students are learning lessons on which to build effective personal financial habits for life.”

The Sixth Annual Stock Market Challenge is sponsored by: The Charles Schwab Foundation, Title and TruWest Credit Union, Champion of Hope.
For more information, visit www.jaaz.org.

2012 JerryFoster06

Resolute Commercial Services’ Foster Named JA Board Chair

Jeremiah Foster, principal and founder of Resolute Commercial Services, has been named board chair for Junior Achievement of Arizona.  As board chair, he will oversee the 48-member board of directors and lead the organization’s governance and policy strategies.

In addition to his involvement with JA, Foster, a Scottsdale resident, is active in the community through his involvement with Scottsdale Public Art Advisory Board, Arizona Town Hall, Urban Land Institute, Turnaround Management Association and Entrepreneur’s Organization (EO).
Foster holds a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from the University of Arizona.

Other members of the executive board include Karen Czack of American Express as board treasurer and Alan Augustine of PricewaterhouseCoopers as board secretary.  Newly elected to serve on the board are Tina Beatty, Sam’s Club; Ed Capasso, Henkel Consumer Goods, Inc.; Ravi Kichloo, AVNET; Charles Lala, Allstate Insurance Company; Susan Menchaca, MidFirst Private Bank;  and Travis Smith, Moss Adams LLP.

About Junior Achievement of Arizona
Junior Achievement is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization which believes that every child deserves an education in economics and finances in order to inspire and prepare them for success in a global economy.

Serving Arizona’s youth since 1957, JA prepares young people for the real world by showing them how to become self sufficient, how to create jobs which make their communities robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace.

Junior Achievement of Arizona reached 92,000 students during the 2011-2012 school year and plans to reach 95,000 students in 2012-2013.

For more information on Junior Achievement or ways to get involved, call 480-377-8500 or visit www.jaaz.org.

Junior Achievement JA You’re Hired! Challenge 2011

Junior Achievement JA You’re Hired! Challenge Teaches Students Workforce Skills

Hundreds of Valley high school students learn workforce skills, compete for internships at the Junior Achievement of Arizona (JAAZ) JA You’re Hired! Challenge at the Tempe Center for the Arts


According to a 21st Century Skills study, 42 percent of employers rate the overall preparation of high school graduates for entry-level jobs as deficient. On March 29, more than 350 Valley high school students will defy this statistic at the Junior Achievement of Arizona (JAAZ) JA You’re Hired! Challenge at the Tempe Center for the Arts.

The JA You’re Hired! Challenge is a part of a three component, award-winning program created by JAAZ in partnership with the University of Phoenix to develop high school students’ work-readiness skills, many of which are not addressed in a normal high school curriculum.

“We realize that even some of the best schools lack the ‘real world’ lessons that are needed to transition from student to employee,” says Joyce Richards, president of JAAZ. “JA You’re Hired! teaches students those skills and does so in a realistic, competitive environment to help them make smart academic and economic choices.”

The first component is a rigorous curriculum led in class by Junior Achievement volunteers to prepare them for the JA You’re Hired! Challenge. Over the course of a few weeks, students learn proper interview techniques; work to improve their writing, language, math and critical thinking skills; and how to apply what they learn in the classroom to real life situations.

These skills are then put to the test by nearly 50 Phoenix area hiring managers who will be on-site the day of the JA You’re Hired! Challenge. They will be testing the students on their abilities through mock interviews, marketing pitches and public speaking exercises.

Some of the hiring managers will be offering summer internships. Students selected will continue to the third component of the program, which is comprised of successfully completing a paid internship with regular correspondence between the employer and Junior Achievement advisors.

“What is truly unique about this program is that it goes beyond lessons and workshops,” Richards says. “Students actually go through the hiring process and apply everything this program has taught them. And like the real world, not everyone gets the job, but at least now they are prepared for whatever challenges they may face in the job market.”

This year’s JA You’re Hired! Challenge program is made possible thanks to the generous support of University of Phoenix and community partners, such as Phoenix Suns Charities, Triton Technologies, Crexando, FedEx, Allstate, bluemedia, Charles Schwab, Manpower, SHRM and others.

For more information on Junior Achievement or ways to get involved, please call 480-377-8500 or visit jaaz.org.

About Junior Achievement of Arizona
Junior Achievement is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization which believes that every child deserves an education in economics and finances in order to inspire and prepare them for success in a global economy. Serving Arizona’s youth since 1957, JA prepares young people for the real world by showing them how to become self-sufficient, how to create jobs which make their communities robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Junior Achievement of Arizona reached nearly 83,000 students during the 2010-2011 school year.
Arizona Bankers Association, Bankers Give Back - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Bankers Association Impacts State’s Economy, Communities

Arizona Bankers Association Impacts State’s Economy, Communities

Ryan Suchala, Bank of Arizona, Arizona Bankers AssociationBank of Arizona President Ryan Suchala recognizes the importance of community.

“This is where we live, work and play and in many cases the city where we are shaping our families,” Suchala says. “As a father of three I give my time to better our community because this is where my boys will become men. Last year, Bank of Arizona employees spent close to 450 hours working in our community and I personally became a board member at Arizona Women Education and Employment.”

To show the Arizona banking industry’s impact on its communities, the Arizona Bankers Association (AzBA) produced a brochure titled “Arizona Banks Give Back.” The report provides a picture of the economic and charitable support the banking industry gives back to the communities it serves, and shows the influence banks have on Arizona’s economy.

Arizona Bankers Association is an organization with more than 70 members that works to create a unified voice and engage members in issues that affect the banking industry.

Lynne Herndon, city president at BBVA Compass“It’s clear the banking industry has been under a microscope the last few years,” says Lynne Herndon, city president of BBVA Compass. “We wanted to pull our information and be treated collectively as an industry to say we are looking to work with companies to help them with their financial needs.”

Arizona Bankers Association created the “Arizona Banks Give Back” survey in November 2010 to collect a variety of data from Arizona banks. The results were released in February 2011. The 12-page brochure includes statistical data that shows how banks provide financial and social stability in Arizona.

The banks that chose to participate in the survey felt that it provided a good opportunity to change the way people currently view banks. The biggest surprise to Paul Hickman, president and CEO of Arizona Bankers Association, was how high bank lending was in Arizona in 2010.

According to the survey results, Arizona banks lent $5.9 billion in new and renewed commercial loans, and more than $11 billion in new and renewed consumer loans in 2010.

“A lot of the feedback we’ve been getting is ‘Wow, I didn’t realize the volume of lending was that great in this economy,’” Hickman says.

The number is likely higher as only 35 AzBA-member institutions responded to the survey, which only represents 63 percent of the organization’s membership, and does not include information from non-member banks.

In today’s economy, banks are more cautious about lending, but the data proves that Arizona banks are continuing to lend to commercial businesses and consumers.

“We keep hearing banks won’t lend,” Hickman says. “But banks don’t make money if they don’t lend.”

Banks want to lend so they can pump money into Arizona’s economy.

Arizona banks provide direct loans to help the state government finance public improvements by improving water, sewer and public health facilities and by helping build schools.

Banks pay income tax to help support local communities as opposed to credit unions, which don’t pay federal income tax.

Arizona banks are also putting money into the economy by being a leading employer of local residents. Banks bring high-wage jobs to the local community, and employ more than 42,000 Arizonans.

Wells Fargo Bank was the fifth largest employer of Arizonans in 2010, and the average salary for an employee working at a bank was around $66,625 in 2010.

By providing jobs, banks provide a ripple effect in the community, because employees pay state taxes and are also consumers that put money back into local businesses.

Arizona banks are also doing more than just putting money into the economy. Members of Arizona banks are striving to aid their community through service.

According to the results from the Arizona Banks Give Back survey, bank employees donated 211,615 volunteer hours to community service in 2010, and donated $15.5 million to charitable and cultural organizations.

“Actions speak louder than words,” says Craig P. Doyle, Arizona regional president of Comerica Bank. “We get out and are active in making a difference in our communities. It’s better than just handing money out.”

To show their commitment to the communities they serve, Comerica employees work with nonprofits like Fresh Start Women’s Foundation, Homeward Bound, Junior Achievement, Sojourner Women’s Shelter, United Food Bank, Central AZ Shelter Services and many others.

An effort from Suchala and the Bank of Arizona helped improve literacy across the Valley.

“Last year, we hosted our annual Caring for Kids Book Drive and collected over 14,000 books for children and adults in our community,” Suchala says. “We educate with multiple employees teaching Junior Achievement programs and with educational programs to local school children. Our employees have worked together this past year sorting school supplies at the annual Salvation Army Pack to School Drive, serving food alongside Alice Cooper for the Cooperstown Christmas for Kids event and pounded nails at two Habitat for Humanity events.”

“These are good members of the community,” Hickman says. “These are people that are donating their money and time at philanthropies around the state and they’re trying hard to impart their discipline.”

Arizona banks participate in programs such as neighborhood revitalization, financial education and assistance for the underprivileged.

In 2008, Mohave State Bank created a program called “Junior Bankers.” Three years later, Mohave State bankers are still training children at Jamaica Elementary School in Lake Havasu about balancing accounts, taking deposits and bank rules. Volunteers meet each week with students before school. The program has expanded to three other elementary schools.

In 2010, the National Bank of Arizona donated one of its foreclosed homes in Glendale to Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona. The bank partnered with the organization to help renovate the property, and 118 people worked to build walls, paint and landscape the property.

Arizona banks are committed to helping the community both financially and through service, Hickman says.
“This industry is like the cardiovascular system of our economy and it needs to be robust and healthy,” Hickman says. “We don’t grow or recover without this industry.”

For more information about the Arizona Bankers Association, visit azbankers.org.

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Arizona Gives Back: By the Numbers

  • More than $5.9 billion distributed in commercial loans (new and renewed) in 2010
  • More than $11 billion distributed in consumer loans (new and renewed) in 2010
  • More than 1,300 banking center locations in Arizona
  • More than 42,000 people work for Arizona banks
  • $66,625 is the average bank employee salary

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Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011