Tag Archives: Kathy Bollinger

Photo by Mike Mertes, Az Big Media

Kathy Bollinger – Most Influential Women In Commercial Real Estate

The 12 women who made AZRE’s Most Influential Women in Commercial Real Estate list are an extraordinary bunch. While that seems implied in the recognition, it’s something that goes beyond their professional achievements. Many of these women have held minimum wage jobs, slowly working through the ranks to a C-suite. A few have known the struggles of being a single parent and what it’s like to be the only female voice in a boardroom. All of these women are active in their communities and industry organizations. And, all of them are changing the Arizona landscape one deal, drawing and deadline at a time.

Kathy Bollinger
Executive vice president
Banner University Medicine Division
Years in the industry: 37

Kathy Bollinger began her career as a speech-language pathologist, where she says she learned the importance of communication. Really, though, after 37 years, she admits her most valued word is “yes.” Stretch after stretch of opportunity in the Banner system, Bollinger considers her highest achievements to include being the founding CEO of Banner Heart Hospital and, most recently, negotiating the acquisition of University of Arizona Health Network and affiliation with the University of Arizona. She was then asked to lead the new enterprise, which influences hundreds of millions of dollars in new construction.

“We are creating history, one decision, one conversation at a time,” she says.

Bollinger is responsible for oversight of Banner – University medical centers around the state in addition to Banner – University Medical Group. She is also responsible for operating efficiency and clinical excellence and oversight of the University of Arizona Medical Schools’ relationship with Banner Health. Lastly, she serves on the Banner Health executive team and has responsibility to integrate the services of Banner Health to ensure a well-coordinated integrated care delivery system.

What is a challenge you’ve faced and how did you overcome it?
I have certainly had many professional challenges, but the one challenge that I felt most poorly equipped to handle was  the day I received the diagnosis of cancer. My great boss provided me a context to move forward. He said, “Develop a plan and work the plan. Trust your care team and prioritize yourself. I’ll cover your work responsibilities.” I learned the most profound things about leadership through my own very personal patient experience.

What is your favorite part of your job?
I’m highly-motivated to leave Banner Health stronger, kinder, better coordinated and more effective than I found it.

When you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wasn’t a child that had a plan. I enjoyed many things and have always been curious. I assumed I would do something amazing. It happened!

What is one little-known fact about you?
I love Motown.

A nurse sits at the iCare ICU Program at Banner Desert in Mesa.

Technology carries real estate through healthcare changes

A patient sits in the ICU at Banner Health’s Fairbanks Memorial Hospital in Alaska.

It’s late, many of the staff have gone home. He watches the glowing blinks of the machines monitoring his vital signs lighting the room in little blue and green bursts. Suddenly, a nurse is beckoned to his bedside by an abnormal fluctuation in his stats. The patient’s physician is notified and, if off-duty, with the press of a button, a critical care specialist or nurse sitting in what’s affectionately called “the bunker,” staffed 24/7 by highly specialized physicians known as intensivists at Banner Desert in Mesa, can appear on a two-way video communications system to assist.

This is the future of medicine. Though Banner Health has been working on its eICUs in the seven states where its located since 2006, telemedicine is continuing to affect change throughout real estate.

Behind the Screen
A COMPACCS study found that patients who would need critical care require, on average, 45 minutes of an intensivist’s time per day, according to “The Critical Care Workforce.” After crunching the numbers, the report claims ICU patients use 18 million ICU days every year. This is on the condition that only a third of ICU patients are seen by an intensivist. To meet this demand, 3,100 intensivists would have been required to treat the patient demand in 2000. That’s more than 65 percent of those who were available in the U.S.

There’s a shortage of these critical care specialists, even 15 years later. This has a direct effect on care.

Mortality rate in ICUs is between 12 and 17 percent, according to U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ “The Critical Care Workforce: A Study of the Supply and Demand for Critical Care Physicians.”

“If demand grows only as a result of the growth and aging of the population, demand for intensivists will increase from about 1,880 in 2000 to 2,600 in 2020 (an increase of about 38 percent),” according to “The Critical Care Workforce.”

“Every ICU could hire a specialist, but it would outstrip the supply in the entire country,” Bollinger says.

With the Affordable Care Act, hospitals are seeing inpatient days decrease. The reimbursement methodology has turned toward value and outcomes at affordable costs versus being reimbursed for doing more, says Kathy Bollinger, vice president of academic delivery at Banner Health.

“There is a change in incentives to provide the right care in the right setting at the right time,” Bollinger says.

Inpatients are spending fewer days in hospitals, and bed and room quantity focuses are now on quality rooms with the appropriate infrastructure.

When Banner Health renovates the patient tower at the existing University Medical Center in Tucson, it will only add 10 additional beds.

“The hospitals are not getting bigger, but they need to get smarter,” said Bollinger.

Banner Health has 500 of its senior patients participating in a pilot program. They are provided an iPad and home technology that facilitate e-visits from their physicians.

“Our early evidence on that project is we’re decreasing those patients’ trips to the emergency department,” Bollinger says.

The Brains
Bollinger says hospitals need to get smarter, and DPR’s national healthcare leader Hamilton Espinosa agrees.

“Their payer mix is getting thrown off skew by the amount of Baby Boomers and reimbursement rates offered by Obamacare,” he says. “The need to be smarter…part of that is leaner, smarter operation.”

The amount of technology used by a hospital requires a larger amount of data that must be managed. This requires updates. Hospitals have also been upgrading their presentation.

“Banner is (Arizona’s) largest hospital system, so they have been moving the fastest and doing the largest amount of work in terms of positioning themselves to streamline and provide healthcare in more efficient manner,” says GPE Commercial Advisors Executive Vice President Julie Johnson. She is referring to the number of satellite Banner clinics that have popped up in the East Valley. There is a grab for market share, she says.

“Dignity has been looking at several different clinics,” she says. “I don’t think they have been implementing them as quickly as Banner.”

These large hospital care providers can afford to expand. However, clinics that have been traditionally geared toward lower income patients are now in a market where these patients have Obamacare and the power of choice. Johnson says Adelante and Mountain Park facilities have expanded their programs to compete. Most recently, Adelante Healthcare in Peoria moved into a retail center and put a huge emphasis on outfitting the space with attractive interiors.

“Real estate is a really expensive part of healthcare delivery,” says Johnson. “(Telemedicine) changes how real estate is delivered. It may not change quickly. People still need to be touched and seen, but it will definitely evolve and change.”

In addition to the adoption of telemedicine, the healthcare industry is seeing aesthetic changes.

There is a greater emphasis on patient care and reducing the amount of time a patient stays at the hospital as well as return trips.

“I think the hospital campus is always going to be a hub of activity, but there is more and more being done at these outpatient clinics,” says Johnson. “Heart surgeries will soon be done in outpatient settings. There is less of a need for hospital beds and more of a need for ambulatory settings. It’s cheaper to provide (care) in those settings. The synergies of proximity around hospital campuses will always be there. Even though the trend is for clinics to be off-campus in the hub and spoke method from 12 years ago, there will always be a synergy.”

For example, HonorHealth, formerly John C. Lincoln, built Sonoran Health and Emergency Center that is an emergency department with an attached clinic. In the event of needing a hospital, patients are transferred to Deer Valley.

“The actual patient is going to have a lot more choice in today’s market,” Johnson says. “There is going to be more hospitality element in providing healthcare. People want to choose it because of health care but also because it has a nice hospitality setting. As more people are having the ability to control their healthcare, if their first $5K is out of pocket and they have a choice of where to get an MRI or where to have my baby, they’re going to go where they’re most comfortable.”

Banner University Medical Center Tucson, Courtesy Shepley-Bulfinch

2 Arizona healthcare projects bring contractors together

If you want to build it, they will come.

Healthcare contractors have been champing at the bit for the last year in anticipation of two major hospital projects in Arizona. In November 2014, Prop 480 passed, which would enable a replacement of the largest clinical teaching hospital in Maricopa County, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems (MIHS), and to develop additional facilities on the campus.

In January, Banner Health finalized its acquisition of the University of Arizona Health Network, which includes the medical school and its facilities. The terms of the affiliation included an agreement to invest $500M over five years into the community. So far, the plans include a new patient tower at the existing campus and a new hospital on the north campus.

“We started with what was the former owner’s priorities and tore into those assumptions and concluded that instead of upgrades on the campus, it was going to require a replacement of the patient care tower,” says Kathy Bollinger, executive vice president of academic delivery for Banner Health.

The current University of Arizona Medical Campus’ operating rooms are the same size as those built 40 years ago — 350 SF. Now, operating rooms are twice the size, Bollinger explains. Building a new facility will cost more, though considerably less than completely retrofitting the entire campus, she adds. Patients of the existing facility need somewhere to go. That’s where the new  comes in.

“From a timing standpoint, things must move out before we begin the hospital project,” Bollinger adds. The RFP for general contractors on the new hospital facility, Banner-University Medical Center Tucson, were issued in late March with a selection expected to be made May 1.

“I’ll be thrilled if we get a shovel in the ground this year,” says Bollinger, adding that it’s more likely to happen in early 2016.

However, for the last year, general contractors have had their eyes on Tucson and preparing strategic partnerships (some are admittedly going solo) in anticipation of the RFP and work.

“A key criteria for the selection will include the ability to include Tucson-based sub-contractors in the project,” says Kip Edwards, vice president of development and construction for Banner Health.

Banner Health solicits from a pre-approved general contractor list, meaning it works with firms it’s familiar with. Edwards had only heard of one joint venture prior to releasing the RFP.

district’s website to join an email list. Maricopa Integrated Health System 4 | May-June 2015

Maricopa Integrated Health System

“There are not generals large enough in the Tucson market to do a hospital project of this magnitude,” he says. “One of our big focuses will be their inclusion of Tucson-based subs. They’ll have to demonstrate their knowledge of the Tucson market.”

This is why DPR Construction tapped Tucson-based Sundt Construction for a joint venture on the project. In addition to a history of joint ventures on educational life science facilities between the two companies, DPR aligned itself with the company for the local know-how.

“I think Banner will get a lot of pressure from the local Tucson marketplace to use as many Tucsonians as possible,” says Hamilton Espinosa, national healthcare leader for DPR Construction. “I think the Tucson community is very proud.”

Ryan Abbott, science and technology group leader for Sundt Construction, observes that using local subcontractors does bring more pride into a project.

“We find that we get a lot more pride in craftsmanship if (subcontractors) drive by that project and can tell family they did that,” he says. “A project built by a community that will benefit from the project, there’s a natural alignment of behavior there…Our industry is really complex and aggregates thousands of supply chains. The simpler you can make those by being locally sourced, the better you are at providing a predictable outcome.”

Sundt Construction is also a prolific joint venturer.

“Most of the time we form a joint venture, it’s not because of the scale of the project,” says Abbott, adding that there can never be too many different experts at work.

It’s about knowing the owner, adds McCarthy Building Companies’ Executive Vice President Justin Kelton.

“McCarthy has a bonding capacity so that we don’t really need a partner (on the MIHS project), but we listen to our owners,” he says. “Either one of us could do the job alone or on our own,” he adds of joint venture partner DPR Construction for the MIHS project. “On Maricopa, you make some assumptions that in public work we can bring a lot to the table as a team. I think they would be more comfortable (with a team).”

Though an RFP for the MIHS project may be a year or more away, one general contractor suggests, these partnerships all started being discussed more than a year ago. Kitchell’s Russ Korcuska said talks of joint ventures for the Maricopa project started about two years ago and more formally a year ago. Currently, it has a loose joint venture with Hunt Construction but nothing finalized by press time.

“These investments are understood to be tremendous opportunities for our community,” says MIHS CEO Steve Purves of the enthusiasm. “In addition to the construction jobs that will be created by the capital projects, the economic impact of what MIHS does – advanced patient care, medical education and clinical training – is quite economically significant to Maricopa County and the State of Arizona.”

As for insight into when general contractors can expect an RFP, Purves isn’t particularly specific.

“Since the election last November, the district board has been meeting regularly to discuss how best to approach the work ahead, ever mindful of its stewardship role regarding this voter-approved bonding capacity,” he says. “The board is looking at best practices and studying integrated project management approaches to prepare for managing the numerous projects and commercial partners in a highly organized and collaborative environment.”

Prop 480 describes three types of projects: outpatient, behavioral and acute care facilities.

“The projects within these three buckets will compromise a substantial portfolio of projects,” Purves says. “It can be a bit daunting to think about them all.”

In the meantime, the district board will work on a timeline “for the proper staging of a project portfolio of this magnitude,” Purves says. He suggested those who are interested in the contract procurement process register at the district’s website to join an email list.

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2 Banner Health facilities among ‘100 Great Hospitals’

Two Banner Health academic medical centers in Arizona have been named to Becker’s Hospital Review’s 2015 edition of “100 Great Hospitals in America,” a compilation of some of the most prominent, forward-thinking and focused health care facilities in the nation.

Banner – University Medical Center Tucson, formerly known as University of Arizona Medical Center – Tucson Campus, and Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix, formerly known as Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, both were named to the prestigious list, published today.

The hospitals are part of the newly formed Banner – University Medicine division of Banner Health, an Arizona-based nonprofit health system operating 28 hospitals in seven western states. In March, Banner Health entered into a 30-year academic affiliation agreement with the University of Arizona to become the primary clinical partner of the UA Colleges of Medicine in Phoenix and Tucson. 

“We are confident that by combining Banner Health’s tradition of clinical excellence with the innovations of academic medicine, we will propel these already outstanding hospitals to new heights in medical research, education and patient care,” said Kathy Bollinger, executive vice president of Banner – University Medicine. “We see endless possibilities in this partnership with the University of Arizona to transform health care in our region and serve the people of Arizona.”

According to Becker’s Hospital Review, hospitals included on the 100 Great Hospitals list are home to many medical and scientific breakthroughs, provide best-in-class patient care and are stalwarts of their communities, serving as research hubs or local anchors of wellness. A version of this list has been published each year since 2011.

To develop the list, Becker’s Hospital Review‘s editorial team conducted research and evaluated reputable hospital ranking sources, such as U.S. News & World Report, Truven Health Analytics, Healthgrades, Magnet designation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center, The Leapfrog Group and several other resources. The final result is a group of 100 hospitals that are leaders in their region, their state and the nation in terms of high-quality patient care.

healthcare

Banner Health unveils new leadership, facility names

With an approval by the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) on the merger agreement to bring the University of Arizona Health Network into Banner Health, and closure of the agreement on Feb. 27, an academic-focused division will be created at Banner that will result in new facility names and leadership appointments within the division. The ABOR vote is expected to occur during the week of Jan. 26.

If ABOR approves, the closure of the agreement on Feb. 27 will launch the Banner – University Medicine Division.  It will include three academic medical centers, a physician group serving as faculty in the academic medical centers and at the University of Arizona Colleges of Medicine in Tucson and Phoenix, and other services.

New Names

The name changes for the academic medical centers and physician group after Feb. 27:

• University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus, to become Banner – University Medical Center Tucson
• University of Arizona Medical Center – South Campus, to become Banner – University Medical Center South
• Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, to become Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix
• University of Arizona Physicians, to become Banner – University Medical Group

“We recognize that Banner Good Samaritan employees and physicians will refer to the hospital as ‘Good Sam,’” said Banner Health President and CEO Peter S. Fine. “But, going forward, the future of this institution is clearly defined and identified in its new name as the designated academic medical center for the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.”

This new division will include more than 1,400 licensed hospital beds, more than 10,000 employees, and more than 800 faculty physicians in Phoenix and Tucson.  Other divisions within Banner include Arizona West with four hospitals, Arizona East with eight hospitals and the Western Division with 14 hospitals. Thirteen of the Western Division hospitals are in six states outside of Arizona. All of these divisions also include many other Banner Health services.

Leadership Appointments – Tucson
•The merger closure will bring Kathy Bollinger into the position of President of the Banner – University Medicine Division. Bollinger is moving into this new post after six years as President of Banner’s Arizona West Division.
• Michael Waldrum, MD, current President and CEO of University of Arizona Health Network, whose role will dissolve with the merger, has chosen not to pursue an executive leadership position within Banner and will leave his post with the closure of the merger.

“While we are excited by the strengths Kathy Bollinger will bring to her role leading a large, complex and new division, we are also grateful for the inspired, dedicated and courageous leadership Michael Waldrum displayed in helping to negotiate the agreement and transition UAHN into Banner,” said Fine. “We know Dr. Waldrum will be sought after for his skills and we look forward to his continued success as a health care leader.”

“It’s been my privilege and pleasure to serve as CEO of the UA Health Network these past two years and to see this complex merger come to fruition,” Dr. Waldrum said. “I am proud to have played a part in it and am certain it will benefit Tucson, the University of Arizona, and especially our patients.  I’m leaving Tucson knowing that Kathy Bollinger and other leaders of the Banner – University Medicine Division are well poised to take academic medicine to new heights in this state.”

Other executives of the new Banner – University Medicine Division include:
• Tom Dickson will join the Banner – University Medicine Division executive team as Chief Executive Officer at the Banner – University Medical Center Tucson and South campuses (479 and 245 licensed beds, respectively).  Dickson is moving into this role from his post as CEO of Banner Thunderbird Medical Center, a 561-bed (licensed) hospital in Glendale, Ariz. He will replace current CEO Karen Mlawsky who is moving into another senior executive role within Banner (see Phoenix area section of the release).
• Steve Narang, MD will continue in his role as Chief Executive Officer at Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix (known as Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center until close on February 27). Narang was named CEO at Banner Good Samaritan in 2013 and prior to that he served as Chief Medical Officer (CMO) of Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa.
• Jeff Buehrle, Banner’s Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for the Arizona East Division, will become the CFO for the Banner – University Medicine Division.
• Cathy Townsend RN, Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) at Banner Boswell Medical Center, a 501-bed hospital in Sun City, Ariz., will move to Tucson as the CNO for Banner – University Medical Center Tucson and South campuses.
• Another new division appointment is Jason Krupp, MD, who will become Chief Executive Officer of Banner – University Medical Group. Dr. Krupp comes from Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Phoenix, where he served as Chief Medical Officer (CMO). Prior to this position, Dr. Krupp was CMO at Banner Boswell Medical Center for two years. He is also well-known in Tucson medical circles from previous positions as CMO at Tucson Medical Center and Clinical Services Chief of General Medicine at the University of Arizona.
• Robert Groves, MD, will become Chief Medical Officer for the Banner – University Medicine Division. Dr. Groves will serve in this new role while continuing his Banner system responsibilities as Vice President of Health Management, in which he provides physician leadership for population health management, medical informatics, telemedicine strategies and reliable design of clinical care delivery.
• Beth Stiner will serve as Vice President of Human Resources for the Banner – University Medicine Division. She has served as Chief Human Resources Officer for Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center and as Chief Human Resources Officer for the UAHN integration activities.

Leadership Appointments – Phoenix Area
• Rob Gould, currently the CEO of Banner Desert Medical Center, a 639-bed (licensed) hospital, will become the new President of Banner’s Arizona West Division. Gould also served as CEO of Banner Estrella and held other leadership roles at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital in Alaska, which is operated by Banner Health.
• Current CEO of University of Arizona Medical Center – University and South Campuses, Karen Mlawsky will become the CEO of Banner Desert Medical Center.
• Deb Krmpotic, CEO of Banner Estrella Medical Center, a 301-bed (licensed) hospital in west Phoenix, will move to the Banner Thunderbird CEO post in Glendale.
• Courtney Ophaug, currently an associate administrator at Banner Boswell, will become the new CEO at Banner Estrella.

Other appointments into vacated positions will be announced as these positions are filled.

List of new leadership appointments:
• Kathy Bollinger, President, Banner – University Medicine Division
• Tom Dickson, CEO, Banner –  University Medical Center Tucson and South campuses
• Jeff Buehrle, CFO, Banner – University Medicine Division
• Beth Stiner, Vice President, Human Resources, Banner –  University Medicine Division
• Robert Groves, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Banner – University Medicine Division
• Cathy Townsend, RN, CNO, Banner –  University Medical Center Tucson and South campuses
• Jason Krupp, MD, CEO, Banner – University Medical Group
• Rob Gould, President, Arizona West Division
• Karen Mlawsky, CEO, Banner Desert Medical Center
• Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Thunderbird Medical Center
• Courtney Ophaug, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center

* Division executive appointments will take effect with the closure of the merger. Between now and the closure, newly identified leaders will be introducing themselves to their new colleagues through the division as well as community leaders. However, these newly identified leaders will not become involved in operational decision-making until the merger closure.

Narang Headshot

Narang named CEO of Banner Good Samaritan

Steve Narang, MD, chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., has been named chief executive officer at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, effective April 26. He will assume the role from current CEO Larry Volkmar, who will continue to serve as CEO until April 25.

Banner Health Arizona West Region President Kathy Bollinger said Dr. Narang will have the opportunity over the next several weeks to work closely with Volkmar to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. “The collaboration between these two Banner leaders will ensure a smooth transition,” she said.

Dr. Narang, a pediatric physician, has served as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s since June 2011. Prior to coming to Banner Health, Dr. Narang served in a variety of medical director and teaching positions in Louisiana, including medical director of graduate medical education and medical director of pediatric emergency services at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“I’m looking forward to working with an outstanding team at Banner Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Narang. “We will work together to take its distinguished history of excellent clinical care, teaching and research and create a distinct value proposition around the delivery of high-value and innovative academic medicine in one of the country’s highest performing health systems.”

Bollinger said that Dr. Narang distinguished himself during the interview process as a visionary leader that is highly driven to deliver results. She said Dr. Narang’s impressive relationship-building strengths will be focused on engaging employees, physicians and the community around the excellence that is the foundation of Banner Good Samaritan’s 100-year legacy. “These strengths, combined with Steve’s background as a practicing physician, will be particularly effective in Steve’s engagement with the graduate medical education program,” she said.

Bollinger said it makes her especially proud that Dr. Narang’s selection reflects Banner’s commitment to internal opportunities for growth, development and promotion.
“In his experience as a physician, teacher, medical director and, most recently, as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Dr. Narang has amply demonstrated leadership attributes that are critical to Banner’s future as a leading health system in the nation,” she said. “The future is indeed very bright.”

Dr. Narang received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and completed his pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a master’s degree in health care management from Harvard University in Boston.

Banner Estrella Tower

Banner Estrella Breaks Ground On $151M Patient Tower

Banner Estrella Medical Center, recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the Valley’s top 10 hospitals, kicked off construction of a $151M patient tower.

Construction of the tower provides an economic injection to the West Valley, creating more than 200 jobs while expanding its emergency room, neonatal intensive care unit and operating rooms.

Last year, the hospital cared for nearly 100,000 patients in its emergency room alone. Additionally, the project is expected to generate hundreds of construction-related jobs during the three-year building timeline.

The new 175-bed patient tower is the second on the Banner Estrella campus and completion is expected in July 2015. McCarthy Building Companies is the general contractor and SmithGroupJJR is the architect.

The groundbreaking  included remarks from Kathy Bollinger, president of Banner Health’s Arizona West Region, Deb Krmpotic and CEO of Banner Estrella.

Located on the SEC of the Loop 101 Freeway and Thomas Rd., Banner Estrella Medical Center is a 214-bed full-service hospital offering general surgery, orthopedics, women and infants services, a full cardiac program with open-heart surgery, emergency services, and medical imaging services.

Banner Estrella is part of Banner Health, the leading provider of health care services in the Valley with 11 hospitals. In 2012, Banner Estrella Medical Center was recognized by U.S. News & World Report as a top 10 hospital in Arizona and high performing in Diabetes & Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Geriatrics, Nephrology, Orthopedics, Pulmonology and Urology Services.