Tag Archives: Kingman

haunted

The 5 most haunted places in Arizona

Just in time for Halloween, we thought you might like to consider a ghostly visit to one of the five most haunted places in Arizona.

Hotel San Carlos, 202 N. Central Ave. Phoenix

Blood splattered on Leone Jensen’s white gown as she hit the pavement from the rooftop of the seven-story hotel. Heartbroken and lonely, 22-year-old Jensen committed suicide in 1928 at the Hotel San Carlos. Guests said they have witnessed a woman dressed in a white shear gown blown by the wind from nearby windows. Screaming children have also been heard running the halls late at night from the multiple drownings that occurred in a water well in the late 1890’s. The well remains on the first floor of the hotel and is the main water supply for the residents. Book a night in the San Carlos hotel to see what you might wake up to.

North Morton Hall at Northern Arizona University, 601 S. Knoles Drive, Flagstaff

Built in 1914, North Morton Hall on the NAU campus is a women’s residence hall and home to a girl who committed suicide in the dormitory. Her ghost has not left the premises as students have seen flickering lights, girls being locked in the bathrooms, blankets flying off beds, and even the sight of the ghost lurking the halls.

Jerome Grand Hotel, 200 Hill St., Jerome

A former hospital, a plethora of ghosts walk the halls and visit the rooms in this hotel in “Ghost City.” Many deaths have occurred in the hotel, such as Claude Harvey who was crushed by a self-serviced elevator and two suicides by hanging. Most of the ghosts are allegedly the patients who died in the United Verde Hospital. Flowers, cigar smoke, and whiskey are just some of the smells guests have said to be coming from the rooms. In the heart of the haunted city itself, witness the sights and smells of this five-story hotel.

Fox Theatre, 17 W. Congress St., Tucson

Built in 1930, the Fox Theatre was used as vaudeville and movie house. During the Great Depression, a man would linger outside of the theatre asking for money to feed his family. Watch your wallets, there has been sight of male ghosts walking about outside of the theatre and might just snatch a couple bucks. Suspicious movement of objects in the theatre have some visitors questioning the eerie environment.

Luana’s Canyon southeast of Kingman

A miner and his family lived in a wooden shack in the opening of the canyon. The husband would leave his family for days to find food and mine for gold in the mountains. One day Luana’s husband did not return from his expedition and her family began to starve. Luana began to go insane as the children begged for food and were slowly dying. Impulsive actions took over and Luana chopped up her kids in the wooden house. The remains of her children were tossed into the nearby river, where she wept and screamed in remorse for her murdered children. Her screams are said to still be heard within the canyon and the blood-splattered house is called the “Slaughter House.” Check out this landmark to see if the blood remains on the walls and Luana’s scream can still be heard bouncing off the mountains.

TractorSupply_Kingman, Velocity

Tractor Supply at Frontier Crossing Opens in Kingman

The grand opening of Tractor Supply will be held November 9th at Frontier Crossing, located at the SEC of Interstate 40 and Stockton Hill Road in Kingman. The 25,898 SF store will join 99 Cent Only and Sears Hometown as part of the tenant lineup for this newly redeveloped shopping center.

This will be the seventh Tractor Supply Store in Arizona. Tractor Supply is a publicly traded company with over 1245 stores in 48 states across the United States. The stores typically locate in rural communities or in the outlying areas of larger cities. The company focuses their products to serve the needs of their customers’ rural lifestyle. They carry everything that is needed to maintain farms, ranches, homes and animals. Each store team includes welders, farmers and horse owners who collectively provide an exceptional depth of knowledge and resources for their customers.

The property is being jointly developed by Accelerated Development Services and Wadsworth Development. “Tractor Supply will be a great compliment to our shopping center. 99 Cent Only and Sears Hometown opened in July. Both stores have exceeded their sales expectations. We expect the same level of success with Tractor Supply,” said Dave Cheatham, President for Accelerated Development.

Currently the shopping center has 25,000 SF remaining to be leased. Discussions are in progress with potential retailers who will round out the tenant mix and complete the project. The leasing team of Michael Clark and John Jackson from Velocity Retail Group are working with the ownership group on all potential new tenants.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Microchip Announces FIRST Robotics results

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced the results of the 2013 FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC) Arizona Regional, held March 22-23, 2013 in Chandler.

Phoenix’s Carl Hayden High School; Tempe Preparatory Academy, Tempe; and Buena High School, Sierra Vista qualified to compete in the 2013 FIRST Robotics Competition Championship, April 25-27, 2013 in St. Louis, MO. Kingman High School/Kingman Academy of Learning, Kingman; Yuma High School, Yuma; and Rockwell-Collins & Escondido Charter High School, Escondido, Calif. were Regional Finalists.  Students had six weeks to build a robot capable of competing in this year’s competition, the game called Ultimate AscentSM, where teams joined forces to fling saucer-like discs through various slots during several two-minute and fifteen-second matches.  Extra points were scored for robots that could hang from a 10 foot tower in the final seconds of the match.  Any student participating on a FIRSTteam is eligible to apply for more than $16 million in scholarships.

“The engineering challenge presented by FIRST to build a functioning robot that must accomplish specific tasks inspires students to find creative solutions using math, science and engineering, while adhering to strict deadlines.  Working with industry mentors, students learn marketable skills such as working on a team, critical thinking, marketing and problem solving, while having fun at the same time,” said Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip Technology, co-chair of the FIRST Arizona Regional Planning Committee, FIRST sponsor and member of the FIRST Board of Directors.

Chandler, Ariz.-based Microchip Technology is the organizing sponsor of the FRC Arizona Regional.  Fifty high-school robotics teams competed in the 2013 FRC AZ Regional, including 44 teams from Arizona, three from New Mexico, two from California and one from Mexico.  AZFirst, a non-profit organization, awarded the Steve Sanghi Scholarship to Bianca Rodriquez, a senior at Carl Hayden High School, Phoenix, AZ.  Funded by Steve and Maria Sanghi, this scholarship totals $16,000 over four years, and is awarded to an outstanding FIRST participant who intends to pursue a college degree in science, technology, engineering or math.  Coconino High School won the Regional Chairman’s Award, which recognizes the team that best represents a model for other teams to emulate, and embodies the purpose and goals of FIRST.  Christine Sapio, teacher at Coconino High School, Flagstaff, a FTC (FIRST Technical Competition) Affiliate Partner, received the “Outstanding Volunteer of the Year” award for her success in growing the FTC robotics program for middle-school and high-school students.

Additionally, Dave Thompson, FIRST coach at Coconino High School, received the Woodie Flowers Finalist Award, which recognizes a teacher or engineer who demonstrates excellence in teaching science, math and creative design.  Chris Brandt from Saguaro High School in Scottsdale was awarded the “Arizona Teacher of the Year,” based upon an essay written by his students.

Generous supporters of the 2013 FRC Arizona Regional included Organizing Sponsor Microchip Technology; Leader in Technology Sponsor Microchip Technology Employees; and Captain of Innovation Sponsors Army ROTC, Avnet, Craig and Barbara Barrett, Medtronic Foundation, Microchip Technology and Wells Fargo.  Friends of the Future Sponsors included Best Buy Children’s Foundation, Go Daddy, ON Semiconductor, and Steve and Maria Sanghi.  Regional Fan Sponsors included Chase Giving Foundation and Wishes in Stitches/Alan and Margaret Jannuzzi.

Due to the growth of local FIRST programs First Lego League, FTC and FRC), two separate FRC Arizona regional events are expected to be held in 2015.  Recruitment of FRC teams is currently occurring, with a goal of doubling the number of teams in the next two years.  For more information and to get involved, contact FIRST Regional Director Carol Popovich at carol.popovich@microchip.com or (480) 792-7938.

November Art Walk Events in Arizona

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011

Art Walk Events in Arizona November 2011


Phoenix, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-10 p.m.
(602) 256-7539
facebook.com/FirstFridayArtwalk

The weather will be cooling down … just perfect for visiting our various arts districts with
great spaces and amazing art. Park at the Phoenix Art Museum, and ride our free shuttles (or ride light rail, take your bike, pedicab, taxi or walk).


Flagstaff, AZ ~ First Friday Artwalk

Friday, November 4th, 6-9 p.m.
kathrynwillisart.com

Enjoy a beautiful fall evening on the streets of downtown Flagstaff, with music, art, refreshments and lively community vibes!


Jerome, AZ ~ Jerome Art Walk

Saturday, November 5th, 5-8 p.m.
(928) 649-2277
www.jeromeartwalk.com

Twenty-six studios and galleries will host openings and happenings throughout the artist colony. From the Old Jerome High School studios to The New State Motor Company with the Patrick Lincoln Gallery, art, music and lively conversation.
Download the walk map.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art Walk at Water Tower Park

Saturday, November 5th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Bisbee after 5

Saturday, November 12th, until 8 p.m.
(520) 432-3554
www.discoverbisbee.com

Experience the town-wide Art Walk with more than 30 shops and galleries, special sales and promotions, live entertainment and refreshments and artist receptions.


Tucson, AZ ~ 5th La Encantada Fine Art Festival

Friday & Saturday, November 11th & 12th, 10-5 p.m.
www.laencantadafestival.org

45 of the region’s finest artists are slated to present and sell their work at the La Encantada Fine Art Festival. The show will also be featuring free children’s art activities and live entertainment all day long!


Sahuarita, AZ ~ 3rd Annual Pecan Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-6 p.m.
(520) 820-3299
www.sahuaritapecanfestival.com

Sahuarita Pecan Festival has been approved as an Official Centennial Event!


Kingman, AZ ~ Kingman Cancer Care Arts & Crafts Festival

Saturday, November 12th, 10-5 p.m. & Nov 13th, 10-4 p.m.
(928) 753-1186
www.kingmantourism.org

You’ll be sure to find that perfect item for that person that has everything. This show features many vendors, original arts, crafts, food and more.


Scottsdale, AZ ~ Thursday Art Walk

Thursday, November 17th, 7-9 p.m.
(480) 990-3939
www.scottsdalegalleries.com

This is America’s original Art Walk. Wander into galleries that capture your fancy, stroll around a delightful area punctuated by dramatic statues, bubbling fountains, tree-covered courtyards and more.


Tucson, AZ ~ 30th Annual Holiday Craft Market

Friday, Saturday & Sunday, November 18th-20th
(520) 624-2333
www.tucsonmuseumofart.org

This event has more than 120 booths of juried work, including jewelry, metalwork, painting, pottery, ceramics, watercolors and food; join this great event.


Yuma, AZ ~ North End Art Walk

Friday, November 18th, 5-9 p.m.
(928) 373-5202
yumamom.com

Dozens and dozens of artists will showcase their work in ceramics, jewelry, prints and canvases, calligraphy, photography, glass and mixed media.


Bisbee, AZ ~ Holiday Art Walk

Saturday, November 26th, late into the evening
(520) 432-2071
www.discoverbisbee.com

Local merchants and artists offer art work, antiques and collectibles, jewelry and wares.  Decorated shops remain open, offer beverages and snacks to make your shopping pleasure a festivity. Located in Historic Bisbee.


Gilbert, AZ ~ Art in the Open

Friday, November 26th, 6-10 p.m.
(480) 363-5939
www.gilbertartwalk.com

At Gilbert Art Walk patrons can find fine art in different mediums, from note cards to large art pieces ranging in various price ranges up to several hundred dollars.


Grand Canyon, AZ ~ 4th Annual Grand Canyon Celebration of Art

Through November 27th
(928) 863-3877
www.grandcanyon.org

Proceeds from this event will be dedicated to funding an art venue on the South Rim that will preserve and showcase the spectacular collection of historic and contemporary paintings owned by Grand Canyon National Park and the Grand Canyon Association.

[stextbox id="black"]If you want to post your Art Walk,
scroll to the bottom of the page and contact us.[/stextbox]

 

Route 66 - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Route 66: What Bridges Arizona To The Rest Of The Nation

Once dubbed the “Main Street of America,” Route 66 Twin Arrows Trading Post - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011not only is a landmark in U.S. history, but also played a vital role in developing Arizona’s economy as a major piece of the state’s infrastructure not long after statehood in 1912.

Arizona has always been known as a gateway to California. First, with the California Gold Rush of 1849, when thousands of people traveled through Arizona on their way to hunt for riches in the Golden State. Since there were no established routes through Arizona, these pioneers blazed their own trails, eventually creating a travel corridor. When built in Arizona, Route 66 followed this same path.

Commissioned in 1936, Route 66 began in Chicago and spanned all the way to Santa Monica, Calif. It was not fully paved until 1937.

Taking Route 66 through Arizona to California not only was popular because it was the easiest way to California, but also because of the tourist attractions and small towns that thrived along the route’s path. From the 1930s into the mid-1950s, Arizona’s tourism industry experienced a golden age as this historic route ran near the Grand Canyon and was a short jaunt away from the Painted Desert and Meteor Crater. In time, Route 66 took its place in American folklore, inspiring a popular song.

Route 66 entered Arizona through Holbrook, which attracted Easterners. Tourism instantly became an important part of its economy. It is reported that the first tourist camp in the U.S. was built in Holbrook. When Route 66 became the official transcontinental highway, tourism took off. It ceased during World War II when gasoline was rationed, but resumed after the war.

The advent of the automobile also was an economic boon to Winslow, which was a major stopping point along Route 66. Cafes, trading posts, motor courts and garages thrived. Similarly, Flagstaff’s economy grew. For years its motor courts and cafes catered to weary travelers.

Seligman, a railroad town founded in 1886, was referred to as the “Historic Birthplace of Route 66.” Its economy flourished when the Santa Fe Railroad established repair facilities there, including the Harvey House Road House.

The last major Route 66 town in Arizona was Kingman, although Oatman and Topock were officially the last towns along the old route. Again, the stretch of 66 that ran through Kingman’s downtown was rich in motels, restaurants and shops. That downtown is listed in the Historic Register for Historic Places. The neon signs of the 1940s proclaiming “Motel Row” remain intact.

But as the nation’s infrastructure grew and improved in the post-war boom years, Interstate-40 arose and Route 66 became irrelevant. Soon, much of the old route was decommissioned.

If it’s “fun in the sun” that attracts people to Arizona these days, it was Route 66 that paved the way for millions to visit and even more to stay and call the Grand Canyon State home.

For more information about Route 66, visit historic66.com.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011