Tag Archives: Kitchell

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Workshop Helps Industry Understand Nuances of Working in Indian Country

 

With 22 recognized tribes in Arizona, each with their own governance, leadership and protocols, working within the American Indian community and in Indian country has become an enviable skill in the business world.

Kitchell has found through first-hand experience that the best way to approach tribal work is by aligning with those who understand the culture, and accepting that patience, strong listening skills and non-verbal cues are critical to the American Indian way of doing business.

These were just a few of the messages shared with construction industry representatives at Kitchell’s Cultural Awareness Workshop, an annual event that brings together Kitchell employees, subcontractors and partners to help everyone better understand the nuances involved in working with tribal communities, regardless of the type of the vocation or project.

“I learned only through personal experience that sitting respectfully and listening at their pace was a skill I had not mastered,” said Kitchell Native American Division Business Development Manager Kari McCormick.

“We’re so used to filling space with words – and that was something I had to adjust when working with the Navajo Nation – respectfully listening, and waiting for them to finish sharing their thoughts.”

This insight and others were shared by Kitchell and the nationally known experts that the company engaged to facilitate the workshop – Jeff Thompson, who has spent 32 years working in Indian Country, and Robert J. Miller, a professor from Lewis & Clark Law School who has practiced American Indian law since 1993.

Unlike the direct communications approach favored by many of today’s successful business leaders, those operating in Indian Country rarely ask direct questions as a matter of course, especially when anticipating a negative answers. By mastering listening skills, the experts shared, you should understand their point of view and anticipate outcomes.

“Allow time to process and let the story evolve,” Thompson said. “No one wants to hear negative answers.”

Another tip that seems to be universally accepted in any business situation: use humor. “Someone in a management or supervisory role should use humor, preferably self-deprecating humor, as a leveler. It’s a very powerful tool.”

 

Bryan Bernardo

Bernardo Joins Kitchell as Operations Manager

Kitchell announced it has hired Bryan Bernardo as Operations Manager.

Based in Phoenix, Bernardo will oversee operations, with a focus on lean construction, on Kitchell job sites in Arizona, California, Nevada and Texas, as well as operations throughout Kitchell’s offices.

Prior to joining Kitchell, Bernardo worked for The Weitz Company for 25 years, most recently serving as Managing Officer of its Southwest regional office based in Arizona.

“We are thrilled to have Bryan join the Kitchell family,” said Kitchell President Dan Pierce. “His proven successes, especially applying Lean principles to cut costs and eliminate waste, will be a great asset.”

 

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Patient Experience Simulation Lab Inspires Conference Attendees

Attendees of the 2012 Healthcare Design Conference held recently at the Phoenix Convention Center were privy to a unique showcase: the first “Patient Experience Simulation Lab” allowing small groups of designers, hospital administrators and other healthcare stakeholders to experience a virtual tour of unfriendly design features compared to an actual tour of a “patient-empowered room.”

The full-scale model was the result of a design competition that the Institute for Patient-Centered Design held to gather best practice ideas from healthcare designers. The winning submission, created by Milwaukee-based Kahler Slater, came to fruition with the help of DWL Architects + Planners which created the construction documents, i-Frame Building Solutions which provided the walls for the room model, and Kitchell which built the mock-up.

“We are empathetic builders – looking at each project by putting ourselves in the patient role,” said Kitchell Healthcare Division Manager Steve Whitworth. “That’s why participating in this project was so intriguing.”

The project was built in two short days in a 2,000 SF space, leaving room for facilitated discussions and a virtual experience alongside the model. The popular workshops, which took place throughout the conference, engaged a diverse group of patients, designers, clinicians and other healthcare stakeholders in a collaborative exchange for improving the patient environment of care.

Featuring color selections indigenous to Arizona – even a back-lit picture window that emulated a grassy hospital courtyard area — the room allowed participants to experience the inpatient room from the perspective of the end users, moving about the space while assuming the role of the patient or family member in a pre-determined scenario. Feedback from the sessions will be included in ongoing research that will result in new evidence-based design tools for patient room design.

“This room is not the patient room of the future; but, rather a laboratory for examining the impact of design features on the patient experience,” said the Institute’s Tammy Thompson. “We were able to usher through those who are responsible for building hospitals and share patient insights in a collaborative environment, providing powerful feedback from practicing nurses, real patients and their families.”

 

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Kitchell celebrates Casino Arizona Bingo Hall Expansion

Bingo fans have a new place to play — thanks to the new 1,000-seat bingo hall built by Kitchell — at Casino Arizona at the 101 and McKellips in Scottsdale.

The 26,000 SF addition represents the reintroduction of bingo into the gaming operations of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC), which also owns and operates the Four-Diamond rated Talking Stick Resort.

Tucson-based Seaver Franks Architects designed the state-of-the-art Bingo Hall.

“The Community is pleased to offer a new venue of entertainment for our guests,” said SRPMIC Vice President Martin Harvier. “Our partners on the project have built and designed a facility that will be enjoyed by all.”

“This is an exciting day for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community,” said Kitchell’s Native American Division Vice President Brad Gabel. “We are thrilled to have played a role in bringing this facility to life, a great entertainment addition to the area. Good luck to all the bingo players out there!”

Kitchell, which has constructed several buildings for the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, applies its innovative approaches to quality assurance, safety, value engineering and environmental protection — among other industry-leading practices — to a wide range of construction and program management projects in the hospitality, healthcare, corrections, utility, renewable energy, retail, performing arts and academic communities.

Its specialized divisions and subsidiaries include commercial, healthcare, Native American, custom homes, FDI planning consultants, environmental services and American Refrigeration Supplies.

 

Dan Pierce, President of Kitchell, AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Q&A: President Dan Pierce of Kitchell

Q&A: Dan Pierce, President of Kitchell

Q: Technology is playing an important role in today’s construction market. What are some of the latest advancements you’re seeing utilized to make building better?

A: We’ve seen remarkable advances with respect to building information modeling (BIM) technologies. The capacity to share information efficiently has enhanced our ability to collaborate with owners and architects. Tablets, iPads, laptops and smartphones are commonplace — the line between design and construction has blurred. And I’ve been very impressed with the caliber of the young people who have chosen construction as a career. Their aptitude in leveraging the various technologies are enhancing our capacity to service our customers.

Q: How has Kitchell developed such a strong presence in healthcare?

A: I think that we’ve managed to develop strong relationships with our customers over the years. For example, we have worked on the hospital campuses that are now part of Banner Health since 1962. Those types of relationships have helped us anticipate many of the challenges that face healthcare providers in our marketplace. We see ourselves as strategic partners.

Q: Are you seeing signs of promise in Arizona’s commercial construction industry?

A: Despite Arizona’s oversupply in most market sectors of the built environment and the fact that we will likely be lagging most areas of the country in terms of economic recovery, we are seeing more activity in 2012 with a number of our design partners. Our development company is also seeing more activity. I see that as a very positive sign and I am optimistic.

Q: How has Kitchell managed to stay successful during the past five years?

A: Because of our diversity, we have been able to remain nimble and adaptive to the marketplace. This is what makes us unique. The size of our company — and the fact we’re employee-owned — is perfectly suited to be fluid and flexible, to be able to adjust workloads to exactly where we need to be at any given moment.


Dan Pierce has had a hand in the construction of numerous commercial projects throughout the Southwest, and has been with Kitchell for more than 30 years, having joined the company right out of college. As President of Kitchell Contractors, Pierce oversees divisions, including everything from renewable energy and healthcare to custom homes and medical technology planning.

Pierce has a bachelor’s degree in construction from Arizona State University. He served on the Accreditation Review Board and the Department Advisory Council when the construction management program was established at Northern Arizona University. An ASHE-Certified Healthcare Builder, he is on the Board of Barrow Neurological Foundation, has served on the Board of the Foundation for Blind Children and is involved in the American Society for Healthcare Engineering.

For more information on Dan Pierce, President of Kitchell, visit Kitchell’s website at kitchell.com.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

kitchell hospital construction, AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Technology Revolutionizes Hospital Construction

“Humanity is acquiring all the right technology for all the wrong reasons.” — R. Buckminster Fuller 

With apologies to the sage Buckminster Fuller, the technology that is being developed for hospital construction is being done so for all the right reasons: to enhance quality, increase speed, decrease waste, save money and boost safety.

On the current, and extensive, renovation of Chandler Regional Medical Center, which features 180,000 SF of new construction anchored by a 5-story tower, Kitchell is harnessing the latest technologies, and refining new ones, that will continue to evolve as hospital construction unfolds until the opening in spring 2014. The project began with evidence-based design of the re-envisioned hospital featuring a triangle- shaped bed tower and a complete reorientation of the entrance.

Some of the challenges facing the hospital construction team include reorienting the main entrance, extensive infrastructure work, upgrading the central plant, doubling the emergency room and an intricate kitchen renovation — all while patients continue to receive uninterrupted care with no risk of infection. Fortunately, Kitchell has teamed with other professionals eager to utilize the latest technology to streamline the building process while enhancing quality and preserving safety. And it certainly helps that the entire hospital construction team is committed to tearing down the traditional “wall” between the design and construction sides, which is a win-win-win (owner, designer, construction firm — not to mention the building’s inhabitants) for all.

An integrated hospital construction team was established from the start that includes owners, architects, engineers, facility users, subcontractors and suppliers. Here are some tactics the team is deploying to achieve success:

  • Virtual model created three years out
    From the beginning, Kitchell, architect Orcutt | Winslow, Van Borem and Frank, Paragon and LEA Engineers designed and coordinated the project utilizing the most up-to-date BIM software. Integrating Archicad and REVIT into a federated model of the building (include an accompanying image) yielded a virtually constructed facility three-plus years in advance of the tower receiving its first patient.
  • Continuous collaboration courtesy of the Human Factor
    At the job site, a free-flowing workspace complete with design studios and interactive spaces facilitates innovation and consolidates the creation of intellectual property and management of construction. All of the hospital construction project’s principal players are empowered to make decisions and to commit resources on the spot, all in the same room, to keep momentum moving forward. Work studios are defined by activities to be tackled, not disciplines. This co-location “no silos” approach breaks down traditional barriers between engineers, designers and construction personnel while stimulating dialogue and innovation.
  • Lean and streamlined
    Each step of the building process is analyzed to promote continuous and reliable workflow throughout and identify ways to avert possible clogs in the project stream. As the project moves from design to construction, Kitchell is using the earlier planning and knowledge of technology to make the construction process as lean as possible. Pull planning, bringing subcontractors into the scheduling process, has been critical.Early BIM planning is setting the stage for prefabrication of interior corridors, systems and bathrooms. This is not your grandfather’s prefabrication — this is highly sophisticated off -site, controlled building of highly complex and technical components which, once built, are literally “plug and play.” The philosophy behind this strategy is to maintain quality and increase speed of construction while decreasing waste.
  • Full-scale (foam or wood) mock-ups
    Kitchell will construct a full-scale mock-up of the prefabrication areas to demonstrate not only what the finished rooms will look like but also what it will feel like to physically experience the spaces. Even the smallest details were designed in REVIT to enhance the authenticity of the final mock-up.
  • In the field
    Vela Systems enables real time data to be gathered and tasks assigned and transmitted right from where the work is happening via Kitchell’s mobile application on iPads. There is no distinction between in-the-office and in-the-field. RFIs, submittals, project specifications, drawings, etc. are available to everyone — including owners and subcontractors — for immediate, actionable information. Being able to identify and communicate potential issues saves time- and labor-intensive, costly rework caused by incomplete or old information.
  • BIM kiosks — 24/7 access to information without a computer
    Once the construction of the new patient tower is in full swing, several BIM kiosks will be activated so subcontractors will be able to pull up documents and the latest coordinated models throughout the hospital construction. These are all housed in a digital archive.

Decades ago, even just a few years ago, the type of technologies deployed to make design and hospital construction a seamless, flawless process were virtually unheard of. But without these advancements, the world of commercial design and construction would involve much more guesswork and risk. In today’s building world, the right technologies are being deployed for the right reasons.

For more information on Kitchell and their hospital construction projects, visit Kitchell’s website at kitchell.com.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Construction Project News

Construction Project News March/April 2012

March/April 2012 List of Construction Project News in Arizona, starting with Allred Company’s second phase of construction of Allred Park Place.

NEW CLASS A OFFICE BUILDING TO RISE IN CHANDLER

San Diego-based Douglas Allred Company plans for the second phase of Allred Park Place with construction of a 92,109 SF, 2-story office building in Chandler. The project, which broke ground at the end of January, is the first speculative office construction to take place in the greater Phoenix area since 3Q 2009. Mark Krison and Scott German of CBRE’s Phoenix office will handle leasing of the Class A office building. The CBRE team also has the marketing assignment for Allred Park Place Phase I, three Class A office buildings totaling 261,860 SF, of which 52,742 SF is available. Balmer Architectural Group of Phoenix is the architect; Willmeng Construction of Mesa is the general contractor. Expected completion is 4Q 2012. Future plans for Allred Park Place include construction of several additional office buildings, which will eventually exceed 1 MSF.

NEW PHOENIX FBI OFFICE BUILDING OPENS ITS DOORS

The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), the U.S. Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and commercial builder/developer Ryan Companies US, Inc. officially opened the 210,202 SF facility that Phoenix-based FBI personnel will call home for the next 20 years. The facility at 21711 N. 7th St. is built and owned by Ryan Companies and replaces the FBI’s four previous Phoenix locations, allowing expansion and consolidation of agency operations and personnel through a long-term lease agreement. The project created more than 1,500 construction jobs and was completed within more than 500,000 “safe man” hours. The GSA required that the facility achieve a minimum of LEED Silver certification. Ryan Companies used Energy Savings Performance utility agreements to achieve, maintain and/or exceed Energy Star benchmarks.

KITCHELL, ORCUTT | WINSLOW TO CONSTRUCT NEW PATIENT TOWER

Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow have been selected to design and construct a new patient tower at Chandler Regional Medical Center, a member of Dignity Health. The $125M project will expand capacity, enhance key service lines, and drive new office and medical development in the East Valley. The 5-story inpatient tower is anticipated to remove capacity constraints with the addition of 96 in-patient beds. Site work began last December with vertical construction of the tower scheduled to begin in 4Q 2012. At the peak of construction, it is estimated that the project will have a workforce of more than 200. It is expected to be complete by 3Q 2014. The patient tower follows a recently completed $10M cardiovascular department expansion, also built by the team of Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow, including two cardiac catheterization laboratories, an additional nine-bed pre/post cardiac short stay unit and ancillary support infrastructure.

CHICAGO CUBS’ SPRING TRAINING FACILITY UPDATE

With the spring training facility for the Chicago Cubs scheduled for completion in 3Q 2013, there is much speculation about what the stadium will look like and how the new general manager of the Cubs will make his mark. Last October, Jed Hoyer was named GM of the Cubs. As his new role, Hoyer will have a “tremendous amount of impact in the design of the facility,” says Bob Hart, vice president of Hunt Construction, the project’s general contractor. (Populous is the architect). As for design of the stadium, there is no word on whether the facility and its surrounding area will have similarities to Wrigley Field or Wrigleyville. “The conceptual design has not yet been determined,” Hart says. “We are expecting the bulk of the design to start in the near future and will last (until) the middle of 2012.” One major decision that has been made regarding the new stadium is that the Arizona State University baseball team will be entering in a contract with the City of Mesa to share the facility with the Cubs. ASU and the Cubs plan to begin play there in 1Q 2014.

SRP, SUNPOWER TO BUILD SOLAR PLANT ON ASU POLY CAMPUS

SRP, ASU and SunPower Corp. have agreed to build a 1MW solar photovoltaic power plant at ASU’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa. The facility will be the first commercial deployment of SunPower C7 Tracker technology, a solar photovoltaic tracking system that concentrates the sun’s power seven times designed to achieve the lowest levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) for solar power plants. SunPower is engineering and building the plant on the SEC of the Polytechnic campus. Under a purchase-power agreement, SRP will buy the entire output of the solar plant, and in a separate agreement, ASU will purchase all of the energy attributable to the plant for its use at the campus. Construction is contingent on a number of factors, including receipt of all applicable permits.

$12M VETERANS INITIATIVE APARTMENTS BREAK GROUND

Madison Pointe Apartments, a $12M, 79,785 SF housing project designed to give veteran residents convenient access to medical care and veteran services, broke ground in February at 4134 N. 9th St. in Phoenix. Developer is the NRP Group; general contractor is NRP Contractors LLC; and architect is Todd & Associates. Colliers International will provide brokerage services. The project was financed with funds from Bank of America, the Arizona Department of Housing, and the City of Phoenix. Madison Pointe will be a short walk to the Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center, Vietnam Veterans of American and the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs. Estimated completion is 4Q 2012.

DPR, WINSLOW | ORCUTT TEAM UP FOR HOSPITAL LOBBY RENOVATION

The lobby at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital is undergoing a $4M renovation project with DPR Construction as the general contractor. Architect for the 12,840 SF renovation is Orcutt | Winslow. The project consists of exterior and interior renovation and expansion of the existing main entrance and lobby. The area will include a welcome/greeting desk, admitting office, gift shop, new coffee bar, for service area, along with an indoor/outdoor meditation area. Expected completion is 2Q 2013.

MCCARTHY COMPLETES 17MW SOLAR STATION FOR APS

McCarthy Building Companies recently completed the $14.3M, 145-acre APS Cotton Center Solar Station in Gila Bend. The project involved installation of the largest photovoltaic system in Arizona. It included a racking system, modules and electrical system for the 17MW facility. Subcontractors included Blount Contracting, Buesing Corp., Schuff Steel, Ironco and Delta Diversified.

Find out more on the above construction project news at the following links.

Douglas Allred Company – www.douglasallredco.com
Ryan Companies US, Inc. – www.ryancompanies.com
Kitchell – www.kitchell.com
Orcutt | Winslow – www.owp.com
Hunt Construction – www.huntconstructiongroup.com
SunPower Corp. – us.sunpowercorp.com
NRP Group – www.nrpgroup.com
DPR Construction – www.dpr.com
McCarthy Building Companies – www.mccarthy.com

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

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2012 RED Awards: Winners & Honorable Mentions

Kitchell, DAVIS and Banner Health captured top honors Thursday night as Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine held the 7th Annual, 2012 RED Awards (Real Estate and Development) to recognize the biggest, best and most notable commercial real estate projects and transactions of 2011.

The event drew more than 400 CRE professionals to the Arizona Biltmore as winners and honorable mentions were selected from a record 116 nominations received in 12 project categories and individual and team broker categories.

Kitchell was named General Contractor of the Year; DAVIS was Architect of the Year; and Banner Health won Developer of the Year.

2012 RED Awards category winners:

Best Education Project: Grand Canyon University Arena; Best Hospitality Project: Westin Downtown Phoenix; Best Industrial Project: Dunn-Edwards Phoenix; Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital; Best Multi-Family Project: Devine Legacy on Central; Best Office Project: Fountainhead Office Plaza; Best Public Project: Virginia G. Piper Sports & Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities; Best Redevelopment Project: Adelante Healthcare Surprise; Best Retail Project: iPic Theater/Tanzy/Salt; Most Challenging Project: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick; Most Sustainable Project: DPR Construction Phoenix Headquarters; and Best Tenant Improvement Project: Limelight Networks.

Merit Award winners were OASIS Hospital (Healthcare) and P.L. Julian Elementary School (Education).

Broker of the Year honors went to Jay Hoselton, Cushman & Wakefield, Individual Leasing; Ken Elmer, Commercial Properties Inc., Individual Sales; Bo Mills and Mark Detmer, Cushman & Wakefield, Team Leasing; and Tyler Anderson and Sean Cunningham, CBRE, Team Sales.

2012 RED Awards honorable mentions:

Education: NAU Health & Learning Center; Healthcare: Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center; Hospitality: Casino Del Sol Hotel Convention Center and Parking Structure Expansion; Industrial: Crescent Crown Distribution; Most Challenging: Arizona Science Center Phase III Remodification; Multi-Family: Phoenix Towers Terrace; Office: UniSource Energy Corporate Office; Public: Maricopa County Downtown Court Tower; Redevelopment: The Q Building at Paradise Valley Community College; Retail: American Sports Complex-Retail Center; Most Sustainable: Phoenix Children’s Hospital; and Tenant Improvement: Gap Fulfillment Center.


View photos from the 2012 RED Awards on our Facebook!


2012 winners can order Awards, Plaques & Reprints


RED Awards 2012 - Phoenix Children's Hospital

RED Awards 2012: Best Healthcare Project, Phoenix Children's Hospital

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Best Healthcare Project was Phoenix Children’s Hospital.


Best Healthcare Project

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Developer: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Size: 760,000 SF
Location: 1919 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix
Completed: October, 2011

Phoenix Children's HospitalPhoenix Children’s Hospital is the largest pediatric hospital in the Southwest and one of the biggest in the country. The facility embraces sustainability techniques. They include energy conservation through sun-shading screens found in each room, cutting an overuse of paper through online distribution and maintaining air quality while utilizing recycled materials. PCH was built to keep up with the expected growing population in Maricopa County. The team produced a pediatric hospital four months early and $50M under budget. Inspection and renovations were completed at night to avoid disrupting the neighboring hospital. Open forum meetings between the owner, architect and contractor with nearby residents contributed to the building productivity and swiftness. Before opening the facility, Kitchell executed an All-Systems Testing method that verified the effectiveness of every life-safety feature. The value and efficiency of this trial run led the Phoenix Fire Department Fire Safety Advisory Board to vote on implementing the All-Systems Test in every project that calls for a Fire and Life Safety Report. The project is a winner of the Valley Forward Merit Award – Environmental Technologies-Central Energy Plant, and the 2011 Modern Healthcare Design Award.

phoenixchildrens.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


Honorable Mention

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Developer: Banner Health
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: Cannon Design
Size: 133,000 SF
Location: 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert
Completed: June, 2011


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

RED Awards 2012 - Kitchell

RED Awards 2012: General Contractor of the Year, Kitchell

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for General Contractor of the Year was Kitchell.


General Contractor of the Year

Kitchell

Winner of Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Honorable Mention for Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

RED Awards 2012 - KitchellKitchell’s contracting of the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new 11-story pediatric tower enables it to serve its pediatric patients with 168 new beds, as well as high-quality outpatient care in new clinics housed on site. Modeled on a night-blooming desert flower and visible from throughout the Valley, the building is visually striking.

However, it is the inner workings of the hospital that are most remarkable – all designed and built with the highest quality patient care, comfort of patients and families, and proximity of specialties in mind. The project also included a new central plant, renovations, and two parking garages, which had to be built in a highly active environment in a busy metropolitan area. Kitchell also implemented an All-Systems Test that will potentially be a staple in the construction of future structures requiring Fire and Life Safety Reports.

The Phoenix landmark was completed four months ahead of schedule and $48M under budget.

kitchell.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

Public Projects - AZRE Magazine January/February 2012

Public Projects: Keeping Construction Companies Alive

Of the 15 Arizona school districts that asked voters in November to approve bonds to build or renovate education facilities, 11 got the go-ahead despite the lingering recession.

That’s good news for many of the state’s construction companies that have relied on publicly-funded projects to boost business and keep workers employed as private investment in new buildings plummeted with economy.

And for public entities with the need and the seed money, it’s a good time to snag a good deal in a highly competitive market for construction materials and services.  But while public projects have helped, government spending has not been the great savior of the industry, according to Arizona’s construction company leaders.

The recession has taken its toll on public building plans with shrinking tax revenue sopping up funds pegged for new schools, city halls, police stations or libraries.  And as absolutely essential projects get checked off the list, public spending is expected to dwindle.  However, at least some projects are still getting budgeted and built, says Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southwest Region.

“From 2003 to 2007, we probably had our best market in decades, but by 2008, everybody knew we were in trouble,” Calbert says.

“Private (projects) stopped overnight.  Public work continued.”

Citing a recent market outlook report for Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Calbert says overall construction value slipped 40% in 2008 from its 2007 high, tumbled another 23% in 2009 and 27% in 2010.  The report predicts 2011 value will increase 40% when the final numbers are compiled, but will sag slightly this year (2012) before heading back up in 2013.

Building During the Recession

Much of the 2011 increase is a result of federal stimulus funding for schools, infrstructure, solar-fueled projects and other green upgrades, Calbert says.

Among the infrastructure projects McCarthy landed is construction of the $140M, first phase of the PHX Sky Train, a people mover pegged to connect Phoenix

Public Projects - AZRE Magazine January/February 2012

Sky Harbor International Airport visitors and employees to the terminals, light rail system and parking lots.

McCarthy’s usually packed education division had a 2011 workload values at about $110M, Calbert says.  That’s down from a high of $170M in 2008.  And about 40% of the 2011 business was out-of-state work as McCarthy took jobs in New Mexico to make up for Arizona’s shortfall.

“Public work has kept us going, but we had to go beyond Arizona,” he says.  Among the school projects McCarthy snagged during the recession is  a $20M addition and renovation for Barry Goldwater High School, says Terry Bohl, the company’s education services director.  Parts of that multi-faceted project were completed during summer 2011 break, and other non-disruptive work is still ongoing, he says.

During the summer break, McCarthy completed 600,000 SF of school construction in Metro Phoenix, including the new buildings, renovations and mechanical upgrades. Still in the works is a new, $12M, 80,000 SF elementary school in Chandler, Bohl says.

Chandler is one of the few Arizona cities able to afford other-than-school public projects during the downturn.  The city broke ground on a $74M city hall complex in mid-2009.  After leasing, saving and budgeting for 25 years, Chandler didn’t have to borrow money to build it, says spokeswoman Jane Poston.  Best of all, Chandler’s project came in $10M under original budget thanks to the sagging economy.

“We had significant cost savings building in a recession,” Poston says.  Designing a much-needed firehouse as solar-fueled and LEED-certified helped Gilbert land a $3M federal grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, says spokeswoman Beth Lucas.

Maricopa County also saved a bundle by opting to build during the recession, says Thomas Goderre, district operations manager for Gilbane Building Company.

Gilbane teamed with Ryan Companies US on a 700,000 SF superior court tower in Downtown Phoenix (construction value $260M).

“The Maricopa County Court Tower project was big and constructed at the perfect time for Maricopa County, Gilbane/Ryan and the subcontractor community,” Goderre says.  “The county was able to realize construction cost savings in the range of $15M to $20M compared to a normal construction climate, while Gilbane/Ryan and the local subcontractors were able to put a lot of people to work during a very tough economic downturn.”

The court tower was completed in November.  That, along with a new Phoenix Politce precinct and four ASU student recreation centers, are among the publicly funded projects that “helped us weather the storm,” Goderre says.

Looking For New Opportunities

In Arizona, about 75% of Gilbane’s business has been publicly funded projects, he says, but Goderre sees that changing as public money dies up and private investment returns to the market.

Sundt Construction vice president Jeff Fairman says he also believes privately funded projects will take over more of his company’s resources during the next few years as cities and school districts continue to get squeezed.

Tempe-based Sundt bills about $1B in a normal year.  Business has dropped overall during the recession, but the company’s 50/50 ration of public/private business has so far remained static, Fairman says.

Sundt has about $500M worth of public work in progress right now, but most of that is in multi-year projects, he says.

Both the volume of new business and overall construction value have shrunk as pre-recession plans that weren’t shelved were at least downsized.  “The bells and whistles went away,” he says.

Besides building the new Chandler City Hall complex, Sundt landed a potpourri of publicly-funded projects during the economic downturn including K-8 and higher education buildings, municipal infrastructure projects, a federal courthouse and a U.S. Marine Corps simulator facility in Yuma.

Mesa-based Caliente Construction has specialized in upgrading or repurposing existing facilities during the downturn, says CEO Lorraine Bergman.  The company is renovating old post office space to accommodate a student center for ASU’s Downtown Phoenix campus.  Caliente has several projects completed or ongoing to make security, technology or mechanical improvements in public buildings from schools to prisons, Bergman says.  “It’s come down to necessity.  You can’t let the buildings fall apart,” she says.

Kitchell president Jim Swanson says the public sector produces “a sizable piece of our business,” typically employing about 30 percent of the company’s workforce in Arizona and California.

Commercial construction work is down for nearly all Kitchell’s business segments, Swanson says.  And public projects in no way take up the slack, he says.  Instead, he’d give props to the healthcare industry for keeping his business healthy.

For more information on the companies and public projects mentioned in this article, please visit the following websites:

calienteconstruction.com

gilbaneco.com

kitchell.com

mccarthy.com

sundt.com

AZRE Magazine January/February 2012

Susan Davenport - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

After Hours: Susan Davenport

After Hours: Susan Davenport

Knowing more about the people we work with is the fun side of the business. It helps start conversations and strengthens business relationships. To nominate a colleague, request an After Hours form from Peter Madrid, peter.madrid@azbigmedia.com.

Susan Davenport

  • Project Director, Alternative Energy and Federal Markets Kitchell
  • Born in Lakewood, Colo.
  • Attended Univ. of Kansas, bachelor’s degree in biology
  • With Kitchell for eight years in its Phoenix office

Responsibilities

To identify and develop new business opportunities and manage client relationships in the alternative energy and federal markets.

Favorites

Sports Teams: Kansas Jayhawks, Kansas City Chiefs, San Francisco Giants, San Jose Sharks, Boston Celtics, Team Radio Shack and New Zealand All Blacks.

Activities: Riding my road bike, hiking, writing, and hanging out in, on or around water.

Destinations: Favorites include Croatia, Greece, Italy, New Zealand and Australia.

Accomplishments

In three years I’ve raised nearly $65,000 for the Lance Armstrong Foundation and American Cancer Society on behalf of cancer fighters everywhere.

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I’m a three-time cancer survivor.

Advice

Received: If you don’t make your clients feel like No. 1, somebody else will. Don’t give them the opportunity to try.

To Share: Treat every day like it’s your first day of work. There’s a reason that you were drawn to his business. Don’t lose sight of it.

Parcland Crossing - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Multi-Family: Parcland Crossing

Parcland Crossing

Parcland Crossing - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Developer: Mark-Taylor/Kitchell
General contractor: Mark-Taylor Development
Architect: Whitneybell Perry, Inc.
Location: South Loop 202 and Alma School Rd., Chandler
Size: 383 units

The $44M luxury apartment community in Chandler will feature one-, two- and three-bedroom units ranging from 625-1,400 SF. Luxury amenities will include a resort-style pool and clubhouse. Expected completion is 4Q 2012.

Kitchell, Orcutt | Winslow Picked to Design and Build New Patient Tower

Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow have been selected to design and construct a new patient tower at Chandler Regional Medical Center, a member of Catholic Healthcare West (CHW). This project will expand capacity, enhance key service lines, and drive new office and medical development in the East Valley.

The five-story inpatient tower is anticipated to remove capacity constraints with the addition of 96 in-patient beds. Site work on the $125 million project begins this month with vertical construction of the tower scheduled to begin in November 2012. At the peak of construction it is estimated that the project will have a workforce of more than 200. It is expected to be complete by fall 2014.

 “We are confident that this expansion will help meet the needs of the community by allowing us to develop new healthcare services and expand existing ones,” said Patty White, president and CEO, Chandler Regional Medical Center.

The expansion will accommodate the hospital’s emergency and medical-surgical services, with 32 intensive care and private cardiovascular intensive care rooms, 64 telemetry and medical-surgical beds, six additional operating suites, ancillary support and infrastructure including a second helipad, chapel, kitchen and dining area, central plant and 275 parking spaces. The addition of 96 in-patient care beds will bring the hospital’s total bed count to 339.

The hospital leadership team hopes to add incremental capacity in order to continue providing for the healthcare needs of this growing community. The patient tower follows a recently completed $10 million cardiovascular department expansion, also built by the team of Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow, including two cardiac catheterization laboratories, an additional nine-bed pre/post cardiac short stay unit and ancillary support infrastructure.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship with Chandler Regional, further expanding our portfolio of Catholic Healthcare West projects,” said Kitchell Healthcare Division Manager Steve Whitworth. “With our vast healthcare experience, hospital clients benefit from the innovations and efficiencies we’ve created on other projects.”

To learn more about Chandler Regional, please visit ChandlerRegional.org.

 

Best Public, Commercial Buildings - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Arizona's Biggest, Best And Most Memorable Public And Commercial Buildings

Steel, Glass and Marvelous: A look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in Arizona

OK, so we don’t have the skylines of L.A., New York or Chicago. But for a state barely celebrating its first centennial, Arizona — Metro Phoenix in particular — is home to some fairly impressive commercial and public buildings.

Arizona doesn’t have the 110-story Chicago Sears Tower (now called the Willis Tower) … but the Chase Tower in Downtown Phoenix looms as the tallest building in Arizona at 40 stories.

We don’t have New York’s swanky Plaza Hotel … but the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa — The Jewel of the Desert — is a world-famous travel destination.

The Los Angeles Coliseum? … Nope, we don’t have that either. But University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale already has played host to one Super Bowl and two BCS National Championship Games.

As part of AZRE’s Arizona Centennial Series, a look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in the state.

Best Sports Venue

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale
Contractor: Hunt Construction
Architect: Peter Eisenman
Year built: 2006

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale - AZRE September/October 2011One might say that the Arizona Cardinals scored when they found their new home in $455M University of Phoenix Stadium. With a multi-purpose design, the 63,400-seat stadium is host to not only football and soccer games, but to an array of events including motor sports competitions, trade shows and concerts. While the stadium may pride itself on its innovative versatility, the building’s design is equally as impressive. The exterior of the stadium, with alternating reflective metal panels and the iconic “Bird-Air” retractable fabric roof, was designed to replicate a barrel cactus. The interior features artistic elements including nostalgic photos and a series of murals representative of Arizona.


Tallest Building

Chase Tower - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Chase Tower, Phoenix
Contractor: Henry C. Beck Co.
Architect: Welton Becket & Associates
Year built: 1972

Chase Tower certainly stands out in the Phoenix skyline with its modern use of glass, steel and concrete. This 40-story financial establishment was originally constructed for Valley National Bank, which after a series of mergers is today Chase Bank. In addition to its contemporary style, the tower strays from tradition with its underground, retail entry level, as opposed to the traditional commercial lobby space used in other buildings of its type. Aside from the tower’s primary use as an office space, Chase Tower offers restaurants, retail and, of course, banking services.


Oldest Commercial Building

Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix
Contractor: J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace (renovation Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011by Huntcor, phases 1 and 2; Joe E. Woods, Inc., phase 3)
Architect: Lescher & Mahoney
Year built: 1929

As the only designated historic theater and last remaining example of theater palace architecture in the Valley, the fully restored Orpheum Theatre leaves little to the imagination when it comes to envisioning the grandeur of drama and cinema in America’s Golden Age. The original Spanish Baroque style theater was built by J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace as the final major construction project before the Great Depression. Once dubbed the “Grand Dame of Movie Theaters,” the Orpheum was originally intended for film and vaudeville performances. Though ownership of the theater has been passed down from Paramount to cinema aficionado James Nederlander to the City of Phoenix in 1984, its elegant, 1,364-seat Lewis Auditorium and glamorous marquee at Second and Adams prove that the “Grand
Dame” status has survived.


Best Hospitality Property

Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix
Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect and builder: Albert Chase McArthur
Year built: 1929

Albert Chase McArthur certainly called upon the teachings of his former instructor, Frank Lloyd Wright, when he designed “The Jewel of the Desert,” The Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa. The resort’s construction features McArthur’s signature concrete “Biltmore Block,” whose geometry mimics the surrounding palm trees. In its early days as the preferred resort of celebrities and heads of state, the Biltmore was owned by William Wrigley Jr. With expansions and renovations including two golf courses, a spa, the Paradise Guest Wing and Pool, ballrooms and additional meeting spaces, the resort retains its status of elite hospitality and one of the largest hotels in Arizona.


Phoenix City Hall - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Best Government Building

Phoenix City Hall
Contractor: Hunt Construction Group
Architect: Langdon Wilson
Year built: 1993

In relation to its surroundings, and rising up 22 stories, Phoenix City Hall can be classified as one of the Valley’s few skyscrapers. The building, also called the Phoenix Municipal Building, replaced the Old City Hall, which was located in the Calvin C. Goode Municipal Building. The building is home the City of Phoenix and the origin of legislation regarding public safety, transportation, recreation and sustainability. Phoenix City Hall is the common stomping ground for the governments of the city’s eight districts.


Most Expensive Commercial Building

Most Expensive Commercial Building - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011CityScape, Phoenix
Contractors: The Weitz Company and Hunt Construction
Architect: Callison Architecture
Year built: 2010

The phrase “never a dull moment” is often reserved for people and places that provide some source of endless entertainment—and that’s exactly what CityScape offers. The $900M, mixed-use development hits the perfect balance of work and play with its collection of commercial towers, entertainment venues, retail and restaurants spanning two city blocks. The mixed-use facility may be one of the few places Valley residents and tourists can exercise, have a relaxing morning in Patriot’s Park, grab sushi or burgers for lunch, grocery shop, buy that new dress, attend a baseball game and finish the day off at a swanky restaurant or bar—all without getting in a car.


Best Medical Facility

Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Year built: 2011

TPhoenix Children's Hospital - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011he visual spectacle that is now the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new main building impacts countless drivers on State Route 51 with its lights and seamless architecture. And with the 11-story tower capable of serving 425 patients, the hospital hopes to impact equally as many children. With the new tower comes additional clinic space and operating rooms, a new Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a separate Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit in response to the hospital’s successful Children’s Heart Center. The hospital’s recent makeover was not limited to the construction of the new tower, but included renovations to the existing buildings and new of satellite centers.


Best Public Building

Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix
Contractor: Ryan Companies US
Architect: RSP Architects
Musical Instrument Museum - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Year built: 2010

Former Target CEO and African art collector, Robert J. Ulrich, was inspired to found the Musical Instrument Museum after visiting a similar museum in Belgium. The museum’s modern design is meant to compliment its surrounding desert landscape. MIM’s interior features a tile path, “El Río,” that flows to connect each of the museum’s galleries, as well as structural lines designed to echo those of common musical instruments. The museum boasts a unique collection of 14,000 musical instruments from 200 countries, with an emphasis on those of Western origin and includes pieces which once belonged to music legends including John Lennon and Eric Clapton.


Biggest Commercial Building

Phoenix Convention Center
Contractor: Hunt-Russell-Alvarado
Phoenix Convention Center - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect: HOK Venue
Year built: 2008 (final phase)

Home to countless trade shows, conventions and formal events and weighing in at 1.9 MSF, the Phoenix Convention Center is among one of the largest of its kind. The many structures of the convention center are built with stones and materials native to Arizona and designed to emulate our southwestern landscape and culture. Each building combines innovation and tradition with state-of-the-art technology services for vendor presentations and art from nationally recognized artists that highlight Arizona’s cultural identity.


Most Recognizable Building

Biosphere 2, Tucson
Builder: Space Biosphere Ventures
Architect: Phil Hawes
Year built: 1987, 1991

Biosphere Tucson - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Biosphere 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to the original biosphere made famous by years of evolution—Earth. The facility functions as a world within a world, separated from the outside by a 500-ton steel liner. Under its 6,500 windows and 7.2M cubic feet of sealed glass, self-sufficient ocean, wetland, grassland, desert and rainforest ecosystems thrive. In addition to the awe-inspiring glass dome structure, it includes the Technosphere basement floor and the Energy Center with electrical and plumbing services to maintain climate and living conditions within the dome. Biosphere 2, originally  funded by a $30M gift from the Philecology Foundation, is now managed by the science program at the University of Arizona.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

San Marquis, AZRE September/October 2011

Multi-Family: San Marquis


SAN MARQUIS

Developer: Mark-Taylor/Kitchell
General contractor: Mark-Taylor Development
Architect: ADG
Location: SWC of Rural and Baseline roads, Tempe
Size: 229,093 SF

The $28M Mark-Taylor/Kitchell venture is a 229-unit luxury apartment community. It will feature 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom units ranging from 654 SF to 1,442 SF. Expected completion is 3Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine, September/October 2011
Phoenix Children's Hospital, Kitchell

Kitchell Delivers PCH Transformation 4 Months Early and $48M Under Budget

Wednesday, June 1, marked a milestone for Kitchell as the $538M patient tower opened at Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

The hospital is Kitchell’s largest project in the firm’s 60-plus year history. Kitchell broke ground on the 11-story facility in May 2008. With hundreds of new beds and new clinics, PCH will now treat children who need outpatient care in a variety of specialties, including dermatology, endocrinology, pulmonology, gastroenterology and orthopedics.

Modeled on a night-blooming desert flower and visible from throughout the Valley, PCH is visually striking but it is the inner workings of the hospital that are most remarkable.

“Working on Phoenix Children’s Hospital has not only been a career highlight for all of us on the team, but it has been personally fulfilling, as well,” says Kitchell senior vice president Dan Pierce. “PCH has touched each of us at some point, whether directly with our own families or with our friends’ families.

“Being a part of this monumental hospital transformation, right down the road from Kitchell headquarters, was gratifying, exciting and even humbling. At different times during construction, we had more than a thousand workers, including subcontractors, on the job site. It was simply amazing.”

“Kitchell has done a great job. The company exemplifies collaboration, integrity and excellence, says David Cottle, executive director of planning, design and construction for PCH.

I have been particularly impressed with the attention to the tiniest details to ensure the best possible quality. This has been a large project wedged into a residential neighborhood. Kitchell made it a top priority to plan and phase the work so that construction congestion had only a limited impact on the surrounding community.”

In addition to more than 1,000 workers on the site at one time, other noteworthy numbers of the PCH tower construction:

•               Number of days from ground breaking to grand opening: 1,107 calendar days

•               Construction man-hours worked:  3,206,803 through mid-May 2011

•               Wire (power): 7,500,000 feet

•               Concrete: 35,496 cubic yards

•               Rebar – 3,267,379 pounds

•               Dirt removed for the Tower basement: 75,000 cubic yards

•               Structural steel: 6,500 tons

•               Lobby/elevator mosaic:  450,000 1”x1” tiles

Pediatric Hospital, AZRE Maagazine May/June 2011

Healing Young Bodies: Building a Pediatric Hospital

Building a Pediatric Hospital

At a pediatric hospital, the healing process should begin as soon as Mom or Dad drives up the driveway to look for a parking space. That’s where it all begins for the young patient and his or her family. And that’s where the differences begin when it comes to building a pediatric hospital, as compared to a “traditional” facility.

After completing three pediatric hospitals in Arizona within the past two years, Kitchell has refined strategies and tactics regarding these special hospitals, which have become ever more complex as technology advances and medical care evolves to treat increasingly acute patients.

Over the past two years, Kitchell has been CMAR (Construction Management At Risk) for Banner Desert Medical Center’s Cardon Children’s Hospital in Mesa, the recently opened Diamond Children’s Center at University Medical Center in Tucson and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Fortunately for hospital architects, engineers and builders, there is solid research to draw upon to guide the development of the most effective, functional children’s medical campuses.

Transformation by Design, produced by the National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), reviewed 320 evidence-based design studies published in academic literature. This report concludes “the physical environment of healthcare settings affects the clinical, physiological, psychosocial and safety outcomes among child patients and their families.”

The No. 1 goal as builders is to produce a stress-reducing, healing environment, while reducing the chances of infections and medical errors. There are several issues to consider when constructing pediatric hospitals:

Pediatric IPD

Bringing all stakeholders, including young patients who are “frequent fliers” at the hospitals, as well as owners, architects, engineers and contractors, into the pre-design phase has proven highly beneficial to construction outcomes. The theme, Through the Eyes of a Child, drove the entire Cardon Children’s Hospital project. And Diamond Children’s Medical Center hosts two ongoing advisory councils comprised of children and teens. Initiatives like these ensure children’s perspectives are always front and center.

Phoenix Children's Hospital, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Motifs/Theming

Theming to engage and entertain is certainly the most obvious defining characteristic of a pediatric hospital, but how to achieve the right tone, taking age-appropriateness into consideration, is far from obvious. Creating a sense of comfort and fun for a toddler is very different than creating a sense of coziness and relaxation for a teenager, both of whom will be sharing space. Some hospitals cultivate a playground/amusement park feel, while others try to maintain a more staid, yet welcoming youth-driven atmosphere. Cutting-edge technology is being utilized to bring “edutainment” and social media options directly into patient rooms.

Noise Maintenance

A quiet environment may reduce recovery time. Rubber flooring with high STC acoustical ratings has replaced vinyl sheeting predominantly used in the past.

Creative Materials

Multiple textures, varied artwork and soothing finishes reinforce the healing process. Highly durable, vibrantly colored terrazzo flooring is currently very popular. Natural elements, such as whimsical water features, are a dynamic way to bring the outside in (and engage the senses of hearing, smell and touch, as well as sight) to what has traditionally been a cold and sterile place.

Lighting

Studies show natural lighting helps babies heal faster. The industry is coming up with creative ways to integrate natural lighting with state-of-the-art LED interior lighting that enables healthcare staff to perform their jobs effectively, but is also pleasing to the patients — a huge leap forward from the harsh cathode lighting of the past.

Pods vs. Private Rooms

What is better for the youngest patient and family, a private room or a pod arrangement? This is actively being discussed right now. The benefits of private rooms seem obvious, but healthcare experts value the interactive nature of community-oriented pod set-ups, which are conducive to family-to-family interaction. After all, no one can relate to a family’s ordeal better than another family simultaneously going through the same challenges. Current designs have trended toward private rooms, but family areas, clinical programs and hospital-directed family support groups have promoted the “community” healing benefit for the young patients.

Space

At pediatric hospitals, more space is needed to accommodate more than one family member. For example, ample space is available for fold-out beds and private guest showers in patient rooms. In general, there are more “soft” spaces for siblings and other family members. The most critical issues to consider when constructing or expanding a pediatric hospital? All involved need to minimize negative impacts to the recovering patients. “The patient comes first,” says Mike Wolfe, a Kitchell project director. “If you or a loved one had the misfortune to be in a hospital that was undergoing construction, would you want a construction crew to be jack-hammering concrete in the middle of the night? Working in and around children’s hospitals requires extra sensitivity and flexibility to work around patients’ needs.”

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Some Unique-to-Pediatric-Hospital Construction Features

  • Expanded kitchens to fulfill children’s menu preferences (pizza, stir-fry, etc.)
  • Treatment rooms on each floor so patient bedrooms are “pain-free” safe havens
  • Wireless Internet access for each patient and their families
  • Interactive play/family spaces on each floor
  • Teen activity rooms
  • Lactation rooms
  • Auditorium/stages for children to see performances, concerts, graduations
    or have parties
  • Meditation rooms
  • Healing gardens
  • Toy stores

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 AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

RED Awards Banner

Best Medical Project 2011

Diamond Children’s Medical Center at University Medical Center

Best Medical Project 2011: University Medical Center, KitchellDeveloper: University Medical Center
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: NTD Architects
Size: 100,000 SF
Location: 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson
Completed: September 2010

The Diamond Children’s Medical Center at UMC in Tucson is a “family centered” pediatric facility that serves young patients throughout southern Arizona. Providing construction services on an existing campus was a challenge, but Kitchell worked closely with various entities, and the interactions became the basis of work plans that evolved over time. The design of the hospital accommodates families’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Following designs of NTD Architecture, Kitchell built 36 NICU beds, 20 PICU private rooms, and a pediatric emergency department, to name a few components. There are also murals, a canopy, a large telescope and stage, and children’s library.





Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical Center

Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical CenterDeveloper: St. Joseph’s Hospital
Contractor:
Kitchell
Architect:
Orcutt-Winslow
Size:
25,107 SF
Location:
110 W. Merrell St., Phoenix
Completed:
February 2010


Phoenix Children's Hospital, sustainable hospital expansion, kitchell, HKS inc.

Sustainable Hospital Expansion – Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s Hospital is one of the country’s 10 largest health care facilities for children. With the rapidly growing pediatric population in our market, the hospital recently reached the half-way point of a $588 million expansion, which includes the construction of a new 11-story patient tower that will nearly double available beds by 2012. The hospital is not only providing a healthy future for its patients with this significant expansion, the project has also embraced sustainability practices in its design, construction, and operations that will support a healthy future for our community.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital takes its responsibility as a health care leader seriously. The hospital made the commitment to build green based on several key considerations: increased public health, reduced operational costs, and a focus on corporate social responsibility.

Promoting the health of patients, visitors, employees, community members, and the global community, Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s expansion will result in economic and efficient operations. Along with its construction partners, design architects HKS Inc. of Dallas and general contractor Kitchell of Phoenix, Phoenix Children’s is building one of the most innovative and environmentally sound children’s hospitals in the nation.

At the heart of the Hospital’s sustainability effort is a Central Energy Plant (CEP) that now powers the 34-acre campus in the heart of Phoenix. This high efficiency CEP features an 800-ton water-to-water heat pump chiller, a technology widely used in the Middle East. In fact, Phoenix Children’s CEP employs the first application of the water-to-water heat pump chiller in a healthcare facility of its size in the United States. This innovative technology will translate to substantial energy savings for the hospital, in addition to boosting Phoenix’s conservation efforts overall. Results will include:

  • Conserving of 5.6 million gallons of water annually (the equivalent of the water needs of 120 households);
  • Reducing discharges to the sanitary sewer system by 600,000 gallons per year;
  • Reducing natural gas consumption by 70 percent; and
  • Saving nearly $11 million in energy and operating costs over 15 years.


The new hospital design also maximizes energy and water efficiency. In patient rooms, views of the mountains on both sides of the Valley will be maintained with high-performance low-e windows and sun-shading screens help to minimize solar heat gain. Additionally, the exterior lighting is designed to reduce light pollution. Combined with an efficient mechanical system design, the new building will use 20 percent less energy than maximum capacity required by code. Furthermore, the hospital is also a good steward of the community’s valuable water resources by installing low-flow plumbing fixtures with automatic flushing sensors that reduce water use in the new tower.

Indoor air quality is an important aspect of designing a sustainable hospital that creates a healing environment for Arizona’s youngest patients, and this process begins with selecting materials free of harmful chemicals. No mercury products or urea-formaldehyde resins were used in construction, and the new cooling system will use non-CFC refrigerant which prevents ozone depletion. Recycled flooring products and low-VOC paints and sealants will protect air quality.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital has also implemented a strategic exterior design, planning for indigenous plants and trees to create exterior places of respite. Local flora line the sidewalks and keep visitors cool and reduce solar heat gain. An expanded cafeteria, roof garden, indoor areas with natural views, and other tranquil spaces on the new campus will help keep employees, patients, and families on-site and off the road during heavy traffic times. Notably, the new facility offers convenient bike storage, a staff locker room in the basement of the new tower, and preferred parking for carpool and alternative-energy cars.

Taking the lead in sustainable construction, the project team has created a paperless strategy where portals and online distribution of materials sent to subcontractors save paper, time, and money. Most notably, Kitchell has conducted a large effort in recycling. On average more than 70 percent of construction waste per month is recycled, which keeps a significant amount of materials out of landfills. Lastly, in a region where dust control in the streets and air can be quite challenging during construction, the site takes extreme measures to reduce the effects of dust on the neighboring community.

Utilizing sustainable design principles, thoughtful green construction techniques, and preparing for environmentally friendly operations, the Phoenix Children’s Hospital expansion is setting a new benchmark in sustainable healthcare design and development.