Tag Archives: Kitchell

Susan Davenport - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

After Hours: Susan Davenport

After Hours: Susan Davenport

Knowing more about the people we work with is the fun side of the business. It helps start conversations and strengthens business relationships. To nominate a colleague, request an After Hours form from Peter Madrid, peter.madrid@azbigmedia.com.

Susan Davenport

  • Project Director, Alternative Energy and Federal Markets Kitchell
  • Born in Lakewood, Colo.
  • Attended Univ. of Kansas, bachelor’s degree in biology
  • With Kitchell for eight years in its Phoenix office

Responsibilities

To identify and develop new business opportunities and manage client relationships in the alternative energy and federal markets.

Favorites

Sports Teams: Kansas Jayhawks, Kansas City Chiefs, San Francisco Giants, San Jose Sharks, Boston Celtics, Team Radio Shack and New Zealand All Blacks.

Activities: Riding my road bike, hiking, writing, and hanging out in, on or around water.

Destinations: Favorites include Croatia, Greece, Italy, New Zealand and Australia.

Accomplishments

In three years I’ve raised nearly $65,000 for the Lance Armstrong Foundation and American Cancer Society on behalf of cancer fighters everywhere.

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I’m a three-time cancer survivor.

Advice

Received: If you don’t make your clients feel like No. 1, somebody else will. Don’t give them the opportunity to try.

To Share: Treat every day like it’s your first day of work. There’s a reason that you were drawn to his business. Don’t lose sight of it.

Parcland Crossing - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Multi-Family: Parcland Crossing

Parcland Crossing

Parcland Crossing - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Developer: Mark-Taylor/Kitchell
General contractor: Mark-Taylor Development
Architect: Whitneybell Perry, Inc.
Location: South Loop 202 and Alma School Rd., Chandler
Size: 383 units

The $44M luxury apartment community in Chandler will feature one-, two- and three-bedroom units ranging from 625-1,400 SF. Luxury amenities will include a resort-style pool and clubhouse. Expected completion is 4Q 2012.

Kitchell, Orcutt | Winslow Picked to Design and Build New Patient Tower

Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow have been selected to design and construct a new patient tower at Chandler Regional Medical Center, a member of Catholic Healthcare West (CHW). This project will expand capacity, enhance key service lines, and drive new office and medical development in the East Valley.

The five-story inpatient tower is anticipated to remove capacity constraints with the addition of 96 in-patient beds. Site work on the $125 million project begins this month with vertical construction of the tower scheduled to begin in November 2012. At the peak of construction it is estimated that the project will have a workforce of more than 200. It is expected to be complete by fall 2014.

 “We are confident that this expansion will help meet the needs of the community by allowing us to develop new healthcare services and expand existing ones,” said Patty White, president and CEO, Chandler Regional Medical Center.

The expansion will accommodate the hospital’s emergency and medical-surgical services, with 32 intensive care and private cardiovascular intensive care rooms, 64 telemetry and medical-surgical beds, six additional operating suites, ancillary support and infrastructure including a second helipad, chapel, kitchen and dining area, central plant and 275 parking spaces. The addition of 96 in-patient care beds will bring the hospital’s total bed count to 339.

The hospital leadership team hopes to add incremental capacity in order to continue providing for the healthcare needs of this growing community. The patient tower follows a recently completed $10 million cardiovascular department expansion, also built by the team of Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow, including two cardiac catheterization laboratories, an additional nine-bed pre/post cardiac short stay unit and ancillary support infrastructure.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship with Chandler Regional, further expanding our portfolio of Catholic Healthcare West projects,” said Kitchell Healthcare Division Manager Steve Whitworth. “With our vast healthcare experience, hospital clients benefit from the innovations and efficiencies we’ve created on other projects.”

To learn more about Chandler Regional, please visit ChandlerRegional.org.

 

Best Public, Commercial Buildings - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Arizona's Biggest, Best And Most Memorable Public And Commercial Buildings

Steel, Glass and Marvelous: A look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in Arizona

OK, so we don’t have the skylines of L.A., New York or Chicago. But for a state barely celebrating its first centennial, Arizona — Metro Phoenix in particular — is home to some fairly impressive commercial and public buildings.

Arizona doesn’t have the 110-story Chicago Sears Tower (now called the Willis Tower) … but the Chase Tower in Downtown Phoenix looms as the tallest building in Arizona at 40 stories.

We don’t have New York’s swanky Plaza Hotel … but the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa — The Jewel of the Desert — is a world-famous travel destination.

The Los Angeles Coliseum? … Nope, we don’t have that either. But University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale already has played host to one Super Bowl and two BCS National Championship Games.

As part of AZRE’s Arizona Centennial Series, a look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in the state.

Best Sports Venue

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale
Contractor: Hunt Construction
Architect: Peter Eisenman
Year built: 2006

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale - AZRE September/October 2011One might say that the Arizona Cardinals scored when they found their new home in $455M University of Phoenix Stadium. With a multi-purpose design, the 63,400-seat stadium is host to not only football and soccer games, but to an array of events including motor sports competitions, trade shows and concerts. While the stadium may pride itself on its innovative versatility, the building’s design is equally as impressive. The exterior of the stadium, with alternating reflective metal panels and the iconic “Bird-Air” retractable fabric roof, was designed to replicate a barrel cactus. The interior features artistic elements including nostalgic photos and a series of murals representative of Arizona.


Tallest Building

Chase Tower - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Chase Tower, Phoenix
Contractor: Henry C. Beck Co.
Architect: Welton Becket & Associates
Year built: 1972

Chase Tower certainly stands out in the Phoenix skyline with its modern use of glass, steel and concrete. This 40-story financial establishment was originally constructed for Valley National Bank, which after a series of mergers is today Chase Bank. In addition to its contemporary style, the tower strays from tradition with its underground, retail entry level, as opposed to the traditional commercial lobby space used in other buildings of its type. Aside from the tower’s primary use as an office space, Chase Tower offers restaurants, retail and, of course, banking services.


Oldest Commercial Building

Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix
Contractor: J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace (renovation Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011by Huntcor, phases 1 and 2; Joe E. Woods, Inc., phase 3)
Architect: Lescher & Mahoney
Year built: 1929

As the only designated historic theater and last remaining example of theater palace architecture in the Valley, the fully restored Orpheum Theatre leaves little to the imagination when it comes to envisioning the grandeur of drama and cinema in America’s Golden Age. The original Spanish Baroque style theater was built by J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace as the final major construction project before the Great Depression. Once dubbed the “Grand Dame of Movie Theaters,” the Orpheum was originally intended for film and vaudeville performances. Though ownership of the theater has been passed down from Paramount to cinema aficionado James Nederlander to the City of Phoenix in 1984, its elegant, 1,364-seat Lewis Auditorium and glamorous marquee at Second and Adams prove that the “Grand
Dame” status has survived.


Best Hospitality Property

Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix
Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect and builder: Albert Chase McArthur
Year built: 1929

Albert Chase McArthur certainly called upon the teachings of his former instructor, Frank Lloyd Wright, when he designed “The Jewel of the Desert,” The Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa. The resort’s construction features McArthur’s signature concrete “Biltmore Block,” whose geometry mimics the surrounding palm trees. In its early days as the preferred resort of celebrities and heads of state, the Biltmore was owned by William Wrigley Jr. With expansions and renovations including two golf courses, a spa, the Paradise Guest Wing and Pool, ballrooms and additional meeting spaces, the resort retains its status of elite hospitality and one of the largest hotels in Arizona.


Phoenix City Hall - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Best Government Building

Phoenix City Hall
Contractor: Hunt Construction Group
Architect: Langdon Wilson
Year built: 1993

In relation to its surroundings, and rising up 22 stories, Phoenix City Hall can be classified as one of the Valley’s few skyscrapers. The building, also called the Phoenix Municipal Building, replaced the Old City Hall, which was located in the Calvin C. Goode Municipal Building. The building is home the City of Phoenix and the origin of legislation regarding public safety, transportation, recreation and sustainability. Phoenix City Hall is the common stomping ground for the governments of the city’s eight districts.


Most Expensive Commercial Building

Most Expensive Commercial Building - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011CityScape, Phoenix
Contractors: The Weitz Company and Hunt Construction
Architect: Callison Architecture
Year built: 2010

The phrase “never a dull moment” is often reserved for people and places that provide some source of endless entertainment—and that’s exactly what CityScape offers. The $900M, mixed-use development hits the perfect balance of work and play with its collection of commercial towers, entertainment venues, retail and restaurants spanning two city blocks. The mixed-use facility may be one of the few places Valley residents and tourists can exercise, have a relaxing morning in Patriot’s Park, grab sushi or burgers for lunch, grocery shop, buy that new dress, attend a baseball game and finish the day off at a swanky restaurant or bar—all without getting in a car.


Best Medical Facility

Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Year built: 2011

TPhoenix Children's Hospital - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011he visual spectacle that is now the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new main building impacts countless drivers on State Route 51 with its lights and seamless architecture. And with the 11-story tower capable of serving 425 patients, the hospital hopes to impact equally as many children. With the new tower comes additional clinic space and operating rooms, a new Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a separate Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit in response to the hospital’s successful Children’s Heart Center. The hospital’s recent makeover was not limited to the construction of the new tower, but included renovations to the existing buildings and new of satellite centers.


Best Public Building

Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix
Contractor: Ryan Companies US
Architect: RSP Architects
Musical Instrument Museum - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Year built: 2010

Former Target CEO and African art collector, Robert J. Ulrich, was inspired to found the Musical Instrument Museum after visiting a similar museum in Belgium. The museum’s modern design is meant to compliment its surrounding desert landscape. MIM’s interior features a tile path, “El Río,” that flows to connect each of the museum’s galleries, as well as structural lines designed to echo those of common musical instruments. The museum boasts a unique collection of 14,000 musical instruments from 200 countries, with an emphasis on those of Western origin and includes pieces which once belonged to music legends including John Lennon and Eric Clapton.


Biggest Commercial Building

Phoenix Convention Center
Contractor: Hunt-Russell-Alvarado
Phoenix Convention Center - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect: HOK Venue
Year built: 2008 (final phase)

Home to countless trade shows, conventions and formal events and weighing in at 1.9 MSF, the Phoenix Convention Center is among one of the largest of its kind. The many structures of the convention center are built with stones and materials native to Arizona and designed to emulate our southwestern landscape and culture. Each building combines innovation and tradition with state-of-the-art technology services for vendor presentations and art from nationally recognized artists that highlight Arizona’s cultural identity.


Most Recognizable Building

Biosphere 2, Tucson
Builder: Space Biosphere Ventures
Architect: Phil Hawes
Year built: 1987, 1991

Biosphere Tucson - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Biosphere 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to the original biosphere made famous by years of evolution—Earth. The facility functions as a world within a world, separated from the outside by a 500-ton steel liner. Under its 6,500 windows and 7.2M cubic feet of sealed glass, self-sufficient ocean, wetland, grassland, desert and rainforest ecosystems thrive. In addition to the awe-inspiring glass dome structure, it includes the Technosphere basement floor and the Energy Center with electrical and plumbing services to maintain climate and living conditions within the dome. Biosphere 2, originally  funded by a $30M gift from the Philecology Foundation, is now managed by the science program at the University of Arizona.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

San Marquis, AZRE September/October 2011

Multi-Family: San Marquis


SAN MARQUIS

Developer: Mark-Taylor/Kitchell
General contractor: Mark-Taylor Development
Architect: ADG
Location: SWC of Rural and Baseline roads, Tempe
Size: 229,093 SF

The $28M Mark-Taylor/Kitchell venture is a 229-unit luxury apartment community. It will feature 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom units ranging from 654 SF to 1,442 SF. Expected completion is 3Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine, September/October 2011
Phoenix Children's Hospital, Kitchell

Kitchell Delivers PCH Transformation 4 Months Early and $48M Under Budget

Wednesday, June 1, marked a milestone for Kitchell as the $538M patient tower opened at Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

The hospital is Kitchell’s largest project in the firm’s 60-plus year history. Kitchell broke ground on the 11-story facility in May 2008. With hundreds of new beds and new clinics, PCH will now treat children who need outpatient care in a variety of specialties, including dermatology, endocrinology, pulmonology, gastroenterology and orthopedics.

Modeled on a night-blooming desert flower and visible from throughout the Valley, PCH is visually striking but it is the inner workings of the hospital that are most remarkable.

“Working on Phoenix Children’s Hospital has not only been a career highlight for all of us on the team, but it has been personally fulfilling, as well,” says Kitchell senior vice president Dan Pierce. “PCH has touched each of us at some point, whether directly with our own families or with our friends’ families.

“Being a part of this monumental hospital transformation, right down the road from Kitchell headquarters, was gratifying, exciting and even humbling. At different times during construction, we had more than a thousand workers, including subcontractors, on the job site. It was simply amazing.”

“Kitchell has done a great job. The company exemplifies collaboration, integrity and excellence, says David Cottle, executive director of planning, design and construction for PCH.

I have been particularly impressed with the attention to the tiniest details to ensure the best possible quality. This has been a large project wedged into a residential neighborhood. Kitchell made it a top priority to plan and phase the work so that construction congestion had only a limited impact on the surrounding community.”

In addition to more than 1,000 workers on the site at one time, other noteworthy numbers of the PCH tower construction:

•               Number of days from ground breaking to grand opening: 1,107 calendar days

•               Construction man-hours worked:  3,206,803 through mid-May 2011

•               Wire (power): 7,500,000 feet

•               Concrete: 35,496 cubic yards

•               Rebar – 3,267,379 pounds

•               Dirt removed for the Tower basement: 75,000 cubic yards

•               Structural steel: 6,500 tons

•               Lobby/elevator mosaic:  450,000 1”x1” tiles

Pediatric Hospital, AZRE Maagazine May/June 2011

Healing Young Bodies: Building a Pediatric Hospital

Building a Pediatric Hospital

At a pediatric hospital, the healing process should begin as soon as Mom or Dad drives up the driveway to look for a parking space. That’s where it all begins for the young patient and his or her family. And that’s where the differences begin when it comes to building a pediatric hospital, as compared to a “traditional” facility.

After completing three pediatric hospitals in Arizona within the past two years, Kitchell has refined strategies and tactics regarding these special hospitals, which have become ever more complex as technology advances and medical care evolves to treat increasingly acute patients.

Over the past two years, Kitchell has been CMAR (Construction Management At Risk) for Banner Desert Medical Center’s Cardon Children’s Hospital in Mesa, the recently opened Diamond Children’s Center at University Medical Center in Tucson and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Fortunately for hospital architects, engineers and builders, there is solid research to draw upon to guide the development of the most effective, functional children’s medical campuses.

Transformation by Design, produced by the National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), reviewed 320 evidence-based design studies published in academic literature. This report concludes “the physical environment of healthcare settings affects the clinical, physiological, psychosocial and safety outcomes among child patients and their families.”

The No. 1 goal as builders is to produce a stress-reducing, healing environment, while reducing the chances of infections and medical errors. There are several issues to consider when constructing pediatric hospitals:

Pediatric IPD

Bringing all stakeholders, including young patients who are “frequent fliers” at the hospitals, as well as owners, architects, engineers and contractors, into the pre-design phase has proven highly beneficial to construction outcomes. The theme, Through the Eyes of a Child, drove the entire Cardon Children’s Hospital project. And Diamond Children’s Medical Center hosts two ongoing advisory councils comprised of children and teens. Initiatives like these ensure children’s perspectives are always front and center.

Phoenix Children's Hospital, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Motifs/Theming

Theming to engage and entertain is certainly the most obvious defining characteristic of a pediatric hospital, but how to achieve the right tone, taking age-appropriateness into consideration, is far from obvious. Creating a sense of comfort and fun for a toddler is very different than creating a sense of coziness and relaxation for a teenager, both of whom will be sharing space. Some hospitals cultivate a playground/amusement park feel, while others try to maintain a more staid, yet welcoming youth-driven atmosphere. Cutting-edge technology is being utilized to bring “edutainment” and social media options directly into patient rooms.

Noise Maintenance

A quiet environment may reduce recovery time. Rubber flooring with high STC acoustical ratings has replaced vinyl sheeting predominantly used in the past.

Creative Materials

Multiple textures, varied artwork and soothing finishes reinforce the healing process. Highly durable, vibrantly colored terrazzo flooring is currently very popular. Natural elements, such as whimsical water features, are a dynamic way to bring the outside in (and engage the senses of hearing, smell and touch, as well as sight) to what has traditionally been a cold and sterile place.

Lighting

Studies show natural lighting helps babies heal faster. The industry is coming up with creative ways to integrate natural lighting with state-of-the-art LED interior lighting that enables healthcare staff to perform their jobs effectively, but is also pleasing to the patients — a huge leap forward from the harsh cathode lighting of the past.

Pods vs. Private Rooms

What is better for the youngest patient and family, a private room or a pod arrangement? This is actively being discussed right now. The benefits of private rooms seem obvious, but healthcare experts value the interactive nature of community-oriented pod set-ups, which are conducive to family-to-family interaction. After all, no one can relate to a family’s ordeal better than another family simultaneously going through the same challenges. Current designs have trended toward private rooms, but family areas, clinical programs and hospital-directed family support groups have promoted the “community” healing benefit for the young patients.

Space

At pediatric hospitals, more space is needed to accommodate more than one family member. For example, ample space is available for fold-out beds and private guest showers in patient rooms. In general, there are more “soft” spaces for siblings and other family members. The most critical issues to consider when constructing or expanding a pediatric hospital? All involved need to minimize negative impacts to the recovering patients. “The patient comes first,” says Mike Wolfe, a Kitchell project director. “If you or a loved one had the misfortune to be in a hospital that was undergoing construction, would you want a construction crew to be jack-hammering concrete in the middle of the night? Working in and around children’s hospitals requires extra sensitivity and flexibility to work around patients’ needs.”

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Some Unique-to-Pediatric-Hospital Construction Features

  • Expanded kitchens to fulfill children’s menu preferences (pizza, stir-fry, etc.)
  • Treatment rooms on each floor so patient bedrooms are “pain-free” safe havens
  • Wireless Internet access for each patient and their families
  • Interactive play/family spaces on each floor
  • Teen activity rooms
  • Lactation rooms
  • Auditorium/stages for children to see performances, concerts, graduations
    or have parties
  • Meditation rooms
  • Healing gardens
  • Toy stores

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 AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

RED Awards Banner

Best Medical Project 2011

Diamond Children’s Medical Center at University Medical Center

Best Medical Project 2011: University Medical Center, KitchellDeveloper: University Medical Center
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: NTD Architects
Size: 100,000 SF
Location: 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson
Completed: September 2010

The Diamond Children’s Medical Center at UMC in Tucson is a “family centered” pediatric facility that serves young patients throughout southern Arizona. Providing construction services on an existing campus was a challenge, but Kitchell worked closely with various entities, and the interactions became the basis of work plans that evolved over time. The design of the hospital accommodates families’ physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Following designs of NTD Architecture, Kitchell built 36 NICU beds, 20 PICU private rooms, and a pediatric emergency department, to name a few components. There are also murals, a canopy, a large telescope and stage, and children’s library.





Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical Center

Honorable Mention: Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical CenterDeveloper: St. Joseph’s Hospital
Contractor:
Kitchell
Architect:
Orcutt-Winslow
Size:
25,107 SF
Location:
110 W. Merrell St., Phoenix
Completed:
February 2010


Phoenix Children's Hospital, sustainable hospital expansion, kitchell, HKS inc.

Sustainable Hospital Expansion – Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s Hospital is one of the country’s 10 largest health care facilities for children. With the rapidly growing pediatric population in our market, the hospital recently reached the half-way point of a $588 million expansion, which includes the construction of a new 11-story patient tower that will nearly double available beds by 2012. The hospital is not only providing a healthy future for its patients with this significant expansion, the project has also embraced sustainability practices in its design, construction, and operations that will support a healthy future for our community.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital takes its responsibility as a health care leader seriously. The hospital made the commitment to build green based on several key considerations: increased public health, reduced operational costs, and a focus on corporate social responsibility.

Promoting the health of patients, visitors, employees, community members, and the global community, Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s expansion will result in economic and efficient operations. Along with its construction partners, design architects HKS Inc. of Dallas and general contractor Kitchell of Phoenix, Phoenix Children’s is building one of the most innovative and environmentally sound children’s hospitals in the nation.

At the heart of the Hospital’s sustainability effort is a Central Energy Plant (CEP) that now powers the 34-acre campus in the heart of Phoenix. This high efficiency CEP features an 800-ton water-to-water heat pump chiller, a technology widely used in the Middle East. In fact, Phoenix Children’s CEP employs the first application of the water-to-water heat pump chiller in a healthcare facility of its size in the United States. This innovative technology will translate to substantial energy savings for the hospital, in addition to boosting Phoenix’s conservation efforts overall. Results will include:

  • Conserving of 5.6 million gallons of water annually (the equivalent of the water needs of 120 households);
  • Reducing discharges to the sanitary sewer system by 600,000 gallons per year;
  • Reducing natural gas consumption by 70 percent; and
  • Saving nearly $11 million in energy and operating costs over 15 years.


The new hospital design also maximizes energy and water efficiency. In patient rooms, views of the mountains on both sides of the Valley will be maintained with high-performance low-e windows and sun-shading screens help to minimize solar heat gain. Additionally, the exterior lighting is designed to reduce light pollution. Combined with an efficient mechanical system design, the new building will use 20 percent less energy than maximum capacity required by code. Furthermore, the hospital is also a good steward of the community’s valuable water resources by installing low-flow plumbing fixtures with automatic flushing sensors that reduce water use in the new tower.

Indoor air quality is an important aspect of designing a sustainable hospital that creates a healing environment for Arizona’s youngest patients, and this process begins with selecting materials free of harmful chemicals. No mercury products or urea-formaldehyde resins were used in construction, and the new cooling system will use non-CFC refrigerant which prevents ozone depletion. Recycled flooring products and low-VOC paints and sealants will protect air quality.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital has also implemented a strategic exterior design, planning for indigenous plants and trees to create exterior places of respite. Local flora line the sidewalks and keep visitors cool and reduce solar heat gain. An expanded cafeteria, roof garden, indoor areas with natural views, and other tranquil spaces on the new campus will help keep employees, patients, and families on-site and off the road during heavy traffic times. Notably, the new facility offers convenient bike storage, a staff locker room in the basement of the new tower, and preferred parking for carpool and alternative-energy cars.

Taking the lead in sustainable construction, the project team has created a paperless strategy where portals and online distribution of materials sent to subcontractors save paper, time, and money. Most notably, Kitchell has conducted a large effort in recycling. On average more than 70 percent of construction waste per month is recycled, which keeps a significant amount of materials out of landfills. Lastly, in a region where dust control in the streets and air can be quite challenging during construction, the site takes extreme measures to reduce the effects of dust on the neighboring community.

Utilizing sustainable design principles, thoughtful green construction techniques, and preparing for environmentally friendly operations, the Phoenix Children’s Hospital expansion is setting a new benchmark in sustainable healthcare design and development.