Tag Archives: leadership

rsz_phoenix_childrens_southwest_valley_center-1

Kitchell Completes Phoenix Children’s Southwest Valley Center

 

Kitchell completed construction of the Phoenix Children’s Southwest Valley Center in Avondale, a new specialty and urgent care center serving West Valley communities and featuring Phoenix Children’s special brand of pediatric care.

The 35,3550 SF urgent and pediatric clinic is a precursor to long-term plans for a larger, more comprehensive facility that doubles the medical space and includes a 48-bed, full-service children’s hospital.

The $14.7M facility includes 27 patient rooms, two treatment rooms, x-ray, ultrasound, three infusion bays and on-site lab services. The Center complements children’s health care services already in the West Valley, with specialties include hematology/oncology, gastroenterology, neuro-psychology evaluations, testing, orthopedics/sports medicine, neurology, psychiatry, pulmonology, urology, dermatology, developmental pediatrics, endocrinology, diabetes education, special needs, ultrasound, radiology, fluoroscopy, lab, and rehabilitation services including occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy and infusion services.

Located just north of Interstate 10 on Avondale Boulevard, the Phoenix Children’s – Southwest Valley Center received strong support from the West Valley communities including the mayors of Avondale, Tolleson, Litchfield Park, Goodyear and Buckeye.

The facility is the fourth Phoenix Children’s specialty and urgent care center. Others are located in East Mesa, Northwest Phoenix/Glendale and Scottsdale.

 

Mane Attraction Salon logo

12/12/12 Deals At Mane Attraction Salon

One time only, on a day that happens only once every 100 years, Mane Attraction Salon in Phoenix is offering the following three specials:

  1. Book your next hair appointment for Wednesday, December 12 at Mane Attraction, and receive $12 off — whether it be a haircut, color or style.
  2. For those who haven’t booked an appointment yet, the 12th caller to schedule a service that day will receive a free haircut and a deep conditioning masque.
  3. And, lastly, the 12th client to check in that day will receive all of his or her booked services for free.

12/12/12 at Mane Attraction Salon

When: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: 3156 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Contact: (602) 956-2996
Web: maneattractionsalon.com

leadership workshops

W. P. Carey School Offers Leadership Workshops

Want to learn key business skills without going back to school for a full degree? The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is unveiling brand new half-day leadership development workshops designed for exactly this purpose. The workshops — focused on concepts that immediately strengthen leadership capabilities — will make lessons taught at the highly ranked W. P. Carey School even more accessible to businesspeople and companies.

“As the economy recovers, we’re hearing from more companies that want to send managers, team and project leaders, those being promoted into management, and those without a lot of formal management education to get a crash course in certain areas,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “They want to beef up leadership skills and effectiveness in a short time frame, and this is a great solution. They also want to reward crucial employees who helped get them through the recession, to help advance their careers.”

The new workshops will be run by some of the top faculty members who also teach in the school’s full-time and evening MBA programs, both ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. The four-hour workshops will be personal, limited to 50 or fewer students. They will also be very interactive, often including simulations, case studies and other strong student involvement, not just lectures.

“For example, participants in the class on effective negotiations will go through an actual role-playing process,” says Dawn Feldman, executive director of the Center for Executive and Professional Development at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “All of the classes are designed so students can immediately use their new skills on the job. They’re also aimed at helping to create a more effective and motivated group back in the workplace.”

The first five workshops will be held at ASU Research Park in south Tempe. They will each run on a Friday morning between July and November. Subjects include:

  • Driving employee engagement – July 13
  • Effective negotiations – Aug. 17
  • Inspiration and motivation as leadership tools – Sept. 7
  • Harvesting knowledge from frontline employees – Oct. 26
  • Leading effective team processes – Nov. 9

Each workshop is $550 per person. However, discounts are available for groups, ASU alums and members of the Economic Club of Phoenix.

For more information on leadership development workshops, call (480) 965-7579 or go towww.wpcarey.asu.edu/ldw.

Desert Schools - community service and leadership award

Desert Schools Honored For Community Service In Arizona

Desert Schools Federal Credit Union, the largest not-for-profit membership-based financial institution in the state of Arizona, announced today that it has been selected by Toastmasters International and the organization’s District 3 Governor as the 2012 award recipient for community service and leadership for the state of Arizona.

This is the first time Desert Schools has been recognized by Toastmasters, a globally recognized, international nonprofit educational organization that operates clubs worldwide for the purpose of helping members improve their communication, public speaking and leadership skills. The organization has more than 270,000 members and over 13,000 clubs in 116 countries.

Desert Schools will be presented with the Toastmasters International 2012 award for community service and leadership on Friday, May 18th. Cathy Graham, vice president of marketing at Desert Schools Federal Credit Union, will accept the award on the credit union’s behalf.

Desert Schools has built its foundation on a fundamental passion for lending a personal hand toward positive change throughout Valley communities and encourages its employees to get involved in the same philanthropic spirit on which the organization has prided itself since its founding.

The Desert Schools ‘CommuniTeam’ – a group made up of dedicated employee volunteers – is active throughout Valley communities and offers Desert Schools’ employees the opportunity to volunteer their time and philanthropic talents throughout the community. Participating in nearly 130 community projects in the Phoenix metropolitan area, 45% of Desert Schools’ employees got involved with or led community projects in 2011, volunteering 2,902 hours to support various causes.

Susan Frank, President and CEO of Desert Schools, said, “We couldn’t be more honored to accept this award from an outstanding organization like Toastmasters International. Giving back to our community has long been the cornerstone of Desert Schools’ business. The time that Desert Schools staff is able to spend year in and year out doing good throughout our Valley is something that we’re very proud of, and it means that much more to be recognized by such an extraordinary philanthropic organization.”

In 2011, the credit union coordinated fundraising efforts with employees, vendors and partners to give back more than $770,000 to the community. Desert Schools raised $360,285 for the Children’s Miracle Network, $224,178 for the United Way and $96,000 in community grants in 2011 alone.

The credit union also awarded $30,000 in community service scholarships to high school seniors and college freshmen for demonstrating dedication to their studies and continued education as well as their commitment to giving back to the community. Scholarships were awarded for Fall 2012 coursework.

For more information on Desert Schools Federal Credit Union, visit Desert Schools’ website at desertschools.org.

Deloitte-Jonas McCormick

Deloitte LLP Names New Managing Principal Of Its Phoenix Office

One of the largest accounting and consulting organizations in Arizona, Deloitte LLP, named a new managing principal of its Phoenix office Nov. 15.

Jonas McCormick, principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP, is now managing principal of Deloitte’s Phoenix office. McCormick succeeds Michelle Kerrick, who was recently appointed managing partner of Deloitte’s Los Angeles office.

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame with a Bachelor’s degree in business administration, McCormick has spent the majority of his career serving the Arizona market.

“Having spent the majority of my career serving some of Arizona’s largest companies, I am familiar with this marketplace and the complex business challenges local companies are facing,” McCormick notes. “In my role, I can help align Deloitte’s diverse offerings – which include audit, tax, financial advisory and consulting services – to address the needs of the organizations we serve.”

As a lead client service principal at Deloitte, McCormick helps companies across a range of industries implement operational excellence and performance improvement programs in their organizations. He assists clients in achieving strategic cost reduction and enhancing revenue and performance management with his vast knowledge in the areas of organizational design and development, human resource management and change enablement.

“One of my key objectives as managing principal of Deloitte’s Phoenix office is to build on the momentum we’ve established in Arizona, where we are currently ranked as the largest professional services firm, and grow our footprint in the local market,” McCormick says. “We will maintain our focus on delivering quality and value to our clients, while continuing to invest in our people and the community in which we live and work.”

Tony Buzzelli, vice chairman and regional managing partner of Deloitte LLP Pacific Southwest, commends McCormick for his competent leadership skills and looks forward to McCormick leading the Phoenix office.

“Having served some of the largest companies in Arizona over the last decade, Jonas has demonstrated strong leadership and success in driving value for our clients,” Buzzelli states. “Jonas’s focus on growing our business, developing our people and representing Deloitte positively in the marketplace position him well to serve as managing principal of our Phoenix office.”

Entrepreneurs Can Reach High Levels Of Success - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

The Entrepreneurs Of Today Can Reach High Levels Of Success — And Impact The World

In today’s fluctuating economy, the notions of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial leadership and entrepreneurial decision-making are receiving increased attention by citizens, academics, managers and politicians on a global basis. The current global financial crisis has put added pressure on creating new ideas and bringing these to the market, resulting in financial fruition, economic development and employment.

Being an entrepreneur and creating value by establishing a new organization in both the profit and nonprofit sectors in business, as well as the arts, impacts economic and social conditions. This creation process takes more time and effort than one can imagine and is by no means easy, with a high failure rate reaching more than 70 percent in certain countries.

Since entrepreneurs are found in all professions — education, medicine, research, law, architecture, arts, engineering, social work and distribution — the definition of entrepreneurship in my book, “Entrepreneurship,” is relevant: “Entrepreneurship is the process of creating something new with value by devoting the necessary time and effort, assuming the accompanying financial, psychic, and social risks, and receiving the resulting rewards of monetary and personal satisfaction and independence.”

Global entrepreneurial leaders create visionary scenarios that assemble and mobilize participants, who become committed by the vision to discovery and creation of sustainable value. They have a wide variety of attributes, including being a visionary, having a passion for their idea, being a risk-taker, having perseverance, building a team, recognizing opportunities and needs, solving problems, and giving back. Let us look at a few examples:

Leonardo Da Vinci — In addition to his many other titles, Leonardo Da Vinci should be labeled as one of the great global entrepreneurial leaders of all time. It is, in fact, the breadth and depth of his work, his wide-ranging skills and his lasting impact on both the arts and society that reflect the strength of his entrepreneurial vision. He created many new and different pieces of art, devices and ways of thinking that were ahead of their time.

Edward Teach (Blackbeard the Pirate) — From 1716-1718, Blackbeard the Pirate ruled the seas and also was an entrepreneurial leader who flourished in his trade. The pirates who joined Blackbeard’s command often came from the lowest classes of society, or were former members of the British Navy, who found the conditions and treatment they received better than life on farms or plantations. All booty taken by the pirates would be divided evenly among the crew, one part each, save the captain’s two.

Peter the Great — Peter I ruled Russia from 1682 until his death in 1725, bringing about major modernization to his country. His global entrepreneurial vision and leadership gave Russia a new position of power as the country was transformed into a Western empire. Educators, military personnel and businessmen were invited to Russia; the army was modernized; a strong navy was developed; and arts and education flourished.

John D. Rockefeller — John D. Rockefeller was an extraordinary American entrepreneur and philanthropist. Through hard work, determination and a strong competitive nature, he became the world’s first billionaire. Rockefeller chose to change his entrepreneurial pursuits away from making money toward giving it away. From his equity position in Standard Oil, a company he co-founded, he felt the need to disperse his wealth to those less fortunate and formed the Rockefeller Foundation; this started the rise of American social philanthropy.

Madam C.J. Walker — Entrepreneurs often find opportunities and success in spite of great odds and obstacles. Madam C.J. Walker was one such person who identified a gap in the market — hair care products for black women. Walker became the first self-made, female black millionaire in the United States. At one point, she employed more than 3,000 women, and had a wide range of hair and skin care products.

Muhammad Yunus — Muhammad Yunus is an example of a selfless global entrepreneurial leader. After seeing the impact of his first micro-loan and the way in which he was repaid, Yunus began to envision a model that could work anywhere. He found that the poor would often quickly repay their loans with few problems. By the early 1980s, Yunus had expanded to other developing countries, and in 1983 formed the Grameen Bank, the institutional home of his micro-lending practices, both of which were honored with a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006.

Bill Gates — Microsoft founder Bill Gates’ entrepreneurial skills are varied. His company revolutionized the computer industry, helped to usher in the Internet age, and had a deep and profound impact on the daily lives of people around the world. Because of this persistence and risk taking, he shaped the evolution of the information age, making him the world’s richest man in 1995. In 2000, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation was founded with the goal of alleviating many of the problems that are afflicting the world’s poorest people. It has grown into one of the premier philanthropic organizations in the world.

The role of global entrepreneurial leaders throughout history indicates the diversity in backgrounds, mindsets and goals that spawn entrepreneurial actions, decisions and leadership. From public sector to private, for-profit to nonprofit, in science, arts, religion, medicine, politics and business, and across industries, the variety of forms that entrepreneurial leadership takes is clear.

For the contemporary entrepreneur who actually starts his or her own business, the experience is filled with enthusiasm, frustration, anxiety and hard work. There is a high failure rate due to poor sales, intense competition, lack of capital, or lack of managerial ability. The financial, social and emotional risks are high, as are the rewards. As history has shown, the individual’s reward can easily set the stage for an accelerated impact on the larger community, region, country or even the world.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Advance And Retain Women’s Role In The Financial Field - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Two Valley Groups Are Working To Advance And Retain Women’s Role In The Financial Field

It wasn’t so long ago that a typical business meeting at a banking or financial institution was dominated by the good ol’ boys network. Well, not anymore. Today, you are likely to see more women among the dark suits at the table.

“I have watched women evolve,” says Deborah Bateman, executive vice president of specialty banking and marketing at National Bank of Arizona, and a founder of the Women’s Financial Group. Bateman boasts a professional background spanning more than 40 years in the banking industry.

“Early in my career, I think we tried to mirror men,” she says. “Over time, women have recognized the skill sets they can bring to business, such as collaboration, connecting, coaching (and) creating value inside Corporate America.”

Women’s roles in the banking and finance sectors are widening, and the proof is in the numbers. In 2009, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, 54 percent of American women were employed in fields related to financial activities. This includes finance and insurance, banking and related activities, securities, commodities, funds, trusts and other financial investments. In Arizona, the percentage of women working in the finance and insurance industry also is significant. U.S. Census data shows there are actually more women than men working in these industries.

Although women have come a long way from their beginnings in these formerly male-dominated sectors, it is an ongoing struggle. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the disparity in salaries for men and women is significant.

In the Phoenix Metro area, during the third quarter of 2009, women made up 14.4 percent of the 35-44 age work force in finance and insurance (private sector) versus 10.4 percent for men. However, women in these fields average a monthly salary of $4,350, compared to men’s $6,643. For women aged 45 to 54, the salary gap grows even wider. In this age group, men on average earn 64 percent more.

“Women need to be more assertive about asking for money and tooting their own horn,” says Donna Davis, CEO of the Arizona Small Business Association (ASBA) and a member of the Women’s Financial Group. “It’s OK to promote your organization, it’s OK to ask for money and to ask for more.”

However, Emily Amparan, vice president of development at Factors Southwest, says she thinks the numbers don’t reflect the real gains women are making.

“I always hold those figures suspect, as I rarely encounter hindrances to make money and achieve success in the financial field,” she says. “I think if you believe it to be so, it probably is … however, the most successful women in the finance industry don’t pay any mind to talk of obstacles, as they forge ahead to make their own path.”

Helping women make their own paths in the financial sector is the mission of a number of organizations emerging all over the Valley. For example, Bateman founded an internal mentorship program at National Bank of Arizona in 2009, that quickly expanded to outside industries and individuals. Later renamed the Women’s Financial Group, the organization’s focus is to bring together women of all professional backgrounds to promote financial planning, mentoring, business services and networking.

Bateman says she hopes the Women’s Financial Group can serve as a catalyst for women to succeed and attain higher positions in banking and finance without compromising their identities.

“For years and years, we would dress in tailored blue suits and wear ties,” Bateman recalls. “Women can be women in the business world. It brings enormous value to business, to their organizations and to the community.”

In addition, Davis says the group can help “women become more savvy financial business people.”

At a recent Women’s Financial Group event, women of diverse backgrounds, both personal and professional, filled the room. Some women were just beginning their careers and some were veterans with decades of experience. But all were there with a mission: to pave the way for future success in their respective financial careers.

Another group aimed at women in the financial sector is Women in Banking, the local chapter of the national Risk Management Association. Founded in 2006, its first meeting took place at a Chevy’s restaurant with 14 business women in attendance. Today, the group includes 50 to 80 bankers, consultants, marketers and business owners from around the Valley. And despite its name, the committee encourages men to join and attend its events.

“There is definitely a need for a professional organization that brings business and banking together for positive networking,” says Amparan, who is a member of the organization’s leadership team.

Along with helping women plot their careers in financing, Women in Banking is a strong supporter of Fresh Start Women’s Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping women in areas such as career change, personal growth, family relationships and more. The group collects clothes for donation and works to raise money to sponsor Fresh Start’s annual golf tournament and fashion show.

That type of commitment to all women in the community is just one example of the impact women professionals in finance are making.

“Women in business are tremendous bridge builders and relationship makers,” Amparan says. “Banking and finance has become more of a warm, open environment to the credit of professional women across the state and country. People are starting to take notice of the successful way women are starting to do business and build relationships.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Avnet's Roy Vallee On Leadership

Avnet’s Roy Vallee On Leadership

Thirty-seven years ago Roy Vallee was stocking shelves at a small electronics distribution company in Los Angeles. That small firm has grown up to become Avnet, Inc., a Fortune 500 firm located in Phoenix, Arizona. Avnet is one of the largest distributors of electronic parts, enterprise computing and storage products, and embedded subsystems in the world. And Roy Vallee is the CEO and chairman of the board. One morning recently, marketing professor  Antony Peloso sat down with Mr. Vallee to talk about Avnet, his leadership style, and how to motivate employees — even in a far-flung global operation. Professor Peloso leads the Marketing Professional Sales and Relationship Management Initiative, which fosters strong relationships between students who are headed for careers in sales, marketing faculty members and corporate partners. The goal is to build professional sales capabilities and advance the profile and status of the sales function. And now let’s hear what Mr. Vallee has to say about one the toughest jobs of leadership: motivating employees. (26:42)

The podcast no longer works, please check the wpcarey website for the transcript.

AzHHA’s New President And CEO Laurie Liles - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

AzHHA’s New President And CEO Is Ready To Tackle The Industry’s Challenges

A familiar face has been named the new president and chief executive officer of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association (AzHHA). Laurie Liles assumed her new role on Sept. 7, succeeding John Rivers, who will be available as a consultant until his retirement becomes official in January.

Selected by the AzHHA board of directors on June 3 after an extensive national search, Liles is a natural for the position, having most recently served as senior vice president of public affairs for the organization. In that role, Liles was the association’s chief lobbyist, putting her in charge of legislative and regulatory advocacy, and making her a familiar face at the state Capitol.

In fact, when she joined the association in 1991, Liles already was well known and respected at the Legislature. She was an intern at the Arizona House of Representatives in 1985, and in 1986 joined the House research staff. It was her first real job coming out of college, where she had majored in political science at Northern Arizona University.

The years at AzHHA that Liles spent lobbying lawmakers have given her a solid foundation for the tasks ahead. She also worked closely with the chief executive officers of AzHHA-member hospitals throughout the state.

“My role as chief lobbyist has given me a great deal of exposure to the challenging issues our members face,” Liles says. “It also enabled me to advance their interests with the regulatory entities they interact with.”

While she savors the experience and knowledge she gained as a lobbyist, Liles doesn’t plan on visiting the Capitol on a regular basis anymore.

“As the head of an advocacy organization, I will be ultimately responsible for accomplishing our advocacy goals,” she says, adding she will work closely with her staff and her replacement, who will tend to the day-to-day duties of lobbying.

Myriad challenges lie ahead, but No. 1 on Liles’ list is not unique to hospitals or the health care industry: the economy.

“The recession has been hard on everyone, and hospitals are no exception to that,” Liles says. “Our members continue to provide high-quality care, and the challenge going forward is to maintain that quality as resources become more and more precious.”

Arizona’s fiscal crisis is expected to continue for the next few years, Liles says, and as the state slowly recovers hospitals will be particularly vulnerable to any government-imposed cuts to Medicare and the state’s Medicaid program, the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS). The question remains how the state will pay for ever-expanding AHCCCS rolls. Enhanced federal matching funds, which faced some opposition in Congress, would ease the burden.

A close second in priorities is implementation of the new federal health care reform law. Fortunately, Liles has maintained a close working relationship with Arizona’s congressional delegation, particularly staff members who deal with health care issues. In addition to e-mails and phone calls, Liles has made it a practice to meet in Washington, D.C., with congressional members a couple of times a year.

Norm Botsford, chairman of the AzHHA board of directors, cited the federal health care law when he announced Liles’ appointment.

“The state’s health care community and citizens will be well served by Ms. Liles’ leadership as we begin the process of implementing the historic health care reforms signed into law by President Obama.” he stated.

But one of the challenges facing Liles and hospital administrators throughout the state does have a silver lining. Asked what good news hospitals can expect in the year ahead, Liles took a long pause before saying: “The really positive news for health care is the increased coverage that the federal health reform legislation brings. Having 32 million more Americans who previously had no insurance be covered is a positive development, but with it comes challenges of providing care for them.”

http://azbigmedia.com/tag/september-october-2010-2

AzHHA’s 2010 Annual Membership Conference - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

AzHHA’s 2010 Annual Membership Conference Is Aimed At Helping Members Prepare For Change

With the health care field on the brink of a major upheaval, the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association’s (AzHHA) 2010 Annual Membership Conference offers members information on what to expect in the future.

The theme, Bringing the Future into Focus, incorporates a mix of topics and speakers intended to appeal to a diverse hospital audience. Attendees will hear from leading economists, patient safety experts, health care visionaries and others.

LeAnn Swanson, vice president of education services for AzHHA, says the conference is the ideal venue to bring the new health care reality into full focus.
“Some of the best minds in the industry will be providing hard-hitting education and thought-provoking commentary,” she says. “This conference is intended for the entire hospital family, including the C-suite leadership team, hospital trustees, legal counsel, operations, quality, patient safety, human resources, and marketing officers.”

This year’s conference, Oct. 14-15 at The Buttes Resort in Tempe, kicks off with a keynote session featuring Lowell Catlett, Ph.D., regent’s professor, dean and chief administrative officer at New Mexico State University’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. He will speak on the present and future of the economy.

Catlett notes that economic downturns are common — with 14 recessions during the past 80 years — and provide a means for society to re-balance what it deems to be important.

“Every recession leads to a spurt in new business starts, reformulation of business practices and new technological adaptations,” he says. “This current pause is no exception as we focus on what we value most. Get ready for phenomenal growth in health care, energy and lifestyle markets. For those willing to embrace the opportunities, the next decade will be successful beyond any in history.”

Immediately after Catlett’s presentation on Oct. 14, the general session will feature Ron Galloway, director of the documentary “Why Wal-Mart Works and Why That Makes Some People Crazy,” and the newly released “Rebooting Healthcare.” His topic, Wal-Mart and the Future of Healthcare, covers in-store health care clinics that offer everything from eyeglasses to flu shots to urgent care.

Galloway says the discount retailer aims to leverage its 4,000 stores into the largest force in American health care.

At the Oct. 15 breakfast meeting, sponsored by the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), Chris Van Gorder, president and CEO of Scripps Health in San Diego and ACHE 2010-2011 chairman, will offer a look at Scripps’ medical response team. Van Gorder will describe the team’s efforts in the Hurricane Katrina-ravaged Gulf of Mexico, San Diego after its massive wildfires and quake-stricken Haiti.

Concurrent breakout sessions will look at the key drivers of physician behavior and the natural tension that exists in doctor-hospital relationships; trends and technologies that are “re-forming” health care in unexpected and beneficial ways; and the notion of being in a health care bubble with a high potential for a correction over the next five years.

The closing session will feature John Nance, author of “Why Hospitals Should Fly,” which was named the 2009 book of the year by the ACHE. Based on his book, Nance offers some solutions to the patient safety and quality-care crises that resonate deeply with all health care audiences.

The conference also will feature AzHHA’s annual awards luncheon, and a president’s reception that will give attendees an opportunity to say goodbye to the organization’s longtime president and CEO, John Rivers, as he nears retirement. The reception also will serve to introduce AzHHA’s new leader, Laurie Liles.

Along with the conference, during the upcoming year AzHHA also will offer a series of webinars and other events of interest to members of the hospital and health care industry, as well as representatives of the business community, Swanson says. The emphasis will be on compliance-related topics, including rules and regulations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and the Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, also known as EMTALA.

To learn more about upcoming education opportunities from AzHHA and to register for conference events, visit www.azhha.org/educational_services and click on education events.

    Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association’s
    2010 Annual Membership Conference

    Oct. 14-15
    The Buttes Resort
    2000 Westcourt Way, Tempe
    www.azhha.org

Arizona Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

leadershiphorizontal

Learn The Principles Of Effective Leadership

Knowledge: Great companies and great leaders are often synonymous, but what does it take to be a great leader? Dr. Angelo Kinicki is professor of management at the W.P. Carey School of Business. As a consultant, Kinicki often works with top management teams. Here, Kinicki discusses the principles of transformational and managerial leadership in increasing the efficiency of executives and the companies they lead. (18:09)

Benito Almanza Arizona State President Company: Bank of America - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

CEO Series: Benito Almanza

Benito Almanza
Title: Arizona State President
Company: Bank of America

How would you assess the banking industry’s reactions to the new financial reform law? What are the industry’s biggest concerns, particularly in regards to derivatives and less onerous regulation on small banks?
Bank of America has generally supported reforms, including the formation of a new consumer protection agency. While this reform will ultimately have an effect on many businesses across Bank of America and other financial service companies, customers and clients should not expect any abrupt changes as a result of this legislation. The full impact and scope of the bill may take years to be felt, as regulators establish hundreds of new rules to implement the law.

The year 2009 was a tough one for Bank of America in terms of the federal bailout and executive shakeup. How has repaying the bailout and installing a new CEO affected the company’s operations and public image?
In December, Bank of America took a series of important actions to move our company forward. We repaid the entire $45 billion preferred stock investment provided under the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), plus interest. A few days later, Brian Moynihan was selected to lead our company. He has a level of credibility and broad-based experience few can rival, having led every major line of business in financial services, including wealth management, corporate and investment banking, and consumer and small business banking.

As Arizona president for B of A, how have you — and your peers from other large banks — addressed the concerns Main Street has about Wall Street?
The industry understands that our well-being is interconnected with the health and vitality of the economy and the communities we serve. It is not in any companies’ interest to put profit over common sense. Nor is it in anyone’s interest to lose sight of the value our industry provides among legitimate concerns about the difficulties of the recent past. Our challenge for the foreseeable future — and I think we’re moving in the right direction — is to reconcile this and strengthen our financial system by working with leaders and regulators in a spirit of trust and goodwill.

In speaking for my own company, Bank of America has introduced clarity commitments within our card, deposit and mortgage services to make sure customers receive clear and easy to understand language about their relationship with our bank. In addition, our new overdraft fee changes went into effect July 1, whereby we will decline a debit card transaction at the point of sale when there is not enough money in the account for the transaction, and not charge overdraft fees to the customer.

Small businesses are having a difficult time getting loans and various lines of credit. B of A prides itself on its No. 1 SBA-lender status. How important is that role in the economic recovery?
With 4 million small businesses customers — more than any other bank — Bank of America feels a deep sense of responsibility to support them in every way possible. In the first half of 2010, we provided $45.5 billion in loans to small and medium-sized companies, well on our way to meeting our pledge to increase lending by $5 billion over 2009 levels, or $86.4 billion.

We continue to also look for creative ways to help these businesses bridge to a stronger economy. For example, we recently announced a new program that can help as many as 8,000 small businesses obtain $100 million in federal microloans through nonprofit lenders like CDFIs, by providing CDFIs with grants to cover loan loss reserves required to get the SBA/USDA loan capital. This is low-cost, long-term capital for small business microloans nationwide over the next 12 months.

What challenges and opportunities lie ahead for the banking industry in Arizona?
Arizona’s economy will probably be on a slower track than most states because of the significant losses in our housing and jobs markets. That being said, there are many bright spots to look forward to and we must continue to make every good loan we can and focus on opportunities that will help our long-term economic recovery …

    Vital Stats


  • Has been with Bank of America for more than 30 years
  • Responsible for the overall performance of all business banking activities in Arizona
  • Graduate of Stanford University and Santa Clara University
  • Member of the California State Bar Association
  • Member of the U.S. District Court Northern District Association
  • Member of the Greater Phoenix Leadership and Arizona Bankers Association
  • Serves on the board of Phoenix Aviation and Teach for America
  • www.bankofamerica.com

Arizona Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

Photo from Wikimedia Commons.

Newly Formed Arizona Commerce Authority Convenes Its Inaugural Board Meeting

Vowing that “today the rubber hits the road,” Gov. Jan Brewer and Jerry Colangelo assembled and introduced 35 state leaders representing diverse backgrounds for the inaugural board meeting of the Arizona Commerce Authority.

The private-sector board will work to align diverse assets and opportunities within the state to compete economically in both domestic and international markets to create high-quality jobs for the Arizona residents.

“For the first time in our state’s history, we convene the Governor, the Speaker of the House and the Senate President, and more than 35 of our nation’s most acknowledged leaders within both the private sector and academia – all with one express purpose: to advance the global competitiveness of our state the economic prosperity we seek for each person, each family and, perhaps more importantly, each child – it’s about a vision for a strong, vibrant economic future for this great state,” Gov. Brewer said.

“When I became Governor, I promised to get Arizona back on track by creating quality jobs, attracting high-growth industries, and advancing our competitive position in the global economy. We are doing just that. With this board, I have now delivered a model to advance Arizona.”

Presentations to the board outlined the impacts of the global economic crisis on the state, the forecasts if Arizona does not address diversification and growth in base industries, the state’s overall global competitiveness, and a focused approach to four core areas on which the ACA will focus and develop a planned approach to advance the state.

The authority will focus on improving the state’s infrastructure and climate to retain, attract and grow high-tech and innovative companies. That focus will be on aerospace and defense, science and technology, solar and renewable energy, small business and entrepreneurship.

“During one of the most challenging economic conditions in our nation’s history, Arizona is competing for something that is even greater than Olympic Gold; we are fighting for the health and future of our families and this state,” said Colangelo, co-chair of the board. “Today, with the expertise and leadership of each board member, we begin to compete aggressively for what really matters.”

Don Cardon, current director of the Department of Commerce, will serve on a selection committee to recruit a president and CEO of the ACA. Other committee members are Gov. Brewer’s chief of staff Eileen Klein; Mo Stein, senior vice president of HKS; Jerry Fuentes, president, AT&T Arizona/New Mexico; and Michael Kennedy, co-founder and partner, Gallagher & Kennedy.

Other notable board members include Kirk Adams, speaker, Arizona House of Representatives; Benito Almanza, state president, Bank of America; Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals; Dr. Michael Crow, president, Arizona State University; Linda Hunt, president, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center; Anne Mariucci, chairman, Arizona Board of Regents; Doug Pruitt, chairman and CEO, Sundt Construction; and Roy Vallee, chairman of the board and CEO, Avnet.

Tartesso Elementary

Elementary School Leaves A Small Carbon Footprint

Buckeye’s Tartesso Elementary School is receiving high marks, but it has nothing to do with the kids in the classroom.

On Aug. 19, 2010, the United States Green Building Council awarded the 3-year-old school with a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver Certification for sustainable building design.

Tartesso, a part of the Saddle Mountain Unified School District, is the first fully state-funded LEED Silver School in Arizona with this recognition.

“Having the certification is a big bonus to our district,” said Dr. Deborah Garza-Chavez, principal of Tartesso. “It’s nice to be noticed as a small district by trying to provide the best learning environment for our students and staff.”

The school had just a little more than 200 students upon opening in 2008 and only served kindergarten through 6th grade. Now fully functioning up to 8th grade, more than 600 students walk the halls of a completely sustainable and environmentally conscious building.

Architects and engineers from DLR Group were responsible for the building designs of the school and worked with budgets allocated by the Arizona State School of Facilities Board.

“Before we started designing the facility in early 2006, we brought our team into a brainstorming session where we could evaluate and strategize as to what sustainable products we wanted to use,” said Bill Taylor, a LEED-accredited professional with DLR Group.

The staff and students at Tartesso have a wide variety of energy saving technologies and products that create a healthy learning environment.

In an effort to reduce water shortages, the building design provides a plumbing system that conserves water. All of the boys’ restrooms contain waterless urinals and the kitchen sinks have low flow water fixtures, a reduction that saves half a million gallons of water per year.

The school provides a high performing mechanical system that goes above and beyond state standards.

A completely computer controlled airflow system continuously brings in new air circulation and automatically turns off air conditioning in an unoccupied room.  This reduces the annual energy cost by 20 percent, in comparison to a building that just meets the state code requirements.

In addition to significant energy savings, DLR Group improved the indoor environmental quality of Tartesso.  The building is positioned so that natural daylight offsets the artificial lighting in all occupied academic spaces, reducing energy and improving the educational environment.

Only low organic compound paint was used and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) free carpets were installed to promote a healthy interior for students and staff.

“[Students] have benefited from not having those harsh smells,” said Angel Tellez, Facilities Engineer for Saddle Mountain Unified School District. “Everything is kid friendly and environmentally friendly and that is improving the learning environment.”

Not only has the school been a leader in sustainable innovations, but it has served as an asset to the economy by purchasing materials from local companies. Ingredients in the concrete were all locally harvested and nothing was shipped long distance.

“This is a place that has students, staff and the community in mind,” said Premnath Sundharam, Senior Associate for DLR Group. “It’s an educational tool for what can be done on limited funds while still making an impact on the environment.”

Your Call IsNot Important

“Your Call Is Not That Important To Us”

“Please hold — your call is important to us.” If you’ve ever heard that sentence then you know what it’s like to be “on hold” for customer service. Journalist and author Emily Yellin found herself suspended in customer service no-man’s-land when she tried to get her home warranty company to honor their commitments. The experience propelled her to explore the inner workings of the customer service industry, and to write a book about it entitled “Your Call Is (not that) Important to Us.” Yellin was a featured speaker at the 20th Annual Compete Through Service Symposium, hosted by the Center for Services Leadership at the W. P. Carey School of Business. She talked with us about the state of customer service today, and how companies might improve. Symposium podcast coverage was sponsored by IBM. (5:54)

hr_director_mega_biz

2009 Mega Business HR Director Of The Year Honoree

Dale SpartzName: Dale A. Spartz, Ph.D.
Title: Vice President of Human Resources
Company: John C. Lincoln Health Network

Years with city: 9
Years in current position: 9
Year incorporated: 1927
Employees in AZ: 3,470
Employees in HR dept.: 15
www.jcl.com

Imagine it’s an ordinary day at your company and you wander over to the employee cafeteria for lunch. A member of senior management joins you for a bite and a little conversation. You know each other.

That’s the kind of environment Dale A. Spartz has fostered at John C. Lincoln Health Network in his role as vice president of human resources. JCL executives are encouraged to interact with employees in order to promote face-to-face communication. Executives also participate in team-building exercises, and the CEO holds regular meetings with employees. Potlucks, holiday lunches and volunteer opportunities keep employees engaged with one another and their managers.

Under Spartz’s leadership, a culture of excellence is promoted through a variety of awards that recognize length of service, special achievements, exceptional nursing care and physician dedication to patients, and teamwork. Diversity also is appreciated at Phoenix-based JCL. Spartz’s human resources team has extended employee benefits to domestic partners, regardless of gender; special fairs encourage employees to showcase their cultural backgrounds; and international recruitment of registered nurses is ongoing. Also, older nurses returning to work are supported through a nurse-refresher course.

Women are well represented throughout JCL’s employee ranks, including the executive team. The CEO is a woman, as are eight of 15 vice presidents.

Described as a caring man with a comforting personality, Spartz is credited with leading the way in ensuring a healthy home-work balance at JCL. Some employees telecommute, while others work flex schedules. Child care is available onsite, as is adult day care for elderly parents and spouses. A fitness and wellness center also is available to employees.

Recruitment and retention of qualified and caring professionals is key to surviving and thriving in the highly competitive health-care industry, and Spartz’s educational background demonstrates his qualifications in that area. He has a doctorate in organizational development, a Master of Science degree in industrial and organizational psychology, a Master of Arts in human resources management, a Bachelor of Science in management and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. Spartz is credited with being particularly strong in recruiting and developing talent, whether among nurses, his own staff or among myriad specialized health care professionals.

JCL’s employee satisfaction ranks well above national averages, as measured by Charlotte, N.C.-based Morehead Associates, an employee and physician research firm for health care organizations. JCL’s high-satisfaction scores have been recognized by Morehead through its Galaxy Award. JCL’s dedication to human services has helped it reduce expenses associated with recruitment, training and turnover.

Spartz also has demonstrated his leadership through the creation of partnerships between JCL and nursing colleges. In fact, the partnerships are a human resources function. Through these partnerships, employees who are in nursing school work in jobs commensurate with their education and are eligible for promotions as their education progresses. Spartz established a 90-day check-in with the nurses’ supervisors that includes a ceremony and a cash award. JCL also offers a mentoring program under which established registered nurses help new RNs integrate into the nursing profession and the JCL culture.

hr_team

2009 HR Team Of The Year Honoree


Phoenix Suns LogoCompany: Phoenix Suns
Web: www.suns.com

Company Established: 1968
Employees in AZ: 200
Employees in HR department: 6

The Phoenix Suns human resources department is known not only as the “go-to” place for a wealth of information, but also as a warm and welcoming office for all employees who walk through the door.

Six people comprise the Suns’ human resources team. Peter Wong is vice president of human resources and Karen Rausch is human resources director. Wong is an adjunct faculty member at Scottsdale Community College and a member of the Corporate Leadership Council and the Sports Network. He is also a board member of the Sports & Entertainment Human Resource Forum and sits on the diversity committee of the Women’s Sports Foundation. Rausch is a member of the Valley of the Sun Human Resource Association and chairs the National Basketball Association’s compensation committee.

The Suns human resources team works in a male-dominated industry, yet its own ranks are half women. It sets an example for the company’s commitment to diversity in another way — half its employees are minorities. In fact, companywide, 38 percent of the people who work for the Suns are women and 37 percent are minorities. Human resources strives for a diverse mix of job candidates by developing outreach programs with Goodwill, Job Corps and the Arizona State University career center.

The Suns’ human resources team has made its mark in a number of ways. It established a leadership group for women in management positions. This year, the leadership group hosted a reception with “Good Morning America” anchor Robin Roberts, who shared professional and personal experiences as a working woman. Katie Pushor, former president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, recently spoke to the group about leading employee teams.

The human resources team also sponsors a leadership committee, a monthly discussion group that includes the CEO, executive management, managers and supervisors throughout the Suns organization. Coordination of the agenda is rotated among members. Each member has an opportunity to prepare presentations and arrange speakers from the Phoenix business community. Suns players and coaches also speak to the group. The leadership committee provides managers with information about the company and discusses trends and opportunities within the sports industry.

Employee recognition involves a number of programs organized by human resources. The department conducts all-employee meetings in which Suns owners and executives provide business updates and presentations are given by players, industry specialists and sports personalities. There also are service awards and a program for employee of the month.

man sitting in chair in front of office window

CEO Series: Steve Cowman

Steve Cowman
Appointed CEO and Board Member, Stirling Energy Systems (SES)

How has the recession affected the alternative energy industry?
It’s had a major impact on the solar industry and the renewable energy industry on two fronts. First of all, there are a lot of solar companies that are not going to make it through the current credit crisis because they are going to run out of capital. … You need to have a pretty strong balance sheet at the moment and you need to have a pretty strong parental structure to support you through this. That’s not just solar — that’s a lot of the renewable companies.

The second issue is getting the funding for the projects themselves. That is a huge challenge because these projects are typically between half a billion and a billion dollars in terms of capital requirement. … What’s really impressed me about the Obama Administration and the DOE (Department of Energy) is that they recognize that there is a technical challenge here given where the credit markets are. They also recognize that renewable energy has the real potential to be competitive in price with fossil fuel after three to five years. But to do that (companies) need some help to actually get there. I think the stimulus package, as it’s been outlined, has tremendous potential to help the renewable (industry) in general and the solar (industry) in particular.

Why is Arizona behind other states in developing solar energy?
Arizona is a great state and Phoenix has clearly grown, but it’s grown on the back of a particular focus … real estate, the holiday center, the golf complexes. … It hasn’t really focused on the industrial side of it. I think if you look at what has actually happened to Phoenix over the past 10 to 15 years, there’s been a slow erosion of its industrial and technological base. And some of the very large companies like Motorola, ON Semiconductor, Intel … have significantly slimmed down or have actually outsourced. And they haven’t just outsourced overseas. …

They’ve moved to New Mexico, they’ve moved to Nevada, they’ve moved to California. I think, to be honest, Arizona fell asleep at the wheel. … (it) didn’t really provide the right type of incentives, and I think it has paid the price.

However, I would say that in the last year, there’s been a shock of reality. Obviously, Arizona has seen the biggest collapse in housing prices. It saw the biggest run-up and it saw the biggest collapse, as well. I think of GPEC (Greater Phoenix Economic Council) as being particularly proactive in terms of trying to bring that awareness, in terms of trying to attract (companies). … That (Arizona) Senate bill (1403) that just went through … is significant, but it won’t fix the problem. But, it does show a culture change in the Arizona Legislature in terms of wanting to be more proactive about attracting inward investment at this time.

What do governments have to do in order to get more companies to turn to alternative energy?
There are two things the state has started to do. The first thing they’ve done is they are mandating renewable targets. So, they are mandating to the utility companies that they must have a certain percentage of their power come from renewables. And if there’s not, there will be financial penalties. That’s the stick, if you like. And the carrot that they are actually providing is the stimulus package to help the renewable companies to get the projects in the ground. So they’ve got those two things running parallel.

What do you see in the future for the alternative energy industry?
The potential is tremendous. You have a fantastic manufacturing and engineering base here. …  You have a large number of really blue chip, Fortune 100 U.S. multinationals that have established a really strong technology base here. You have Arizona State University that has some fantastic programs, and you have a great environment for people to live in. So, it’s a really attractive place and I have to think that the future will be really good. … (However) there are companies who have worldwide headquarters here but do no manufacturing here — who shall remain anonymous. So, the real challenge for Arizona is how do you get those companies to increase their level of vertical integration and move beyond just having headquarter functions to having manufacturing and design (here)?

What kind of leadership team works best for a company like Stirling?
Ideally, you want someone who brings a well-honed skill set. You want someone who has experience in, hopefully, one or two different areas, someone who has good interpersonal skills. … So it’s your personality, it’s your attitude. … If you have a can-do, we can knock down any barrier to make it work (attitude), you will make it work. … So what’s the ideal executive? The answer is there is not an ideal executive. What you want is a good mix.

    Vital Stats



  • Appointed CEO of Stirling Energy Systems in June 2008
  • Held numerous senior management positions at Greenstar Ireland, General Electric, Harris Corporation, General Semiconductor, Vishay Intertechnology, Volex Europe.
  • Earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in engineering from the University College, Dublin and Sheffield University; master’s degree in management science from Trinity College Dublin
  • www.stirlingenergy.com
Michelle Kerrick

First Job – Michelle Kerrick

Michelle Kerrick
Managing Partner
Arizona Practice Deloitte, LLP

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My very first job was waiting tables at a Bob’s Big Boy restaurant in Flagstaff during high school. My sister and I had signed up for a ski trip to Utah, but I needed to earn the money over Christmas break to be able to go. After dropping several meals and breaking the coffee pot, I realized that waitressing was not for me — but I learned several great lessons from that job. First, find the areas where you excel and the things you’re passionate about, and second, don’t let hot coffee land on the polyester uniforms!

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
I joined Deloitte, which was named Touche Ross at the time, as a staff accountant in 1985. I was recruited from Northern Arizona University and have been here ever since. My dad encouraged me to study accounting. He felt it would be a challenging field and a marketable career. I chose Deloitte because of the energy and warmth of the people I met. That stands true today. I work with an incredible group of very talented individuals. One of the most important lessons I have learned in my 23 years in this profession is the importance of flexibility. When you are a junior staff member, client, industry and team assignments change frequently, which can be intimidating. You have to be able to react to change in a positive way. I also learned that working hard and maintaining a good attitude not only helps you be successful, it fosters a collaborative environment where everyone benefits from the team’s accomplishments.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
My restaurant job paid the industry standard for tipped employees: less than minimum wage. In 1979, it was about $2.50 an hour. When I joined Touche Ross in 1985, I was earning a salary of $18,000, plus a $2,000 bonus, and I was thrilled. Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play? Two mentors influenced me tremendously. The first is a now-retired Deloitte partner named Dave Martin. I had the opportunity to work with Dave for a great portion of my career. He was an impressive leader with remarkable business acumen and taught me a lot about client service and navigating the Deloitte organization. My other mentor is a friend outside of the accounting profession whom I have known for more than 15 years. He helped me hone my business skills and develop the ability to take a long-term, big-picture view, which is critical for any business leader.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Work hard and keep a positive attitude. Be flexible to the many changes that will come your way, since every new experience is a learning opportunity. Keep things in perspective: life will go on, and everyone makes mistakes. Strive for balance between work and your personal life — you can’t give 100 percent at work if you don’t take the time to stay healthy and fit.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I had always thought about med school; however, given some of the issues facing the health care system, I have no regrets! One of the great aspects of my job is the support and encouragement I receive from the firm to give back to the community. That is certainly something I am passionate about and I hope to always stay active in our community. I currently work with Fresh Start Women’s Foundation, the Maricopa Partnership for Arts and Culture, Greater Phoenix Leadership, Saint Mary’s Food Bank and the United Way. I want to see Phoenix become the metropolitan area that will attract viable companies and great talent.

Phoenix_skyline_Arizona_USA

A Voyage Of Discovery In Phoenix

Facing a down economy, shrinking budgets and significant pressures to outperform the year’s commitments, how do you find time for sustainability? Let’s face it, if there is no payback within the current year, it’s unlikely you can get capital or modify your operating budget to make any kind of significant difference toward a green program, right? Wrong!

In a recessionary environment there’s more than one way to cut costs and leverage those savings to support other initiatives. In addition to pure cost savings, a little bit of planning and adjustment of current policies can yield results with little or no additional expense.

Our approach at the Greater Phoenix Chapter of IFMA, beginning in August 2008, was to establish a Facility Managers’ Green Peer Group (FMGPG) to foster open information exchange and provide a forum for sharing best practices.

What FMGPG has done is to create the environment for the peer group to be successful. A facilitator who is familiar with the subject matter is the primary pivot point; we manage and develop the agenda, secure the location and communicate through the FMGPG to the group members. The facilitator then leads the meeting and keeps the group focused on the agenda and future goals.

The initial goal of the peer group was to educate the members on the five major categories of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) as they related to the Existing Building Operations and Maintenance structure, or EBOM.

The LEED-EB system focuses on building maintenance and operations. Unlike the other LEED standards, points are awarded for established programs and policies with measured results over time. Metrics are taken during a performance period lasting from three to 12 months.

As with the LEED for new construction products, points are awarded in six categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor air quality, and innovation in operations

There are 92 available points, with a minimum of 34 required for the lowest level of certification. Most organizations nationwide appear to be striving for Silver or Gold certification based on the initial condition of the building.

We established a yearlong program that was based on the following formula:
General Discussion and Checklist Review + Facility Examples and Benchmarking + Site Visit = A Solid Foundation of Understanding.

So, what’s the bottom line on the benefits of the peer group:

  • Approaching sustainability concepts with minimal or no impact to your FM resources and budget.
  • Marketing your FM organization through sustainability involvement.
  • Taking advantage of LEED benefits without certifying your site.
  • Decoding the myths and fears of LEED.
  • Strengthening your FM position by demonstrating sustainability initiatives.
  • Demonstrating the hidden value of your FM organization by introducing and achieving sustainable initiatives.
  • Educating your staff, customers and stakeholders, as well as yourself, on sustainability and the workplace.
  • One LEED case study, managed by an IFMA CFM (Certified Facility Manager), has shown the following validated results:

    • Effectively reduced electricity use by 35 percent.
    • Effectively reduced natural gas use by 41 percent.
    • Reduced domestic water use by 22 percent.
    • Reduced landscape water use by 76 percent.
    • Diverted up to 85 percent of its solid waste.
    • Reduced total pollution by 26 percent.
    • Reduced CO2 emissions by 17 percent.

    A new study by CoStar Group, the commercial equivalent of MLS, has found that sustainable “green” buildings outperform their peer, non-green assets in key areas such as occupancy, sale price and rental rates, sometimes by wide margins.

    The results indicate a broader demand by property investors and tenants for buildings that have earned either LEED certification or the Energy Star label, and strengthen the “business case” for green buildings, which proponents have increasingly cast as financially sound investments.

    According to the study, LEED buildings command rent premiums of $11.24 per square foot over their non-LEED peers, and have 3.8 percent higher occupancy. Rental rates in Energy Star buildings represent a $2.38 per square foot premium over comparable non-Energy Star buildings, and have 3.6 percent higher occupancy. And, in a trend that could signal greater attention from institutional investors and the C-level, Energy Star buildings are selling for an average of $61 per square foot more than their peers, while LEED buildings command a remarkable $171 more per square foot.

    At the end of the day — even in a down economy — you can make a difference, even with little or no budget.

    Tourism Honoree Southwest Airlines Best of the Best 2009

    Best of the Best Awards 2009: Tourism

    Tourism Honoree: Airlines Serving Arizona

    Southwest Airlines

    Southwest Airlines - Best of the Best Awards 2009 presented by Ranking Arizona

    Photograph by Duane Darling

    It all began on a cocktail napkin more than 38 years ago. Attorney Herb Kelleher and businessman Rollin King sketched Southwest Airlines’ original route structure connecting Dallas, Houston and San Antonio, which officially created the low-fare category in the airline industry. Today, Southwest has become the nation’s largest airline in terms of domestic passengers enplaned, serving 65 airports in 33 states. Southwest provides more than just air travel to the communities it serves. By attracting new customers with low fares and high frequency, Southwest creates jobs for residents and revenue for the airports and cities it serves — a phenomenon dubbed “the Southwest Effect.” Southwest has been a maverick in the industry and a model for excellence in American business.

    Guided by visionary leadership, Southwest has managed to remain profitable through some of the country’s most turbulent times.

    3800 E. Sky Harbor Blvd., Phoenix
    800-I-FLY-SWA
    www.southwest.com

    Year Est: 1982
    AZ Staff: 4,000+
    Parent Company HQ: Dallas, Texas
    Destinations out of AZ: 64


    Tourism Finalist: Meeting/Convention: 43,999 SQ FT or less

    The Ritz-Carlton Phoenix

    The Ritz-Carlton Phoenix is the premier luxury business hotel in Arizona, acclaimed for its warm hospitality and impeccable, personalized service. More than 20,000 square feet of meeting and event facilities accommodate groups from 10 to 500 guests. The 14 meeting rooms and outdoor Poolside Terrace create an ideal setting for events.

    2401 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix
    602-468-0700
    www.ritzcarlton.com


    Tourism Finalist: Resorts/Hotels: 184 rooms or fewer

    Royal Palms Resort & Spa

    Nestled at the base of Camelback Mountain, Royal Palms Resort and Spa is a Spanish Mediterranean-style estate that offers 119 guestrooms, casitas and suites. The Royal Palms combines the graciousness and sophistication of a Mediterranean villa with the intimacy and privacy of a secluded retreat. With its unique ambience, stone fireplaces, and mountain views, the resort offers the award-winning T. Cook’s restaurant, Mobil Four-Star Alvadora Spa and more than 20,000 square feet of meeting space.

    5200 E. Camelback Road, Phoenix
    602-840-3610
    www.royalpalmsresortandspa.com


    Best of the Best Awards 2009 presented by Ranking Arizona

    ethics scale

    Making Ethics An Essential Part Of Doing Business

    The challenge of building an ethical climate in businesses is not new. However, in the last decade, the importance of such a climate, and the heavy costs of ethical transgressions, have been prominent in the daily headlines. They reveal the impact of decades of ethical mismanagement that goes beyond explicitly breaking laws. Rather, the issue is the systematic failures of businesses in developing, executing and maintaining an infrastructure that fosters ethical decision-making.

    By ethical decision-making, we mean the ability of employees to recognize and detect decision situations that risk damaging operations or investments, negatively impacting shareholders and other stakeholders, or harming the business’ reputation.

    Business ethics are complex; we cannot trivialize the work of developing a culture of integrity. Nevertheless, here is a list of key guidelines that managers in companies of any size can use to build an ethical system of “doing what is right.”

    The prerequisites
    Start at the top — You are the ethical leaders of the business. Chief executive officers must formally commit to incorporating ethical behaviors as a guiding principle within their business’ mission statement and goals. Ethical core values should be consistently communicated, embraced and reinforced to stakeholders.

    Know key laws and regulatory issues — Employees must know relevant laws such as Sarbanes-Oxley, Occupational Health and Safety, intellectual property, etc., that impact their responsibility areas. Many employees should know labor laws to avoid discriminatory behaviors. And, they should know that violating laws or trying to “get around them” will not be tolerated.

    Standardize policies and procedures — This is where ethical lapses frequently occur, especially in small businesses. There is a tendency to ignore or resist putting in place formal codes of behavior because they can make the members of an entrepreneurial enterprise feel constrained, or worst of all, bureaucratic. But without written common rules and procedures for such areas as itemizing expenses, accepting gifts, incentive programs, days off, or handling customer communications, businesses lend themselves to problems of cheating, fairness and misrepresentations. This is not to suggest developing detailed manuals, but rather identifying key areas of inconsistencies that can cause financial, reputation or stakeholder harm, and then developing proactive communication to avoid potential ethical misconduct.

    Implement a formal system to handle potential ethical problems — Employees should know where they can go within the company if they have or notice an ethical dilemma, particularly if they believe they cannot go directly to their manager. If a business has a human resources department, that is a logical place to go if employees are concerned about the risks of “whistle blowing.” Some businesses have designated an ethics officer, a hot line, or a suggestion box to foster an environment of integrity. Whatever approach is taken, employees must be assured that they will not suffer negative consequences for consulting with appropriate parties to discuss their concerns.

    Conduct behavioral interviewing with potential employees — How do you hire employees who are ethical? Unfortunately, there are no valid and reliable “ethical behavioral” tests. Some businesses have job prospects take written exams that include questions addressing fictional ethical dilemmas; others ask those questions in interviews. These approaches may provide insights into a potential hire’s ethical reasoning and decision-making. While no one can guarantee a recruit’s future ethical behavior, the processes described above will help integrate him or her into the ethical climate of the business.

    Building a foundation
    Incorporate ethical behavior into performance expectations — This is a very new area. To ensure that the values of the organization are aligned with an employee’s conduct, ethics could be included as part of the performance appraisal process. Employees then become accountable not just for achieving business results, but also for how they went about accomplishing them.

    Provide employees with mentors — One way to help employees in ethical decision-making is to provide them with colleagues who can offer advice and support. This can be done by establishing a formal system of mentors, or by actively encouraging employees to seek out others within the organization.

    Hold periodic employee training sessions — Learning about ethics within a business context is an ongoing process. Holding periodic employee meetings where they can learn from one another about ethical dilemmas they faced and how they were resolved, situations where they should not push boundaries, and how to talk about ethical issues with others, can be invaluable in developing a collective ethical identity.

    Identify and develop ethical leaders — As your business identifies employees who “do the right things,” the company should highlight their performance, reward them and promote them as role models to others.

    Commitment to an ethical climate
    Respond quickly to reports of unethical behavior — Investigate, and if confirmed, work to resolve them. You will want to do this, not only to reinforce a climate of ethics, but to prevent any possible escalation of an unaddressed ethical problem.

    Establish and follow through with consequences for both positive ethical behaviors and misconduct — Reward employees who demonstrate sound ethical behavior, and be clear on the consequences if employees violate a law or policy, are deceptive in their dealings with others, do creative but dangerous manipulation of data or information, etc. Rewards and punishments can be tangible or intangible, but they must be consistent and appropriate to the potential or actual harm that results from the situation at hand.

    Monitor ethical activity — If possible, do ethical audits. Like any business-result area, measurement is fundamental. One can accomplish this through looking at the number of ethical instances reported, doing a survey, compliance reports, etc.

    Keep up to date on laws and compliance issues — Ensure that managers are current on any revisions.

    CEOs have to be the ethical leaders. They need to stand for and drive the values they want their business to be known for as it succeeds in its performance. To do this, they must be clear on what their values are, communicate them regularly, establish checks and balances to ensure value commitment, and reinforce a culture of integrity. This is not an easy process, but it is a necessary condition toward building an ethical climate. And this is the ultimate leadership challenge.

    Dale Kalika is a lecturer and Barbara Keats is an associate professor in the department of management in the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. They are conducting research on Generation Y, their entrance into the work force, and ethical decision-making.

    Custome Fit EDU 2008

    A Custom Fit EDU

    By Don Harris

    From two hours to two years, customized education programs are being offered to boost the performance and expertise of executive-level employees — and as a result improve a company’s bottom line.

    Often, businesses struggle with putting the right person in the right leadership position. Even then, there might be gaps between what the person knows and needs to know. Customized programs are designed to fill those gaps.

    cutome_fit_edu 2008

    The focus of universities is on education, not necessarily training. There is even an executive education program that puts upper-level employees directly into community service through nonprofits as a way to help those in need and at the same time generate new skills and ideals that will benefit the employee’s own business.

    Andy Atzert, assistant dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, and director of the school’s Business Center for Executive and Professional Development, says the center aids companies by expanding the knowledge and skills of managers and leaders, but doesn’t do tactical training, such as how to write a business plan.

    The types of industries that utilize the center, Atzert says, include financial services, health care, technology, semiconductors, automotive, agribusiness, supply-chain services, information systems, and two major out-of-state oil companies.

    “There is a demand outside Arizona for the expertise that we have,” Atzert says. “In fact, a majority of the companies are from out of state, and many of those are engaged in our online program.”

    When Atzert says customized, he means customized.

    “Some companies want a two-hour seminar, others want a customized MBA program that will take two years,” he says. “We deliver the program at company locations, at ASU or online.”

    Because many companies have global work forces, the online option is getting increasingly popular. It’s more costly to send a person to an off-site location, not because of the travel expenses, but because of the time involved in being off the job, Atzert says.

    Many of the courses offered focus on supply-chain management, which is a business discipline that has to do with how goods and services are bought and moved from one location to another.

    For example, Toyota faces several supply-chain challenges in obtaining all the parts and materials needed to build an automobile. Atzert identifies questions the ASU program helps answer, such as what is needed, where does it come from, how do they buy it, how do they decide what to buy, how do they work with their designers, and what’s the best way to optimize their efforts and expenditures?

    At the University of Phoenix, AZ LeaderForce is a program that pairs key business leaders with local nonprofits in a yearlong project to help improve the various organizations’ services and train those executives seeking leadership guidance.

    Rodo Sofranac, University of Phoenix curriculum developer, says the program benefits businesses in a number of ways, including quality-of-life awareness, increasing leadership skills, and ethics.

    “The issue is for participants in a project to take what they have learned and experienced back to their workplace and incorporate it in their personal life,” Sofranac says.

    The University of Phoenix, which provides classroom facilities, produces a curriculum and donates its services for AZ LeaderForce, works with the Collaboration for a New Century, an organization formed about 10 years ago through the efforts of Phoenix Suns Chairman Jerry Colangelo. Topics covered include ethics, integrity, leadership, critical thinking skills and the social responsibility of business.

    Steve Capobres, executive director of the Collaboration for a New Century, says the organization targets poverty issues and enlists the business community to work with human service agencies.

    cover_october_2008

    “At the same time,” Capobres says, “we have an executive leadership development program going on. We not only want their time, we want to mold them, cultivate them to become the next generation of business leaders. It’s a yearlong curriculum that takes them through the issues of what a good corporate citizen is. What does it mean to work in the community? What is your own leadership style, your ethics? It’s all about building good corporate leaders who are going to replace our older, retiring leaders.”

    Among the corporate participants are Salt River Project, Bank of America, UBS Financial Services, State Farm Insurance, Lennar Homes and American Express.

    “By taking people outside the world of business and putting them in the community to deal with the issue of poverty,” Capobres says, “those employees are going back to the company to be a better manager.”

    wpcarey.asu.edu
    www.phoenix.edu
    www.thecollab.org

    AZ Business Magazine October 2008 | Previous: Big Money… | Next: At Your Service