Tag Archives: LEED Certification

Mesa Fire Station 219 received LEED Gold Certification, the first for a fire station in the City of Mesa.

Project News: Sept/Oct 2013

>> DPR renovations include multiple healthcare projects

Healthcare projects kept DPR Construction busy with renovations at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Banner Boswell and Osborn Medical Center:

** The EP Cath Lab No. 1 project at St. Joe’s was a 1,300 SF renovation of the existing cath lab room to meet ADHS Health Guidelines. HKS was architect for the $365,000 project.

** The Banner Boswell hybrid OR project included updated staff lockers, finishes upgrades to the pre-op area and renovating 2 standard ORs and providing a new hybrid OR. HKS was architect for the $11M project.

** The Osborn MC project included the remodeling of the 18 diagnostic care unit rooms and support space. HVAC and electrical upgrades were also performed. Synectic Design was architect for the $700,000 project.

Two non-medical projects included the Chandler central plant expansion at Digital Realty and the Chandler K&L suites also at Digital Realty. Subcontractors included Bel-Aire Mechanical, Alliance Fire Protection, Cupertino Electric, Ace Controls, D.H. Pace, Ganado Painting & Wallcovering, Progressive Roofing and Metal Weld.

 

>> Royal Palms Resort and Spa unveils renovation of T. Cook’s

The Royal Palms Resort and Spa, Phoenix’s historic boutique resort, unveiled the restaurant’s three-month revitalization project in early September. Royal Palms teamed with Phoenix-based creative design team Bar Napkin Productions and its Founding Principal Haley Balzano to develop the interior design which boasts vibrant shades of authentic colors of the desert and an overall softer palette. Boldly colored chairs surround rustic wooden tables adding depth and diversity to the dining room, while iron chandeliers create a sense of intimacy and stimulate enchanting experiences and romance. The project also features a newly crafted wine and tequila room and an expanded bar. Howard S. Wright, a Balfour Beatty company, was the general contractor.

 

>> W.E. O’Neil Construction picked for Hohokam Stadium Renovation

W.E. O’Neil Construction was hired as construction manager at risk for the renovation of Hohokam Stadium in Mesa, which will serve as the 2015 spring training facility for the Oakland A’s. The Chicago Cubs are getting a new facility in 2014 — Riverview Park — and the A’s are leaving Phoenix Municipal after this coming Cactus League season. The Mesa City Council voted unanimously for the hiring W.E. O’Neil to provide input on several aspects of the project and the procurement of five hydrotherapy tanks for a total cost just shy of $560,000. The GC will also have a hand in project design, cost-estimating, development and coordinating with the city during the construction process. Under a facilities use agreement signed with the A’s, the City of Mesa covers the first $15M of the renovation and the accompanying Fitch Park, and will split the next $5M with the team.

 

>> El Mirage Police facility tops out

The El Mirage Police facility project topped out recently. The current facility is housed in trailers and modular buildings that are outdated and do not provide the proper space for law enforcement personnel to function in a safe and secure environment. The new police station will be the first building in a civic area that will ultimately include other structures. The site for construction is directly south of the City’s new award-winning Gateway Park. Voters approved the funding in the fall of 2011 and Arrington Watkins, architect/designer, along with D.L. Withers Construction, were awarded the project.

 

>> Mesa Fire Station 219 earns LEED Gold Certification

Mesa Fire Station 219 received its LEED Gold certification and plaque, the first for the City of Mesa. The project, completed in 2012 by D.L. Withers Construction and designed by Perlman Architects, used several sustainable practices that included solar panels, a solar hot water system, insulated concrete exterior walls and an insulated cool foam roof.

 

Desert Star Construction's First LEED Home, Paradise Valley

Paradise Valley Gets The First Ever LEED Certified Home

Scottsdale, Ariz.-based Desert Star Construction, Inc. (DSC) has placed the first ever LEED home in Paradise Valley. DSC specializes in luxury commercial properties and luxury homes in the Paradise Valley and  Scottsdale areas. They stand out by doing complex projects that offer the leading green standards.

“Our clients range from local leaders to presidents of Fortune 500 companies,” says Jeremy Meek, sustainability programs manager at DSC. “They recognize that green building is the future, and they welcome opportunities to consider new technologies as they build.”

LEED, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, certifications are determined by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and are the leading, nationally-accepted, third-party verification program for green buildings.

This will be one of four custom LEED homes located in the greater Phoenix area.

“We’ve been building ‘green’ for over 30 years, but this is the first official LEED home we have done,” Meek says. “We do niche commercial projects and audits for the luxury market.”

In order for a home to be “green” and have the LEED tag, they must meet high design standards, rigorous construction practices and scrupulous third-party verification of all measures. The USGBC then ranks the homes as (from lowest to highest) Certified, Silver, Gold or Platinum.

The three-structure Paradise Valley LEED home includes a main house, guesthouse and casita. The guest home has been ranked “Gold” while the casita is “Platinum” Certification.

Because of the different certifications and building style, DSC has also completed houses five and six.

“We build better, implement new things on the next home and always favor the next project,” Meek says.

All three buildings apply essential green-build and sustainable strategies to meet LEED requirements. In the Paradise Valley home, these include:

  • Solar hot water and solar electric systems
  • Reduced water use through low-flow faucets and toilets, as well as an “intelligent” landscaping irrigation system
  • High-efficiency LED lighting and mechanical equipment
  • Enhanced home occupant health measures, such as hard surface floors in lieu of carpet that can emit chemicals from production
  • Materials that reduce the local heat island effect, such as light-colored driveways, sidewalks and patios (particularly those within 50 feet of the home) that reflect rather than absorb heat from the sun
  • Recycled and salvaged materials
  • An advanced home automation system that includes motion detectors that will shut off lights when spaces are not in use and gives homeowners the ability to control light intensity. At the Paradise Valley home, all lights are set to 90 percent brightness, which can double the life of bulbs.


About Desert Star Construction

For 34 years, Desert Star Construction has advanced a tradition of excellence and integrity through its commercial and luxury custom home construction and renovation projects. The company has gained honors including a Gold Nugget Best in the West award, Home Builders Association of Central Arizona Custom Home of the Year, Valley Forward 2010 Environmental Excellence Award of Merit, and the 2010 Heart of Business Award.

BIG Green Expo

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

The 2011 BIG Green Expo & Conference took place on April 15 & 16, 2011 at the Phoenix Convention Center.


About BIG Green


The greening of business, development, government and consumer products is at an all time high and growing exponentially. Rising energy costs, new laws, and growing demand for environmentally friendly consumer products continue to drive the green marketplace. In 2010, the BIG Green Expo & Conference took place at the Phoenix Convention Center in Downtown Phoenix. It is Arizona’s largest green conference — with 200 exhibitors and more than 10,000 individuals participating in the event. The BIG Green Expo & Conference targets both the commercial and residential industries. The expo showcases sustainable products and services impacting every area of life. Those attending the conference will hear from prominent industry voices on both a local and national level, who will share their insight and knowledge of an environmental-friendly future. Some speakers in attendance were Colin Tetreault (Topic: LEED is DEAD, The Next Evolution of Business), Loretta Hall (Topic: Earth Sheltering for Sustainable Public Buildings), Adam Robbins (Topic: The LED Revolution: Learn about LED technology) and Diane Brossart (Topic: Sustainable & How You Can Be Part of the Solution). Whether you’re a savvy homeowner looking to create a more sustainable home, or a business owner looking to create a greener space for employees — the BIG Green Expo & Conference has something for everyone.


Topics covered:

Green Awareness Solar Power Water Efficiency Sustainability LEED Certification Green Return on Investment Existing Building Retrofitting Sustainable Product Use & Design Green Government Programs Sustainable Building Practices Greening your home & business

Attendees of BIG are:

Architects, builders, contractors, and engineers (commercial and residential) Government, institutional and corporate purchasing/supply chain managers CEO’s, senior management and purchasing managers Corporate planners, business leaders Facility & Property managers Homeowners

Exhibitors are suppliers of:

Building and construction products and services Architectural and engineering services: (commercial, residential, government and institutional) Local, state, federal, non-profit and private green programs Waste management Renewable energy Transportation Furnishings and Appliances Landscaping Interior/Exterior design Consumer goods and services

Sponsored by:

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011 Sponsored by SRP


For more information or to reserve a booth for next year, please visit exposaz.com and contact

Phone: 602-277-6045 Fax: 480-361-8707 Email: exposaz@azbigmedia.com

 

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Brooke Bogart - Big Green Conference 2011

Speaker: Brooke Bogart ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Brooke Bogart, Ecological Environments, LLC

Brooke Bogart, Ecological Environments, LLCAs an award winning architect, Brooke’s designs have been featured on the cover of EcoStructure magazine. She is the third LEED AP in the state of Arizona and has remained in the forefront of sustainable design.

She continues to stay on the cutting edge by receiving her Masters in Energy and Cliate Design at Arizona State University. After practicing sustainable architecture since 1997, she is now assisting other architects, designers, contractors and owners in the pursuit of green building design and LEED certification as Principal of Ecologicial Enviornments, LLC.

Brooke is also known for her educational seminars on various aspects of sustainability and LEED.


Topic: How manufacturers, contractors, architects and interior designers can market their company in an environmentally friendly manner.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 a.m.
Room 158

BIG Green Conference 2011


BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.


Sponsors:

Rider Levett Bucknall, LEED

Is ‘Green’ The Whole Answer?

Our natural resources are limited and they are fast becoming scarcer and more costly. Thankfully, in recent years, awareness of this issue has heightened and individuals, companies and governments are making efforts towards more responsible usage of our depleting natural resources. Unarguably, we’re in the Age of Environmental Thrift, when ‘going green’ is just good practice—for the planet and for the pocketbook. The question remains, are we doing enough to minimize the use of scarce resources?

In the construction industry, environmentally responsible practices are being promoted by the US Green Building Council and others through programs like the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED™) rating system. Overall, 26 state and local governments—the state of Arizona among them—are mandating LEED™ certification for new construction, and President Obama is currently seeking LEED™ certification for improvements made to the White House.

Despite the rapid acceptance of sustainable design and its application on a variety of both new-build and renovation projects, the practice is limited in its ability to reduce whole earth impacts. Why? Because even though continual improvements are being made in the ways in which we use natural resources—sustainably harvested lumber, energy-efficient building systems, recycled building products—we’re still consuming! Only if the scale of resource usage stabilizes will the efficiency of how they are delivered result in reducing the net environmental impact. We need to be asking how and where we can use existing assets instead of consuming more of the earth’s limited resources to construct new assets.

Significant natural resources can be saved by capturing the remaining value and extending the life of a building rather than demolishing and replacing it. But how does one know if it is viable to extend the life of a building? The state of Arizona addressed this question in 2004 by implementing a process in which consideration must be given to ‘relifing’ existing buildings before a new government building can be procured. Rider Levett Bucknall worked with government officials to develop the legislation which, in the first six months, saved the state $26 million. The legislation has since been endorsed by the American Legislative Exchange Council as model legislation for all 50 states.



Through a relifing study on an existing Arizona state medical laboratory building, including an inspection of the current condition of various building components and their life expectancies, Rider Levett Bucknall determined that investment of approximately $4.9 million would allow continued use of the building for an additional 25 years.


‘Relifing’ is mathematically-based analysis which helps building owners and managers capture the remaining value of and extend the life of their buildings after years of service. It improves the decision making process when considering whether to renovate a building versus demolish it and build new and can be used during the design of a new building to optimize the building’s design life. Throughout the development process, it helps to minimize the use of scarce natural resources.

The Age of Environmental Thrift provides an ideal time for people to reconsider the traditional approaches to green practices, especially in the construction industry. Building owners, designers and contractors should be open to new ways of approaching old problems and be willing to implement tools to help them get the most out of our shrinking resources.


Rider Levett Bucknall is an international property and construction consultancy headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona. www.rlb.com/life

Southwest Build-it-Green Expo & Conference

Speaking Opportunities At The Annual Southwest Build-It-Green Conference

Don’t miss out! The annual Southwest Build-It-Green Expo & Conference is scheduled for April 15-16, 2011 and speaking opportunities are still available! Fill out your speaker form (PDF) today.

As the largest sustainability expo in Arizona, this is one event you won’t want to miss. Last year’s expo attracted more than 200 exhibitors and 10,000 attendees, with topics ranging from green awareness, to solar power, LEED certification, water filtration, and many more.

BIG also features guest speakers of local, national and international prominence. Among some of the speakers last year were Anthony Floyd, AIA, LEED-AP Green Building Manager for the City of Scottsdale; Dr. Tom Rogers, professor and Chair of Construction Management at Northern Arizona University; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; James Brew from the Rocky Mountain Institute; Lori Singleton, manager of Sustainability Initiatives and Technologies at Salt River Project and many more.

In addition to the conference, the exhibits showcase products such as eco-friendly appliances and environmentally conscious landscaping techniques that aim to reduce Arizona’s carbon footprint. There are a wide variety of topics and something for everyone – homeowners and businesses alike.

For more information visit www.builditgreenexpo.com.

Google Buys Wind Power

Oil Spill, Google Wind Power & More

From global new to local business this week we’ve gathered stories about how hair can help the oil spill, what Belgium wants to do with the deceased, Google buying wind power and more. Plus, we’ve got an additional story on what one Valley business is doing to help the environment.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing Shelby Hill.

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.

Local
Cut Your Hair and Help the Oil Spill
Matter of Trust wants you to mail your hair, your dog’s hair and your kids’ hair to them to help soak up the oil in the Gulf.  Send hair to 99 Saint Germain Ave., San Francisco, CA 94114, and visit http://www.matteroftrust.org/ to see images of the hair in action.

Learn about the “Energize Phoenix Project”
The “Energize Phoenix Project” will provide energy-efficient improvements to neighborhoods along the 10-mile stretch of Phoenix’s light rail corridor.  It’s expected that this project will create up to 8,000 new jobs over the next six years.  To learn more about this project, attend the Phoenix Green Chamber of Commerce’s education forum on Monday, July 26.

National
Google Buys 20 Years of Wind Power from Iowa Farm
Google Energy, a subsidiary of Google, signed a 20-year deal with Story II Wind Energy Center in Iowa to buy wind power.  This is another step in achieving Google’s goal of becoming a carbon-neutral company.

In California, Kaiser Gives $1 Million to Build Green Health Clinic
La Maestra Community Health Center in San Diego would not only be green, but also help promote green building and living to the surrounding community.  La Maestra could be the first of its kind to earn LEED certification.  This clinic’s impact wouldn’t be small either, the clinic, expected to be 36,400 square feet, is projected to see 180,000 patient and client visits annually.

International
An Eco-Friendly Burial Isn’t a Burial at All
Belgium authorities hatched a plan to dissolve the dead in caustic solutions and flush them into the sewer system as a way to replace cremating and burial in a cemetery, which are both not environmentally friendly. Six states, including Colorado and Oregon, recently passed legislation to allow this process to occur in the United States.

Iceland Volcano Causes Decrease in CO2 Emissions
Think back to April when the hard-to-pronounce volcano Eyjafjallajökull had European planes grounded for six days.  Those six days without most of the European air traffic decreased our carbon emissions dramatically.  The volcano did release CO2, but at a much lower rate than humans produce.  Is nature sending us a message?

Mark Wilhelm Lifetime Achievement Az Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

BIG Green Awards: Lifetime Achievement

Twelve categories, hundreds of nominations — but only one will take home the green. It’s the first annual Southwest Build-it-Green Awards, where BIG teamed up with the USGBC to bring you the leanest sustainable leaders and projects in Arizona.

Recipient: Mark Wilhelm, LEED AP
Co-founder, Green Ideas Sustainability Consultants

Mark Wilhelm has a long-standing commitment to the green movement, and over the years he has given countless hours toward improving the earth.

Wilhelm realized in 1973 that he wanted to create ways to make the U.S. a sustainable place to live. He focused on solar energy technology, building energy simulation, and designing energy-efficient buildings. After earning his master’s in environmental planning from Arizona State University, Wilhelm worked for APS for 13 years, where he headed the development of the APS Environmental Showcase Home (ESH). The home is designed to use 60 percent less water and 85 percent less energy than a regular home and displayed new sustainable technologies, materials and procedures.

In 1994, Wilhelm created the firm Green Ideas Sustainability Consultants with his colleague, Charlie Popeck, to promote green building. He also volunteers to teach sustainability to ASU students and community organizations throughout the Valley.

Wilhelm is a founding member of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Arizona Chapter, and served as chapter chairman in 2006. In 2007, Wilhelm successfully lobbied to have the Arizona chapter host the 2009 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo. He also helped to choose the LEED Silver certified Phoenix Convention Center as the site of the conference. To recognize Wilhelm for his hard work and passion, he was named chairman of the Greenbuild Host Committee. The 2009 Greenbuild International Conference and Expo truly engaged the greater Phoenix community and attracted more than 27,000 attendees from around the world.

www.egreenideas.com


Finalist: Edwards Design Group
www.edwardsdesigngroup.com

The Edwards Design Group is the pioneer of building environmentally sound, energy efficient homes in Scottsdale, Ariz. Brothers Kevin Edwards and Doug Edwards have been creating environmentally friendly homes for customers for thirty years. The company’s green approach protects the earth, conserves energy and saves homeowners money.

The Edwards Design Group was the first construction group to create and build a house using straw bale and autoclave aerated concrete, an insulated building block that doesn’t need to be as replaced as often as regular concrete. The Edwards Design Group also set up recycling processes on site during construction, saving one owner over $25,000.

The Edwards Design Group helped the City of Scottsdale increase its awareness on environmentally friendly and safe building techniques and materials. The company works closely with the City of Scottsdale’s Green Building Program, and has participated in the annual “Green Building Expo.” Kevin and Doug both host a TV show called “Sustainable Scottsdale.”


Finalist: Richard Franz-Under, RA, LEED AP
Pima County Development Services
www.pimaxpress.com

Richard Franz-Under made history in Arizona when he received the first LEED certification for a building in the state. The Desert Vista Campus Plaza Building at Pima Community College was also the 31st building in the world to achieve LEED certification. In 1997, while working at Pima Community College, he developed the first green building program and is the state’s leading expert in designing buildings to meet LEED certification.

His dedication to sustainability doesn’t end there. Franz-Under commutes 20 miles round trip to work on a bicycle and provides community outreach for sustainable construction practices and affordable housing. He also manages a LEED for Homes Provider program — the only one in the nation — and is currently supervising the certification process of one remodel, 94 multifamily units and 62 new homes.

Franz-Under has served as a consultant for several different LEED projects in Arizona and speaks to the community throughout the year, educating people about the importance of green building practices.

Arizona Business Magazine Jul/Aug 2010

GPEC Profile: Craig Robb, Executive Vice President And Director Of Finance And Administration, National Bank Of Arizona

Craig Robb
Executive vice president and director of finance and administration, National Bank of Arizona

With a 17-year career in land development prior to joining National Bank of Arizona seven years ago, Craig Robb was a natural to become an active member of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.

Robb, executive vice president and director of finance and administration for the bank, is in his first year on the GPEC board of directors. He also serves on the GPEC Next Committee, which reviews possible projects and initiatives before forwarding them to the board.

But it was his two-plus years on GPEC’s Community Development Committee that enabled him to draw extensively from his combined experience in real estate and banking. Comprised primarily of real estate brokers and developers, with some bankers, the panel focused on shovel-ready projects as the construction industry’s fortunes plunged.

One of the areas his committee worked on involves sustainability and LEED certification.

“GPEC maintains a strong effort to identify programs and buildings that are more attractive to potential companies coming into the Phoenix area,” Robb says. “It’s an effort to match companies to a building that is LEED certified and sustainable, whether it’s office or industrial. That’s very attractive to a company that might be interested in relocating here.”

The bank’s relationship with GPEC is a two-way street.

“We are glad to be a contributor to GPEC, which is absolutely the right organization for promoting Greater Phoenix,” Robb says, “especially how difficult it is now, with the competition we face in a national and global economy. On a reciprocal basis, we have benefited. GPEC has given us a greater interest in sustainability.”

The bank, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2009, decided to upgrade some of its nearly 80 branches that were facing energy challenges.

“We started our own effort to see what we could do to create a more sustainable platform for our own buildings,” Robb says.

About the same time in late 2008, Robb, through a GPEC event, met the CEO of Solar City.

“That blossomed forward, and we ended up with a $1.5 million installation at our Biltmore location, improving our energy efficiency,” he says. “In addition, the bank has committed $25 million to provide a lease program that allows individuals to lease solar equipment for their homes.

“We made our contribution to GPEC, and as a result here is a relationship that has blossomed into well over a $50 million investment related to solar.”

www.nbarizona.com


Arizona Business Magazine

February 2010

Relifing - AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

The Cost Of Relifing A Building During The Age Of Environmental Thrift

The Cost Of Relifing A Building During The Age Of Environmental Thrift

Breath of Life – Relifing

Difficult financial times teach us that it is possible to do more with less, but also that doing more with less takes both thought and effort.

In 1965, Adlai Stevenson, then U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, notably said, “We travel together, passengers on a little space ship, dependent on its vulnerable reserves of air and soil.” This phrase alerted the world to the necessity to preserve Earth’s natural assets and resources. However, it is only in recent times — with the discussion of climate change — that serious attention has been paid widely to the question of the use of scarce natural resources and the effect of that use on the environment. The world has entered an era in which using natural resources sparsely has become critical, perhaps even a cause célèbre — this is The Age of Environmental Thrift.

The construction industry has been making serious efforts to catch up by adopting sustainable design practices represented by the LEED certification system. However, traditionally there has been no systematically adopted, mathematical approach to test whether an existing building could be successfully “relifed” instead of being demolished. Clearly, relifing an existing building saves natural resources — it does more with less.

Life Options

For all building owners — especially those with large sophisticated healthcare facilities such as hospitals, clinics, etc. — it should be natural to start by asking the question, “Can we economically extend the life of our existing building by 5, 10 or 20 years instead of demolishing?”

The difficulty in the past was that there was no simple, definitive, mathematical way to determine a solution to this question. However, when the state of Arizona adopted the concept of studying relifing options through building life extension studies, it broke new ground in managing taxpayer funds. These studies have been conducted on many buildings, including laboratories and state hospital buildings, with good success.

A relifing study determines the “useful life” of a building by analyzing the cost and service life of its various components:

  • structure
  • external cladding
  • internal fit-out
  • building systems

From these components, a life expectancy may be calculated. The study then analyzes and prices recommendations for maintenance, upgrades, renovation and replacement of various building components necessary to extend the building’s life to certain milestones. When the analysis is compared with the cost of building a new structure, owners have a quantitative tool to determine which option will make the best use of their functional and financial resources.

Private sector clients would be well advised to follow the state’s lead. By measuring and analyzing the service life possibilities of each building and relifing those that can be saved, millions of dollars and thousands of cubic yards of natural resources can be saved. With more thought, more can often be done with less.

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www.usgbc.org

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

Kilowatt Krackdown - AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

BOMA Greater Phoenix Launches Kilowatt Krackdown Initiative

BOMA Greater Phoenix launches Kilowatt Krackdown initiative to reduce energy consumption marketwide.

Last year, BOMA International announced its 7-Point Challenge, encouraging local chapter members to reduce the carbon footprint of their buildings. BOMA Greater Phoenix embraced the opportunity and formed the Green Buildings Committee to further this goal, and in the process, pursued LEED certification for one of their member’s existing buildings. This year, the committee extends the sustainability challenge to the commercial real estate community.

What is Kilowatt Krackdown

Kilowatt Krackdown, an initiative launched by the committee in July 2009, challenges the industry to take on the first 2 steps of the 7-Point Challenge:

  • Decrease building energy consumption by 30% by 2012
  • Benchmark energy performance through the EPA’s ENERGY STAR tool

Why

Phoenix Metro ranks 22nd in the country for the number of ENERGY STAR-qualified buildings in 2008, points out Dave Munn, principal and chief technical officer at Chelsea Group Ltd. and co-chair of the Green Buildings Committee. “Given that we are No. 5 in the country in population … we need to bolster efforts here to get more facilities to participate in this program, and show the country that we are indeed committed to energy efficiency.”

Who

Phoenix Mayor Phil Gordon was the first mayor in the United States to endorse BOMA International’s 7-point Challenge, and to begin benchmarking energy performance of municipal buildings. The committee continues to work on recruiting mayors of other cities to accept the challenge.

How

APS and SRP have partnered with the committee on the Kilowatt Krackdown initiative to sponsor an energy efficient training series for building management and maintenance staff. In a 4-hour, interactive workshop, participants learn how to use the EPA’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager benchmarking program, which provides ENERGY STAR ratings on buildings, makes comparisons to similar facilities in the geographic area, tracks energy performance over time and pinpoints specific ways to save energy in the future. The online tracking system provides a print-out of kilowatt usage and a new ENERGY STAR rating every 4 to 6 weeks.

“People need tangible results,” says Susan Engstrom, senior real estate manager at Tiarna Real Estate Services and president of BOMA Greater Phoenix. “I think it’s encouraging to see a piece of paper comparing your energy usage month-to-month and year-to-year, and to get an ENERGY STAR rating each time. This gives an incentive to improve.”

The workshops also explain how to take advantage of the power companies’ resources and incentive programs. According to Jerry Ufnal, new construction liaison for the APS Solutions for Business Program and BOMA Green Buildings Committee member, the power company offers the next step to the benchmarking program.

APS and SRP can evaluate each of their customer’s facilities to identify areas in need of improvement. They can also train building operators on how to run equipment more efficiently, give rebates for energy studies and energy-efficient upgrades, and provide information on current renewable energy resources available in Arizona, such as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and bio-gas.

“I consider energy efficiency to be one of the strongest things you can do from a green perspective,” Ufnal says. “It has tremendous advantages for building owners because they reduce the cost of operations and maintenance of their buildings, which makes them more profitable. And at the same time they are saving energy and resources. It just makes good, logical sense.”

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www.aps.com
www.aps-solutionsforbusiness.com
www.boma.org
www.bomaphoenix.org
www.chelsea-grp.com
www.energystar.gov
www.phoenix.gov
www.srpnet.com
www.tiarna.com

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

LEED Certification - AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

LEED Certification – Making Existing Buildings More Eco-Friendly

Eco Buddies

This summer, two Phoenix office buildings entered new territory for existing private-sector buildings in Arizona. Collier Center and Phoenix Plaza became Arizona’s first privately owned multi-tenant existing buildings to receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s consideration for LEED certification, thanks to the efforts of their owners and their two building managers. Both buildings are seeking LEED-Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance (LEED-EB O&M) Silver-level certification.

Of course, LEED certification isn’t just about saving the world. It’s also about being best-in-class, separating a company’s building from its competition and improving operating efficiency. LEED-certified buildings promote an eco-friendly workplace and, in most cases, offer lower overall operating expenses — two factors tenants are specifically looking for these days.

LEED in the Private Sector

Yet, to date, the USGBC lists only three LEED-certified existing buildings in Arizona, two single-tenant quasi-government buildings and a single-tenant manufacturing facility. Arizona’s other LEED-certified buildings are new construction, and almost all are owned by the government.

So why aren’t more private-sector owners of existing buildings interested in LEED certification? Most either don’t know enough about the program or assume it’s too expensive. However, research entities like CB Richard Ellis are proving that LEED certification costs far less than believed, and can result in significant savings that will continue for the life of the asset.

For example, Collier Center reduced its electricity consumption by 30%, or 2.7 million kWh, between January 2009 and July 2009. Compared to the same time period in 2008, that’s a savings of $216,000, or 67 cents, PSF annualized — Phoenix Plaza’s results are equally as dramatic.

Also, Collier Center and Camelback Esplanade III are transitioning janitorial services to daytime cleaning, and anticipate reductions in annual lighting costs of 10 cents to 15 cents PSF.

The Cost of Green

Minimum costs to pursue LEED certification include a small registration fee of about $500 and a certification fee, which depends on a building’s size. As property manager for both Collier Center and Phoenix Plaza, CBRE reports these costs at $12,500 for each building. Additional costs to satisfy prerequisites and credits vary from building to building. Of the 30 applications CBRE’s Sustainability Programs group has completed so far, the costs to certify averaged 24 cents PSF, and ranged from 10 cents to 67 cents PSF.

For CBRE, the certification projects took approximately 6 months to complete, including determining each building’s existing status and satisfying certification requirements in 6 categories under LEED-EB O&M:

  • sustainable sites
  • water efficiency
  • energy and atmosphere
  • materials and resources
  • indoor environmental quality
  • innovation in operation
  • and upgrades

Overwhelmingly, the process has been favorably received by existing tenants — and many have even begun seeking ways to improve on their own green efforts.

A broad implementation of sustainability practices, such as LEED, in the nation’s private-sector existing buildings can significantly advance progress toward energy independence and precious resource conservation, while also promoting eco-friendly workplace environments and cutting operating costs.

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www.usgbc.org

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2009

Phoenix_skyline_Arizona_USA

A Voyage Of Discovery In Phoenix

Facing a down economy, shrinking budgets and significant pressures to outperform the year’s commitments, how do you find time for sustainability? Let’s face it, if there is no payback within the current year, it’s unlikely you can get capital or modify your operating budget to make any kind of significant difference toward a green program, right? Wrong!

In a recessionary environment there’s more than one way to cut costs and leverage those savings to support other initiatives. In addition to pure cost savings, a little bit of planning and adjustment of current policies can yield results with little or no additional expense.

Our approach at the Greater Phoenix Chapter of IFMA, beginning in August 2008, was to establish a Facility Managers’ Green Peer Group (FMGPG) to foster open information exchange and provide a forum for sharing best practices.

What FMGPG has done is to create the environment for the peer group to be successful. A facilitator who is familiar with the subject matter is the primary pivot point; we manage and develop the agenda, secure the location and communicate through the FMGPG to the group members. The facilitator then leads the meeting and keeps the group focused on the agenda and future goals.

The initial goal of the peer group was to educate the members on the five major categories of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) as they related to the Existing Building Operations and Maintenance structure, or EBOM.

The LEED-EB system focuses on building maintenance and operations. Unlike the other LEED standards, points are awarded for established programs and policies with measured results over time. Metrics are taken during a performance period lasting from three to 12 months.

As with the LEED for new construction products, points are awarded in six categories: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, indoor air quality, and innovation in operations

There are 92 available points, with a minimum of 34 required for the lowest level of certification. Most organizations nationwide appear to be striving for Silver or Gold certification based on the initial condition of the building.

We established a yearlong program that was based on the following formula:
General Discussion and Checklist Review + Facility Examples and Benchmarking + Site Visit = A Solid Foundation of Understanding.

So, what’s the bottom line on the benefits of the peer group:

  • Approaching sustainability concepts with minimal or no impact to your FM resources and budget.
  • Marketing your FM organization through sustainability involvement.
  • Taking advantage of LEED benefits without certifying your site.
  • Decoding the myths and fears of LEED.
  • Strengthening your FM position by demonstrating sustainability initiatives.
  • Demonstrating the hidden value of your FM organization by introducing and achieving sustainable initiatives.
  • Educating your staff, customers and stakeholders, as well as yourself, on sustainability and the workplace.
  • One LEED case study, managed by an IFMA CFM (Certified Facility Manager), has shown the following validated results:

    • Effectively reduced electricity use by 35 percent.
    • Effectively reduced natural gas use by 41 percent.
    • Reduced domestic water use by 22 percent.
    • Reduced landscape water use by 76 percent.
    • Diverted up to 85 percent of its solid waste.
    • Reduced total pollution by 26 percent.
    • Reduced CO2 emissions by 17 percent.

    A new study by CoStar Group, the commercial equivalent of MLS, has found that sustainable “green” buildings outperform their peer, non-green assets in key areas such as occupancy, sale price and rental rates, sometimes by wide margins.

    The results indicate a broader demand by property investors and tenants for buildings that have earned either LEED certification or the Energy Star label, and strengthen the “business case” for green buildings, which proponents have increasingly cast as financially sound investments.

    According to the study, LEED buildings command rent premiums of $11.24 per square foot over their non-LEED peers, and have 3.8 percent higher occupancy. Rental rates in Energy Star buildings represent a $2.38 per square foot premium over comparable non-Energy Star buildings, and have 3.6 percent higher occupancy. And, in a trend that could signal greater attention from institutional investors and the C-level, Energy Star buildings are selling for an average of $61 per square foot more than their peers, while LEED buildings command a remarkable $171 more per square foot.

    At the end of the day — even in a down economy — you can make a difference, even with little or no budget.