Tag Archives: Lewis and Roca LLP

Kenneth Van Winkle and Frederick J. Baumann_I

Lewis and Roca, Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons Join Forces

Lewis and Roca LLP, headquartered in Phoenix and a Southwestern leader in representing businesses in litigation and complex real estate transactions, and Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons LLP, a century-old Rocky Mountain firm with nationally recognized litigation and banking practices, announced today they will combine forces to create one of the largest law firms in the Western U.S.

When the firms officially join on September 1, 2013, the new 250-lawyer firm will be called Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP. With a presence in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming, the firm will maintain nine offices, including Phoenix , Denver, Las Vegas, Tucson, Reno, Colorado Springs, Albuquerque, Silicon Valley and Casper.

“Our growth into new markets is driven by our commitment to client service and our clients’ interest in gaining access to legal services throughout the West,” said Lewis and Roca’s Managing Partner Kenneth Van Winkle. “We found a solid partner in Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons and quickly realized our growth strategies aligned. Our two firms are strong apart, and we will be even stronger together.”

Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons Chairman Frederick J. Baumann said the combination was consistent with his firm’s strategic plan and was fueled by clients who want access to legal counsel in markets where their businesses are growing.

“Our clients have been expanding in the Southwest region for some time and encouraged us to find an opportunity to establish a presence there,” said Baumann. “With Lewis and Roca, we are partnering with a firm with an equally strong reputation in its practices and markets. Lewis and Roca not only shares our commitment to client service, but is a seamless fit strategically, culturally and professionally.”

The combination will strengthen the two firms’ existing national litigation practices, creating an expanded team of litigators with added experience across additional jurisdictions. It also will expand the firms’ business transactional, real estate and energy practices, which will enable the new firm to advise clients on projects from creation to completion.

Kenneth Van Winkle and Frederick J. Baumann_I

Lewis and Roca, Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons Join Forces

Lewis and Roca LLP, headquartered in Phoenix and a Southwestern leader in representing businesses in litigation and complex real estate transactions, and Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons LLP, a century-old Rocky Mountain firm with nationally recognized litigation and banking practices, announced today they will combine forces to create one of the largest law firms in the Western U.S.

When the firms officially join on September 1, 2013, the new 250-lawyer firm will be called Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP. With a presence in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming, the firm will maintain nine offices, including Phoenix , Denver, Las Vegas, Tucson, Reno, Colorado Springs, Albuquerque, Silicon Valley and Casper.

“Our growth into new markets is driven by our commitment to client service and our clients’ interest in gaining access to legal services throughout the West,” said Lewis and Roca’s Managing Partner Kenneth Van Winkle. “We found a solid partner in Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons and quickly realized our growth strategies aligned. Our two firms are strong apart, and we will be even stronger together.”

Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons Chairman Frederick J. Baumann said the combination was consistent with his firm’s strategic plan and was fueled by clients who want access to legal counsel in markets where their businesses are growing.

“Our clients have been expanding in the Southwest region for some time and encouraged us to find an opportunity to establish a presence there,” said Baumann. “With Lewis and Roca, we are partnering with a firm with an equally strong reputation in its practices and markets. Lewis and Roca not only shares our commitment to client service, but is a seamless fit strategically, culturally and professionally.”

The combination will strengthen the two firms’ existing national litigation practices, creating an expanded team of litigators with added experience across additional jurisdictions. It also will expand the firms’ business transactional, real estate and energy practices, which will enable the new firm to advise clients on projects from creation to completion.

legal

Top Lawyers list: Government relations

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Clare Abel
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
602-234-9920
bcattorneys.com
Abel concentrates her practice primarily in the areas of real estate, zoning and condemnation Law. She is listed in Southwest Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America and Arizona’s Finest Lawyers.

S. David Childers
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4880
kutakrock.com
Childers served on the U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services’ Task Force on Long-Term Health Care Policies, and the Governor’s Private Sector Task Force on Long Term Care and the University of Arizona College of Business & Public Administration National Board of Advisors.

Robert D. Dalager
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8540
gknet.com
Dalager practices governmental affairs and land use law.  Prior to joining Gallagher & Kennedy, Dalager was with the Arizona State Senate for nearly 10 years.

Gregory Y. Harris
Lewis and Roca LLP
602-262-0218
lrlaw.com
Harris has extensive experience appearing before state and federal agencies and in state and federal court, and appears regularly before the Arizona Legislature.

Yvonne R. Hunter
Fennemore Craig, P.C.
602-916-5386
fclaw.com
Hunter’s practice focuses primarily on government affairs. Hunter formerly served as an Assistant Arizona Attorney General in the Arizona Attorney General’s Office.

Joseph A. Kanefield
Ballard Spahr LLP
602-798-5468
ballardspahr.com
Kanefield’s practice is focused on government relations, civil and appellate litigation, public-private partnerships, administrative law, state and local tax matters, gaming, and election and campaign-finance law.

Timothy A. La Sota
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-452-2712
tblaw.com
La Sota practices in the areas of government relations, regulatory and administrative law, election law, land use and procurement.

Paige A. Martin
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4827
kutakrock.com
Martin, an AV Preeminent Peer Review Rated partner in the firm’s Scottsdale office, and primarily represents governmental entities and private employers.

Mary R. O’Grady
Osborn Maledon, P.A.
602-640-9352
omlaw.com
As a former solicitor general for the State of Arizona, O’Grady has a unique breadth of experience with public law issues. Her areas of expertise include election and campaign finance law and state constitutional law.

Jordan Rose
Rose Law Group
480-505-3939
roselawgroup.com
Rose practices in the areas of government relations, municipal issues, land use, zoning, administrative law, renewable energy, and lobbying.

John B. Shadegg
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5204
steptoe.com
Shadegg, former U.S. Congressman, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in1994 and served eight terms before retiring from Congress in 2010.  He practices in Steptoe’s Government Affairs and Public Policy group.

David K. Udall
Udall Shumway PLC
480-969-3043
udallshumway.com
Udall has successfully represented a variety of clients with zoning and development issues before the City of Mesa, Maricopa County, Town of Gilbert, City of Chandler, and Casa Grande.

Michelle De Blasi

2013 Top Lawyers list: Environmental law

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Robert D. Anderson
Fennemore Craig, P.C.
602-916-5455
www.fclaw.com
Anderson practices in the areas of environmental, natural resources and water law and chairs the firm’s natural resources and environmental practice.

Michelle De Blasi
Greenberg Traurig LLP
602-445-8485
www.gtlaw.com
De Blasi advises clients on energy and environmental sustainability, including traditional and renewable energy, climate change, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Carla Consoli
Lewis and Roca LLP
602-262-5347
www.lrlaw.com
The industries which regularly call on Consoli include mines, alternative energy developers, large-scale residential and commercial developers, manufacturers, and investors in these industries.

Peter W. Culp
Squire Sanders
602-528-4063
www.squiresanders.com
Culp practices in the areas of environmental, water and natural resources. Culp was recognized by Chambers USA 2012 as a leading individual for environmental matters, including water rights.

J. Stanton Curry
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8222
www.gknet.com
Curry practices environmental law with an emphasis on air quality, Superfund and environmental auditing matters.

Joseph Drazek
Quarles & Brady LLP
602-229-5335
www.quarles.com
Drazek’s practice focuses on regulatory and litigation matters within the Firm’s Environmental Group and spans a variety of industries including mining companies, high technology companies, fenvironmental testing laboratories, and water companies.

Mark Freeze
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5215
www.steptoe.com
Freeze is of counsel in Steptoe’s Phoenix office, and has more than 23 years of experience. He practices in the areas of labor and employment law and environmental law.

Karen Gaylor
Jennings, Haug & Cunningham, LLP
602-234-7808
www.jhc-law.com
Gaylord’s practice focuses on environmental and natural resource matters. She has counseled businesses, municipalities, water providers, insurers, and individuals for more than 25 years.

David P. Kimball, III
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8130
www.gknet.com
Kimball is head of the firm’s environmental and natural resources department and is recognized nationally as an expert in all areas of federal, state and local environmental and natural resources law.

Mitchell Klein
Polsinelli
602-650-2303
www.polsinelli.com
Klein has extensive experience working with many state and federal agencies in all areas of natural resource and environmental law.

Lucas Narducci
Polsinelli
602-650-2301
polsinelli.com
Narducci’s practice is focused on various aspects of mining, environmental, natural resources, energy, safety and health law, as well as regulatory counseling and permitting, workplace exposure issues, and workplace safety.

Sheryl Sweeney
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
rcalaw.com
Sweeney practices in the areas of water law, environmental law, electric utility law and special taxing districts. She is chair of the Water, Energy, Resources and Environment practice group at Ryley Carlock.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group