Tag Archives: Lorraine Pino

Westgate Entertainment District

Glendale CVB Launches a New Blog

The Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau is offering a new tool to attract travelers to Glendale and the West Valley and help people keep up with events and tourism-related activities. The Glendale CVB is now blogging about the best places, deals and events to check out.

The Glendale CVB is launching this new blog to accompany the full lineup of interactive tools designed to help connect the traveler with the various sights and experiences available in Glendale and the surrounding West Valley cities.

“Visitors will still find great information on our full website, but now we are adding a new layer of connectivity that we encourage people to explore and share with others,” said Lorraine Pino, Glendale CVB manager. “The new tool will also allow us to engage CVB members to tell stories about their hidden gems as guest bloggers.”

Regular posts, featuring pictures and videos will be compiled from staff and guest bloggers. The blog can be accessed through www.visitglendale.com.

triathlon store

Sporting events pump billions into Arizona economy

If you build it, they will come.

We did. And they have.

Over the last decade, the Valley has added Jobing.com Arena, University of Phoenix Stadium, built new spring training facilities, upgraded old ones and visiting sports fans have responded by pumping billions of dollars annually into the economy. And when the Super Bowl returns to Arizona in 2015, the big winner will be the Valley, which will score an economic impact $600 million.

“If you take a look at the economic-impact studies that have been done for events such as spring training and the Fiesta Bowl and the Phoenix Open, the numbers are impressive,” says Steve Moore, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Convention and Visitors Bureau. “For example, the last time the Super Bowl was here, in 2008, if you added its economic impact to that of annual events like Cactus League, the Phoenix Open, the Fiesta Bowl, and the NASCAR events at PIR, you’re looking at a number approaching $2 billion.”

But economic-impact studies alone don’t tell the whole story, Moore says.

“The enormous media value of hosting Super Bowls, college bowl games, NASCAR events, and NBA and (Majore League Baseball) all-star games simply cannot be purchased,” Moore says. “These big-time events also bring in corporate executives who use the games to entertain clients, and those executives and clients often return to town with their own corporate meetings.”

Arizona tourism leaders have utilized and marketed some its the state’s best features — sunny weather that guarantees no delays, desert scenery, excellent facilities and hotels — to become a major player in the world of sports. And the impact on the industry is staggering.

“Huge and immeasurable,” says Jesse Thompson, director of sales and marketing for Hotel Valley Ho in Scottsdale. “Every traveling team spends a night in town. Every team has loyal followers who travel to see their teams. And more than just the team travel, you have sportscasters, television crews, medical teams, referees, and not to mention the hundreds of employees at these venues that service everything from security to bathroom cleaning. Also, all the ancillary travel revenues from cabs and taxis, airlines and airports, food and beverage, entertainment, and retail are huge considerations.”

Consider this:

> Cactus League baseball will have an economic impact in excess of $350 million this year; the average stay for fans will be four days; and most will spend $350 a day while they are here. “Spring training typically offers the biggest sporting-related economic boost we see every year,” says Ron Simon, general manager of Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort.
> The 2012 Waste Management Phoenix Open pumped $222 million into Arizona’s economy — with direct sales tax revenue estimated to be $8.2 million — and non-local attendees spent an average of $300 per day.
> When the Super Bowl rolls back into town, 85 percent of the 73,000 fans at the game will be from out of state; 65 percent of them will be key company decision-makers; another 50,000 fans will visit without tickets; and the average Super Bowl visitor will spend $2,000 while they are here.
> Glendale alone draws between 4 million and 5 million people annually to sporting events that take place in Glendale’s Sports and Entertainment District, which contribute to the city’s increased hotel occupancy and sales tax collection throughout the year.

“The Fiesta Bowl and spring training are tremendous economic engines for Glendale and the West Valley,” says Lorraine Pino, manager of the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau. “Both of these events bring hundreds of thousands of fans to the region. The hotel occupancy rate also reaches near capacity during spring training.”

But it’s not just high-profile athletes that drive sports tourism in Arizona. Beyond being known as a mecca for golfers, the Valley hosts high-profile events for amateur athletes that translate to big bucks for the tourism industry.

Events like Ironman Arizona and the P.F. Chang’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon are huge economic drivers because they bring not only the athletes, but their families and friends out for support which drives room nights and retail dollars for the entire community,” says Tori McLaughlin, regional director of sales and marketing, West Coast for Kimpton Hotels & Restaurants, which includes both Hotel Palomar and FireSky Resort & Spa.

But beyond the beautiful golf courses, hiking trails and weather, Arizona has built its sports tourism empire by creating its own “Field of Dreams” story and epitomizing the “If you build it, they will come” strategy.

“There has been a major investment in the construction of spring training stadiums, including the development of new stadiums and enhancements to existing ones,” Simon says. “We’ve also seen great development and growth of the entertainment and shopping areas surrounding Chase Field in downtown Phoenix and Jobing.com Arena and University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale.”

With improving infrastructure and venues, Phoenix is extremely well positioned to successfully bid for even more mega sporting events in the future, experts predict.

“Arizona’s success has created destination envy, particularly in Texas, which actually enjoys an advantage over us because they have legislation in place that allows them to provide hosting-obligation funds based on incremental visitor spending at these events,” Moore says. “In fact, both Houston and Dallas were chosen over the Valley during the last bids for the NCAA Final Four. But we’ve become a better competitor due to the metamorphosis of downtown Phoenix. We stressed this in our most recent Super Bowl bid. The fully expanded convention center, the 1,000-room Sheraton, light rail, CityScape, the new Westin and Hotel Palomar — none of these things were around in ’08, when the Super Bowl was last in Arizona. The NBA and MLB got a taste of the new downtown when they held their All-Star festivities here, and the NFL will get an even bigger taste in 2015.”

KOOZA Photos 2007 004

Glendale CVB Rising in the West

Game on!

Cities like Glendale, Peoria, Goodyear, Surprise, and the other 14 cities that make up the West Valley are capitalizing on the rapid expansion of tourism and hospitality amenities — particularly spring training baseball facilities and other sports-related events — to grab a bigger share of the $18 billion that Arizona’s 37 million annual visitors spend.

As tourism in the West Valley continues to grow, the Glendale Convention & Visitor’s Bureau (CVB) is playing a bigger and more vital role to help drive visitors to West Valley hospitality businesses.

“The region provides the local and out-of-state traveler with an experience like no other,” says Lorraine Pino, Glendale CVB manager. “We are home to nine Cactus League spring training teams, the Arizona Cardinals and Phoenix Coyotes, Phoenix International Raceway, Wildlife World Zoo and Aquarium, great outdoor festivals, historic districts in each of our cities, performing arts centers and unique shopping venues. And, of course, you can be an astronaut for the day at our Challenger Space Center.”

Despite this diverse range of attractions, tourism is a relatively new industry in the West Valley. As a result, not every community in the area is equipped to implement independent marketing and promotion initiatives. Glendale CVB organizes and facilitates these initiatives, partnering with more than 100 restaurants, shopping malls, sports facilities, resorts and hotels, and service organizations.

“We work closely with our hotels — such as the Renaissance Glendale Hotel & Spa, Wigwam Resort, Hilton Garden Inn Avondale and many more — to provide lead generation and conference assistance,” Pino says.

Glendale CVB also serves as a liaison to large-scale entertainment such as Cirque du Soleil, which was held at University of Phoenix Stadium this summer, and mammoth events such as the Super Bowl, which will return to Glendale in 2015.

“When the Super Bowl was last held in Glendale in 2008, the Glendale CVB was not yet in existence,” Pino says. “But now that our bureau is in place for the 2015 game, the region will be in a better position to capture a greater share of visitor spending.”

Economists estimate that hosting a Super Bowl has an economic impact of $300 million-$500 million on the region.

“In addition, realizing that this mega event impacts the entire metro area and several destinations statewide, the Glendale CVB will be working with other tourism and hospitality organizations throughout the Valley to ensure that we provide the greatest fan experience possible, and to host the best Super Bowl possible,” Pino says.

By the end of 2012, Glendale will welcome yet another visitor destination when the Tanger Outlets Westgate is completed. The 328,000-square-foot retail development will feature 85 brand-name outlet stores and is expected to bring an additional 5 million-6 million annual visitors to the area.

With economic growth in the West Valley expected to continue its upward trend for years to come, Pino insists that communities must work together to realize the greatest benefit from an increasing number of visitors.

“It’s important that we all work together and pool our resources to achieve economies of scale,” Pino says. “This is the very reason the Glendale CVB came into existence: to serve as a regional organization to promote and showcase the 14 West Valley cities and to bring tourism business to the area. This regional approach is what will be needed for our hospitality businesses to continue to grow.”

Arizona Tourism Alliance Brian Johnson

Arizona Tourism Alliance

Brian Johnson, managing director Loews Ventana CanyonBrian Johnson
Managing Director
Loews Ventana Canyon
www.loewshotels.com

With 33 years in the industry, Brian Johnson has experienced firsthand the roller coaster ride the tourism industry takes as the economy shifts. Johnson has risen far in his career, working his way up from a dishwasher to his current position as managing director of the iconic Loews Ventana Canyon in Tucson. But even a resort as well known and popular as the Loews Ventana Canyon must work hard during tough economic times and low tourism rates.

“As anyone else, we have to find ways to create a new wrinkle that will bring people back to our property,” he says. In the past and in recent days, those new wrinkles have included renovations, nature trail additions that harmonize with the surrounding environment, and a butterfly garden. As one of the first ecologically conceived hotels, the environment has always played a part in all of their decisions, he explains.

Johnson’s involvement in the Arizona Tourism Alliance, where he serves on the executive committee, has been beneficial for both himself and the resort.

“It’s one of these things where you have a group of like-minded people who are dealing with the same issues and putting everyone together to create that effect that will help the common good of our industry,” he says. “It’s a global standpoint; we’re not just looking at one area, we’re looking at all the components and doing what is good for all of Arizona.

“I think in our industry, you can be whoever you want to be. This industry has created that opportunity for me and my family … ”


Lorraine Pino, manager of Glendale Convention and Visitors BureauLorraine Pino
Manager
Glendale Convention and Visitors Bureau
www.visitglendale.com

Spend just five minutes with Lorraine Pino and one thing becomes obvious — she’s passionate about tourism, not only in Glendale, but the whole state of Arizona.

As manager of the newly appointed Glendale Convention and Visitors Bureau (formerly the Glendale Office of Tourism), Pino promotes all Glendale has to offer. She has managed several campaigns that benefit both Glendale and the West Valley. One such campaign is Shop Glendale, a program that provides daily discounts and monthly prizes for the public from more than 70 business participants. To date, more than 35,000 Shop Glendale cards have been distributed.

Pino also helped create the West Valley Events Coalition, which brought West Valley cities together to pool their resources for advertising and marketing efforts geared toward tourism.

Involvement in the Arizona Tourism Alliance has been vital to the efforts of Pino and her team, she says.

“The resources, education and connectivity of the Arizona Tourism Alliance (ATA) are a huge help and much needed foundation for CVBs and DMOs (Destination Marketing Organizations) throughout the state,” Pino explains. “With our recent transition to a convention and visitors bureau, the resources of the ATA were monumental in helping us form our business plan.”

The new status as a CVB has brought a wealth of positive changes, she says. Funding from the members can now be used toward more aggressive marketing and branding efforts.


Doug Yonko, vice president of communication Hensley DistributingDoug Yonko
Vice President of Communication
Hensley Distributing
www.hensley.com

Doug Yonko is a true believer in longevity and commitment. Just take a look at his employment history with Hensley Distributing. The Phoenix-based beer distributor has existed for 55 years and Yonko — who works as the vice president of communications — has been with the company for more than half that time.

Hensley Distributing is active in many of the community’s charitable efforts, and encourages its employees to do likewise. The company and its employees are also committed to being involved in key issues that impact the state, including Arizona’s tourism. Yonko demonstrates that objective through his involvement on the Arizona Tourism Alliance’s executive committee, where he says he has the “opportunity to connect with some really smart people who truly understand the significance of tourism.”

The downturn in the economy and political issues such as SB 1070 have hit the tourism industry hard, Yonko says, but the situation has taught the business community how to withstand hard times.

“I believe there is a silver lining in these challenges,” he says. “The issues ranging from immigration to budget cuts, etc., have brought the business community closer in terms of the discussion and development for long-range solutions to protect and to foster the growth of the tourism industry. … We have to hold ourselves accountable, as well as the Legislature for our future — funding is critically important if Arizona is to remain competitive.”

AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011