Tag Archives: Managing Director

Hermosa.Inn

Haunted Boutique Resort Offering Ghost Tours

As one of the oldest resorts in the Valley with a rich cowboy history dating back to the 1930’s, it’s only natural that The Hermosa Inn would be home to a few friendly spirits still wandering the grounds. From original owner, cowboy artist Alonzo “Lon” Megargee, to a “Pink Lady” on a bridge and unexplained moving objects, this luxury boutique resort is now offering a Hermosa Hauntings package, where guests will receive two creepy cocktails from Last Drop at the Hermosa upon arrival, in addition to a guided ghost tour of the property.

“While we have accumulated quite a few ghost stories over the years, all the spirits that have been encountered seem to be quite friendly,” said Managing Director Michael Gildersleeve. “With so much interest from guests over the decades – and even more so in recent years with the popularity of rivaling ghost hunting shows on television – we thought it fitting to offer a package that gets our guests into the holiday spirit, and maybe even allows them to have an experience of their own with an on-property spirit.”

Valid October 1 – November 3, 2013 and starting from $246/night, the Hermosa Hauntings package includes an overnight stay, two creepy cocktails – Last Drop’s “Eye for an Eye” (recipe here) – upon arrival, and a guided ghost tour through the property.

Ghost stories that have been reported from throughout the Inn include the following:

Closing the Door
Apparently Lon likes the doors shut. A maid actually quit after having doors shut on their own multiple times while she was cleaning the guest casitas.

A Pat on the Head
A guest came into the restaurant to show her friends some of Lon Megargee’s original artwork that hangs in Last Drop (the portion of the Hermosa Inn that was Lon’s original art studio and residence). The host showed them the way, walked in the other room, had his hands full and when he came back to the guests (still with both hands full) the woman was looking up in the air. Our host asked what she was looking at, or if the roof was leaking from the rainy day, and she said “No, you just patted me on the head.” He assured her that he did not, as his hands were full.

Cowboy in the Mirror
Yet another maid quit her job at The Hermosa Inn; this time due to the reflection of a cowboy that appeared in the mirror behind her. When she turned around, no one was there.

Lady in Pink
Multiple guests have asked “Who is that lady in the pink gown walking over the bridge by the pool?” While we don’t know who she might be, a lady in a floor-length flowing pink gown (something not of this time period) does appear to guests in the late hours of the night or early mornings as she walks across the bridge.

Lon Did It
Oftentimes candlesticks will somehow fall out of their candlestick holders and other objects seem to move on their own or be misplaced. Decorations on the host stand have been “pushed” off, and a host was talking to a guest at the bar when a bottle of tequila flew off the shelf and broke multiple glasses. The staff will often joke “Oh, Lon must have done that!”

Kids at Play
One of the restaurant’s evening dishwashers refuses to work alone at night because she has seen children of times passed playing out in the parking lot upon leaving at 1 or 2 in the morning, in addition to seeing the Pink Lady mentioned above.

Spirits in the Cellar
When workers were doing construction in the underground wine cellar of LON’s, they had left various tools in disarray and went upstairs to get something. When they came back down, all their tools had been neatly placed in a row. There have also been accounts of doors opening/closing and lights going on and off.

To book a Hermosa Hauntings package, call 602.955.8614 (toll free at 800.241.1210) or visit www.HermosaInn.com and use promo code Haunting. For more information on The Hermosa Inn, LON’s and Last Drop, visit Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and the Hermosa Inn blog.

ghost

Haunted Boutique Resort Offering Ghost Tours

As one of the oldest resorts in the Valley with a rich cowboy history dating back to the 1930’s, it’s only natural that The Hermosa Inn would be home to a few friendly spirits still wandering the grounds. From original owner, cowboy artist Alonzo “Lon” Megargee, to a “Pink Lady” on a bridge and unexplained moving objects, this luxury boutique resort is now offering a Hermosa Hauntings package, where guests will receive two creepy cocktails from Last Drop at the Hermosa upon arrival, in addition to a guided ghost tour of the property.

“While we have accumulated quite a few ghost stories over the years, all the spirits that have been encountered seem to be quite friendly,” said Managing Director Michael Gildersleeve. “With so much interest from guests over the decades – and even more so in recent years with the popularity of rivaling ghost hunting shows on television – we thought it fitting to offer a package that gets our guests into the holiday spirit, and maybe even allows them to have an experience of their own with an on-property spirit.”

Valid October 1 – November 3, 2013 and starting from $246/night, the Hermosa Hauntings package includes an overnight stay, two creepy cocktails – Last Drop’s “Eye for an Eye” (recipe here) – upon arrival, and a guided ghost tour through the property.

Ghost stories that have been reported from throughout the Inn include the following:

Closing the Door
Apparently Lon likes the doors shut. A maid actually quit after having doors shut on their own multiple times while she was cleaning the guest casitas.

A Pat on the Head
A guest came into the restaurant to show her friends some of Lon Megargee’s original artwork that hangs in Last Drop (the portion of the Hermosa Inn that was Lon’s original art studio and residence). The host showed them the way, walked in the other room, had his hands full and when he came back to the guests (still with both hands full) the woman was looking up in the air. Our host asked what she was looking at, or if the roof was leaking from the rainy day, and she said “No, you just patted me on the head.” He assured her that he did not, as his hands were full.

Cowboy in the Mirror
Yet another maid quit her job at The Hermosa Inn; this time due to the reflection of a cowboy that appeared in the mirror behind her. When she turned around, no one was there.

Lady in Pink
Multiple guests have asked “Who is that lady in the pink gown walking over the bridge by the pool?” While we don’t know who she might be, a lady in a floor-length flowing pink gown (something not of this time period) does appear to guests in the late hours of the night or early mornings as she walks across the bridge.

Lon Did It
Oftentimes candlesticks will somehow fall out of their candlestick holders and other objects seem to move on their own or be misplaced. Decorations on the host stand have been “pushed” off, and a host was talking to a guest at the bar when a bottle of tequila flew off the shelf and broke multiple glasses. The staff will often joke “Oh, Lon must have done that!”

Kids at Play
One of the restaurant’s evening dishwashers refuses to work alone at night because she has seen children of times passed playing out in the parking lot upon leaving at 1 or 2 in the morning, in addition to seeing the Pink Lady mentioned above.

Spirits in the Cellar
When workers were doing construction in the underground wine cellar of LON’s, they had left various tools in disarray and went upstairs to get something. When they came back down, all their tools had been neatly placed in a row. There have also been accounts of doors opening/closing and lights going on and off.

To book a Hermosa Hauntings package, call 602.955.8614 (toll free at 800.241.1210) or visit www.HermosaInn.com and use promo code Haunting. For more information on The Hermosa Inn, LON’s and Last Drop, visit Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter and the Hermosa Inn blog.

hispanic

5 Things To Know About the Latino Marketplace

Mark Suarez is Managing Director of Mosaic Multicultural, a new full-service multicultural marketing agency working in partnership with The Lavidge Company. Mosaic provides multicultural advertising, interactive, public relations and marketing services. Recently, Mosaic was named the agency of record for the Phoenix McDonald’s Hispanic business. Here are five things Suarez says you should know about doing business with the Latino marketplace:

  1. You have to connect with us through both culture and language. Language doesn’t always mean in Spanish either. More than half of Latinos in Phoenix speak some English, while only 35 percent are Spanish dominant. Therefore, an approach in both English and Spanish, with culturally relevant strategies and creative would be an effective way to reach our market. We live, work and play in two different worlds most of the time. Take the time to understand us. Invest in bi-lingual collateral and employees.
  2. Consistency is key. When talking to the Latino, or any multicultural market, you must be consistent. Brands that invest in us are rewarded with our business. However, it’s an ongoing process and not a launch and leave relationship. It takes time to build a relationship with us. We want to genuinely get to know and trust you and your brand before we reward you with our business. We also need to be engaged consistently just as you do with the general market consumer, especially since in Arizona we will be the general market very soon.
  3. Community is king. Engage us in our communities through events and our passion points. We are passionate about our families, values, sports, communities and brands, which are not completely different from other’s core values and passions. We are involved in our community and look out for each other. We might bring our entire family to your business for a single purchase. Don’t be alarmed by this as we are just sharing our life with the people closest to us. Even the smallest purchases are discussed with family and friends.
  4. Latinos are not all the same. We are a very diverse group with many colors, income levels, educational levels, social levels, etc. We don’t spend our time trying to “acculturate” to the traditional American culture. Instead, we are shaping American culture into the future, especially here in Arizona. We appreciate businesses that understand our diversity and embrace it.
  5. We have money and we spend lots of it on products and services that are important to us. Our purchasing power in Arizona alone is more than $40 billion and will be $50 billion by late 2014. This consumer revenue is up for the taking, market smartly and you’ll share in the billions.
Prepare loan package, secure loan

Small businesses get loans in record numbers

A common complaint since the financial crisis began was that some of the Wall Street banks that were being bailed out by the federal government weren’t doing enough to help the mom-and-pop shops on Main Street.

“In 2008 when the recession hit, the impact on small business lending was pretty catastrophic,” said Greg Lehmann, managing director of Biltmore Bank of Arizona. “Not only did you have small businesses struggling with lost revenue and weakening balance sheets, but all the banks were retrenching and looking inward.  The unique element about the Recession was that it hit every business sector; small business, large businesses, banks, etc. Nobody was immune to its impact.”

In 2013, small business owners and entrepreneurs have a little more reason for optimism. So far this year, big banks are approving small business loans at the highest rate in more than two years, according to Biz2Credit, which calculates its monthly Small Business Lending Index using 1,000 loan applications made over its online lending platform.

“With an improving economy, Wells Fargo is growing new lending commitments, providing more dollars to help small businesses stay competitive today and for the long term,” said Jennifer Anderson, business banking manager for Wells Fargo Arizona. “The business owners who see increased demand for their products and services are investing in their businesses now. As business owners become more confident and find more opportunities to grow and improve their businesses, we expect to do more business.”

Wells Fargo literally puts its money where its mouth is. According to SNL Financial, the bank was the nation’s largest lender to small business in 2012, lending $32.8 billion to small businesses.

But Wells Fargo isn’t alone. If you look at recent reports, small business lending is up across the board:

* Biz2Credit found that big banks — those with more than $10 billion in assets — approved 15.9 percent of the small business loan applications in February 2013, up from 11.7 percent in February 2012. Small bank approval rates have also ticked up — 50.3 percent in February, up from 47.6 percent in February 2012.
* Government-guaranteed loans have increased 6 percent year-over-year in fiscal 2013. That represents $9.2 billion, an 18 percent increase over the dollars approved during the same period a year ago. Approvals in the last two years have set Small Business Administration records.

Despite the positive reports, the general belief is that small businesses aren’t getting loans, which isn’t true, said Dee H. Burton, executive vice president of Alliance Bank of Arizona.

“Yes, small businesses can get loans now,” Burton said. “At Alliance Bank, we have always been actively engaged in lending to small business — and we never stopped lending even through the toughest times of the Recession.”

What about the perception that lending standards have changed or tightened? That’s another misperception, bankers said.

“General underwriting guidelines have not really changed over the years,” Burton said. “Unfortunately, the Recession has made it more challenging for businesses to qualify. For most businesses, a reduction in revenue may have resulted in a negative impact on cash flow or resulted in a more leveraged balance sheet. Further, the value of assets which banks often look to take as collateral — equipment, real estate, accounts receivable, etc. — are not at the levels they were pre-Recession. All-in-all, these factors have impacted small businesses’ ability to meet the typical standards under which banks underwrite business loans.”

While Lehmann said banks were more willing to bend on some of the fundamentals prior to the Recession, he said banks always look to cash flow, collateral, and capital levels to make a credit decision.

At Wells Fargo, Anderson said lending standards have remained consistent. Before the bank extends credit, it looks for a business to show:

* Steady cash flow. Cash flow is a key indicator of a business’ financial health and its future prospects. When it can show reliable cash flow, we can see it has the resources to repay new loans.
* Debt load is manageable. Banks want to make sure a business has the ability to take on additional debt and is in a strong financial position to manage its debt payments.
* Good payment history. Payment history provides an important record of its ability to responsibly pay down debt.

As for lines of credit for small businesses, Ward Hickey, business banking manager for National Bank of Arizona, said, “Small business lines of credit are based on  business cash flow and collateral values. As both of these improve for small businesses in Arizona, the underwriting standards will ease and more small business lines of credit will be available.”

As the economy in Arizona continues to strengthen, bankers see a better environment for small business.

“We can point to a number of positive signs in small business lending,” Anderson said. “There is more small business activity in our stores, more small businesses are applying for credit, and loan delinquencies continue to decline.”

As businesses shift from survival mode to growth mode, the outlook for lending to small and medium-sized businesses — which Lehmann called “the life blood of the Arizona economy” — continues to be positive, which will help small businesses grow and add workers.

“Arizona will continue to be a growth state and businesses that have survived this Recession will be able to grow as the state continues to grow,” Burton said. “We see businesses are now investing in items such as new equipment and new expansion, which had been put on hold during the Recession. Businesses are also taking advantage of the current interest rate environment to fund their expansion.”

Lehmann agreed.

“As the economy continues to heal and grow,” he said, “so will the small businesses of Arizona.”

woman

Women Investing In Women announces summit plans

Women Investing In Women announced that their Inaugural Women Investing in Women Summit, at the Arizona Biltmore on 12/12/12, will bring together over 150 professional women from across the Valley to discuss important issues and opportunities, build new relationships and celebrate our accomplishments in 2012.

Anu Bhardwaj, WIIW’s founder stated, “I appreciate all the support from our valued sponsors, luminary speakers, and community partners that are helping bring the Women Investing In Women Summit to Arizona — by supporting our mission of creating a cohesive platform for women in Financial Literacy, through education, entrepreneurship and providing access to capital markets”.

Kathy Lynn-Cullotta, co-president of 85 Broads Phoenix, said “We are very excited to help support the WIIW mission and be a partner in bringing this wonderful event to the women business owners in Arizona.”

WIIW Summit topics on 12-12-12 will include Impact Investing with guest panel Natalia Oberti Noguera, founder of Pipeline Fellowship; Michelle Mace, ASU Women & Philanthropy; Jackie Sturm, Intel’s global strategic initiatives.

Continuing the WIIW Summit with a luncheon conversation about Board Diversity and women’s participating in the  2020 Women on Boards Campaign which is a national campaign to increase the percentage of women directors on U.S. public company boards to 20 percent or greater by 2020.  Our Arizona Summit keynote speaker Dr. Mary Walshok, founder of Global CONNECT / Dean of the UCSD Extension School and the Summit discussion will be led by Shelly Esque, Intel’s Corporate Affairs Group and include Joanne Flynn, Managing Director, Phoenix Group International.

The One Day summit Educational Track’s will include a variety of speakers and topics including Branding Your Brilliance, Women’s Access to Capital, Women’s Angel Investors in Arizona, Women Entrepreneurs Building New Companies Faster, The Lean Launch pad Way, and Pitching like a Rock Star with Candace Klein, founder of SoMoLend.

WIIW 2012 Summit Sponsors and Partners include Intel, Venture Catalyst Private Equity Partners, 85 Broads Phoenix, Premier Media Service, Nautilus Group / New York Life, 2020 Women on Boards, NetGains America, Quarles & Brady, The Valley Girl Show, Arizona State University, NAWBO, AZBIO, MBAWI, Global CONNECT, Women & Philanthropy, SEEDSPOT, Thunderbird Online.

Sign up today to attend 12-12-12 Women Investing In Women at Arizona Biltmore a Full Day Program is only $175 Includes Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner all the Educational Tracks and Summit Access.

Women Investing in Women is a branded platform of high impact educational programs and public-private partnerships emphasizing financial literacy and entrepreneurship by women for women, globally.  These programs will be held internationally to provide continuing education to address the need for high quality online content and interactive event formats that foster broader access to capital for women and the growth of women-led businesses.

deal

ASU program helps leaders of small businesses

The fifth annual Small Business Leadership Academy at the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU helps small business owners and executives learn how to improve efficiency, streamline operations and raise profits.

“Classes are held just one night per week, so they fit right into busy executives’ schedules,” said Dawn Feldman, executive director of the W. P. Carey School of Business Center for Executive and Professional Development, which hosts the program. “Participants not only take away great business knowledge, but also a new support network of peers that will exist long after the program is over.”

Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding co-sponsor, offers a number of scholarships to its current suppliers and small business customers.

“The academy offers an outstanding opportunity for small business owners to gain knowledge from highly acclaimed professors and establish lasting relationships with other community small business owners,” said Carrie Young, senior director, corporate operations services for SRP. “The partnership we have with ASU, coupled with the sponsorship and scholarships we offer to the academy, is a natural fit for SRP in supporting economic development within our own community.”

As part of a larger partnership with ASU focused on small business support, JPMorgan Chase is also a top sponsor, providing 15 scholarships to the academy.

“As Arizona’s number one SBA lender, we know how important small businesses are to our economy,” said Joe Stewart, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase in Arizona.

Participants must come from companies that have been in business for at least three years; have annual revenues between $1 million and $10 million; and have fewer than 100 employees.

For more information, call (480) 965-7579, e-mail wpcarey.execed@asu.edu or visit wpcarey.asu.edu/sbla.

speakers

Hear from Top Business Leaders in the New ECP Season

Top leaders from Sam’s Club, Intel, the United Services Automobile Association (USAA), and the Arizona Diamondbacks are among those taking the stage during the current season of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. Every year, Phoenix-area audiences are invited to attend the club’s luncheons and hear from some of the biggest names in the business world.

“We want Valley businesspeople to be able to hear from the heads of major local companies and top executives from international firms,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This series brings leaders from a variety of industries to talk about what’s happening in their own companies, as well as in the business arena as a whole.”

The Economic Club of Phoenix (ECP) was founded by a group of prominent business executives called the Dean’s Council of 100, in conjunction with the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The club is now the preeminent Arizona forum for the exchange of ideas about business and the economy. Its monthly luncheons and other activities offer business leaders and others opportunities to network and engage.

This season’s speaker lineup (subject to change) is:

Thursday, Nov. 8 – William Toler, chief executive officer, AdvancePierre Foods; Matt Wilson, managing director, Oaktree Capital Management
Wednesday, Jan. 23 – Derrick Hall, president and chief executive officer, Arizona Diamondbacks
Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 – Charles Redfield, executive vice president of merchandising, Sam’s Club
Tuesday, March 19 – Doug Davis, vice president and general manager, Arizona fab/sort manufacturing site, Intel Corporation
Thursday, April 25 – Maj. Gen. Josue Robles Jr., president and chief executive officer, United Services Automobile Association (USAA), Dean’s Council of 100 Executive of the Year
Thursday, May 16 – Annual Economic Outlook Luncheon

All luncheons run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The November event will take place at JW Marriott’s Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, with the rest of the locations still to be announced.

Non-members are welcome for a $75 luncheon fee. Funds in excess of the cost of lunch are used to support scholarships and faculty research at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596, e-mail wpcarey.ecp@asu.edu or go to www.econclubphx.org.

capital

3 Phoenix-area companies offered access to growth capital

The Initiative for a Competitive Inner City (ICIC), Bank of America, FORTUNE and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) are proud to announce that they have selected three Phoenix-area companies for their annual Inner City Capital Connections (ICCC) program. This year the program received a record-setting 5,200 company nominations from across the country and selected 178 companies for participation. Especially critical in today’s economic climate, ICCC identifies inner city businesses in need of growth capital, educates them on the sources of capital, and matches them with capital providers in order to grow their businesses and create jobs.

The three Phoenix-area companies selected include:

Each of these companies was selected for the program because of its strong growth potential and commitment to the inner city.

ICCC, co-founded with Bank of America, educates inner city entrepreneurs on how to access capital and matches them with capital providers. To do this, the program offers selected companies web-based training workshops, coaches to help perfect company pitches, a day-long information session on equity and other forms of growth financing, and an innovative one-day event that directly connects them with investors to make pitches and discuss potential opportunities.

“There is a lack of capital availability in America’s inner cities,” stated Mary Kay Leonard, ICIC President and CEO. “In fact, 71 percent of inner city businesses have, on average, only a quarter of the capital needed to compete on average in their industries. For many urban entrepreneurs, ICCC helps open the door to a network of financial options that they had limited or no access to previously.”

The program is free to the inner city businesses, and 178 companies from across the country have been selected to participate in this year’s program. To qualify, a business must be located in the inner city (defined as an area of concentrated economic distress) or have a disproportionate percent of its employees residing in such an area. In addition, a company must have $2 million in revenue. The companies selected for the program represent numerous industries including technology, food and beverage, consumer goods, business and professional services, and manufacturing.

Since its inception in 2005, 375 inner city companies and 150 capital providers have participated in ICCC. Participating companies have raised more than $703 million in capital and created more than 5,694 jobs in their communities.

“ICCC demonstrates that growing inner companies, if given the access to capital, can generate the jobs and wealth that are crucial to the transformation of our urban communities,” explained Edward Powers, Managing Director of Bank of America BAML Capital Access Fund. “We are proud to help these growing businesses connect with a vast network of capital providers.”

The meetings with potential investors will be held on November 9, 2012 at the headquarters of FORTUNE.