Tag Archives: March 2010

Packing 101

Packing 101: Weekend Getaways

With summer’s searing wrath upon us, it’s time to prepare and prioritize your weekend getaway wish list. And whether you’re planning a romantic rendezvous, a trip with the girls or a family expedition, packing wisely is always the challenge.

Packing 101: Here are some tips to help you become a more efficient packer:

Packing 101

Good things come in small packages

Absolute truth: no matter how big the suitcase, you’ll fill it! Save yourself the temptation and aggravation by settling on a smaller bag. With less space, you’ll find yourself putting more thought into what you’re packing, and how you’re packing (i.e., if bringing heels, remember to place them in the middle of the bag, heels facing in).

Rolling articles up tends to keep them from getting too wrinkled during the trek.

Think, and then pack

Plan ahead. Once you’ve decided on your itinerary, pack accordingly. If you’re on the fence, be a minimalist — to do otherwise spells big trouble, and big suitcases. Go with your gut; your initial instinct bears out more often than not.

Simplicity and versatility are key

Packing 101It’s not a costume party. Think comfortable chic. Color coordination is key, so stick to two to three different colors; this way you have the option of mixing and matching your items without reconciling palettes or patterns. (Neutrals are always a safe bet; however, don’t be afraid to spice things up with some trendy pastel pieces for layering.).

Try before you buy

Run a beta test. With limited space, you want to be sure that the items you pack are the items you’re going to be happy with once you arrive. Pairing your outfits from head to shoes before departing will save you from a mini fashion crisis. It’s better to bring more tops than bottoms: not only are they smaller and easier to pack, but unlike bottoms, you can’t be a repeat offender.

Let these guidelines serve as your mantra as you blissfully plan that weekend away. The moral of the story is: simple is better, and everything is good in moderation. Keep that in mind, and you’ll experience packing rapture (or at least avoid that pre-departure anxiety attack).

Woman standing over a desk

First Job: Linda Hunt, Service Area President, Catholic Healthcare West Arizona And St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center

Linda Hunt
Service Area President, Catholic Healthcare West Arizona and St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
During the day, I was a secretary for a construction company. I answered phones, coordinated job assignments and oversaw payroll. In the evening, I worked at Walgreens stocking shelves and cashiering. I learned making a living without a college degree was very hard work. It was tough holding down two jobs and trying to have a life, especially as a college student. I had a lot of fun, but knew I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life in either position.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
When I finished my nursing training, I took a position as a staff nurse at Ochsner Foundation Hospital in New Orleans. My first assignment was in labor and delivery. I took the 3 to 11 p.m. shift because it paid more money. It was very exciting and frightening to be responsible for the lives of mothers and babies. As a new graduate, I learned a lot about life, experienced situations that brought people great happiness and overwhelming sadness, and I sometimes saw the violent side of humanity. I had a tremendous passion for being a nurse. It was fun working with people, hearing their stories, and witnessing new life come into the world. I would get teary-eyed every time I saw a birth — it’s so miraculous.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
I netted $250 a month working as both a construction company secretary and a Walgreens sales clerk. I spent eight months earning enough money to buy a used Buick. My first nursing paycheck netted $534 for two weeks of work.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did he or she play?
Dr. Jodi Alphin was a great mentor to me. I reported to her when I was director of nursing at St. Luke’s Hospital in Colorado. She mentored me in decision making, relationship building, and the art and science of leadership. Jodi molded my career in a variety of ways and helped me grow into a health care leader.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Proposed budget cuts at the state and federal level have made this an extremely difficult time for health care. If you are entering health care today, you will need to be innovative and able to envision a different delivery system for care — a system that incorporates personal accountability, evidence-based medicine and prevention. This is a time in health care when you can make great contributions to mankind.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would be an executive chef and owner of a world-class restaurant in a major metropolitan area. I would have won a prestigious James Beard Foundation Award for my food and wine.


Arizona Business Magazine

March 2010

Seafood in white dish

New Italian Eatery Bice Bistro Opens In Glendale’s Westgate City Center

Bice Bistro at Westgate City Center Among the array of restaurants at the ever-growing Westgate City Center in Glendale is a new standout: Bice Bistro.

The Italian restaurant has a contemporary feel from the moment you step inside. The decor is light and sophisticated, and attention is immediately drawn to the wine wall lining one entire side of the restaurant. Televisions tuned to sporting events hang above the bar at the front, but there is quieter, more intimate seating in the back.

When my dining companions and I first saw the menu, we knew we were in for quite a treat. Bice Bistro offers a wide variety of Italian food, including pizzas, sandwiches, pastas, fish and meat. As soon as the bread arrived at the table, it was clear that we would not be disappointed with the overall meal. The bread was served with butter spiced with flecks of red pepper, making it difficult to save room for the entrees as we gorged on the high-carb treat.

Of the appetizers we chose to sample, the overwhelming table favorite was the calamari. Served with mushrooms, zucchini and a spicy tomato sauce, it was perfectly cooked — the lightest and fluffiest I have ever tasted. Not surprisingly, it was much fought-over and completely devoured before too much time had passed.

Luckily, our salads soon arrived and diverted our attention. Bice Bistro offers the usual green and Caesar salads, and the Caesar, which had a hint of garlic, was definitely delicious. The star salad of the evening, however, was what our lovely waitress called the “house specialty.” The baby spinach salad came with beets, goat cheese, pine nuts and lemon vinaigrette. The beets in particular were fresh, and even those of us who had never tasted beets before thoroughly enjoyed them.

Before long our entrees were served and, as with the appetizers and salads, we were pleasantly surprised by the diversity of flavors. Our pizza of choice, fotomodella, had tomato sauce, mozzarella cheese, prosciutto, arugula, and the key ingredient, truffle oil. Needless to say, it was distinct from any pizza any of us had ever tasted, and it was easily a favorite. Another favorite entree was the crab-and-shrimp-stuffed ravioli with a lobster cream sauce. The ravioli is made in-house, and it was perfectly cooked. The rich and creamy sauce, however, was what really made the dish.

Finally, it was time for dessert. Although we all thought we had filled up, we still managed to relish three delicious treats: tiramisu, chocolate souffle and mango sorbet. The tiramisu and souffle were equally exquisite, and we were all impressed with how rich the souffle was without being overly sweet. The sorbet, which also is offered in other fruity flavors, was simple yet delicious — the perfect alternative if you’re just not hungry enough for a full dessert, but can’t imagine walking away with nothing. AZ Business Magazine March 2010

So the next time you’re at Westgate and feeling overwhelmed by the vast number of restaurants vying for your business, relax — Bice Bistro will not disappoint.

If You Go:
Bice Bistro
6751 N. Sunset Blvd., #E-110
Westgate City Center, Glendale
(623) 877-4760
www.biceglendale.com

 

AZ Business Magazine

March 2010

People in lab coats working in a wet lab office environment

East Valley Energy: Leaders In Business, Government And Education Are Working To Keep The Region Growing

The East Valley has experienced unprecedented growth since 1980. With nearly 1.7 million residents and more than 54,000 businesses, community and business leaders alike are looking to the future to prepare for greater global competition. They also are working to sustain a strong and vital economy that will protect and preserve the quality of life that exists in the East Valley’s 17 communities. In this East Valley report, Arizona Business Magazine looks at some of the major economic engines powering the region.

Arizona State University
Arizona State University, the largest public research university in the United States, has been contributing to East Valley and state economic development efforts since 1885, when ASU was initially founded. The university’s core focus is training the labor force and turning out college graduates that will stay and work in Arizona.

ASU is also involved in community efforts, such as bringing the Insight Bowl to Tempe. In addition, ASU Gammage is a major driver of people to local restaurants, stores, parks and stadiums. The university’s research and development efforts produce spin-off companies, as well as attract those that want to be near a research university. The perfect example is SkySong. Scottsdale raised $100 million to partner with ASU and create the innovation park that currently has more than 40 small, startup companies from 12 different countries.

“SkySong is a global portal for metropolitan Phoenix, and companies are attracted to it because they want to be near the university,” says Virgil Renzulli, ASU’s vice president of public affairs. “ASU is one of 100 universities in the country that turn out new knowledge.”

At ASU’s Polytechnic campus in eastern Mesa, the university brought in some of the best solar researchers in the country to work in the research lab.They also have alternative energy research programs in place to look at creating energy from light, and creating regular fuel and jet fuel from algae and bacteria.

“Working with East Valley cities and organizations is important because so many things today need a group effort,” Renzulli says. “It’s all part of the modern knowledge economy infrastructure. ASU wants to see things improve. We are good citizens and the majority of the time we look at what’s good for the East Valley, as well as the state.”

The city of Chandler
With companies moving less nowadays, the city of Chandler is planning to grow its own companies in hopes of diversifying and stabilizing the community’s job market, as well as positioning the East Valley in the global marketplace.

Chandler’s new venture is a wet lab incubator called Innovations, and it’s aimed at young, startup science and technology companies seeking move-in-ready lab space. Innovations is located in a 40,000 square foot former Intel building on McClintock Road and Chandler Boulevard. Space will be available for lease starting May 1. Christine Mackay, Chandler’s economic development director, said Innovations would contain everything — soup to nuts — that a young startup company needs to work and succeed.

Chandler City Council approved a 10-year lease on the building in September, along with $5.7 million to renovate the building. “Many young companies start with a grant or on a shoestring budget, so traditional commercial space is too expensive,” Mackay says. “They need a partnership to succeed until they can commercialize on their own. They could find cheap space without us of course, but they wouldn’t have access to things like business managers and attorneys to help them succeed and move forward.”

Studies show that 80 percent of small companies that start up through incubators succeed — four times the average of other small business startups. Although Chandler has yet to market the incubator, it has received a lot of interest from entrepreneurs and is already 25 percent pre-committed. ASU has expressed interest in leasing space, as well, Mackay says.

“Right now, we’re in the process of forming a team of experts with backgrounds in renewable energies, engineering, biosciences, applied materials, etc., to help us pick companies with the ability to succeed,” Mackay says. “Our hope is that those companies stay in Chandler long term.”

Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport
Allegiant Air began offering passenger service at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport in 2007, with two aircraft serving eight cities. Today, the airline serves 20 cities with five aircrafts, and this year more than 650,000 passengers are expected to pass through the terminal. In the last two years, Cessna and Hawker Beechcraft have both opened maintenance and repair facilities near the airport. Collectively, more than 35 aviation companies operate at the airport, generating more than $251 million in annual economic activity.

“The work we did in 2006 put the wheels in motion for the Phoenix-Gateway area,” says Roc Arnett, president and CEO of East Valley Partnership. “We make things move and shake to improve business and quality of life in the East Valley.”

William Jabjiniak, director of economic development for Mesa, considers EVP a great partner.

“We look to East Valley Partnership for leadership and policy direction that affects positive change for Mesa,” he says. “It’s also important for the East Valley to have a unified voice and that’s what EVP is for us and our neighboring cities.”

Mesa, which is just shy of 500,000 people, is currently focusing its economic development efforts on four key industry segments: health care, education, aerospace and tourism. The city’s economic development team also is working diligently with existing businesses in the community.

“Economic development is based on relationships, which we are trying to grow with existing businesses and the brokerage community,” Jabjiniak said. “About 80 percent of growth in a community comes from existing businesses, so essentially they are the bread and butter.”

One of Mesa’s biggest retention projects over the last several months has been hanging onto the Chicago Cubs. The Cubs have been holding spring training in Mesa for more than 50 years and provide the state with an annual economic impact of $52.2 million. In late January, officials with the Cubs announced the team would stay put in Mesa — if a new, multimillion-dollar stadium and practice complex is built.

V icon, similar to Facebook icon

How Should Employers Respond To Social Media In The Workplace?

Virtual Networking:

According to some major news articles, the reign of e-mail as a primary tool for communication is coming to a close. This does not mean e-mail will no longer have a place in many people’s daily lives, but rather that its use will be minimized as new generations of communicators strive for instant feedback.

The Nielsen Company conducted a study that found that as of August, 276.9 million people used e-mail across the U.S. and other major countries. In contrast, the number of users on social networking sites was 301.5 million. What is staggering is that social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter have only been in existence for about five years or less. What does this mean for employers?

Currently, there are three major responses by employers regarding employee (and their own) use of social media. The first response is to completely ignore social media and deal with issues if and when they arise. In fact, according to Russell Herder and Ethos Business Law, more than one in three businesses have no policies concerning the use of social media sites in the workplace. The second response is to completely ban social media and even block social media sites so there is no potential for use. As of July 2009, the American Management Association found that approximately 71 percent of IT departments are blocking users from social networking. The third response is to allow employee use of social media within a defined setting.

While trying to weigh how to respond and considering the potential risks, such as security issues and low productivity, it is important for employers to consider that studies show that, although 61 percent of all employees access their Facebook profile at work, this may be a phenomenon to embrace. It is no secret that the delineation between work time and home time has blurred with the use of laptops and cell phones.

In August, the University of Melbourne reported the results of a study that showed people who use the Internet for personal reasons at work are about 9 percent more productive than those who do not. One possible theory according to Brent Colker, the Melbourne study author, was that “short and unobtrusive breaks, such as a quick surf of the Internet, enables the mind to rest itself, leading to a higher total net concentration for a day’s work, and as a result, increased productivity.”

Given these dynamics, most employers will want to choose the third approach and opt for a social media policy that will provide active social media users in the workplace with defined parameters. Much like Internet-use policies, the employer will want to advise its employees on the proper professional etiquette of social media while protecting its own interests. To do this, the employer should be mindful to consider the following when drafting its policy:

  • Encourage employees to use good judgment: Don’t write anything you wouldn’t say in person.
  • Advise them on how to preserve confidentiality and intellectual property: Do not disclose customer or proprietary information.
  • Require employees to disclose any work-related blogging to their supervisor: An employee should use a disclaimer on his blog clarifying where he works and that the opinions and views expressed are not necessarily those of the employer.
  • Mandate that social media use not interfere with getting the job done and that computer use will be monitored appropriately: Always stay productive.
  • Provide a reminder or training regarding the ethics code of the business or given profession: Respect copyright and fair use and do not risk harassment, discrimination or defamation.
  • Encourage employees to be courteous social media community members: Pay heed to mutuality, authenticity and timeliness; these concepts have special meaning in the social media sphere.
  • Clarify the place of social media within the overall business goals and communication plan: Workplace social media use should follow the employer’s goals.

As employers venture into this brave new world, they should be mindful that any policy implemented should work consistently with any Internet-use policy or disciplinary policy already in place.In addition, some employers may need to consider drafting more than one policy — one for hourly and one for salaried employees due to wage hour laws. Also, employers should remain aware of other legal issues that may arise, such as free speech rights and potential litigation and discovery issues. As such, it is always prudent for employers to have legal counsel review such a policy before it is implemented.

Man standing in front of building pointing a surveillance camera at you

Pasquale J. Piscitelli, Founder And CEO Of Simply Surveillance, Took His Background In Technology To The 24-hour Monitoring Business

Pasquale J. Piscitelli
Simply Surveillance
Title: Founder and CEO
Est.: 2003

“The greatest achievement is starting with just a vision and shoestring budget, and then being able to complete projects that challenge most large companies while keeping our integrity.” – Pasquale J. Piscitelli, founder and CEO of Simply Surveillance

Pasquale J. Piscitelli has always worked in technology — ranging from graphic art to database administration. Today, he is the CEO of Simply Surveillance, a local business that specializes in 24-hour monitoring for alarm systems and surveillance cameras.

The company began in 2003 as B*Evolved Technology group, which Piscitelli founded to specialize in low-voltage installations, entertainment, communications, wireless networks, surveillance and security systems.

Piscitelli knew that the company needed focus, and he credits the change to a complete stranger.

“During an expo, a man visited our booth,” he says. “As he approached the booth he said, ‘Wow, what a great logo, nice colors, interesting name … but what do you do?’ ”

That day, Piscitelli called business associates and reassessed the company.

“We came to the realization that surveillance was the majority of our business and the market was tantalizing,” Piscitelli says. “The transition was painless. Simply Surveillance was formed.”

The company now has eight employees, including office staff and installation technicians, and is poised for further growth. Piscitelli hopes to begin franchising on the West Coast and eventually throughout the United States.

But their current location in the Valley has been an advantage.

“Arizona is an opportunistic state,” he says, adding that it “is a sizeable state with a personable and relatively tight-networked business community. Once you have a reputation for being a ‘straight shooter’ everyone will know and it doesn’t take long.”

“The greatest achievement is starting with just a vision and shoestring budget, and then being able to complete projects that challenge most large companies while keeping our integrity.”

But it isn’t easy. Piscitelli notes that one of the most challenging aspects is researching new products in an industry that is constantly changing.

He reveals that Simply Surveillance stays on top of technology by working directly with manufacturers from the United States and abroad to enhance their offerings. They build relationships with the companies and stay loyal.

“These relationships give us an edge because we stay informed of new product developments before they are released to the public,” he says, and asserts that one of the best parts of the industry is knowing that he is making things that matter.

AZ Business Magazine March 2010“I like the fact that we can customize systems, be creative, and meet our client’s needs,” he says. “People look to us to solve problems so it’s never boring! There’s a certain satisfaction knowing our systems actually make a difference in people’s lives.”

While economic woes affected many companies negatively, Simply Surveillance is one company that has actually benefited from the recession.

“I’d like to thank all the thieves, creeps and less reputable for keeping us in business,” Piscitelli jokes, before adding seriously, “some find excuses in recession, some find opportunity. We focus on opportunity!”

Man sitting at desk working on laptop.

CEO Series: Harry Curtin

Harry Curtin
Founder and CEO, BestIT

How did the recession affect the IT industry?
I think it really hurt IT. It really did, especially with larger corporations, I saw. It was almost like within a couple of month period that companies just shut everything off — especially large, multinational, Fortune 100 companies. You could talk to each one of them and they all had the same kind of story where “we have to cut it off,” and if they had a program they had been working on for a year, they just shut it down. I think there was a lot of fear, absolutely. The small- and mid-sized (companies), I think, really kept it up more than the large, to me. I think they felt a little bit more nimble. They stayed a little more positive, frankly. They were fighting through it more than the large companies. I think decisions from the top kind of cut everything off all the way down. It really hurt (IT) companies that were focused with larger companies, major projects. It changed them. It changed things a lot.

What signs of recovery are you seeing in your industry?
What I’m seeing right now is mostly that companies are taking a deep breath after everything and they’re looking at, “OK, maybe I’m not ready to do something today, but what should I be doing tomorrow?” They’re starting to plan for later this year, next year; (they) don’t want to let things get to the point where things are just falling apart. (They) want to stay on top of it, but what’s (their) next step? So they are really in the planning phase in my book, and they are opening up their ears and thinking about what they need to do next. Even though they may not be ready today, they are taking those initiatives to move in the right direction.

What are the benefits of IT outsourcing?
It allows you to focus on your core business. It can reduce costs greatly, if it’s done right. It can also create more of an efficiency in your business, because you aren’t focusing on an area that you aren’t an expert in. You can stay focused on what you’re really good at and just do it that much better, rather than being distracted by an area that’s not really a core. Our company, we outsource areas where it’s not our competency or something we want to do long term.

In terms of image, does the outsourcing of services still face challenges?
I think so. I think people in the late ’90s and early-2000s got a view of outsourcing that it’s shipping a job or a service overseas, which is not the case. That’s a piece of it, but lots of companies — I’ll use manufacturing as an example. You may manufacture a whole component, but maybe a piece of that is something you’ve never been able to manufacture correctly, you haven’t gotten the quality you wanted, you haven’t gotten the pricing right, and you essentially outsource that piece. Maybe it’s a local company down the street that does it … I think that if (people) are just looking at it as (work) goes overseas, that is not the right way. I think you need to look at what the solution is. (BestIT) is a U.S.-based organization; essentially when a company signs on with us, if it’s an extensive enough contract, we’re going to need to hire here. AZ Business Magazine March 2010So we’re going to be creating jobs, as well as they are going to be creating jobs for themselves, because now we’ve reduced what their costs are and they can hire in sales or project management — wherever they feel the gaps are in their business.If (people) look deep enough, they’ll find organizations that offer outsourcing that may not be what the typical outsourcing is.

What does an IT professional need in order to be considered part of the C-level team?
(There needs to be) a lot of hard work, a lot of focus, a great attitude — people that are really committed to helping support the business. And not taking this (job) as a nine-to-five, but also thinking out-of-the-box in terms of where can you take the business up to the next level, or what you can do yourself to help the business.

    Vital Stats



  • CEO of BestIT
  • Founded BestIT in 2004
  • Owned an investor relations firm with a focus on small-cap technology firms
  • Worked as an investment adviser at Charles Schwab
  • Worked at Oracle Direct Sales for Oracle Corporation
  • Attended Buffalo State College
  • www.bestit.com
2 wind turbine with solar panels in front of a blue cloudy sky

Can Green Save The Day? Leaders Across The Valley And State Are Betting That Sustainability Will Help Lead To Economic Stability

Search for the word “sustainability” on Google and you’ll end up with nearly 25 million hits. But what does sustainability mean to Arizona, especially as the state’s economy crawls out of the crater left behind by the recession?

“The word sustainability and the word green means different things to different people — it’s more than just environmental technologies … The real question is how is the concept of sustainability affecting businesses at large. Because sustainability is a business issue,” said Rob Melnick, executive dean of the Global Institute of Sustainability/School of Sustainability at Arizona State University.

Though 2009 proved to be a difficult year economically, it was a landmark year for the green industry in the Grand Canyon State.

In October 2009, Clean Edge Inc., a research and publishing firm devoted to the clean-tech sector, listed Phoenix in the top 15 U.S. metro areas for clean-tech job activity. Phoenix was in the company of established cities in the industry such as San Francisco, Oakland and San Jose, Calif., as well as Denver, Boulder and Greeley, Colo.

A month later, Gov. Jan Brewer signed Senate Bill 1403 into law, creating the Renewable Energy Incentive Program, which provides refundable tax credits and property tax reductions for manufacturers.

“That sent a resounding alert to the industry that Arizona was serious about becoming a global leader in the renewable energy sectors,” said David Drennon, spokesperson for the Arizona Department of Commerce. “The result has been a solid response in companies — particularly in the solar industry — to consider establishing operations in Arizona. It means investment in our state and jobs for Arizonans.”

In her State of the State address in January, Brewer reinforced her belief that the sustanability industry will have a positive effect on the state’s economic recovery.

“We celebrate significant progress in establishing our foothold in the solar industry, and in advancing our competitive position in the national and global economy,” she said. “Our goal is to land the top solar manufacturers in the world and we are well on our way.”

School of Sustainability building at ASU
The School of Sustainability at Arizona State University has done much to advance the state’s reputation in the global green industry.

And on the federal level, President Barack Obama in January unveiled $2.3 billion in Recovery Act Advanced Energy Manufacturing tax credits for clean energy manufacturing projects across the United States. Companies with plans to build in Arizona requested nearly $30 million in tax credits. In a release announcing the funds, Obama stated, “Building a robust clean-energy sector is how we will create the jobs of the future. (The credits) will help close the clean-energy gap that has grown between America and other nations, while creating good jobs, reducing our carbon emissions and increasing our energy security.”

Slow Beginnings
Although the Renewable Energy Incentive Program signaled the state’s shift toward a valid future in the green sector, Arizona still has a way to go before catching up to other states.

A new study by the nonprofit research group Next 10 found that between 1995 and 2008, California had a 2.4 percent annual growth rate in its core green-economy employment. The study also found that although total jobs in California decreased 1 percent between January 2007 and January 2008, green jobs increased 5 percent.

“The state has to make some strategic investments,” Melnick said. “It’s got to be creative about regulation, work force development, finance and marketing itself. Right now, no one is saying Arizona is the green job capital of the world. We really could have been the solar capital of the world 20 years ago. We were growing so fast and so rich, but now we need it.”

Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) echoes these sentiments.

“It’s a very policy-specific industry,” Broome said. “We have to think critically about energy policy, planning and community economic development.”

Now more than ever, Arizona needs to take the right steps in securing the industry as a valuable economic engine.

Green Jobs
The burgeoning sustainability industry is growing green jobs, bringing the prospect of much-needed employment to the state.

Brewer recently announced that one of the world’s largest solar-cell manufacturers, China-based Suntech Power Holdings, will bring its U.S. headquarters to the West Valley this year. Suntech, a multibillion-dollar corporation that makes photovoltaic solar cells and solar electric systems, will potentially be one of the first companies eligible for the Renewable Energy Incentive Program.

“We did quite an extensive search around the country,” said Steven Chan, chief strategy officer of Suntech Power Holdings. “(Arizona) had a combination of a strong potential market, very supportive policies and incentives, and very good educational institutions.”

The plant is set to open in Goodyear and is expected to begin production in the third quarter of this year, with an initial production capacity of 30 megawatts. The 80,000 to 100,000-square-foot plant will be designed with growth in mind, due to the anticipated expansion of the U.S. solar market.

Suntech announced it is expecting up to 150 jobs for the company’s first phase — 75 at launch, with the potential to double within the year. The plant will have a variety of jobs that will be focused mostly on manufacturing and operations.

“We’re looking forward to building a long-term base for Suntech in Arizona. We feel that both in Arizona and across the U.S. there is a promising future for a green work force,” Chan said.

Another manufacturer also has announced plans for an Arizona presence — and it comes from an unlikely source. Tower Automotive, a producer of structural metal components for the automobile industry, plans to invest $50 million in an Arizona plant. The decline of the U.S. auto industry hurt the company and spurred it to diversify its product line. The plant will manufacture mirror assemblies for solar-power systems and will employ about 200 people.

RED Awards banner 2010

Brokerage Team Of The Year For Sales 2010

Bo Mills, Cushman & Wakefield
Mark Detmer, Cushman & Wakefield, Brokerage Team of the Year for Sales 2010
Bo Mills
Mark Detmer

Cushman & Wakefield

THE TEAM:
• Bo Mills, Exec. Director
• Mark Detmer, Exec. Director

SALES DETAILS:
• 7 Sale Transactions
• Totaling 2.03 MSF
• $46.3M in Value

Bo Mills and Mark Detmer sold the 2 largest industrial buildings in Phoenix in 2009. Both were sold to corporations that will employ more than 600 new employees in the Phoenix market. Their largest single transaction that closed in 2009 was the largest industrial sale in Phoenix — the 101 Distribution Center, a 619,000 SF center in Glendale that sold for $17.4M. The team represented both sides of the deal between Conair Corp. and Heritage.

Mills and Detmer specialize in representing developers, institutional landlords and corporate tenants desiring to acquire, develop, lease and dispose of industrial real estate. AZRE March 2010 Front CoverThe two started their careers more than 14 years ago, and have completed more than 600 lease and sale transactions totaling more than 13 MSF of buildings and 2,500 acres of land valued in excess of $1.5B.

Both are members of the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors (SIOR) and are Certified Commercial Investment Members (CCIM). They are active in the local chapter of the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), and each served as Chairman of Night at the Fights — Mills in 2002 and Detmer in 2008.

www.cushwake.com

AZRE Red Awards March 2010 | Previous: Brokerage Team – Leasing

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RED Awards 2010

Best Educational Project 2010

ASU College of Nursing & Health Innovation

The rapid growth of Arizona State University, and the birth of its new Downtown Phoenix campus, created a special architectural and urban opportunity. This compact, 5-story building serves as both the campus’ primary gateway on its marquee corner, and will house one of the largest nursing programs in the United States. The urban infill project created much needed density within the Phoenix Downtown core, and reused existing plant materials that were salvaged prior to new development.

Developer: City of Phoenix
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: SmithGroup
Size: 84,000 SFRed Awards March 2010 AZRE
Location:550 N. 3rd St., Phoenix
Completed: August 2009

Honorable Mention: Ironwood Hall

Developer: Maricopa County
Community College District
Contractor: Caliente Construction
Architect: Architekton
Size: 57,446 SF
Location: 2626 E. Pecos Rd., Chandler
Completed: December 2009


AZRE Red Awards March 2010 | Previous: Best Medical Project | Next: Most Challenging Project


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Brokerage Team of the Year for Leasing 2010

Tom Adelson, CB Richard Ellis
Kevin Calihan, CB Richard Ellis
Jim Fijan, CB Richard Ellis
Jerry Roberts, CB Richard Ellis
Tom Adelson
Kevin Calihan
Jim Fijan
Jerry Roberts

CB Richard Ellis

THE TEAM:
• Jim Fijan, Exec. VP
• Tom Adelson, Exec. VP
• Jerry Roberts, Exec. VP
• Kevin Calihan, Sr. VP

LEASING DETAILS:
• 97 Lease Transactions
• Totaling, 1.3 MSF
• $215.9M in Value

Four men and more than $215.9M in leases for 2009 — an amazing feat in the Valley of the Sun, during one of the most difficult times the commercial real estate industry has encountered. Executive Vice Presidents Jim Fijan, Tom Adelson and Jerry Roberts, along with Senior Vice President Kevin Calihan, conducted 97 transactions totaling more than 1.3 MSF.

Their largest single transaction that closed in 2009 was a long-term lease with a law firm for 54,000 SF at CityScape, a 27-story office tower located at One E. Washington St. in Phoenix. CBRE’s sales team represented the landlord, and the value of the transaction exceeded $28 million in consideration.AZRE March 2010 Front Cover

Fijan, Adelson, Roberts and Calihan are recognized as industry leaders and encompass an unmatched level of professionalism, comprehensive market knowledge and strict adherence to high ethical standards. While they are often acknowledged as the top brokers in their field, these four individuals are involved in numerous community and charity organizations, including the Juvenile Diabetes Research Center, Sun Angel Foundation, Downtown Phoenix Community Development Corporation and the Southwest Autism Research Center.

www.cbre.com

AZRE Red Awards March 2010 | Previous: General Contractor | Next: Brokerage Team Sales