Tag Archives: maricopa county

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Banner acquires Odyssey Hospice to expand hospice services

Banner Health announced the acquisition of Odyssey Hospice in Maricopa County, which is owned by Gentiva, a national home care and hospice organization based in Atlanta, Ga. Non-profit Banner Health will assume operations of Odyssey Hospice facilities and programs on Dec. 1, 2012. On that date, Banner Hospice will transition Odyssey patients, employees, facilities and programs into Banner.

“This expansion of hospice care is an important part of building a key patient program within Banner’s continuum of community-based services. Banner Hospice is an essential resource for the growing number of patients within insurance plans served by the Banner Health Network,” said Banner Health’s David Baker, chief executive officer of Banner Home Care. “We’re extremely pleased to bring such a high quality service like Odyssey Hospice into Banner Health, and we’re honored to bring such an outstanding group of professionals into Banner,” he continued.

The acquisition includes two in-patient hospice facilities – one in Mesa and the other in Peoria – and all in-home hospice services in Maricopa County. Odyssey’s in-patient hospice unit in Mesa will merge on December 1, and all patients will be transferred into Banner Hospice’s Mesa in-patient facility. “We are committed to ensuring that these transfers occur as smoothly as possible for the patients and their families,” Baker said.

Odyssey Hospice employs more than 130 people in the Phoenix area. It is anticipated that Banner’s daily census of hospice patients in Maricopa County, both in-patient and in-home, will grow to more than 300 patients daily.

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Arpaio far ahead in fundraising in sheriff’s race

Republican Joe Arpaio remains the leader in fundraising in the race for Maricopa County sheriff.

The Republican incumbent raised $457,000 from Aug. 9 through Sept. 17 and had $3.8 million in his re-election campaign fund at the end of the period.

The campaign for Democrat Paul Penzone says it raised $138,000 during that period and finished with $114,000 left over.

A spokesman for Independent Mike Stauffer’s campaign says the candidate’s latest fundraising numbers were unavailable.

Maricopa County Court Tower Garners Awards

Maricopa County Court Tower Garners Awards

Good things come in pairs. The Maricopa County Downtown Court Tower (MCDCT) team, comprised of Gilbane Building Company in association with Ryan Companies US, Inc., can attest to that.

After winning the 2011 Best of NAIOP Economic Project of the Year Award, the MCDCT team also received a RED Award honorable mention in AZRE for Best Public Project. The tower was recognized for outstanding industrial or office economic projects that impact the county and the construction community in a beneficial way.

“The Economic Project of the Year Award is proof of the wisdom of the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors and Department of Public Works,” said Todd McMillen, Gilbane’s project executive.

The 700,000 SF tower opened on Arizona’s 100th birthday, Feb.14, with its long-awaited debut and a dedication by former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

Designed by Gould Evans Associates, the tower sits in the heart of Phoenix and houses more than 200 courtrooms. Not only is the tower Maricopa County’s first LEED Silver certified project, it has benefitted the economy through creating more than two million hours for employment opportunities.

Due to infrastructure improvements, and a land exchange between the city and the county, hundreds of thousands of dollars of annual deferred maintenance were omitted. The project created more than 1,600 jobs; 1,200 in the construction trades, 300 in professional, and 100 service jobs in such things as printing, delivering, and other areas.

Over the life of the project, the estimated local payroll benefit will be $110M in taxable income. In addition to local businesses benefiting, the vast majority of the tower was completed using Arizona businesses and Arizona workers, even more proof of the economic impact.

Local materials were purchased whenever possible: Schuff Steel provided the steel and fabrication; Coreslab provided the precast facade.

“This project was a major economic engine for construction in the greater Phoenix area for over three years,” said Steve Jordan, Ryan Companies director of construction. “Not only did it provide for a consistent source of income for many workers and their families, but because the project was paid for in cash, it also saved the citizens of Maricopa County nearly $200 million in financing charges that will never need to be collected in higher taxes.”

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Humana Invites Nonprofits To Apply For $100,000 Grant

An opportunity for Maricopa County charities to secure significant funding to improve the health and wellness of community residents has just opened up thanks to Humana. Non-profit organizations are now invited to apply for the $100,000 Humana Communities Benefit-Arizona charitable grant, sponsored by health benefits provider Humana Inc.

For the sixth consecutive year, the Humana Communities Benefit program will award a one-time, $100,000 grant to a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in Maricopa County focused on improving health experiences or building healthy communities. Applications from nonprofit organizations in Maricopa County are being accepted now through June 29. Organizations will be considered in the operational areas of childhood health and education, health literacy and services or intergenerational health. Following a selection process by a panel of local judges, the 2012 grant winner will be announced at a celebratory event on Oct. 25.

“The Humana Communities Benefit-Arizona grant has helped several deserving organizations positively impact community health in ways they may not otherwise have been able to accomplish, and we are delighted to continue this program in 2012,” said Michael Franks, Regional President of Senior Products for Humana’s West Region and co-chairperson of the awards program.  “We encourage all eligible non-profit organizations to apply.”

The Humana Communities Benefit program in Arizona awarded the 2011 grant to Arizona Bridge to Independent Living (ABIL), which provides independent living services to people with disabilities throughout Maricopa County. The organization used the funds to purchase adaptive exercise and fitness equipment – specifically designed for the physically disabled – for its Virginia G. Piper Sports & Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities. The facility, one of only two nationwide to provide this type of service, had its grand opening in February 2012.

“Since 2007, we have contributed more than $700,000 to Phoenix-area community health initiatives led by some of the area’s most innovative nonprofits,” said Curt Howell, president of commercial operations for Humana in Arizona and co-chairperson of this year’s charitable-awards program. “Humana believes strongly in supporting the local communities in which we operate by helping deserving nonprofits in Arizona, and we look forward to continuing the tradition this year.”

More information on the application and the grant are available at www.Humana.com/HCB. Questions can also be directed to Humana by e-mail to ArizonaBenefits@Humana.com.

50 Largest Employers in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers In Arizona

These are the 50 largest employers in Arizona, including public and privately held companies and not-for-profit corporations, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.


50 Largest Employers in Arizona

Walmart Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 30,634
Employment change since 2010: Added about 300 jobs
2010 revenue: $421.8 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark.
Phone: (479) 273-4000
Website: www.walmart.com

Banner Health

Arizona employees in 2011: 28,353
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1911
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 747-4000
Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Wells Fargo & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 14,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $93.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1852
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 411-4932
Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Bank of America Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 13,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,000 jobs
2010 revenue: $150.5 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1904
Headquarters: Charlotte, N.C.
Phone: (800) 944-0404
Website: www.bankofamerica.com

McDonald’s Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 12,770
Employment change since 2010: Added about 955 jobs
2010 revenue: $22.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1955
Headquarters: Oakbrook, Ill.
Phone: (800) 244-6227
Website: www.mcdonalds.com

Apollo Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 460 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1973
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (480) 966-5394
Website: www.apollogrp.edu

Kroger Co. *

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 400 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.7 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1883
Headquarters: Cincinnati
Phone: (623) 936-2100
Website: www.frysfood.com
* Includes Fry’s Food Stores and Fry’s Marketplace

Raytheon Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 11,500
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 794-3000
Website: www.raytheon.com

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 10,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $102.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1799
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (602) 221-2900
Website: www.chase.com

Honeywell International Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,716
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 700 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: www.honeywell.com

Intel Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,700
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: www.intel.com

Target Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $65.4 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Phone: (612) 304-6073
Website: www.target.com

US Airways

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,926
Employment change since 2010: Added about 150 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.9 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1981
Headquarters: Tempe
Phone: (480) 693-0800
Website: www.usairways.com

Catholic Healthcare West

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,291
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1986
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (602) 406-3000
Website: www.chw.edu

Home Depot Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 8,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 350 jobs
2010 revenue: $66.2 billion
Company’s focus: Home improvement
Year founded: 1978
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (714) 940-3500
Website: www.homedepot.com

Walgreen Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,750
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $63.3 billion
Company’s focus: Retail drugstores
Year founded: 1901
Headquarters: Deerfield, Ill.
Phone: (847) 940-2500
Website: www.walgreens.com

Safeway Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,500
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $41.1 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1926
Headquarters: Pleasanton, Calif.
Phone: (480) 894-4100
Website: www.safeway.com

American Express Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,465
Employment change since 2010: Added about 200 jobs
2010 revenue: $30.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1850
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (623) 492-7474
Website: www.americanexpress.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 7,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 935 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: www.fcx.com

Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,900
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 earnings: $330.4 million
Company’s focus: Electric utility
Year founded: 1985
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 250-1000
Website: www.pinnaclewest.com

Bashas’ Supermarkets

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,641
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 1,800 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1932
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 895-9350
Website: www.bashas.com

Scottsdale Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,556
Employment change since 2010: Added about 55 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 882-4000
Website: www.shc.org

UA Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: About 6,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,050 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: www.u.arizona.edu

Circle K Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 590 jobs
2010 revenue: $16.4 billion
Company’s focus: Convenience stores
Year founded: 1951
Headquarters: Laval, QC, Canada
Phone: (602) 728-8000
Website: www.CircleK.com

General Dynamics

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,026
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,810 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: www.generaldynamics.com

Boeing Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,800
Employment change since 2010: Added about 100 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: www.boeing.com

Carondelet Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 124 jobs
2010 revenue: About $601 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1880
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 872-3000
Website: www.carondelet.org

Mayo Foundation

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 138 jobs
2010 revenue: $7.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1864
Headquarters: Rochester, Minn.
Phone: (480) 301-8000
Website: www.mayo.edu

CVS Caremark Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 50 jobs
2010 revenue: $96.4 billion
Company’s focus: Pharmaceutical services
Year founded: 1993
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (615) 743-6600
Website: www.caremark.com

Salt River Project

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,346
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 392 jobs
2010 revenue: $2.7 billion
Company’s focus: Utility supplier
Year founded: 1903
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 236-5900
Website: www.srpnet.com

Costco Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,151
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.2 billion
Company’s focus: Membership discount stores
Year founded: 1976
Headquarters: Issaquah, Wash.
Phone: (602) 293-5007
Website: www.costco.com

Abrazo Health Care *

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,089
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.5 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (602) 674-1400
Website: www.abrazohealth.com
* A division of Vanguard Health Systems

Albertsons Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 450 jobs
2010 revenue: $5.9 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery and drug stores
Year founded: 1939
Headquarters: Boise, ID
Phone: (602) 382-5300
Website: www.albertsons.com

FedEx Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,918
Employment change since 2010: Added about 330 jobs
2010 revenue: $34.7 billion
Company’s focus: Delivery, copy centers
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Memphis, Tenn.
Phone: (866) 477-7529
Website: www.fedex.com

Southwest Airlines Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,857
Employment change since 2010: Added about 259 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.1 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Dallas
Phone: (602) 304-3983
Website: www.southwest.com

Marriott International

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 722 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.7 billion
Company’s focus: Resorts and hotels
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters: Bethesda, Md.
Phone: (301) 380-3000
Website:  www.marriott.com

Qwest Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,200
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 190 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.3 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1896
Headquarters: Denver
Phone: (800) 244-1111
Website: www.Qwest.com

United Parcel Service

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,170
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 48 jobs
2010 revenue: $49.5 billion
Company’s focus: Package delivery
Year founded: 1907
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (888) 967-5877
Website: www.ups.com

John C. Lincoln Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,166
Employment change since 2010: Added about 539 jobs
2010 revenue: $551 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters:  Phoenix
Phone: (602) 870-943-2381
Website: www.jcl.com

USAA

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,045
Employment change since 2010: Added about 74 jobs
2010 revenue: $17.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: San Antonio
Phone: (800) 531-8111
Website: www.usaa.com

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,001
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1974
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 435-4000
Website: www.schwab.com

Freescale Semiconductor

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: www.freescale.com

IBM Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $95.8 billion
Company’s focus: Technology services
Year founded: 1924
Headquarters: Armonk, N.Y.
Phone: (800) 426-4968
Web site: www.us.ibm.com

Cox Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,997
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 67 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.1 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (623) 594-0505
Website: www.cox.com

TMC HealthCare

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,966
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 84 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1943
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 327-5461
Website: www.tmcaz.com

Verizon Wireless

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,901
Employment change since 2010: Added about 201 jobs
2010 revenue: $63.4 billion
Company’s focus: Wireless provider
Year founded: 1984
Headquarters: Basking Ridge, N.J.
phone: (480) 763-6300
Website: www.verizonwireless.com

Cigna HealthCare of AZ

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,865
Employment change since 2010: Added about 401 jobs
2010 revenue: $21.3 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1972
Headquarters: Philadelphia
Phone: (602) 942-4462
Website: www.cigna.com

Grand Canyon University

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,818
Employment change since 2010: Added about 537 jobs
2010 revenue: $385.8 million
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1949
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 639-7500
Website: www.gcu.edu

Starbucks Coffee Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,783
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,003 jobs
2010 revenue: $10.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Seattle
Phone: (602) 340-0455
Website: www.starbucks.com

Go Daddy Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,754
Employment change since 2010: Added about 441 jobs
2010 revenue: $741.2 million
Company’s focus: Internet services/technology
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 505-8800
Website: www.GoDaddy.com

These are the state’s 5 largest government employers, ranked by the number of employees.

State of Arizona: About 49,800 employees
City of Phoenix: About 15,100 employees
Maricopa County: 12,792 employees
Arizona State University: 11,185 employees
Mesa Public Schools: 8,376 employees

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Maricopa County Medical Society

Maricopa County Medical Society Celebrates 120 Years Of Excellence

In 1892, 20 years before Arizona was admitted into the union, a small group of physicians from across the greater Phoenix area joined together to form the state’s first regional medical association – the Maricopa County Medical Society (MCMS). These physicians banded together in order to address and rectify the challenges of frontier medicine not knowing the legacy they would leave.

One hundred and twenty years later, as MCMS celebrates a milestone anniversary, the leadership of the Society and its members are committed to continuing the legacy of their founding fathers: to promote excellence in the quality of care and the health of the community; and to implement efforts through which professionalism in medicine is enhanced, and the ethics and quality practice of medicine are fostered and preserved.MCMS

But most importantly, what runs deep and is a common thread to physicians of yesterday and today, is their dedication to making sure their patients have access to timely care and that their rights and choices are supported.

“I am honored to have the opportunity to lead our local, grassroots professional organization into its 120th year of service to our community, and it is my privilege and great honor to serve as MCMS’ 118th president,” says Dr. Michael R. Mills, founder of Arizona Digestive Health, the largest GI group practice in the country.

“MCMS has an extensive and rich history of addressing the needs of physicians our community and advocating for our patients. In a year where political headlines will dominate the news and threaten to polarize our country, physicians must come together in solidarity, recognizing our common desire to preserve and protect the essence of our noble profession.”

Dr. Mills, who has served on MCMS’ Executive Committee, Board of Censors and the Board of Directors as a Central District Director, takes over for outgoing President Nathan Laufer, MD.

Dr. Mills’ presidential agenda is to push for solidarity with all practicing physicians within Maricopa County and the state, establish philanthropic and educational programs with community organizations, work with Arizona medical schools to develop mentorship programs for future physicians, and increase MCMS membership and retention.

Dr. Mills’ commitment to the mission, vision and values of MCMS are shared by the following officers, marking a continued commitment to strong leadership for MCMS: Daniel M. Lieberman, M.D., president-elect; Miriam K. Anand, M.D., vice president; Suzanne A Sisley, M.D., secretary; and Michael Grossman, M.D., treasurer. Each officer serves a one-year term.

Joining the 2012 officers and board of directors are the following physicians, who were elected to serve a three-year term as directors: Kelly Hsu, M.D., Central District; Timothy M. Daley, M.D., Mark R. Wallace, M.D and Christina S. Reuss, M.D., were all elected to the Scottsdale District.

“With the many challenges facing physicians in 2012 and beyond, it is critically important that our association understand the needs and concerns of all physicians so that we can continue to work together to find solutions to the ailing healthcare system,” said Daniel F. Mitten, executive director and CEO of MCMS.

For a list of the entire MCMS Board of Directors, visit mcmsonline.com.

Sustainability Discussions at the GoGreen Conference

GoGreen Conference ’11 Sustainability Panel Discussions (Part II)

In the first part of the GoGreen Conference ’11 coverage, we reported that sustainability education and patience were the buzzwords of many of the panel discussions. Here’s why:

The panel discussion titled “Green Your Workplace: High Impact Change at Your Business,” moderated by Ed Fox, chief sustainability officer for APS, focused on how to turn the idea of going green and sustainability into governance. This challenge small and large businesses face was the topic of discussion among the panel, which included:

  • Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of Adolfson & Peterson Construction;
  • Jonce Walker, sustainability manager of Maricopa County;
  • Anthony Floyd, LEED AP, green building program manager of the City of Scottsdale;
  • and Leslie Lindo, president and co-founder of IKOLOJI.

Fox began the discussion asking the panelists how one would convince the leaders of companies to pursue incorporating green elements into the workplace.

Floyd suggested offering incentives and marketing materials and free literature to spur interest. Lindo agreed providing incentives to employees will help encourage them to make the changes second nature. She also suggested owners become educated themselves and have a strong advocate in the office.

Walker took a different approach and said reducing consumption to afford sustainability is one step a business can consider taking. The company must be efficient and through this efficiency, it will convince others that the extra cost will be worth it.

Walker continued to say that it helps to know all the benefits of turning your particular business green — environmental, economical, etc. — and know your audience.

“Ninety percent of clients are bottom-line driven,” Dunn said. They want to save energy and save money, he added. Two ways companies can do this is by making their own operations more efficient (switching your lighting to LED, for example) while also anticipating changes in the marketplace.

Dunn also said behavioral modifications must take place. You can switch to LED, but the appropriate actions must be taken by the staff, i.e. remembering to turn off the lights.

But what was stressed was the acceptance of risk. While making your business more environmentally friendly and sustainable will help you save money in the long run, it will take some time to get there with few obvious returns. Or, as Fox put it, the few “low hanging fruit.”

In the following discussion, “Applying Sustainabilty Best Practices to Impact Community Equity and Diversity,” moderated by Dr. George Brooks, owner of Southwest Green and NxT Horizon Group and including Greg Peterson, founder of Urban Farm; Diane Brossart, president of Valley Forward; and Rosanne Albright, Brownfields Project Manager of the City of Phoenix, regenerative sustainability was the hot topic as well as education.

“Nature regenerates itself, not just sustains itself,” Peterson said. “Education is the key piece to sustainability.

Urban farming (or growing and sharing food), recycling land via the Brownfields Land Recycling Project, and the importance of parks and open space in the state were all covered in this discussion.

“Energy, food, health, poverty — they are all connected,” Brooks said. “Local sourcing and urban farms can help offset the costs of energy.”

Peterson’s final thoughts?

“It’s really a grassroots movement,” he said. “For those of you in the government, get out of our way.”

Visit the GoGreen Conference website at gogreenconference.net.

 

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Lori Singleton ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Lori Singleton, Salt River Project (SRP)

Lori Singleton, SRP

Lori Singleton is the manager of sustainability initiatives and technologies at Salt River Project. She is a 29-year employee of SRP and 40-year resident of Arizona. She is responsible for design and implementation of SRP’s environmental outreach programs with special focus on renewable energy.

Lori’s responsibilities at SRP include development and implementation of renewable energy projects to meet SRP’s sustainable resource goals. Singleton oversees research and development projects to support company-wide initiatives for SRP including gasoline lawn mower recycling, tree planting, clean school bus initiative, travel reduction and other internal environmental programs.

She works on development and implementation of the “green” energy pricing program, solar incentive program for residential and commercial customers and renewable energy education programs for implementation in middle school and high school curricula.

In addition, she does promotion and public relations for all new renewable energy projects and purchases (solar, wind, geothermal, landfill gas, low head hydro, fuel cells) while serving as the environmental issues media spokesperson for SRP and being a constant representative of SRP on numerous environmental committees, boards and commissions.

She was appointed by Governor Janet Napolitano to serve on the Solar Energy Advisory Council and also has several other current affiliations including: Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors; Audubon Society, chair, Board of Directors; Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, chair; Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President & National Board Director; Southwest Center for Education; and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of Directors.

Current Affiliations

Solar Energy Advisory Council, appointment by Governor Janet Napolitano
Valley Forward Association, Board of Directors
Audubon Society, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force, Chair
Association for Commuter Transportation, Valley of the Sun, President &
National Board Director
Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment (ASU), Board of
Directors

Affiliations (Past)

Valley Forward Association, Chair, Board of Directors
Maricopa County Regional Travel Reduction Task Force
City of Phoenix, Environmental Quality Commission
Valley Metro, Clean Air Advisory Committee
Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Environmental Committee
Valley of the Sun United Way Loaned Executive


Topic: How people & organizations can get involved in the green movement from an energy perspective.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Room 157

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



 

BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Speaker: Mark Kranz ~ BIG Green Expo & Conference 2011

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, SmithGroup

Mark Kranz, AIA, LEED AP, is the design principal and lead designer for the Phoenix office of SmithGroup’s Higher Education and Science and Technology Studios.  Mark’s work has been published locally, regionally and nationally.

He speaks publicly about sustainable design strategies for laboratory and academic facilities, and his work is consistently recognized by the design and construction industries.  Kranz works regionally within the Western United States with research institutions and institutions of higher education creating laboratory and instructional facilities that elegantly reflect their specific context and function.

He has spent the past 11 years with SmithGroup, creating the vision for some of the most significant architectural contributions for some of the most prominent institutions and public entities in the Southwestern United States including Arizona State University, the University of Arizona, the City of Phoenix, the State of Utah, The City and County of Denver, and the Maricopa County Community College District.

He is currently behind the design visions for numerous landmark projects for clients including the National Renewable Energy Laboratories in Golden Colorado, The University of Hawaii at Hilo, the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command in Honolulu, Hawaii, as well as Gateway Community College in Phoenix, Arizona.


Topic: Sustainable Strategies for Higher Educational Facilities: A case study of four sustainable educational facilities in four unique settings.

Conference Speaker
Friday, April 15, 2011
9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Room 155

BIG Green Conference 2011


 

BIG Green Expo
Friday & Saturday
April 15th & 16th 2011
9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

 



Sponsors:

Arizona Commerce Authority

Arizona Commerce Authority Is Tasked With Re-Invigorating The State’s Economy

As Arizona enters 2011, unemployment continues at about 9.5 percent, and according to one national ranking of commercial real estate site selectors, Arizona’s reputation as a business-friendly state continues to slide. That’s where the newly formed Arizona Commerce Authority comes in.

“It’s not about re-branding, and it’s not about a committee,” says Don Cardon, ACA president and CEO. “This is about a plan that has the governor involved. We want to significantly advance Arizona’s economic future into a pronounced global competitive position.

“This is not about politics or any industry in particular. It is how we distinguish Arizona within a global market,” Cardon adds. “The competitive nature of global markets requires the state’s absolute focus and collaboration with private-sector partners to achieve growth and diversification of the economy.”

Gov. Jan Brewer took steps to accelerate the ACA’s mandate at the board’s second meeting. Besides officially naming Cardon head of the ACA, Brewer vowed to work with the state legislature to finish “re-creating the authority as a streamlined, modern organization that unleashes the most innovative minds in the business community.”

In outlining some of the details of her economic development plan for Arizona, Brewer touched on three items:

• Creating a “deal-closing fund’’ for the government to provide cash to companies willing to expand or relocate here.

• Expanding the tax credits available to corporations that conduct research and development in Arizona.

• Eliminating capital gains for investments made in small businesses.

Putting Cardon in charge of the ACA is the first step in implementing that plan. He will lead the organization, which will focus on attracting new businesses and retaining existing businesses that create more high-wage, quality jobs.

“My intention was to return to the private sector. However, Governor Brewer and Mr. (Jerry) Colangelo convinced me this is the most critical time for Arizona,” Cardon says. “Since the Governor has allowed me to assist her in designing the road map we are pursuing, I realized this was a unique time in life where my continued involvement may be best concerning all the ACA is aggressively endeavoring to achieve.”

“Don Cardon’s work with me in restructuring and revitalizing the new Commerce Authority has been groundbreaking,” Brewer says. “His credibility in the arena of business and industry is essential to our success in advancing Arizona’s economy.”

In an executive order last summer, Gov. Jan Brewer established the 35-member, statewide ACA to replace the Arizona Department of Commerce. The ACA is led by a private-sector board that will work to align diverse assets and opportunities within the state in order to compete economically in both domestic and international markets to create high-quality jobs for Arizona residents.

In picking a board vice chairman, Brewer reached out to one of the Valley’s most successful and visible businessmen, Jerry Colangelo. Under Brewer, Cardon and Colangelo, the ACA will have a focused approach to four core areas on which to advance the state.

The ACA will work on improving the state’s infrastructure and climate to retain, attract and grow high-tech and innovative companies. The focus will be on aerospace and defense, science and technology, solar and renewable energy, and small business and entrepreneurship.

At the board meeting, committee reports detailed sustainable strategies that will help Arizona compete globally.

• Focus on science, technology, engineering and math in K-12 education.

• Focus on the innovation cycle to grow knowledge-based businesses.

• Develop toolbox and retain policy enablers for capital intensive industries to encourage high-wage employers to invest in Arizona.

• Make positive changes to Arizona’s regulatory environment.

• Foster collaboration that enables development of Arizona’s small-business community within the industry sectors.

• Enhance the ACA’s industry sectors by establishing the leadership required to connect all stakeholders, companies, universities, private-public partnerships and other organizations.

“During one of the most challenging economic conditions in our nation’s history, we are fighting for the health and future of our families and this state,” Colangelo says. “It’s also about business retention … to put everyone in the position where they can be successful. Let the people who know how to do these things take charge.”

Adds Joe Snell, president and CEO of Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO): “The ACA needs to work with the state Legislature to ensure that we have the tools and programs needed to compete with other states. Arizona desperately needs a competitive jobs bill that must address incentives.”

Creating jobs and attracting new businesses are at the top of the ACA’s list. While there are projections that Arizona will add more than 400,000 jobs by 2018, about 300,000 will be needed just to make up for those lost since the recession began in December 2007. Not helping matters is the state’s murky business climate.

The Pollina Corporate Top 10 Pro-Business States for 2010 ranks Arizona the 27th friendliest state for business. Arizona was a Top 25 state in 2004 (15th), 2005 (20th) and 2006 (25th). It dropped from the Top 25 in 2007.

In Site Selection magazine’s poll of state business climates, however, Arizona climbed to No. 17. Two major announcements at the end of 2010 helped buoy that ranking: pharmaceutical giant Roche Group’s expanded operation at Oro Valley-based Ventana Medical Systems (500 new jobs in biomedical research) and Intel Corporation’s announcement that it was upgrading and adding jobs at its facility in Chandler.

“The ACA brings a much-needed public/private partnership to lead the state in these difficult economic times,” says Don Keuth, president of the Phoenix Community Alliance. “They can address those issues that make Arizona less competitive and create strategic solutions to allow us to compete. And, they can focus on growing those industry clusters where we have a competitive edge.”

The renewable energy bill passed by the Legislature in 2009 demonstrates that economic development programs can immediately impact an industry cluster.

Case in point: Arizona is leading the country in the creation of new solar jobs. Recent examples include Rioglass Solar, a Spanish company, building a $50 million reflector manufacturing plant in Surprise; and China-based Suntech selecting Goodyear for its first manufacturing plant outside of that country.

“We need a broad vision to accept that new rules and new tools will be needed,” says board member Mo Stein, principal and senior vice president of HKS Architects, whose company designed the Valley’s newest spring training facility, Salt River Fields at Talking Stick. “It is no longer business as usual; not the same questions and certainly not the same answers.”

For more information about the Arizona Commerce Authority, visit azcommerce.com.

Vote Signs

Arizona’s 2010 Midterm Election Results

Midterm election results – In the 2010 midterm elections, Republicans won many seats on both national and local levels, and there’s now a Republican majority in the United States House of Representatives. Here’s how Arizonans voted at the polls yesterday

More election coverage from AZNow.Biz includes our political columnist, Tom Milton, analyzing the 2010 midterm election results in his weekly column and an infographic of Arizona’s past voting statistics.

For a full list of election results, including those elected to the Arizona House of Representatives, the Arizona Senate, city propositions, court appointees and other results, please visit the Arizona Secretary of State’s Web site or your county recorder’s Web site for local results.

Midterm Election Results:

Last updated 11/13/2010 at 9:40 am

Governor

REP – Jan Brewer – 54.28%
DEM – Terry Goddard – 42.43%
LBT – Barry J. Hess – 2.24%
GRN – Larry Gist – 0.93%

United States Senate

REP – John McCain – 58.69%
DEM – Rodney Glassman – 34.55%
LBT – David F. Nolan – 4.67%
GRN – Jerry Joslyn – 4.44%

United States Representative District 1

REP – Paul Gosar – 49.65%
DEM – Ann Kirkpatrick – 43.68%
LBT – Nicole Patti – 6.54%

United States Representative District 2

REP – Trent Franks – 64.82%
DEM – John Thrasher – 31.03%
LBT – Powell Gammill – 4.05%

United States Representative District 3

REP – Ben Quayle – 52.15%
DEM – Jon Hulburd – 41.08%
LBT – Michael Shoen – 5.03%
GRN – Leonard Clark – 1.58%

United States Representative District 4

DEM – Ed Pastor – 66.84%
REP – Janet Contreras – 27.48%
LBT – Joe Cobb – 2.95%
GRN – Rebecca Dewitt – 2.57%

United States Representative District 5

REP – David Schweikert – 51.94%
DEM – Harry Mitchell – 43.18%
LBT – Nick Coons – 4.77%

United States Representative District 6

REP – Jeff Flake – 66.32%
DEM – Rebecca Schneider – 29.07%
LBT – Darell Tapp – 3.09%
GRN – Richard Grayson – 1.36%

United States Representative District 7

DEM – Raul M. Grijalva – 50.16%
REP – Ruth McClung – 44.16%
INO – Harley Meyer – 2.83%
LBT – George Keane – 2.71%

United States Representative District 8

DEM – Gabrielle Giffords – 48.69%
REP – Jesse Kelly – 47.23%
LBT – Steven Stoltz – 3.93%

Secretary of State

REP – Ken Bennett – 58.12%
DEM – Chris Deschene – 41.72%

Attorney General

REP – Tom Horne – 51.77%
DEM – Felecia Rotellini – 48.00%

State Treasurer

REP – Doug Ducey – 51.80%
DEM – Andrei Cherny – 41.33%
LBT – Thane Eichenauer – 3.99%
GRN – Thomas Meadows – 2.78%

Superintendent of Public Instruction

REP – John Huppenthal – 55.24%
DEM – Penny Kotterman – 44.60%

State Mine Inspector

REP – Joe Hart – 57.02%
DEM – Manuel Cruz – 42.78%

Corporation Commissioner

REP – Brenda Burns – 29.06%
REP – Gary Pierce – 28.09%
DEM – David Bradley – 18.99%
DEM – Jorge Luis Garcia – 17.52%
LBT – Rick Fowlkes – 3.23%
GRN – Benjamin Pearcy – 1.59%
GRN – Theodore Gomez – 1.44%

Continue:

Propositions ~ State Senators ~ State Representatives

87787264

Falling Prices, More Foreclosures Plague The Valley’s Housing Market

The housing market in the Phoenix metro area continues to tread through troubled waters.

According to a new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, the median price for an existing home in the Valley fell for the third straight month. Making matters worse, foreclosures continue to weigh down activity in the existing-home market.

The median home-resale price for last month was $135,000 — $3,000 less than August 2009. In fact, existing-home prices have been falling steadily since May, when the median price was $144,000. The median price was at $143,000 in June, and $137,500 in July.

“Although current interest rates and home prices are very attractive, homeowners don’t seem to be motivated to buy,” says Jay Butler, an associate professor of real estate at ASU. “This lack of motivation can be attributed to anemic economic and job recovery, low consumer confidence and stricter underwriting guidelines, among other factors.”

Home sales last month were particularly sluggish, with 4,800 homes re-sold. That’s down from almost 5,100 in July. In August 2009, almost 6,000 homes were re-sold. The numbers aren’t expected to improve anytime soon as home sales traditionally slow down after the summer season.

“As the year comes to an end, median prices often decline in response to holiday and school activities that allow little time or desire to buy a home,” Butler says. “Beyond the impact of foreclosure activity, the absence of a strong move-up market, will also limit any growth in home prices.”

The other barometer of the Valley’s existing home market — foreclosures — fared just as badly in August. Foreclosures accounted for 45 percent of the existing-home market last month, the highest percentage since January.

“When you add in re-sales of previously foreclosed-on homes, all of this foreclosure-related activity represents a full two-thirds of the market’s transactions in August,” Butler says.

About 4,000 foreclosures were recorded in Maricopa County in August, up slightly from about 3,900 in July. In August 2009, 3,100 foreclosures were reported.

RED Awards 2010

Best Educational Project 2010

ASU College of Nursing & Health Innovation

The rapid growth of Arizona State University, and the birth of its new Downtown Phoenix campus, created a special architectural and urban opportunity. This compact, 5-story building serves as both the campus’ primary gateway on its marquee corner, and will house one of the largest nursing programs in the United States. The urban infill project created much needed density within the Phoenix Downtown core, and reused existing plant materials that were salvaged prior to new development.

Developer: City of Phoenix
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: SmithGroup
Size: 84,000 SFRed Awards March 2010 AZRE
Location:550 N. 3rd St., Phoenix
Completed: August 2009

Honorable Mention: Ironwood Hall

Developer: Maricopa County
Community College District
Contractor: Caliente Construction
Architect: Architekton
Size: 57,446 SF
Location: 2626 E. Pecos Rd., Chandler
Completed: December 2009


AZRE Red Awards March 2010 | Previous: Best Medical Project | Next: Most Challenging Project


Maricopa County Downtown Court Tower, AZRE January/February 2010

Public: Maricopa County Downtown Court Tower


MARICOPA COUNTY DOWNTOWN COURT TOWER

Developer: Maricopa County
General contractor: Gilbane Building Co. & Ryan Companies US Inc.
Architect: Gould Evans + DMJM
Location:
101 W. Madison St., Phoenix
Size: 690,280 SF

The $259M court tower will house 32 courtrooms, with unique design elements that make it more efficient and user-friendly for the public. Construction on the 16-story tower began Nov. 2008, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 2011. Subcontractors so far include Dickens Quality Demolition, Code One Construction and Buesing Company.

AZRE January/February 2010
Lawrence Olde

Lawrence Odle, Air Quality Director For Maricopa County

Lawrence Odle
Air Quality Director, Maricopa County
www.maricopa.gov

Lawrence Odle’s initial field of study — wildlife toxicology specializing in rattlesnakes — would have kept him busy in Arizona. Yet, that’s not the career he chose.

Odle, the air quality director for Maricopa County, says he was a “starving senior” at the University of California at Riverside when he was hired on a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to set up air monitoring stations throughout California.

“That’s how I got into the field, and I just never got out,” Odle says. “I went into the enforcement arena in air quality and applied what I had learned in my environmental studies.”

During the past 30-plus years, he has been active in environmental regulation, including air monitoring, permitting, research, planning, compliance, legislative, legal and administrative in California, Oregon and Hawaii. He also has a law degree, and is a certified mediator and former registered asbestos consultant.

In one year with the California Air Resources Board, Odle says he learned more about environmental quality than he could have imagined.

“It was a highly educational time of my life,” he says. “I was exposed to a lot of administrative issues, as well as field work. It was the most concentrated experience one can get. It was an education you can’t buy.”

Eventually, Odle became interested in public policy issues and served two terms as president of the California Air Pollution Control Officers Association.

Odle, who joined Valley Forward in 2003 and now sits on its board of directors, began keeping an eye on Maricopa County air quality in October 2008.

“Mostly my heart is in the public policy development area,” he says. “I enjoy identifying what is in the best public interest in regulating environmental air quality. Sometimes there are spirited discussions. There are so many fables and facts that are mixed around air quality issues.

“I admit I’m somebody who worried for years about what kind of world we would be leaving our children,” Odle says. “I went to a Valley Forward awards program and that’s when I saw a sense of responsibility and accomplishment from the business community stepping forward and creating green programs.”

DATOS 2009 annual expert analysis of the role and impact of Latino businesses and consumers on the state’s economy

Comprehensive Information On Hispanics In Arizona

On Nov. 18, the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, will release DATOS 2009, an annual expert analysis of the role and impact of Latino businesses and consumers on the state’s economy.

For nearly 15 years, DATOS has provided insight into issues ranging from the purchasing power of the Hispanic market to its prevalence in various segments of private industry. This year’s edition again provides detailed information on the Hispanic population’s growing impact on the economy. The report takes months to complete, with research overseen by Louis Olivas, professor emeritus at W.P. Carey.

The following is a summary of the key findings presented in DATOS 2009. The project is funded by SRP.

Hispanic Business
There are more than 2 million Hispanic-owned businesses in the United States with a combined revenue approaching $465 billion. Arizona is home to more than 35,000 Hispanic-owned businesses.

Nearly two out of every five Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona is a sole proprietorship and 67 percent are family-owned. More than one-third of Arizona’s Hispanic-owned businesses have annual revenues above $500,000, and the median household income among Arizona’s Hispanic business owners is $76,400.

Purchasing Power
The purchasing power of the Hispanic market commands attention. In 2008, Hispanics accounted for 8.9 percent of all U.S. buying power, up dramatically from 5 percent in 1990. In total, U.S. Hispanics control $951 billion in spending power, and by 2013 this figure is projected to reach $1.386 trillion. In Arizona, Hispanics account for 16 percent of the total state’s buying power, leading Arizona to rank fourth among all states for its concentrated Latino consumer market.

Hispanic Consumers
When it comes to marketing, Hispanic consumers have diverse attitudes. Often, an individual’s language preference is a key determinant in their perceptions of advertisements and products. Understanding more about Hispanics’ household composition, financial resources, homeownership rates, methods of telecommunication and product preferences are all essential to developing loyal consumers. For example, did you know that Latinos nationwide were responsible for buying 297 million movie tickets in the past year, compared to 150 million tickets for African Americans and 155 million for all other ethnicities combined?

Technology

The Hispanic population is embracing new media and other technology at a promising rate. Fifty-two percent of the Hispanic population is now online, representing 23 million users nationwide. Internet use is far greater among English-dominant and bilingual Latinos than Spanish-dominant Latinos, suggesting tremendous room for growth. Eight percent of second-generation Latinos and 89 percent of college-educated Latinos go online. In addition to downloading music, uploading photos, and researching products, online news is also popular among Latino Internet users. While online, at least 80 percent said they read the news at least once per month.

Cellular use is also notably high among Latinos. Hispanics are more likely than white non-Hispanics to buy the latest phones, upgrade them faster and use special features. Hispanic adults ages 18-34 use an average of 1,200 cell phone minutes per month, compared to 950 minutes for the general population. They are also more likely to use features such as text messaging and music downloading.

In addition to cell phone use, online social networking is another sign of high social connectedness among Latinos. Forty percent of Hispanics maintain profiles on sites such as MySpace, Facebook or MiGente, a trend that is likely to explode as more Latinos hit their teens and young adulthood.

Media

Arizona contains some major Hispanic media markets. According to Nielsen Media Research, Phoenix ranks eighth for Hispanic TV household markets. Print media is also alive and well in the Hispanic community. The vast majority of Hispanic adults (82 percent) read Hispanic newspapers, and the same proportion pass them on to at least one other person. Among Hispanics aged 25-34, 25 percent have called or visited a store in response to an advertisement.

U.S. Latino Population
As a proportion of total U.S. population growth, Hispanics accounted for 51.6 percent of that growth. This is predominantly the result of births to the existing population rather than immigration; six out of 10 Hispanics were born in the United States. Larger average household size (3.6 for Arizona Hispanics versus 2.7 for all Arizona residents) is another contributing factor.

Over the next four decades, the number of minority workers in the U.S. labor force will grow from 32 percent to 55 percent, with the greatest increase coming from Hispanics. The country as a whole will benefit from the productivity, purchasing power, taxes, and Social Security contributions of Hispanic workers.

AZ Population
Arizona ranks fourth among all states for the largest percentage of Hispanic residents. In 2007, 1.9 million Latinos accounted for 30 percent of Arizona’s total population.

Maricopa County in particular has experienced tremendous growth in the Hispanic population. Between 2000 and 2007, it ranked second (after Los Angeles County) for the largest increase in Hispanic population. Mirroring the nation, the majority of these Arizona Hispanics are U.S.-born (63 percent).

The median age of Hispanics in Arizona is 25, compared to 42 for the white non-Hispanic population, and the median household income is $40,476, compared to $55,554 for the white non-Hispanic population. Given the youthfulness of the Hispanic population, Arizona Latinos are certain to increase in number and purchasing power over the next few decades.

Birth and Fertility

In 2007, Hispanic births accounted for 25 percent of all births in the United States. Teen pregnancy is still a major issue facing the Latino community, but between 1991 and 2004, the birth rate for Hispanic teens fell 21 percent. Clearly, the relative youth of Hispanics will continue to impact future fertility patterns in the United States and Arizona. The Hispanic fertility rate in Arizona exceeds the U.S. Hispanic fertility rate. From 1987 to 2007, the number of Hispanic births in Arizona has increased 211 percent.

Growth trend

The Hispanic population in the United States has increased by 11 million since 2000, and Arizona ranks fourth among states for the largest percentage of Hispanics (30 percent). In the 2008 presidential election, Hispanics voted in record numbers, demonstrating growing civic engagement and a vested interest the country’s future. Specifically, 50 percent of Hispanics turned out to vote, an increase of 2.7 percent from the 2004 presidential election. And Hispanics are voting with their pocketbooks and mouse-clicks as well. Sixty percent of 18- to 34-year-old Latinos and 76 percent of U.S.-born Latinos access the Internet. During a recent 12-month period, the average amount spent online by a Latino in Phoenix was $831.

Hispanics Trend Young

One of the defining characteristics of the Hispanic population is its youthfulness. The median age of Hispanics in the United States was only 27.7 in 2008, compared to 36.8 for the total population. Nearly two-thirds of Hispanics are under the age of 35.

Furthermore, 25 percent of the nation’s children under age 5 are Hispanic. For all children under 18, 44 percent are non-white.

The median age of Hispanics in Arizona is 25, compared to 42 for the white non-Hispanic population. U.S.-born Hispanics’ median age is only 16, which means that half of these native-born Hispanics are not old enough to drive, vote or consume alcohol. However, they will be soon. And they are at a formative stage in their lives when core values and social and consumer habits are being influenced and developed.

Lifetime fertility for Hispanic women has been 45-47 percent higher than for white non-Hispanic women. From 1987 to 2007, the number of Hispanic births in Arizona has increased 211 percent.

Latino Student Population

In the fall of 2008, 416,705 Latino students were enrolled in Arizona’s K-12 system. Hispanics accounted for 86 percent of total growth in school enrollment from 1998 to 2008. According to the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, by 2017-2018, Hispanic high school graduates in Arizona will exceed the number of white non-Hispanic high school graduates. This phenomenon has already occurred in New Mexico and California, and Arizona is clearly moving toward this milestone.

    By the Numbers
    Trends that matter


  • U.S. Hispanics control $951 billion in spending power and by 2013 this figure is projected to reach $1.386 trillion.
  • Young Hispanics will grow to be Arizona’s future workers, business owners, consumers, voters and civic leaders.
  • Along the way, they will have significant impacts on Arizona’s public education system, arts and culture scene, and economy.
  • Hispanics are wired and tech savvy. They already utilize the Internet for shopping, social networking, and news. Their use of new technologies will continue to increase.
  • Source: DATOS 2009