Tag Archives: may-june-2012

coldwater depot logistics center

Industrial: Coldwater Depot Logistics Center

Coldwater Depot Logistics Center

Developer: Trammell Crow Company
General Contractor: TBD
Architect: Butler Design Group
Location: 1110 N. 127th Ave., Avondale
Size: Phase 1 — 603,863 SF
The $27M (Phase 1) industrial building will consist of state-of-the-art warehouse design with ample trailer parking and truck maneuverability. The 56-acre can accommodate up to 1MSF of cross-dock distribution warehouse space. Expected completion is 4Q 2012.

ironwood cancer & research center - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Medical: Ironwood Cancer & Research Center

Ironwood Cancer & Research Center

General Contractor: TBD
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Location: 3600 block of S. Rome St., Gilbert
Size: 25,000
The $10M project is an expansion of Ironwood Cancer & Research Center’s clinical operations. The new facility will be patient-centered and will include multiple modalities, such as medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical urology and clinical trials. The facility will have state-of-the-art patient areas, exam rooms, full-service chemotherapy suite, pharmacy and radiation therapy vaults. Expected completion is 4Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

banner health verrado - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Medical: Banner Health Verrado

Banner Health Verrado

Developer: Banner Health
General Contractor: McCarthy Building Companies
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Location: NWC of I-10 and Verrado Way, Buckeye
Size: 12,566 SF
The $4.5M freestanding outpatient clinic is the first project of a master plan for an acute care campus on the Greenfield site in Buckeye. Subcontractors include Midstate Mechanical, S&H Steel, Echo Canyon Electrical, Iron Tree Plumbing and Brothers Masonry. Expected completion is 3Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

office - hayden ferry lakeside - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Office Tower: Hayden Ferry Lakeside Phase III

Hayden Ferry Lakeside Phase III

Developer: Ryan Companies US, Inc.
General Contractor: Ryan Companies US, Inc.
Architect: DAVIS
Broker: CBRE
Location: NEC Mill, Ave., and Rio Salado Parkway,
Tempe
Size: 250,000 SF
The final phase of Hayden Ferry Lakeside will be a 10-story, Class A office tower in Tempe. The building design will maintain the same nautical theme as its predecessors, Hayden Ferry Lakeside I and II. It will be the first high-rise to break ground in Downtown Tempe since 2007. Construction is expected to begin in 4Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

arizona stadium - north end zone - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Public: Arizona Stadium – North End Zone Expansion

Arizona Stadium – North End Zone Expansion

Developer/Owner: University of Arizona
General Contractor: Mortenson Construction
Architect: Heery International
Location: 640 N. Vine Ave., Tucson
Size: 189,000 SF
The $56M project includes construction of the new north end zone facility at Arizona Stadium, which will provide upgraded premium seating and fan amenities. The work will also provide new facilities for the football program and provide new concourses cross-connecting access to the east and west seating section. Expected completion is 3Q 2013.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

downtown phoenix housing

Multi-Family: Downtown Phoenix Housing Project

Downtown Phoenix Housing Project

Developer: Concord Eastridge
General Contractor: hardison/downey
Architect: Ayers Saint Gross
Location: Roosevelt St. to the north; McKinley St. to the south; Fourth St. to the east; Third St. to the west
Size: 2.9-acre site comprising 2 parcels
The $52M, 2-building, mixed-use project is the first private investing supporting Downtown Phoenix student housing. Plans call for 325 apartment units and 5,000 SF of retail space. Subcontractors include Spectrum Engineers, Dibble Engineering, PK Associates and SmithGroupJJR (landscape architect). Expected completion is 3Q 2013.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Roosevelt Child Nutrition Warehouse

Education: Roosevelt Child Nutrition Warehouse & Education Center

Roosevelt Child Nutrition Warehouse & Education Center

Developer: Roosevelt Elementary School District
General Contractor: D.L. Withers Construction
Architect: Orcutt|Winslow
Location: NEC 10th St. and Baseline Rd., Phoenix
Size: 27,000 SF
The $4.6M project will include a hydroponic growing area for vegetables and spices, a Tilapia farm and outdoor fruit-bearing trees. The multipurpose facility is designed to not only serve as the hub for the district’s Child Nutrition Department but also serve as an instructional resource to enhance and support Wellness and Nutrition Education within the school district. Food preparation classes will be offered to RSD students as well. Subcontractors include CSI, MJ Schneider Plumbing, EF Charles, Thunderbird Masonry, Swisher AC, Western Underground, Gunsight and Schuff Steel. Expected completion is 2Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Tanger Outlet Center Westgate

Retail: Tanger Outlet Center Westgate

Tanger Outlet Center Westgate

Developer: Tanger Outlets
General Contractor: C70 Builders (Minneapolis)
Architect: Adams & Associates (Mooresville, N.C.)
Location: Loop 101 and Glendale Ave., Glendale
Size: 368,043 GBA
The $100M project will feature more than 80 brand-name retail outlets in an open-air mall setting. The building architecture will be based on a modern Southwestern theme of intersecting forms and clean lines. Subcontractors include Markham Contracting, Speedie & Associates, Stormwater Plans, PTR Mechanical, Parsons Electric, Apel Steel and E&K of Phoenix. Expected completion is 4Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

telemedicine - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Telemedicine – The Wave Of The Future

As technology becomes more sophisticated, telemedicine may become more common in the healthcare industry.

Remember on “Star Trek” where people could be teleported? Imagine how valuable it would be to teleport a medical specialist when needed.

Thanks to technology, we are not that far off.

Better mobile technologies and electronic health records have caused the healthcare industry to incorporate more telemedicine into medical care. Jonathan Linkous, CEO of the American Telemedicine Association, defines telemedicine as “the delivery of any healthcare service or transmission of wellness information using telecommunications technology.” Experts say telemedicine has the potential to transform the way medical care is provided and the way medical education is taught.

“Physicians and patients can now interact and share information through video conferencing, online communications and mobile phones,” says Dr. Tami Romano of HealthNation, a Scottsdale-based company that is leading the way in providing affordable healthcare to 75 groups and businesses through telemedicine services. “The access to electronic medical records allows physicians to be more efficient, to share information more easily and provide remote monitoring, to people living in rural areas. It gives patients access to specialists without leaving their homes, and there is more opportunity for in-depth and expanded care with remote diagnosis and follow-up.”

Dr. Ronald Weinstein, who helped create the Arizona Telemedicine Program in 1995, has built a broadband communications network in Arizona that brings clinical services to hundreds of thousands of patients at 160 sites in 50 Arizona communities, including remote towns on Arizona’s Indian reservations and in its state prisons.

Weinstein says the use of telemedicine in medical training will save lives.

“The third leading cause of death in adults in the United States is medical error,” says Weinstein, who was named “Innovator of the Year” by the University of Arizona in March. “We’re working on a new curriculum to train nurses, doctors, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals together.”

Weinstein says that many patient-care deaths stem from failures in communication. In addition to fostering communication among health professionals, using telemedicine as early introduction to medical education will produce citizens capable of making better health decisions. “Health literacy in the general population is critical if we are going to manage our own health,” he says.

In addition to providing a better platform to inform patients and for doctors to communicate, telemedicine is also helping companies’ bottom line in an age of skyrocketing medical costs.

“Employees are able to address healthcare issues for themselves and their families without incurring loss of time from work,” Romano says. “Companies are able to contain costs by structuring health benefits with the combination of a major medical plan and telemedicine services, giving employees coverage for the big things and first line of defense care for wellness,” Romano says. “The cost is less than a PPO and encourages more preventative care.”

While Medicare has been slower to change reimbursement policies to accommodate telemedicine care, private insurers and state Medicaid payers have been more progressive in covering many services, and that’s pushing more doctors and hospitals to provide them.

“The introduction and expansion of telemedicine will continue to enhance the communication between physicians and patients, which will ultimately allow better patient outcomes,” Romano says. “It will also help to contain costs, reduce physician overhead and transition our system from fixing the sick to preventing the sick, which will lead to a healthier population.

5 telemedicine services

  • Specialist referral services typically involves of a specialist assisting a general practitioner in rendering a diagnosis. This may involve a patient “seeing” a specialist over a live, remote consult or the transmission of diagnostic images and/ or video along with patient data to a specialist for viewing later.
  • Patient consultations using telecommunications to provide medical data, which may include audio, still or live images, between a patient and a health professional for use in rendering a diagnosis and treatment plan.
  • Remote patient monitoring uses devices to remotely collect and send data to a monitoring station for interpretation.
  • Medical education provides continuing medical education credits for health professionals and special medical education seminars for targeted groups in remote locations.
  • Consumer medical and health information includes the use of the Internet for consumers to obtain specialized health information and online discussion groups to provide peer-to-peer support.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

dennis desmond - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

After Hours with Dennis Desmond

Dennis Desmond

  • Managing director, Jones Lang Lasalle
  • Born in Chicago
  • Attended Loyola Marymount University (Los Angeles), where he received a BS in personal and industrial relations
  • Married to wife, Kathleen, for 38 years
  • Dennis Desmond has been with JLL for 2 years; has been in commercial real estate for more than 30 years

Responsibilities
Dennis Desmond leads the investment sales practice within the Capital Markets Group of Jones Lang LaSalle’s Phoenix office, specializing in office investment sales for institutional clients and private owners of real estate.

Favorites
SPORTS TEAM: Arizona Diamondbacks, Chicago Cubs and Chicago White Sox
ACTIVITIES: Baseball games and time with my grand kids.
DESTINATIONS: I’m Irish, so Ireland tops my list. My favorite spots are Kinsale and Dingle. Both are small, picturesque coastal seaport cities.

What did you think you’d be when you were growing up?:
A major league center fielder. My goal was to play in Yankee Stadium. I fell a little short — played minor league ball for two years for the Coos Bay/ North Bend A’s.

What accomplishment are you especially proud of?:
Our children (son, Ryan, 34; daughter, Megan, 32). They are wonderful people.

What would people be surprised to know about you?
I’m a two-time cancer survivor of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. I was diagnosed 15 years ago and told there was no cure. My advice to others: “Enjoy every day.” Desmond also served 8 years as a special agent in the U.S. Secret Service. In between protection assignments, he investigated forged U.S. Savings Bonds and worked in Washington, D.C., during Watergate.

For more information on Dennis Desmond at Jones Lang Lasalle, visit Jones Lang Lasalle’s website at joneslanglasalle.com.

Knowing more about the people we work with is the fun side of the business. It helps start conversations and strengthens business relationships. To nominate a colleague, request an After Hours form from Peter Madrid, peter.madrid@azbigmedia.com.

energy supply - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Energy Supply And Demand – A Holistic Approach To Energy Independence

Energy is the lifeblood of the economy. Arizona’s population and energy use are projected to grow for the foreseeable future and our economic prosperity is closely tied to the availability of reliable and affordable supplies of energy. While energy supply, energy demand and the natural environment are at a significant point of conflict, the effect of this tension can be mitigated through a collaborative effort among all stakeholders which can help create balance.

The need for collaboration is at the heart of why the Arizona Technology Council accepted the responsibility of leadership for the Arizona Energy Consortium (AEC) in July, 2011. The effort was established under the auspices of the City of Phoenix related to a grant from the Federal Department of Labor to establish strategies for integrating the workforce needs of targeted green energy industries in Arizona. The City, as part of the central region, was awarded a large portion of the Arizona State Energy Sector Partnership (SESP) grant that agreed to establish an energy consortium to define the workforce needs in the energy arena. Thus, the Arizona Energy Consortium was founded.

City leaders quickly realized they were addressing issues that went well beyond city borders and the workforce. When the City of Phoenix approached the Council about taking AEC under its wing, it made perfect sense to us. The Council has members from every side of the energy equation, from traditional production to renewable and energy conservation. We represent a statewide neutral ground that’s not tied to a particular technology, and can embody the entire energy industry.

Today, the AEC is comprised of more than 250 members from the state’s diverse energy sectors and is co-chaired by Michelle De Blasi, a partner with the law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP and chair of its Solar Energy Law Team, and Christopher Davey, executive director of EnviroMission. Constituents from city and state governments, utilities, law firms, conservation groups, private industry and universities are all working together to get real work done and break down the silos that have long existed in Arizona.

One of the charters of AEC is to serve as a supportive venue for current and new members locating or expanding their businesses within the state, as well as a repository for reliable information related to the energy industry. In addition, AEC is providing meaningful input towards the development of a long-term Energy Roadmap to strongly promote both economic development initiatives and continued technological innovation across the state. The end result will be similar to the long-term bioscience roadmap initiated by the Flinn Foundation designed to make the state’s life sciences sector globally competitive.

Can we achieve energy independence in our lifetime? Given Arizona’s unique abundance of sunshine, we certainly have an advantage on the production side of the equation in the renewable energy sector and are well positioned to become an exporter of energy. Arizona possesses many of the essential elements necessary to become a global leader in energy, but must strengthen its will, focus, collaboration and messaging, to achieve this goal. With everyone working together to raise all boats, AEC is taking this holistic approach.

For more information, visit aztechcouncil.org/committees/aec.


Steven G. Zylstra is president and chief executive officer of the Arizona Technology Council.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

AZRE Newsmakers

Newsmakers: AZRE Magazine May-June 2012

Find out about Arizona’s newsmakers for May/June 2012

newsmakers - canada, oconnell, poulin» McCarthy Building Companies has appointed Scott Canada to the merit review committee for the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D funding opportunity solicitation in Phoenix. The initiative is an aggressive research and development plan led by the U.S. Department of Energy and aimed at developing solar technologies to meet a levelized cost of energy target of 6 cents/kWh without subsidy by 2020. McCarthy also promoted two associates to project directors. They are Lee O’Connell in Albuquerque and Steve Poulin in Tempe.

newsmakers - morrow» Voit Real Estate Services appointed Donald Morrow as managing director of the firm’s Phoenix operations. Morrow will oversee all aspects of Voit’s operations in the Phoenix market, including brokerage, asset and property management. Prior to joining Voit, Morrow served as a partner at Biltmore Holdings.

» Sundt Construction chairman and former CEO J. Doug Pruitt was named among the recipients of the prestigious 2012 Golden Beaver Award. Pruitt received the Management Award from The Beavers, a heavy civil engineering construction association. He retired as CEO of Sundt in September 2011, but remains involved with the company serving as chairman. Sundt also added Tom Auay-Fuay to serve as project manager in the Southwest. He will concentrate his efforts on preconstruction activities relating to mining and industrial construction projects.

» Commercial Properties Inc. (CPI) hired John B. Daley, who brings 30 years of commercial, retail, office and industrial real estate experience. Daley has coordinated some of the largest commercial real estate deals in Arizona. CPI also was selected by CoStar Group as recipient of a CoStar Power Broker Award. In addition, four brokers won individual awards as Top Industrial Leasing Brokers. They include Leroy Breinholt, Darin Edwards, Cal Johnson and Eric Jones.

» The Arizona Builders’ Alliance was honored by the Associated General Contractors of America as a 2011 Community Award recipient, one of 13 organizations recognized as the construction industry’s best charitable work. The ABA Community Board supported four projects in 2011.

newsmaker - byrd» Lincoln Property Company hired Tina Byrd as property manager in the Desert West Region office in Phoenix. Byrd is responsible for managing the newly renamed and remodeled Camelback Square.

» CBRE announced that Ike Isaacson has been named the new leader for its Tucson office and the Southern Arizona market. Isaacson has nearly 15 years of commercial real estate experience in the Tucson market, specializing in the leasing and sale of office, medical and R&D buildings.

» Erin Harper joined Alliance Project Advisors as senior project manager in Phoenix. Prior to joining Alliance Project Advisors, Harper worked with CBRE Global Corporate Services on site at American Express’ TRS Division since 1996. She has more than 20 years of project management experience.

newsmakers - gaylord, hawks, bladine» Jennings, Haug & Cunningham expanded its legal services with the addition of a prominent Arizona environmental law practice group. The three attorneys include senior partner Karen Gaylord, Ronnie Hawks and Janis Bladine. They have been representing clients in environmental law.

» Scottsdale-based MC Companies has announced the new joint venture with Phoenix-based Clark-Wayland Construction. This venture will focus mainly on development and construction of new multi-family projects in Phoenix and Tucson. The combined company has more than 75 years construction experience and has built more than 25,000 units in Arizona.

newspaper - plapp» Colliers International announced that senior associate Danny Plapp joined the office properties team of Charles Miscio, Greg McMillian and Niki Ward. Plapp will focus on procuring new tenants for property owners, while working with the specific needs of users. He joins Colliers from LevRose Commercial Real Estate in Scottsdale. Plapp has more than four years of commercial real estate experience, specializing in office properties.

» Carlyle Development Group announced a leasing and management team for the newly acquired Metrocenter in Phoenix. This team includes the addition of Brent Meszaros as general manager, real estate veteran Anita Blackford as senior VP of leasing, and locally based Phoenix Commercial Advisors as Metrocenter’s exclusive retail broker representative.

» Gensler added three new associates to its Phoenix staff. They include Jennifer Gozzi, interior designer; Lori Stenguist Johnson, project coordinator; and Stephanie Gomez, marketing manager.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

arizona construction - lge design build project - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Arizona Construction: Project News

Arizona Construction projects 2012:

LGE BEGINS WORK ON QUARTET OF TI PROJECTS
LGE Design Build has begun work on four tenant improvement projects, including a renovation of the popular Valley eatery Lolo’s Chicken & Waffles. LGE’s projects include: construction on a 35,200 SF office TI for Integrated Device Technology in Tempe; construction on a 23,643 SF office TI for Child & Family Support Services in Phoenix; a 17,607 SF major manufacturing expansion for Galco International in Phoenix; and a 4,200 SF restaurant renovation for Lolo’s Chicken & Waffles in Phoenix.

HARDISON/DOWNEY DONATES SERVICES TO GALLERY@CITY HALL
hardison/downey construction inc. played a significant role in building out the new Gallery@City Hall, an art gallery that features rotating exhibitions at Phoenix City Hall. As a nearly pro-bono project, hardison/downey donated its services to ensure the space was ready for its inaugural exhibit, which celebrates the cultural legacy that Phoenix residents began building nearly a century ago. The space features rotating exhibitions from the city’s historic and contemporary art collection, and is free and open to the public from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. hardison/downey is one of approximately 40 businesses and residents that contributed to the privately funded effort.

WORK BEGINS IN EARNEST AT CUBS NEW SPRING FACILITY
Riverview Golf Course closed its doors in March as work began for the Chicago Cubs new spring training complex in Mesa. Initial work will include the salvaging and relocation of about 300 trees. Riverview Park closed on April 2, and the softball fields are scheduled to close June 28. Once that is done, major construction work at the $99M will commence. Hunt Construction is the general contractor; Populous is the architect.

MCCARTHY BUILDING CHANDLER’S 30TH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
McCarthy Building Companies is in the process of completing the Chandler Unified School District’s 30th elementary school, Carlson Elementary School, in southeast Chandler. The $12.4M, K-6 school will have room for 950 students. The 80,000 SF building will include a gym/multipurpose room, media center, classrooms and office space. HDA Architects Inc. is the architect and subcontractors include Midstate Mechanical, Suntec Concrete Inc. and Hawkeye Electric. Two other projects of note: McCarthy recently completed a new multipurpose room and kitchen facilities at the Arcadia Neighborhood Learning Center that is undergoing a complete remodel. When completed next fall, the $14.8M project will include a 62,000 SF, 2-story building. McCarthy and DLR Group are combining their efforts on the West-MEC Phase II maintenance building. The $3M, 18,900 SF project is the addition of a pre-engineered building at the school in Glendale.

DPR PROJECTS INCLUDE WORK WITH BANNER, EBAY
DPR Construction has been awarded the Banner Boswell Chiller Replacement project in Sun City and the eBay Quicksilver project in S. Jordan, Utah. DPR is working with Affiliated Engineers on the $1.2M installation of a new, 750-ton chiller and 750-ton heat exchanger, new plumbing and new electrical service for the chiller and support equipment at Banner Boswell. Expected completion is 2Q 2012. DPR is working with Winter Street Architects/AHA Consulting Services on the high-density data center that includes a 130,000 SF shell and 10,000 SF of whitespace built out in the first phase. Expected completion is 2Q 2013.

KITCHELL BREAKS GROUND AT PREMIUM OUTLET MALL
Kitchell broke ground as general contractor of the $70M, 360,000 SF Phoenix Premium Outlet adjacent to the Wild Horse Pass Hotel and Casino on the Gila River Indian Community. The single-level village style setting will feature 90 store fronts in 9 buildings. It will include outdoor pedestrian courtyards, but there will also be sufficient coverage for all-weather shopping. The project is expected to create more than 300 construction jobs over the next year. Expected completion is 2Q 2013. Architects Orange is architect of the project.

fountain hills tenant improvement project - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012AIID MOVES INTO NEW FOUNTAIN HILLS FACILITY
The American Institute of Interior Design recently relocated from an outdated space it occupied for the past 23 years and is now in a new facility in Fountain Hills. The $1M (suite value and tenant improvement) 4,400 SF project was developed by GMK Building and Development. General contractor was George Kasnoff and architect was Colin Edward Slais. The school design merges classical with contemporary styling in an open floor plan that includes cement flooring, a reflected ceiling plan sculpted at four heights and 37 panorama view windows.

PHOENIX ARCHITECTURAL FIRM HELPS DESIGN MOB MUSEUM
Phoenix architectural firm Westlake Reed Leskosky was the lead design team behind the $42M Mob Museum in Las Vegas. The 40,000 SF historic 1933 U.S. Post Office and Federal Courthouse includes 17,000 SF of exhibit galleries on three floors, including the restoration of a historic courtroom, famous as the site of the Kefauver Committee hearings that marked the exposure of organized crime and the beginnings of federal prosecution in the early 1950s.

BILTMORE ON THE LAKE UNDERGOES $1M RENOVATION
Biltmore on the Lake, 11050 N. Biltmore Dr. in Phoenix, underwent a $1M renovation with J&L Construction serving as the general contractor. Biltmore on the Lake is a 420-unit multi-family property developed by B.H. Properties.

ON THE DRAWING BOARD
Landmark Properties of Athens, Ga. and Chicago-based Harrison Street Real Estate Capital LLC plan to develop the Retreat, a 774- bed luxury, student cottage project near 22nd St. and Park Ave. in Tucson. It will serve University of Arizona students and is expected to open in time for the 2012 fall semester. … Zaremba Residential of Ohio plans to develop a 420-unit luxury apartment complex near Indian School Rd. and Goldwater Blvd. in Scottsdale. Plans call for a 5-story complex. … JLB Partners of Dallas purchased ±9.7 acres in Scottsdale and plans to build a 369-unit luxury apartment community of the former Portales Place property. Sale price was $13.87M. … Alliance Residential Co. plans to build a 259-unit apartment community behind the Scottsdale Waterfront mixed-use project at the SWC of Scottsdale and Camelback roads. Broadstone Scottsdale Waterfront LLC paid $13.5M for the 3.35-acre parcel. … A Charleston, S.C. company plans to develop a 370-unit apartment complex within the Desert Ridge community in northeast Phoenix.

[stextbox id=”info” bgcolor=”cccccc”]CONSTRUCTION: P&Z

TOWN OF BUCKEYE
The Town of Buckeye is requiring new or increased development fees related to the Development User Fee Schedule. The new fee schedule is to be presented to the Town Council May 15. For more information, visit the Town Development Services website at buckeyeaz.gov or call (623) 349-6211.

MARICOPA COUNTY
Maricopa County is proposing a Text Amendment (CPA2011010) that will redefine a “Major” Comprehensive Plan Amendment by raising the acreage threshold from 100 acres or less to more than 640 acres. For more information, contact Robert H. Kuhfuss at (602) 506-3301. The proposed Text Amendment was tentatively scheduled for the April 11 Board of Supervisors hearing.

CITY OF AVONDALE
The City of Avondale is completing an updated version of its General Plan. The Avondale General Plan 2030 was to be presented to the City Council on April 2 for possible approval. The General Plan 2030 update is scheduled for a citywide vote for adoption on Aug. 28. For more information, visit the City website at ci.avondale.az.us.

CITY OF PEORIA
The City of Peoria secured a new long-term lease agreement with the Seattle Mariners and San Diego Padres, keeping the Peoria Sports Complex as the teams’ spring training site up to 2034. The Peoria Eighty Three Arrowhead Entertainment District, where the Peoria Sports Complex is located, may positively benefit from the lease renewal. For more information about the Entertainment District, visit p83az.com.


P&Z column compiled by Dave Coble and Karl Woodard, MEUP, with Coe & Van Loo Consultants Inc. cvlci.com[/stextbox]

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Energy Roadmap - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

AEC – Creating an Energy Roadmap To Bolster Arizona’s Renewable Sector

The Arizona Energy Consortium is creating an Energy Roadmap to complement Arizona’s existing energy sources and bolster the state’s renewable sector, which stretches from solar and wind power producers to energy-efficiency companies.

Think about being a placekicker and each time you line up to attempt a game-winning field goal, the goal posts shift.

That’s how Chris Davey, executive director of EnviroMission, an Australian firm with plans to build a 2,800-foot solar energy tower in western Arizona, describes what it can be like to do business as a developer of energy projects in Arizona.

“If you’ve got one regulatory body that you answer to and it changes midway through the process, it’s going to impact how you develop a project,” Davey says. “If you’ve got various government agencies that are meant to respond within a certain period of time and they take five times as long to do that, it creates uncertainty. It changes timelines and constantly moves the end zone.”

To help ease some of the uncertainty in Arizona’s energy industry, Davey has teamed up with Michelle De Blasi, a partner with Quarles & Brady who focuses her practice on guiding renewable energy projects from concept to completion, to co-chair the Arizona Energy Consortium (AEC).

“The AEC initiatives aren’t an academic exercise,” Davey says. “The AEC is not driven by the utilities, nor academics, nor regulators. It’s driven by industry and what’s best to ensure Arizona has a diverse energy future that maintains reliability and cost effectiveness.”

The AEC — a committee of the Arizona Technology Council (AZTC) — was created to become a member-driven voice for Arizona’s growing energy industry.

“We don’t have an energy plan,” De Blasi says. “We don’t have one nationally and we certainly don’t have one in the state. There are bits and pieces of a plan going on at any given time, but we don’t have a plan that guides us. Without that plan, it’s very difficult for Arizona to compete with other states that have much more clarity in their policies and incentives.”

BORN OUT OF A NEED

AEC1 factThe AEC’s broad cross sections of members — which include private, for profit and nonprofit companies; government and tribal organizations; and businesses that range in specialties from solar to title companies — show that there is a relatively unified belief that the state has to do something to become more competitive and friendly to the energy sector. And the AEC’s rapid growth — it has grown from about 40 members to more than 200 in less than six months — shows that the belief is strong.

“The AEC was born out of a necessity, from a true need for a platform for all affected stakeholders to come together and try to drive change, influence change and ultimately have an energy policy or roadmap in place that gets implemented and provides a fair playing surface,” Davey says. “We need a plan that says, ‘Here are the boundaries, you might be a little off on the left or on the right, but you need to know that you are still within those boundaries.’ As a developer, we have to know where the goal posts are.”

Part of establishing those boundaries is getting legislators, business owners and regulators on the same page.

Government policy has enormous impact on business, says Margaret LaBianca, a shareholder with Polsinelli Shughart, who counsels clients on a broad range of regulatory compliance and strategic considerations with respect to renewable energy. AEC pulls from all realms of the energy industry, which provides a broad view of the real-life implications of legal constraints and incentives. The upshot will be an ability to identify policies that best position Arizona’s energy industry for the long term.

What makes the AEC different from other energy groups in the state is that it is a statewide collaborative — members can sit in on meeting via video conferencing or by phone from anywhere in the world — that is applying its collective expertise to develop a long term strategic plan for energy industry growth. Also, the group isn’t focused on one energy sector. Fossil fuels, nuclear energy, natural gas and renewable energy are all treated the same and viewed from a big-picture perspective.

“This is probably strange because here I am pursuing a high-profile solar project and I’m the biggest advocate for energy diversity,” Davey says. “The AEC isn’t just another green initiative. It’s about energy and creating a diverse energy portfolio. Diversity is good for business.”

THE BUSINESS OF ENERGY

AEC2 factThe AEC’s mission is to promote economic development initiatives and technological innovations across the state, organizers say. To accomplish that, the AEC works with other Arizona organizations, including the Arizona Governor’s Energy Office, GPEC, elected officials, the Arizona Corporation Commission, Arizona tribes, Arizona utilities and local governments.

Despite all the hard work completed by a number of Arizona stakeholders — from the governor’s office to GPEC — it is difficult for the industry to prosper while policies are unclear.

“It’s almost a daily call I get from people saying, ‘Hey, I’d like to set up my business there. What are your policies on this or that?’” De Blasi says. “I have to answer, ‘It’s not exactly clear.’ It’s frustrating for me and for potential businesses looking at Arizona, so sometimes they don’t come here. They go to California or New Mexico or Colorado where they have great policies.”

One fact that illustrates the problem: Phoenix-based De Blasi does more work with renewable energy in Massachusetts than she does in Arizona.

“If you look at the states that have been successful — California, Oregon, New Jersey, Massachusetts — it’s a wholesale buy-in,” De Blasi says. “It’s the governor. It’s the legislature. It’s the governing entity for their utilities. They go farther and have taken advantage of federal incentives to attract business.”

So why isn’t Arizona — with its 300 days of sunshine a year — a player?

“You’ve got your traditional power guys that are entrenched in the communities, they’ve been there forever because most power plants have been around a long time,” Davey says. “So you’ve got your fossil fuel technologies that have been around forever and then something new comes forward — whether that is solar, wind, geothermal, biomass — and it upsets the status quo. Most people want to see innovation happen, but they are scared to go down that path because it’s still relatively unknown.”

Not only is there a fear of the unknown, it’s the fear of higher production costs that keeps more energy innovation from happening.

“One of the defining challenges for the next decade and especially over the next century, will be to find an appropriate balance between the competing needs to supply electricity that is reliable, affordable and stays under an acceptable level of environmental impact,” says Mark Bonsall, general manager and CEO of Salt River Project (SRP). “One thing is clear – all the options are more expensive than our current portfolio of resources.”

LEGISLATIVE ROADBLOCKS

AEC3 factFor some lawmakers, the fear may lie in being more concerned with losing votes than on losing economic development for the state. “We have incredibly cheap power here,” De Blasi says.

“We have a nuclear power plant that supplies us with efficient and cheap energy. People are used to that. That has fed into legislators not wanting to be responsible for raising people’s energy rates by forcing the utilities to spend money replacing traditional energy with renewables.”

One of the AEC’s goals, De Blasi says, is to work with the legislators to help create legislation that promotes business.

“I would love for us to be a resource for the legislators to come to as a neutral body, with a pro-business mindset,” De Blasi says. “It would help tremendously if lawmakers reached out to the community and asked what they thought proposed legislation would do to industry and get community input before they put bills out onto the street that wreak havoc on the industry and wreak havoc on financing. By the time they have to pull them back or resend them, the damage is already done.”

Providing guidance and education for legislators will be the key to developing Arizona’s energy industry in the future, Davey says.

“We have to get lawmakers to support the right bills and educate them the right way so the right bills get written,” he stresses. “Instead of having something out there that provides a lot of uncertainty when you are trying to get a project delivered, we just want to provide a level of clarity that doesn’t necessarily remove a whole lot of due process; it just makes it clear so that when you’re developing something, you know what the next hurdle is going to be.”

It’s clear that Arizona legislators need to stop and listen to the needs of their constituents. According to a new poll from the Arizona Working Families Coalition, almost half of the likely voters surveyed said job creation — including those that would arise from changes in the energy sector — should be legislators’ top priority.

“It’s clear that voters want their legislators to stay out of working people’s financial decisions and to focus on the economy,” says John Loredo, who is working with Arizona Working Families and is the former Arizona House minority leader. “If lawmakers continue to ignore the priorities of the people who put them in office, there will be some real consequences for them in November.”

The first step toward removing some of those hurdles came in November 2011 when the AEC unveiled “Arizona’s Solar Strategic Plan,” a document that proposes recommended actions for the long-term growth of the state’s solar industry. The recommendations focused on technology innovation, manufacturing and power generation.

“The Strategic Plan is meant to guide Arizona’s growing solar industry along a sustainable path,” De Blasi says. “Our goals are increased jobs, economic development, energy self-sufficiency and security, technology innovation and reduced greenhouse gas emissions — all resulting from increased use of solar energy as a component of a broader energy strategy. The AEC will be working hard to pull together the stakeholders to ensure that the plan is implemented — the crucial step that has been missing with previous proposed plans.”

The plan’s recommendations include incentives — preferably back-end performance-based funds — to nurture existing solar companies and attract new firms; looking for ways to attract private investment; and longer-term utility incentives to spur demand, rather than the current year-to-year options.

“We’re in a conservative state and there is some resistance to renewable energy, but there is nothing better than taxing the sun,” Davey says. “If we think about it from a more broad perspective, where it’s not just about servicing Arizona’s needs, it’s about servicing our neighbor’s needs as well. If there is policy in place that adversely affects our ability to build here, it also affects our ability to generate energy that we could sell out of state, which is something everyone in the business community wants to achieve.”

De Blasi and Davey say the Strategic Plan will serve as a jumping off point for the AEC to develop a broader Energy Roadmap that will be a catalyst to attract new business and create a more friendly energy-industry environment.

“The end result will be not unlike the long-term Bioscience Roadmap initiated by the Flinn Foundation, designed to make the state’s life sciences sector globally competitive,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “Arizona possesses many of the essential elements necessary to become a global leader in energy, but must strengthen its focus, collaboration and will to achieve this goal.”

THE ENERGY ROADMAP

AEC4 factThe AEC formed an Energy Roadmap subcommittee — led by De Blasi and Davey — to work with stakeholders and coordinate efforts that will further develop Arizona’s energy industry.

“There is the throwaway line that we want to be the Saudi Arabia of solar,” Davey says. “But right now, we are so far away from that, it doesn’t even matter.”

To ensure a competitive and secure economic future, De Blasi and Davey say the state must have a consensus-driven plan that will create a sustainable, safe, reliable, affordable, efficient, and diversified energy supply. Taking a page from the Bioscience Roadmap — which, since 2002, has helped Arizona increase the number of bioscience jobs by 41 percent and increase the state’s number of bioscience firms by 27 percent — De Blasi and Davey hope to design the Arizona Energy Roadmap, that will optimize Arizona’s unique assets, integrate regional investments and attract national and international interest as a place from which to conduct business.

“When you work in the energy industry every day, you realize the issues,” De Blasi says. “So to come up with a plan for the state, it’s just a matter of putting pen to paper and asking, ‘If I had my ultimate project or ultimate policies, what would that be? What are the stumbling blocks? What are the issues? What needs to be fixed and how do we go about fixing the problems?’”

The key issues that De Blasi and Davey say need to be addressed to make Arizona a more dynamic player in the energy industry are government policy and how it impacts the financing of energy projects; transmission of energy and how Arizona looks at transmission from both a statewide and regional perspective; and the state’s ability to use tax benefits to help different energy projects, something that has been difficult to make happen in Arizona, Davey says.

“It’s critical to change the message we send to potential developers — whether it’s the renewable energy industry or natural gas industry — and to stop pointing fingers and start working together and realize this is an energy mix,” De Blasi says. “Do we just want to be someone who gets all the crumbs from our neighboring states because that’s what we’ve gotten so far, or do we really want to be someone who leads and gets the benefit of the economic development and all the things that follow?”

To develop the content, identify issues, and generate feedback for the Roadmap, Davey and De Blasi are not turning to the usual suspects.

“They may not all be in the energy industry,” De Blasi says. “We want to talk with folks who have been in different industries, but have been successful in growing those industries. We want to pull in different ideas, different thoughts so that we can put together a comprehensive plan that we can implement successfully and will drive business.”

The most important thing the Energy Roadmap will do, Davey says, is create some clarity in an industry that has lacked clarity up until this point.

“Perception is reality,” Davey points out. “When you have a document — even if it’s not fully implemented yet — the perception will be that at least the state is moving in the right direction. It will be what helps differentiate us or at least put us on a level playing field with others who already have plans in place.”

De Blasi and Davey say they hope to have the Arizona Energy Roadmap drafted within the next couple months, although elements of the energy roadmap — such as the Solar Strategic Plan — may be released in stages. But once it’s released and implemented, Davey says it will send a message to developers like himself.

“It will say to the world, ‘Arizona is open for business,’” he says. “Once you provide clarity and certainty, money follows and projects get done. Once projects are done, there is job creation and a new diverse economy that comes from a supply chain. We will end up with different glass manufacturers, plastic manufacturers, steel manufacturers, aluminum manufacturers, and fabricators that are going to be here that aren’t here today. You’re going to have the best engineers here. Their kids are going to go to school here, so the education system will be impacted.

“Arizona has the land, the environment, the proximity to an incredible market, to not only put something in place to service our domestics market, but to service neighboring markets as well,” Davey says. “So if the Energy Roadmap is able to create an environment that creates that certainty and clarity so that business can prosper, that would be something pretty good to walk away from.”

For those individuals and companies who want to become a member of the AEC and are not already members of the Arizona Technology Council, the AZTC is waiving its membership requirement to participate in the AEC for 2012. For more information, contact Lauren Ferrigni at lferrigni@aztechcouncil.org.

For more information on the Arizona Energy Consortium and the Energy Roadmap, visit the Arizona Technical Council’s website at aztechcouncil.org/committees/aec.

Go to related article – Power Brokers Leading the Charge

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Arizona Energy Consortium - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Arizona Energy Consortium – Power Brokers Leading The Charge

The Arizona Energy Consortium is establishing the energy roadmap to create a brighter economic future for Arizona. The following individuals are leading the charge.

Robert Bowling - First SolarRobert Bowling
Company: First Solar  

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-Chair of the Workforce Development Committee, which focuses its efforts on current barriers to Arizona’s energy workforce development, as well as devising potential solutions to overcome such barriers.

Relationship to the energy industry:
25 years of power generation experience in Fossil, Hydro and PV.

Why he became involved with the AEC:
“Having always been ‘involved’ in various initiatives throughout Arizona, I saw the value that this consortium has towards the greater good for all Arizonans.”

Why he thinks Arizona needs the AEC:
“As a nation we all understand the various issues surrounding energy dependence. The Arizona Energy Consortium will help AZ be the leader in a variety of energy issues.”

Predicted impact the AEC will make on Arizona by 2022:
“Hopefully by making Arizona the leader in lost cost, sustainable energy production and a hub for energy innovations.”

Tekla Taylor - Golder AssociatesTekla Taylor
Company: Golder Associates, Inc.

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-Chair of the Membership Committee, which is dedicated to growing the Arizona Energy Consortium in terms of membership recruitment, as well as promoting the AEC in the form of event planning and hosting. Members of this committee will be responsible for identifying members who could positively contribute to, as well as benefit from, involvement within the AEC.

Relationship to the energy industry:
Manager, Golder Energy Services US

Why she become involved with the AEC:
“Actively participating in AEC keeps us informed of the opportunities and challenges that face energy sector growth in Arizona thereby impacting our clients.”

Why she thinks Arizona needs the AEC:
“Collaboration among all stakeholders in the industry is critical to ensuring long term success and placing Arizona as a leader in the renewable energy market.”

Predicted impact the AEC will make on Arizona by 2022:
“Through design and implementation of innovative renewable market solutions, AEC will have a significant impact on market sector growth, diversity and economic development.”

Mary Wolf-Francis - DIRTT Environmental SolutionsMary Wolf-Francis
Company: DIRTT Environmental Solutions

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-Chair of the Energy Efficiency Committee, which is responsible for reviewing energy efficiency programs, as well as current barriers to energy efficiency across a wide range of Arizona energy sectors (solar, natural gas, oil, coal, nuclear, wind, geothermal, etc.). Members are encouraged upon review of energy efficiency barriers, to develop potential solutions that would maximize energy efficiency and encourage future Arizona project development.

Relationship to the energy industry:
Business liaison for the State Energy Sector Partnership Grant that brought the Arizona Energy Consortium into fruition as part of the objectives in the grant.

Why she became involved with the AEC:
Brought companies in energy efficiency, renewable energy, sustainability and utilities together to discuss creating the AEC then passed the torch to Michelle De Blasi and Steve Zylstra at the Arizona Technology Council.

Why she thinks Arizona needs the AEC:
“Companies in Arizona need to work together to grow and sustain energy companies here in the state.

Predicted impact the AEC will make on Arizona by 2022:
“The AEC will be the catalyst for diversifying our energy companies here in Arizona to reduce our reliance on the grid.”

Chris Davey - EnviroMissionChris Davey
Company: EnviroMission

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-chair of the Arizona Energy Consortium and co-chair of the Energy Roadmap Committee, which will focus its efforts on developing and implementing an Energy Sector Roadmap for Arizona. Documents such as, Arizona’s Solar Strategic Plan and Arizona Town Hall’s AZ’s Energy Future Report will be utilized in constructing the Energy Sector Roadmap.

Relationship to the energy industry:
As executive director of EnviroMission, he has been vital to the development of the first U.S. Solar Tower project in western Arizona. He has negotiated a number of Power Purchase Agreements, secured parcels of land with both governmental and private bodies, raised capital to deliver the unique Solar Tower technology and advocated on behalf of the solar industry.

Why he became involved with the AEC:
“I want to put something in place to make it easier for people to get done what I’m getting done now. I’m from 8,000 miles away, but I call Arizona home now and I want to make it a better place.”

Michelle De Blasi - Quarles & BradyMichelle De Blasi
Company: Quarles & Brady

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-chair of the Arizona Energy Consortium and co-chair of the Energy Roadmap Committee, which will focus its efforts on developing and implementing an Energy Sector Roadmap for Arizona. Documents such as Arizona’s Solar Strategic Plan and Arizona Town Hall’s AZ’s Energy Future Report will be utilized in constructing the Energy Sector Roadmap.

Relationship to the energy industry:
She is chair of the firm’s Solar Energy Law Team and focuses her practice on guiding renewable energy projects from concept to completion. In addition, she practices in the area of environmental and natural resources law advising clients on federal and state air and water quality issues.

Why she became involved with the AEC:
“With its solar resource and geographic proximity to target markets such as California, Arizona has an opportunity to revitalize its economy by continuing to grow its clean energy sector. By combining business leadership with guidance for good public policy, the Arizona Energy Consortium will play an important role in helping Arizona achieve its clean energy sector expansion goals.”

Ann Marie Chischilly, Esq. - ITEP at NAUAnn Marie Chischilly, Esq.
Company: Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) at Northern Arizona University

Position with Arizona Energy Consortium:
Co-chair of the Public Outreach Committee, which is responsible for educating investors, developers, legislators, and the general public on the Arizona Energy Consortium and the energy industry.

Relationship to the energy industry:
“I began my work in the energy industry as an attorney with the Gila River Indian Community and founded their Renewable Energy Team in 2010. I began my position at NAU in April 2011 and have been developing the Tribal Clean Energy Resource Center, which will help tribes and Alaska Native Villages transition from fossil fuel based energy to clean and renewable energy. For 20 years, ITEP has become a national leader in training and educating tribes in the environmental mediums and has served more than 500 of the 565 tribes nationally.”

Why she become involved with the AEC:
“I want the 22 tribes of Arizona to be included in the process of developing the Energy Roadmap and seeking their input is essential to accomplishing the mission.”

Why she thinks Arizona needs the AEC:
“Arizona has many great organizations, but AEC captures all of them into one group and unites the renewable-energy sector. Becoming more organized and united will make Arizona a leader in this industry.”

Predicted impact the AEC will make on Arizona by 2022:
”The AEC will help Arizona become a leader in the renewable energy industry nationally.”

For more information on Arizona Energy Consortium, visit Arizona Technology Council’s website at aztechcouncil.org/committees/aec.

Go to related article – AEC – Creating an Energy Roadmap

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

black chile - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Spicy And Sweet – Black Chile Mexican Grill

Black Chile Mexican Grill at Biltmore Fashion Park provides an upscale environment to wind down.

It’s 5:30 p.m. mid-week, and the Biltmore Fashion Park has proven to be more than merely a place to turn off Camelback Rd. to wait out the post-work, rush-hour traffic. Business-suit-donned professionals aplenty are heading straight to Black Chile Mexican Grill to relax al fresco on the restaurant’s patio while indulging in both the happy hour specials (with a Black Chile Margarita in hand) and owners Michael McDermott and Jason Merritt’s upscale, Mexican cuisine.

Black Chile began in McDermott’s kitchen over a four-month period, as creations now found on the menu were developed. McDermott’s most memorable dish?

“The skewers were one of those dishes we couldn’t stop picking at in the kitchen,” McDermott recalls. “I kept going back for more.”

Upon hearing this, my dinner party and I agreed we must try the carne asada skewers as one of our appetizers. We also followed suit with the rest of the dinner patrons that night who opted for either the high tops in the bar or the patio seating, which was already nearly full by 6 p.m. Not to mention it was a comfortable 75 to 80 degrees that night; with gorgeous, rare weather like that, how do you pass that up?

But back to the food. The appetizers that arrived to our table, all recommended by McDermott, included the aforementioned skewers as well as the Cotija grilled corn, the fresh guacamole and the avocado egg rolls.

Upon first bite of the skewers, we all agreed McDermott’s anecdote was far from exaggerated. The marinated carne asada was so juicy and tender, we only wished we had the same opportunity to have seconds, and thirds, and fourths … but maybe that was just me. Thankfully the corn took our minds off the longing for a moment as the sweetness of the corn was perfectly subdued by the aioli, cayenne pepper and hints of lime as well as the abundant, thick layer of Cotija cheese caked atop.

Post-appetizers, we were treated with six dishes, including the fish tacos with sweet cabbage slaw and chipotle mayonnaise, which seemed a bit too overwhelming for me, although everyone else enjoyed it; the shrimp diablo, a rightfully named, hot-and-spicy combination of chipotle cheese sauce, chiles, onions and garlic; and the baked salmon filet rubbed with chipotle sauce. (Notice a common ingredient yet?)

The final two entrees, however, were the favorites of the table.

First up, the meatloaf — a unique combination of ground beef, chorizo, sausage and sauteed onions, topped off with Oaxaca cream sauce.

The finale of our entrees were the enchiladas with shredded chicken, roasted poblano cream sauce and two types of cheeses — Asadero and Manchego. McDermott mentioned during the night that this was Black Chile’s No. 1 seller; and we definitely believed it. The entree was mild, flavorful, and as one of my dinner mates put it, “If you don’t like spice, you’ll love this dish” — but in a positive way, considering the rest of the entrees we tried that night were more on the spicy side.

Combine the meals with Black Chile’s attentive service, clean representation and comfortable environment, and you’ve got yourself a winner. We weren’t the only patrons who felt this way, though; Black Chile was voted best patio dining, best upscale Mexican restaurant and best margarita (the Black Chile Margarita) by the 2011 Best of Phoenix.

Don’t believe us? Try it for yourself, and end the night as we did with the churros, which were so light and soft, and the rich chocolate and whipped cream sauces we dipped them in could almost rival the sweetness of the corn found in the sticky rice side.

Never before Black Chile Mexican Grill has Mexican food ever tasted so spicy-sweet.

For more information on Black Chile Mexican Grill, visit Black Chile Mexican Grill’s website at blackchile.com.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

Valley Partnership - 25Years

Valley Partnership: President's Message

25 Years of Commitment

Beginning at the end of 2011, I was charged with the responsibility of reviewing the 25-year history of Valley Partnership in anticipation of the yearlong celebration of our Silver Anniversary.

The only records kept by a small organization with a historically small staff were the binders of corporate minutes (required by law) and some photographs — not pictures on websites, CDs, JPEGs or TIFFs — of events and Community Projects. I dreaded the thought of combing through tedious legalese and staged pictures of people holding shovels pretending to do heavy lifting at some children’s facility one day a year.

I was wrong.

Reading the corporate minutes from 1987 through 2011, each year came alive with the personalities of the Chairs of the Board of Valley Partnership. They were business people who led the organization and the commercial real estate industry in some of the direst times and in some of the most successful. I read of the dedication of the Partners who served on Valley Partnership committees with missions ranging from Government Advocacy to Business Development to our Community Projects.

Although 25 years have passed and the Valley has grown beyond the boundaries that existed in 1987, one thing has been consistent: Valley Partnership is a partnership among strong individuals who are dedicated to the four corners of the Valley Partnership Mission:

  • Advocacy
  • Education
  • Networking
  • Community Service

I hope you enjoy this look back over the past 25 years, particularly the comments of the past Chairs of the Board of Directors, a collection of prestigious commercial real estate professionals who committed a significant amount of their career and time to Valley Partnership.

I invite you to join Valley Partnership for the next 25 years and become a part of the Valley of the Sun’s Premier Advocacy Group for Responsible Development.

Richard R. Hubbard
President & CEO
Valley Partnership

For more information about Valley Partnership, visit the Valley Partnership’s website at valleypartnership.org

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

backyard makeover - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Valley Partnership's Extreme Backyard Makeover

Valley Partnership’s annual community project transforms a Maggie’s Place facility with a backyard makeover.

If there is one thing that every house should have it’s a dream backyard.

Even on a rainy November morning, Valley Partnership volunteers came together for their annual community project to bring the potential for an ideal backyard to fruition.

The mission was to refurbish the yard of one of the community facilities for Maggie’s Place, a home for expectant mothers who wish to achieve their goals in a dignified atmosphere.

The only significant feature of the backyard at Magdalene House’s in Phoenix, one of Maggie’s Places, was an old gazebo that was removed as part of the project’s construction. Additionally, there wasn’t much functionality with the lack of grass and a play structure.

The 2011 project brought in more than 150 volunteers — more than last year’s event — with the chance for each helper to contribute. The volunteers could participate in any of the activities:

  • Scraping the ground to level it out for the incoming playground;
  • Filling the removed gazebo space with personalized bricks used from donations;
  • Building a small play area, including equipment for mothers to have meetings while also watching their children;
  • Planting, painting and ornamenting the yard to add decoration.

The new backyard, completed in a day’s work, was a combination of the volunteers’ vision and the residents’ excitement.

Selecting a project each year is a collaborative effort usually by a core group of volunteers on the Valley Partnership project committee.

Project chairperson, Terri Martin-Denning of NAI Horizon, says the group decided on Maggie’s Place because “it fit Valley Partnership’s mission; their needs aligned with our (Valley Partnership) goals.”

Once the project is chosen, a development team is assembled to plan the construction process. The committee members then look for those with skilled labor to complete the heavy building; removing the worn gazebo was one of those arduous tasks. Finally, the volunteers are recruited and the renovations can commence.

Those behind Maggie’s Place founded the first house on Mother’s Day of 2000 — a suitable day to express gratitude for current and future moms. Magdalene’s House in Phoenix began with five pregnant women in need of a home. It has since expanded to five houses located in Tempe, Glendale and Cleveland, Ohio.

The mission of Maggie’s Place is to:

  • Provide hospitality for pregnant women alone or on the streets;
  • Connect expectant and new mothers to resources involving prenatal care, health insurance and education;
  • Inform and encourage the use of savings programs to prepare mothers for life after Maggie’s Place.

Valley Partnership is the only grass-root organization in Arizona dedicated to promote responsible development. Its commitment was particularly revealed in the restoration of Maggie’s Place and the enthusiasm of both the volunteers and the recipients.

Director of facilities at Maggie’s Place, Dave Kriegl, says they are always looking for outreach from volunteers and organizations. He also says that despite the rain that November day, there was “quite a transformation and a remarkable change” after the volunteers finished the job.

Both Martin-Denning and Kriegl say they believe the expectations of the committee and the women residing in Maggie’s Place were fully met.

Through the laborious work of the volunteers, the residents of the Magdalene House are able to relish in a renewed and kid-friendly backyard, host events and enjoy all the benefits that Maggie’s Place has to offer.

For more information about the backyard makeover at Maggie’s Place, visit the Valley Partnership’s website at valleypartnershipcommunityproject.org

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

bioscience - economic outlook - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Strength Of Bioscience Helps Brighten Arizona’s Employment Outlook

Bioscience brings strength to Arizona’s employment opportunities.

Arizona’s economic doldrums are finally starting to appear in the rearview mirror.

“Here in Arizona, the state ranked No. 12 in job creation (in 2011),” says Lee McPheters, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center at ASU’s W. P. Carey School of Business. “That’s a vast improvement from last year at this time, when it ranked No. 40.”

Twenty percent of the Phoenix-area companies interviewed for a Manpower Employment Outlook Survey plan to hire more employees during the second quarter of 2012, while just three percent expect to reduce staff.

Leading the charge in Arizona job growth is technology, healthcare and bioscience, Ernst says. “We’ve also seen manufacturing pick-up substantially in the last month with roles in accounting and finance,” he added.

According to Manpower spokesperson Frank Amendariz, other job prospects for the next quarter appear best in construction, transportation, utilities, wholesale and retail trade, information, financial activities, professional and business services, and leisure and hospitality.

“Employers expect stronger employment prospects compared with one year ago,” Amendariz says optimistically.

“There’s a lot more optimism among hiring managers than in years past,” says Andy Ernst, regional vice president of Robert Half International, a specialized staffing services company. “Businesses are looking to hire. As the economy continues to regain its foothold, we anticipate an uptick in hiring as more companies look at ways to market themselves to attract new candidates and retain key members of their team. We anticipate the next 3-4 years being very good on the job front here in Phoenix.”

But no sector has shown the strength or potential that bioscience has shown. During the post-recessionary period of 2009-10, bioscience jobs in Arizona increased by 7.4 percent, compared with a 1.8 percent decline for the state’s overall private sector, according to a new performance analysis of Arizona’s bioscience sector, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation.

The annual study by the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice found that since 2002 Arizona has outpaced the nation in generating bioscience jobs and firms, and in winning National Institutes of Health grants, the gold standard for biomedical research funding. Even venture-capital funding, long a challenge for Arizona’s bioscience sector, was on an upswing in the past year.

“Through the most trying economic circumstances of our lifetimes, bio in Arizona more than held its own,” says Walter Plosila, senior advisor to the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice. “The bioscience sector is past the ‘promising’ stage. It is now becoming integral to Arizona’s future.”

Since Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was launched in 2002, bioscience jobs in the state have grown 41 percent to a total of 96,223, versus 11 percent growth for the nation as a whole. Those jobs pay an average annual wages of $55,353, 29 percent higher than the overall average for private-sector wages in Arizona.

With those jobs comes the demand for a better educated workforce.

“In the Phoenix market, there is high demand for experienced professionals with four-year degrees or more who have 2-3 years experience working in their field,” Ernst says. “The unemployment rate for college-degreed workers 25 and older is 4.2 percent and even lower from some specialties such as IT, accounting and finance.”

While the investment in education is paying off for Arizona’s workers, the investment of time and energy in developing a cohesive plan to further the state’s bioscience industry is paying dividends for the state’s workforce and its economy.

Martin Shultz, chair of the statewide steering committee that oversees the Bioscience Roadmap, applauded the commitment of Arizona leaders. “Over the past decade, officials ranging from school principals to mayors to three governors have made long-term investments in our state’s future by supporting the biosciences,” Shultz says. “The excellent return on those investments is undeniable.”

For more information on the Bioscience Roadmap, visit the Flinn Foundation’s website at flinn.org.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

Biltmore Bank - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

Father-Son Bank On Arizona Business

Family-built Biltmore Bank of Arizona has assets totaling more than $260 million

The Lehmann family has a lot of baggage.

“When I finished grad school back in 1969, I got two job offers,” says Richard J. Lehmann. “One was with Ford Motor Company; the other with Citibank.”

The banking gig, however, meant moving to Europe, which actually sealed the deal.

“I was lucky enough to study abroad — and bum around Europe — while still in school, and both my wife and I are always up for adventure,” Lehmann says.

Over the next seven years, Lehmann’s rapidly growing career took him from Hamburg to Düsseldorf to Frankfurt to Kronberg, where his youngest son, Greg, was born. With two young children and extended family a continent away, the Lehmann family moved back to the U.S. in 1977, with Lehmann still focusing on international banking.

“Talk about a commute,” Lehmann says.

But the move wouldn’t take, just yet, and the family was back on the move in 1985 when Lehmann packed their bags for London to take a position overseeing all Middle East, European and African clients for Citibank.

Arizona, however, would eventually come calling.

The family finally unpacked its bags in Arizona in 1988, when Lehmann became chairman and CEO of Valley National Bank.

But just as the elder Lehmann was unpacking his bags in the Valley, youngest son Greg was picking up and moving to Vermont to study anthology in college.

While there, just as his father did, Greg spent a semester studying overseas (Asia), where he would return after graduation to volunteer with the building of schoolhouses in the developing nation of Nepal. Motivated, but lonely living alone in a small Nepalese village, Greg moved to New York City in the 1990s and took a job in advertising with such brands as Mercedes Benz and MLB, and then one with an Internet company. He even helped re-brand the Cleveland Cavaliers when LeBron James was drafted.

By the early 2000s, with dad retired (and unretired) most recently from Bank One, where he worked as the bank’s president and COO, Greg was busy, too — getting married and starting a family in New York.

And then everything changed.

When Richard hosted his son’s family for Christmas in the early 2000s, he made a singular comment: “So, I am thinking of starting a bank.”

“Floored, my initial reaction was ‘Yeah sure, Dad.’ But as Christmas gave way to the New Year, I saw he was serious — and serious about recruiting me.”

By 2003, Richard and long-time colleague Jeffrey Gaia, with others, began planting the seeds for the Biltmore Bank of Arizona. After a lifetime of servicing some of the biggest businesses across the globe, Lehmann wanted to get personal.

“Truly understanding the needs of Arizona businesses and working with them face-to-face to ensure exceptional client service is our singular focus,” Richard says. “We wanted to be a part of each of our client’s growth — and the growth of the Arizona economy.”

Inspired, Greg packed his family’s bags and moved to the Valley for good in 2004, helping to launch the Biltmore Bank of Arizona with his father.

The father-son team proved a perfect fit. The Biltmore Bank now has two locations, 50 employees and assets totaling more than $260 million. They service hundreds of businesses in Arizona each day through customized loan solutions, SBA lending, treasury management, business checking, and online and mobile banking.

While other banks have closed in recent years due to the sagging economy, Biltmore has flourished, most recently receiving a cash infusion from Grandpoint Financial that will allow them to grow and invest with its current and prospective clients and consider possible acquisitions in the future.

“In order for us to support the continued growth, we need to have a strong balance sheet and a formidable capital position,” Richard says. “Arizona businesses will bounce back, and now we have the capital to help them.”

For more information on Biltmore Bank, visit Biltmore Bank’s website at biltmorebankaz.com.

Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

Valley Partnership

Valley Partnership: Partners 2012

Six partners tell why they chose to be involved with Valley Partnership and why they stay.

Markham Contracting

mike markham - markham contracting - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012Mike Markham Jr., vice president and chief operating officer at Markham Contracting, isn’t involved in many trade organizations.

“But I’ve chosen to stay in Valley Partnership because of the value it brings,” Markham says. “It goes beyond just the business connections, it’s about to the community service we do. That’s why we stay involved — Valley Partnership is moving forward and trying to be influential in the Phoenix area while remembering it’s important to give back to the community.”

The fifth-generation Arizonan established membership with Valley Partnership through the community project committee. Eight years later, he’s still involved with both Valley Partnership and the committee, which manages annual donations to local nonprofits to enhance facilities for children and those in need.

Markham began working in the construction industry in 1995, receiving his bachelor’s degree in construction engineering from Arizona State University in 1999. After several years at another company, he went to work for his father’s business, Markham Contracting, in 2001.

“We’re a family business my father started in 1977, so I grew up around Markham Contracting,” he says. “My dad founded it, and now we’re moving into our second generation — my sister and I are taking over the day-to-day operations, transitioning to the second generation.” 68 | May-June 2012

Sunbelt Holdings

heidi kimball - sunbelt holdings - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012Heidi Kimball, vice president and designated broker at Sunbelt Holdings, exemplifies the American Dream. She started working at the commercial real estate firm in 1982 as the receptionist, and worked her way up through decades of loyalty and dedication.

Kimball became involved with Valley Partnership in 1994, first participating in the state legislation committee. Her first year on the Board of Directors was in 1998, and, after several terms, she served as Valley Partnership president in 2002. Still active in the organization, she foresees Valley Partnership will continue its work as a channel between the public and private sectors.

“I think V.P. will carry on as the single point of contact for parties seeking resolution of a variety of development issues,” she says. “From a public policy standpoints, we provide the resources, the contact to the development community, as well as a bridge to municipalities and government to the citizens through village planning committees and neighborhood associations.”

Kimball, who says she’s proud to see more women entering the construction industry and earning leadership roles, notes that Valley Partnership’s diversity serves in its favor.

“I think Valley Partnership serves a unique role in being able to speak to, really, all sides of an issue by virtue of our diverse membership,” Kimball says. “We can address governmental, citizen and developmental concerns.”

Abacus-Abengoa

jeff chaves - abacus-abengoa - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012Jeff Chaves joined Valley Partnership four years ago because he shares common values with the organization — action and advancement.

“Valley Partnership has a very strong reputation for being the premier advocacy group in the Valley of the Sun, and I wanted to be part of that,” Chaves says.

Chaves spent the first 15 years of his career as a consulting hydrogeologist, and then ventured into business development with civil engineering firm Olsson Associates. After serving as director of business development at Kitchell, he accepted a position at Abacus-Abengoa as market sector leader and where he currently serves in a consulting and advisory capacity. Abacus-Abengoa is an international company applying innovative technology solutions for sustainable development.

The father of four, baseball coach and California native serves as a member of Valley Partnership’s Board of Directors. Chaves was enthusiastic when asked to join the board last year because Valley Partnership’s impact is a tangible, influential force, he says.

“When you look back 25 years ago, when Valley Partnership first started and industry professionals were trying to get an audience with legislators, for example, it was difficult,” Chaves says. “Now, they come to us. That, as much as anything, is a good indication of the powerful impact of Valley Partnership in the Valley.”

Chaves foresees real estate developers will emphasize sustainability in the future, both economic and environmental. Valley Partnership, he says, will remain a pivotal player in Arizona.

City of Phoenix

debra stark - city of phoenix - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012Debra Stark, planning director for the City of Phoenix, joined Valley Partnership in the mid-1990s when the organization was first forming and establishing professional ties throughout the Valley. She was working for Maricopa County at the time and recalls being pleasantly surprised when Valley Partnership representatives appeared at the county’s Department of Transportation meeting, hoping to collaborate.

“I thought, ‘That’s refreshing!’ ” Stark recalls. “They want to partner with us instead of us writing some legislation or ordinance and then them reacting negatively, and it’s better to partner than continue to fight. The next thing you know, I was drawn into the organization.”

Stark, who earned her master’s in planning from Arizona State, is on the city/county committee. The Wisconsin native says she’s remained loyal to the organization for so many years because of Valley Partnership’s tangible, constructive impact on the Valley.

“Valley Partnership brings a reputation of quality, and I think any Arizonan wants a quality city, so this organization knows how to reach out and promote that level of excellence,” Stark says. “They’re a voice in Arizona; they’re certainly a voice in Maricopa County and Phoenix, and they get involved for the right reasons, and that’s to improve the quality of life.”

Kitchell

dick crowley - kitchell - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012After graduating from the University of New Haven with a degree in civil engineering, Dick Crowley entered the general contracting industry in 1980. Deciding he found his niche, he stuck with the field. “I’ve been involved in projects in 20 states, including retail, commercial, healthcare, parking structures — a vast array of various projects,” he says.

Crowley has since spent his entire career in commercial construction, both in operational functions and in marketing and development. Crowley is eight years into a flourishing career at Kitchell, an employee-owned construction, real estate and contracting company operating primarily in the Southwest, where he serves as vice president of marketing.

Crowley is also an avid pilot, father to 4-year-old Grace, and a strong believer in sustainable expansion. He joined Valley Partnership two years ago.

“Both Kitchell and myself, personally, have a vested interest in our community, particularly in Maricopa County,” Crowley says. “Valley Partnership really has become the premier advocacy group for real estate development, and as such it has created an opportunity for its members to have unique access to the policy makers that influence development in our community.”

Crowley serves on the sponsorship and events committees, and particularly enjoys Valley Partnership’s Friday breakfasts. “There’s a networking function that people enjoy, but what keeps people coming back is that education component where they learn something.”

Ryan Companies US, Inc.

molly ryan-carson - ryan companies us - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012Molly Ryan-Carson is a legacy at Ryan Companies US, Inc., a national developer and commercial real estate firm. Her grandfather founded the company in 1938, blazing a trail for a family business that would eventually span three generations.

Ryan-Carson has been with Ryan Companies for 11 years. She served as retail development director for eight years, then earned a promotion to vice president of development in 2010.

She joined Valley Partnership at the recommendation of a colleague two years ago, when the commercial real estate market wasn’t exactly prospering.

“Though the last two years have been no picnic, it’s been very interesting to see Valley Partnership focus to maintain relevance and importance for individuals who are now looking for jobs, thereby strengthening the community,” Ryan-Carson says. “They really put their money where their mouth is, and they work hard to achieve important goals. Both myself and Ryan Companies are certainly active supporters; we believe in V.P.”

Ryan-Carson sits on Valley Partnership’s Board of Directors, where she says she’s established relationships and connections that have positively impacted her career. She also serves on the events committee and often frequents the Friday morning breakfasts.

“I remain involved because I feel Valley Partnership is out to make a difference for individuals at every level of commercial real estate and development,” she says.

For more information about Valley Partnership, visit their website at valleypartnership.org

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

real estate - Arizona Business Magazine May/June 2012

Real Estate Trading Trend Is Paying Off

Home builders, sellers and buyers say, ‘I’ll trade you’

An emerging real estate trend is paying off for some Valley companies.

For The Landmark in Scottsdale, real estate trading has accounted for almost 20 percent of its sales the past 12 months. The average list price for the trade homes: $1,100,000.

“We had a buyer prospect who told our sales team, ‘I want this condo and I would buy it in a heartbeat, but I need to sell my home first,’” says Kirsten Brown, vice president of Butte Companies. “We didn’t want to lose that excitement and timing is everything when a buyer is in the heat of the moment. (Butte Companies’ owner, Ed Lewis) asked the location of their home and how much is it was listed for. The dialogue opened and grew from there. That’s where the general concept of trading came from for us.”

The trading concept is especially beneficial for buyers with a singlefamily home, vacation home, or lots they need or want to sell before they make another purchase.

The concept is simple: Buy my house and I’ll buy your house. The exchange takes place on the same date via a simultaneous closing. The sales are contingent upon each other. Since contracts require a closing on the same date for both properties, the bank will not use the monthly payment from the client’s current mortgage as a liability, nor will it use the old mortgage balance in total loan to value ratios. Having fewer liabilities helps the client qualify for the new loan and negotiate better mortgage terms.

Fulton Homes touts its trade-in program with this slogan on its website: “Why stay in an old home when you can trade up to an energy efficient Fulton Home?” It took the trade movement a step further with a Super Bowl ad.

“Fulton Homes saw great response in the heightened level of interest (in the trade-in program),” says Doug Fulton, CEO of Fulton Homes. “It was definitely a touchdown.”

With the local housing market struggling for the past few years, homebuilders have struggled to find innovative ways to find buyers. While trading has been labeled as simply a marketing gimmick by some critics, Brown says it fills a need in the current economic atmosphere.

“Many buyers don’t want to put their home on the market and face the reality of today’s prices or others simply don’t want the hassle of open houses every weekend in their home disrupting their life,” Brown says. “This resolves those concerns and many more. When we make an offer for a trade deal, we don’t focus on the price of our home or the value of their home, we simply discuss the difference in the price between the two. Once that is agreed upon, the rest falls into place.”

If trading is a trend, it doesn’t appear to be one that is going away any time soon.

“The concept is gaining momentum as is exemplified by the ARMLS recent board decision to add a tab in all online MLS listings that allows an agent to list and/or search for ‘trade’ properties in order to pair up your clients willing to trade with those homeowners looking to trade,” Brown says. “This was just implemented in the last nine months by ARMLS, so that to me says they agree it’s not a fad, but a helpful tool agents can use to help their clients sell or buy regardless of the market.”

25 years of exemplary leadership, AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Valley Partnership: 25 Years of Exemplary Leadership

Behind every great organization are great leaders. And Valley Partnership is no exception. With the Valley-based development group celebrating its 25th anniversary, AZRE magazine posed the following question to its past chairmen:

What was Valley Partnership’s most significant or greatest accomplishment while you were chairman?

Ron Haarer, Sr. - Westwind Aviation
Ron Haarer, Sr., Westwind Aviation
“Valley Partnership’s first Board of Directors was comprised of members of the development community, city officials and community activists. Watching these diverse groups working together was the ultimate reward for months of soul-searching and persistence and 25 years of continual existence.”


John Graham - Sunbelt Holdings
John Graham, Sunbelt Holdings
“I’m proud that a new organization was able to survive a difficult real estate downturn and was a positive participant in working through the RTC era. A large number of people have contributed to (V.P.’s 25-year) success.”


David Scholl - Westcor/Vintage Partners
David Scholl, Westcor/Vintage Partners
“Valley Partnership’s participation in a yearlong discussion with the Regional Transportation Commission, and making efforts in communication and partnership was a success.”


Charlie Byxbee - Byxbee Development Partners
Charlie Byxbee, Byxbee Development Partners
“Sustaining the organization through such a harsh real estate environment. In addition, we were actively involved with the policies of the Resolution Trust Corporation, and Valley Partnership was able to provide input to the RTC, including offering testimony during oversight hearings that were held in Phoenix.”


John Ogden - Suncor Development
John Ogden, Suncor Development
“Staying alive — I served for two years and it was clearly, ‘staying alive.’ We were just coming out of the RTC era and everybody was broke or being sued.”


Meyer Turken - Turken Industrial Properties
Meyer Turken, Turken Industrial Properties
“We hired qualified executive directors and became more politically and legislatively active. Our industry can be proud of the way we led the charge and have made Phoenix and Maricopa County the great metropolis it is today.”


Lee Hanley, Vestar
“Our objectives for 1995 were influencing government positions on real estate, expanding our membership, and providing networking opportunities. V.P. created a new category of membership for government agencies. Perhaps our greatest achievement was to retire a promissory note created in 1987 to finance Valley Partnership operations in the early years. We became self supporting.”


Lee Hanley - Vestar

Tim Terrill, Sella Barr/Walton
“Substantially expanding our public sector membership and broadening out private sector reach. Advocating responsible development and input on real estate and growth policies at the state and local level.”


Tim Terrill - Sella Barr/Walton

Clesson Hill, Grayhawk Development
“Focusing on the growth of the community project and making it into an integral part of Valley Partnership’s membership and the efforts of our active committees.”


Clesson Hill - Grayhawk Development

Jim Pederson, The Pederson Group
“During my tenure, I was most proud of our progress in promoting quality development in Arizona. Such initiatives as ‘Growing Smarter’ provided a set of guiding principles to help Arizona not just grow, but reach for the next level in developing quality growth.”


Jim Pederson - The Pederson Group

Gregg Alpert, Evergreen Development
Valley Partnership and the commercial real estate community lost a leader and a friend on Sept. 25, 2010, when Gregg Alpert unexpectedly passed away. He was 45.


Gregg Alpert - Evergreen Development

Ken Roth, Roth Development
“Valley Partnership’s greatest and most challenging accomplishment was trying to make sense of the events of Sept. 11 and assessing the relationship between the attacks and the real estate business.”


Ken Roth - Roth Development

Heidi Kimball, Sunbelt Holdings
“Valley Partnership assumed a leadership position in formulating the Outreach Task Force that was challenged with creating a coalition to work proactively on issues confronting business and the real estate development industry, thereby leveraging the industry’s influence at the local and state levels.”


Heidi Kimball - Sunbelt Holdings

Pat McGinley, Vestar
“Created the framework for the Annual Sponsorship Program that was instituted for the following calendar year. Also, organized the first Flat Tire Tour and increased financial reserves for Valley Partnership to more than $200,000.”


Pat McGinley - Vestar
Pete Bolton - CBRE/Grubb & Ellis
Pete Bolton, CBRE/Grubb & Ellis
“We needed someone well connected with the Legislature and Governor’s Office and were fortunate to get Maria Baier (as President and CEO). She was considered one of the true experts on the subject (of development). We also put together the Cross Association Collaboration, which included Valley Partnership, NAIOP, ICSC, BOMA and almost every development association.”


Jay Tubbs - Ryan/Monte Vista Counsulting
Jay Tubbs, Ryan/Monte Vista Consulting
“The biggest accomplishments during my tenure were the growth in our membership, Valley Partnership’s leadership role in the effort to achieve reform at the State Land Department and the continued focus and growth of the annual community project, which I consider one of the most important works of Valley Partnership each year.”


Charley Freericks - DMB Associates
Charley Freericks, DMB Associates
“Working closely with State Land Commissioner Mark Winkleman to draft Proposition 106 and staff the lobbying effort. V.P. formed task forces under the county committees, providing prompt review of the proposition.”


Keith Ernest - RED Development
Keith Ernest, RED Development
“Collaborating with our membership to assist suburban municipalities in their efforts to streamline the development processes. V.P. preserved the practice of allocating sales tax revenues toward infrastructure reimbursement.”


Steve Betts - Suncor Development
Steve Betts, Suncor Development
“Bringing together a coalition of business groups, cities and legislative leaders to pass innovative authority for local economic incentive development agreements with the appropriate protections of public interests.”


Sean Walters - Sunbelt Holdings
Sean Walters, Sunbelt Holdings
“The board worked quickly and diligently with CEO Richard Hubbard to cut costs and increase benefits to our partners. We increased our focus on networking and helping unemployed members find jobs with new enterprises. Valley Partnership additionally made adjustments to create a balanced budget for 2010.”


Mark Winkleman - ML Manager
Mark Winkleman, ML Manager
“Valley Partnership’s greatest accomplishment was holding together the primary voice for the real estate community during the toughest economy any of us have ever endured.”


Mindy Korth - CBRE
Mindy Korth, CBRE
“Valley Partnership members re-energized the commitment and focus of the organization and then getting the word out about our accomplishments through a thoughtful and branded communication plan.”


For more information on Valley Partnership, visit Valley Partnership’s website at valleypartnership.org.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

corporate team-building - AZ Business Magazine May/June 2012

All Work And Go Play – Corporate Team-Building Activities

Corporate team-building activities abound from Old West hootenanny’s to serene red-rock settings to zipping around a race track

Great teamwork builds business faster than any technology. And as we slowly emerge from the Great Recession, corporate team-building activities are making a comeback.

Spending on business group travel and activities increased nearly 8 percent in 2011, according to the Global Business Travel Association, and it is expected to rise again in 2012.

If you’re looking for places to take employees for some team building and brainstorming time, the Valley offers a full menu of opportunities.

Here are a few:

Fairmont Scottsdale Princess Resort
The Fairmont Resort has much to offer for corporate outings with its Fairmont Signature Series. Packages in the series include Tequila 101 & Competition, Mimosas & Crepes, DC Ranch Cycling and the Ultimate Western Experience. During the Ultimate Western Experience, participants do a little of everything — from 4×4 excursions and pistol shooting to bow and arrow shooting and horseback riding. Just tie in a team-building platform, and everyone is ready to go.

Loews Ventana, Tucson
Loews Ventana Canyon offers the ideal setting for an Old West-themed, Tucson-style party. Your group can enjoy the night sky and the sounds of a saloon, or ride the mechanical bull until dinner is served. This is a guaranteed great time with a throwback to the Old West right down the interstate in Tucson.

Enchantment, Sedona
At Enchantment in Sedona, you can reward colleagues with a program designed to improve wellness that will pump them up. Enchantment also offers exploration expeditions for strengthening problem solving methods. Participants can expect all of this along with the great scenery, amenities and the beautiful red rocks of Sedona.

Bondurant Raceway
If your fellow office employees have the need for speed, Bondurant Raceway is the place to race off to. The ProKart Enduro package is specifically designed for team building; it starts with a ground school, followed by an open practice session to get comfortable with the track. Then, teams can get together for a few minutes to determine strategy for race time.

Bucca Di Beppo
The spirit of Italian culture in the room makes an outing at Bucca Di Beppo a festive and fun one. With dishes served family style and endless Italian options, there is something for everyone, including banquet packages available for groups of 20 or more, different menu options and themed dining rooms within which to enjoy dinner.

Mesa Arts Center
Searching for more of a theatrical outing for your company? Then search no further than the Mesa Arts Center. It has ongoing shows, offering a 10 percent discount on ticket prices for groups of 20-49 and a 15 percent discount for 50 or more. With upcoming shows such as “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” “Rock of Ages” and “Ragtime,” a toe-tapping time is guaranteed and will have the office singing show tunes the next day.

Musical Instrument Museum
Enjoy sounds other than office noise at the Musical Instrument Museum. With more than 5,000 musical instruments and musical history from around the world, there will be no awkward silences. Guided tours can last up to about an hour with an overview of the world’s music. Guided tours are free with just cost of admission, which is $15. Don’t miss the opportunity to listen to music you may have never known existed.

Talking Stick Resort
Talking Stick Resort is the place to really let all that hard work pay off with a night out with fellow employees. With endless entertainment activities of which to take advantage, including entertainers such as Jay Leno and Smokey Robinson in the Salt River Ballroom or endless gaming action in the casino, there is something for everybody’s liking. Reward your employees, and make it a TSR night; experience Scottsdale like never before.

Red Rock Balloon Adventures
Fly away on a Red Rock Balloon Adventure in Sedona, and see the sights in a whole new way. Start off with a morning drive to the location, watch the sunset during liftoff and, before you know it, you will get to witness the glorious red rocks, wildlife and much more that Sedona has to offer in a calm balloon ride. When you land, a commemorative picnic awaits. This isn’t for the faint of heart, but it’s an adventure that’s will be talked about at the water cooler in the office for the next couple of weeks. Get ready for a magical getaway.

Phoenix International Raceway
Rev up your office mates by letting them enjoy the NASCAR experience at PIR. Not only will they get to see great races, they will also enjoy great food and drink, games and good company. With basic seating to high-end luxury seating available, Phoenix International Raceway will fit the needs of your corporate outing, and, as a result, they will never want to leave.

Granite Creek Vineyards
Looking for more of a peaceful, laid back setting for employees? Then Granite Creek Vineyards is bliss. Granite Creek offers Block Six Catering that custom designs each menu to the party’s desires — even a menu specifically designed to be paired with a Granite Creek Wine selection. So take it easy with a glass a wine, and escape if only for a day.

Grand Canyon Railway
Arizona companies can enjoy the Grand Canyon Railway with fellow employees by qualifying for a discount of 20 percent on train rides and 10 percent off packages. What better way to escape the office and view the great sights of the Grand Canyon with coworkers than on the Grand Canyon Railway.

iPic Theaters
iPic Theaters in Scottsdale offers a discount for employees who work at the Scottsdale Quarter. Members also enjoy perks, such as discounted pricing Monday-Thursdays, and every Tuesday, members get discounted pricing on drinks and food. So sit back, relax, and enjoy the show.

Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar
Make your corporate outing a memorable one at Fleming’s. Fleming’s can custom design your night out with either a choice of three different set of menus or build one that everyone can enjoy. Or, enjoy a wine tasting with small plates. Either way, you’ll forget about all office work with this night out at Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar.

Phoenix Zoo
You think your office is a jungle? Then enjoy a fun outing with “real” animals at the Phoenix Zoo. The Phoenix Zoo offers full-catered company picnics along with team building activities outdoors. With discount admission from $18 to $12 for adults, the Phoenix Zoo offers a one-of-a kind adventure for your corporate outing, and animal company at the same time.

Pink Jeep Tours
What better way to take in the beautiful sights of Sedona than with a Pink Jeep Tour. Pink Jeep Tours offers a discount of 20 percent off for groups of 12 or more. Groups can customize their tours by including a BBQ cookout or box lunches, team building activities, scavenger hunts and more.

Taliesin West
Discover the masterpiece Frank Lloyd Wright designed and built in 1937. Tours can be custom designed for prearranged groups. With a group of 15 or more, take a 1 1/2-hour tour along with additional options, such as renting out space in the evenings, to take in the night sky with a catered dinner. Have your coworkers experience Frank Lloyd Wright