Tag Archives: Mayo Clinic

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W. P. Carey School Announces Hall of Fame Members

Two technology mavens and a prominent professor focused on improving our health care will be honored for their accomplishments this month. The three alums will be inducted into the W. P. Carey School of Business Homecoming Hall of Fame at Arizona State University on Oct. 30. Previous inductees come from such diverse organizations as the American Red Cross, the Arizona Diamondbacks, Motorola, Wells Fargo Bank and XM Satellite Radio.

“The new honorees have all blazed a trail in their respective fields, making a difference in their professions, their community and society as a whole,” says Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “They also set a great example for our current students that there are no limits on how far they can go in their own career paths.”

The 37th annual W. P. Carey School inductees are:

• Leonard Berry – Dr. Berry, a distinguished professor and well-known author, has devoted his career to studying the marketing and quality of services, with a recent focus on how to improve health care service. He has written 10 books and done extensive work with the Mayo Clinic. He is currently examining how to improve the service experience of cancer patients and their families. Berry has received countless major academic awards and is both a fellow of the Academy of Marketing Science and a past national president of the American Marketing Association. He is a member of several boards of directors, including for Lowe’s, Genesco and Nemours Children’s Health System. He is a Regents Professor, teaching at Texas A&M University, and he received his Ph.D. from ASU’s business school in 1968.

• Brian Gentile – Gentile’s impressive tech career spans almost 30 years and major global companies, including Apple, Sun Microsystems (now part of Oracle), and NCR Corporation. He is a leader in “big data” and cloud computing, who recently built and served as CEO of Jaspersoft Corporation. After TIBCO Software recently acquired the company, Gentile became senior vice president and general manager of its TIBCO Analytics products business unit. He has also been a public governor on the board of the Pacific Stock Exchange, a public member of a New York Stock Exchange committee on ethics and business conduct, and a founding board member for several Silicon Valley startups. He earned his MBA from ASU in 1992.

• Chuck Robel – Tech legend Robel served as chairman of the board of McAfee, one of the world’s best-known computer-security software companies, prior to its multibillion-dollar sale to Intel. He now serves on the boards of directors of GoDaddy, Jive Software, and several other public and private companies. He previously helped to manage about $1 billion in portfolio investments as chief operating officer at venture capital fund Hummer Winblad Venture Partners. He has been involved in more than 80 initial public offerings (IPOs) as an adviser, investor and board member. He received his bachelor’s in accounting from ASU’s business school in 1971.

Alumni, business leaders and students will attend the Homecoming Hall of Fame event Thursday, Oct. 30 at McCord Hall Plaza on ASU’s Tempe campus. The reception starts at 5:30 p.m. Advance registration is requested at www.wpcarey.asu.edu/events/2965 or by calling (480) 965-3978.

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Az Business honors Most Admired Companies

BestCompaniesAZ and Az Business magazine honored 40 companies at the 2014 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies award reception on September 11, 2014 at the Westin Kierland Resort.

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Arizona’s Most Admired Companies are selected based on how a company has performed in the following areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, corporate and social responsibility, customer opinion and innovation. Five companies were recognized with a “spotlight” award for each of the five categories.

CONGRATUALTIONS!

The five spotlight awards winners are:

Customer Opinion: Cresa
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Quality Leadership: Kitchell
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Social Responsibility: Vanguard
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Innovation: Laser Spine Institute
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Workplace Culture: GoDaddy
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“This is the most comprehensive and prestigious corporate awards program in Arizona because it recognizes the contributions and impact these ‘most admired companies’ bring to our state,’” says Denise Gredler, co-founder of the Most Admired Companies Program.

“These companies truly exemplify what it means to be a good corporate citizen,” says Cheryl Green, publisher of Arizona Business Magazine. “MAC winners consistently show strong leadership, a commitment to the communities in which they operate and concern for their employees and customers.”

This year’s presenting sponsors included Dignity Health of Arizona, National Bank of Arizona and Thunderbird International School of Global Management. Additional Event Sponsors include Charles Schwab, Progrexion, Ryan and Shutterfly.

The 40 companies named Most Admired Companies for 2014 were:

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Alliance Residential Company
American Express
Arizona Diamondbacks
AXA Advisors
Banner Casa Grande Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
CBRE, Inc.
Charles Schwab
Cresa Phoenix
Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment
DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Fennemore Craig
GoDaddy
Goodmans Interior Structurs
Grant Thornton
Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort
Homeowners Financial Group
Hyatt Regency Phoenix
Infusionsoft
International Cruise & Excursions, Inc.
Kitchell
LaneTerralever
Laser Spine Institute
Mayo Clinic
Miller Russell Associates
National Bank of Arizona
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Quarles & Brady
Rider Levett Bucknall
Ryan, LLC
Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network
Shutterfly, Inc.
Sonora Quest Laboratories
Sundt Construction
The CORE Institute
Telesphere
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
University of Advancing Technology
Vanguard

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“Cooks & Chords” to raise funds for MS

Cooks & Chords, an evening tasting chef-prepared dishes from Valley restaurants paired with just the right spirits and acoustic music to raise funds to find a cure for multiple sclerosis, is scheduled Saturday, Sept. 13 beginning at 6 p.m. at the Mayo Clinic, 13400 E. Shea Blvd. in Scottsdale.

Cooks & Chords is sponsored by the Mayo Clinic. Among restaurants committed to the event are Aiello’s Salumeria, Charr Burger, Isa’s Pizza, Mayo Clinic, Pita Jungle and Sierra Bonita Grill.

Proceeds from the event that also includes a raffle and silent auction will support MS research, programs and services.

Auction items include, but are not limited to, a stay at the world-famous Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego, jewelry, stay and golf at La Paloma Resort in Tucson and VIP tickets to the Barrett Jackson Auto Auction.

Tickets are $75 per person and are available by visiting www.ArizonaMS.org or calling (480) 455-3958. Additional sponsorships are available.

Chefs and restaurants interested in participating should call Arizona MS Chapter Director of Development Brandee Wessel at (480) 455-3958.

For more information about MS, visit www.nationalmssociety.org.

Medical Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

NIH awards BAI, Mayo $8.3 million

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) renewed funding for the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute (BAI) and Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, longitudinal study of the earliest changes associated with the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease at older ages. The award, an estimated $8.3 million over the next five years, continues NIH’s long-term support of the investigation.

The study, which began two decades ago, has been examining the subtle brain imaging, memory and thinking changes that occur in healthy late-middle-aged and older adults who have inherited from their parents either one, two or no copies of the apolipoprotein E (APOE4) gene, the major genetic risk factor for developing late-onset Alzheimer’s. Each additional copy of the gene significantly increases a person’s chance of developing the disease.

“We are extremely grateful to the NIH and our wonderful research volunteers for their support,” said Dr. Eric M. Reiman, BAI Executive Director and one of the study’s principal investigators. “From the beginning, this study has been driven by our interest in finding treatments to prevent or end Alzheimer’s as quickly as possible, and to provide the information and tools needed to do just that.”

By studying individuals at three levels of genetic risk, researchers have been able to get a sneak peek at the changes associated with the risk of Alzheimer’s. As study participants begin to reach older ages, researchers hope to further clarify the extent to which characteristic brain imaging and other biological changes are associated with subsequent clinical decline. Additionally, researchers hope to further clarify the number of at-risk persons needed to conduct prevention trials, as well as share this valuable resource with other researchers and further develop the methods needed to test the range of promising treatments as quickly as possible.

This longitudinal study began in 1994, soon after researchers discovered the APOE4 gene’s contribution to the risk of developing Alzheimer’s. They have been following approximately 200 healthy volunteers with varying copies of the APOE4 gene, starting between the ages of about 50-65. Every two years, participants are monitored using an extensive battery of brain imaging, memory and thinking tests. A growing number of participants have also been providing cerebrospinal fluid samples. As many of the volunteers reach older ages, a growing number are now at risk for developing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. This disease progression will give researchers the opportunity to characterize the extent of change in various biomarker and cognitive measurements. Data will be used to evaluate potential treatments that could combat amyloid plaques, which are strongly associated with Alzheimer’s, as well as help inform the design of future prevention trials.

“Like Dr. Reiman, I am excited about the opportunity we have been given to help advance the study of preclinical Alzheimer’s,” said Dr. Richard J. Caselli, Professor of Neurology at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and the study’s other principal investigator. “We also look forward to the chance to share our data and samples with other researchers to help advance the scientific fight against this terrible disease.”

The study has had a profound impact on Alzheimer’s prevention efforts. It has helped shape the field’s understanding of the progressive brain changes that precede the clinical onset of Alzheimer’s by almost two decades. It has also served as the foundation for the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative, an international collaborative formed to accelerate the evaluation of promising but unproven therapies. Data from this longitudinal study has also contributed to the development of the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer’s Association research criteria for pre-clinical Alzheimer’s. It has also provided key information for the first reconceptualization of Alzheimer’s as a sequence of biological changes that progress over a person’s lifetime.

“By providing insights into the earliest Alzheimer’s-related changes to brain function and structure, this study is contributing to the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’ Disease goal of finding effective interventions by 2025,” said Dr. Neil Buckholtz, of the National Institute on Aging, which leads the NIH research program on Alzheimer’s.

This work also includes researchers from Arizona State University, University of Arizona and the Translational Genomics Research Institute, organizations that are partners in the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium. Dr. Eric M. Reiman of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute and Dr. Richard J. Caselli of Mayo Clinic are the two principal investigators.

Alzheimer’s is a debilitating and incurable disease that affects as many as 5 million Americans age 65 and older, according to a number of estimates. Without the discovery of successful prevention therapies, the number of U.S. cases is projected to nearly triple by 2050.

bioscience

Arizona Biomedical Corridor advances

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council today approved the Phoenix Industrial Development Authority to issue up to $180 million in revenue bonds to finance Mayo Clinic’s new proton beam radiation therapy center.

The Council also approved a two-year extension of its agreement with ASU and Mayo Clinic to continue collaborative planning efforts to develop the Arizona Biomedical Corridor in northeast Phoenix.

The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, the corridor’s anchor, will be the only center in the Southwest to provide proton beam radiation, a technology that precisely delivers radiation to a tumor while protecting surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The 165,000-square-foot underground facility will help Mayo medical teams treat about 2,000 patients, including children, each year beginning in spring 2016.

“Mayo Clinic’s newly consolidated cancer center is exciting for our community because it helps to deliver top-notch care to our residents and contributes to the innovation-based economy we need,” said Stanton.

“I am thrilled we are taking the next step in our partnership with ASU and Mayo Clinic on the Biomedical Corridor in District 2,” said Vice Mayor Jim Waring. “This project will be a great economic driver for the city and the state, and only enhance Phoenix’s image as an international destination for medical care.”

“Arizona cancer patients will no longer have to travel far to receive proton beam therapy,” said Wyatt Decker, M.D., chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic in Arizona. “Proton beam therapy, with fewer side effects and greater precision, is particularly beneficial for children and younger patients. We’re pleased to be offering this important treatment soon in the fight against cancer, right here in our community.”

Stanton also announced that the Arizona State Land Department has accepted the application by KUD International, a private developer, to play a key role in developing biomedical and advanced technology research on the site. As a result, the department plans to auction 225 acres of land within the proposed corridor by the end of this year.

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Getting Better Customer Service

How can your favorite businesses improve your customer experience and offer better types of service? Business leaders from around the world will gather in Phoenix next week to learn how to gain an advantage and win your loyalty. The 24th annual Compete through Service Symposium will feature speakers from Cisco, Disney Institute, FedEx Services, HP, IBM, Vanguard and other household names.

Some of the topics being covered this year: How services can help differentiate your business, lessons in innovation, how to use smart analytics, and how to create “wow” through the smallest things to make a difference for your customers.

This event is hosted by the prestigious Center for Services Leadership at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The center was created in response to the unique challenges faced by companies as services have become a driving force in economies around the world, with less growth happening in products and manufacturing. The center’s member firms include Boeing, FedEx, GE, IBM, Mayo Clinic, Michelin, PetSmart, State Farm Insurance Company and other household names. The center also offers online courses, a list of which can be found at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/research/services-leadership/online-courses.

WHEN: Wednesday to Friday, Nov. 6-8, Full schedule available at http://wpcarey.asu.edu/symposium

WHERE: Marriott Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel, 50 E. Adams St., Phoenix, AZ 85004

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Mariano transitions from White House to children’s health

Although she doesn’t, Dr. Connie Mariano could boast about her title as the first Filipino American in history to receive the rank of Navy Rear Admiral. However, when she reflects on her past, this “first” may not seem quite as significant as another first: “the first patient.” This is how Dr. Mariano, former White House physician, referred to her most important patient: the president of the United States.

Mariano served for nine years as the White House physician under President George H.W. Bush, President Bill Clinton and President George W. Bush.

Mariano recently published a captivating book about her experiences at the White House. The memoir, titled “The White House Doctor: My Patients Were Presidents,” is written in such a way that you feel as if you’re sitting down with Mariano herself, listening to stories about her years caring for the most important patients of her medical career.

Since 2001, Mariano has lived and served people here in the Valley. After four years working as a consultant in the Executive Health Care Program at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Mariano established the Center for Executive Medicine, a medical concierge practice for CEOs and their families. Framed pictures of Mariano being sworn in as Rear Admiral and posing with Presidents and other world leaders adorn the walls of her medical office, furnished to resemble the West Wing of the White House.

While Mariano has spent her life in innovative service to others, she’s not finished yet. Recently, Mariano was nominated and chosen to sit on the board of directors for Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Ever since Mariano’s younger sister came close to death at the age of 3 after accidentally ingesting poisonous liquid, Mariano, who played a vital role in saving her sister’s life, has recognized the importance of quality pediatric care.

Now, a mother of two and a stepmother of two, Mariano continues to see the need for excellent pediatric medicine and as a physician who cares for adults, oftent sees the dangerous effects of unhealthy choices that could have been prevented in childhood.

“As a parent, I can definitely see the importance of (pediatric care),” said Mariano. “But also as a physician who believes in preventative medicine, I think if you can give good care in the pediatrics world, get (children) started with good prevention of disease and good health habits, as well as educate the parents, you’ll have a healthier population.”

When discussing what excited her about the board position with PCH, Mariano said, “The most significant thing was to be part of a great team of people who are really going to make a difference in childcare here in the Valley.”

Mariano looks forward to acting as a liaison between Phoenix Children’s Hospital and the federal government and using the connections she has in Washington to contribute to the growing institution.

“There’s a reason I’m in this position in my life,” Mariano said. “The best thing to do about it is to touch lives.”

With every life she encounters, Mariano asks, “How can I help that life be better?” As a board member for Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Mariano will be able to contribute to the betterment of thousands of young lives.

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TGen researchers uncover root of myeloma relapse

Researchers have discovered why multiple myeloma, a difficult to cure cancer of the bone marrow, frequently recurs after an initially effective treatment that can keep the disease at bay for up to several years.

Working in collaboration with colleagues at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, researchers from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) in Phoenix were part of the team that conducted the study published in the Sept. 9 issue of Cancer Cell.

The research team initially analyzed 7,500 genes in multiple myeloma cells to identify genes which when suppressed made cancer cells resistant to a common class of drugs called proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib or carfilzomib. Then, the team studied bone marrow biopsies from patients to further understand their results. The process identified two genes (IRE1 and XBP1) that control response to the proteasome inhibitor and the mechanism underlying the drug resistance that is the barrier to cure.

The findings showed recurrence was due to an intrinsic resistance found in immature tumor progenitor (mother) cells is the root cause of the disease and also spawns relapse. The research demonstrates that although the visible cancer cells that make up most of the tumor are sensitive to the proteasome inhibitor drug, the underlying progenitor cells are untouched by this therapy. These progenitor cells then proliferate and mature to reboot the disease process, even in patients who appeared to be in complete remission.

“Our findings reveal a way forward toward a cure for multiple myeloma, which involves targeting both the progenitor cells and the plasma cells at the same time,” says Rodger Tiedemann, M.D., a hematologist specializing in multiple myeloma and lymphoma at Princess Margaret. “Now that we know that progenitor cells persist and lead to relapse after treatment, we can move quickly into clinical trials, measure this residual disease in patients, and attempt to target it with new drugs or with drugs that may already exist.”

“Some myeloma cells are too immature to be caught by the drugs and thus hide underground only to reemerge later,” says Keith Stewart, M.B., Ch.B., Dean for Research at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and contributor to the study. “This study has wide implications in the search for a cure of this common blood cancer as this ‘progenitor cell’ will have to be targeted.”

Jonathan Keats, Ph.D., head of TGen’s Multiple Myeloma Research Laboratory, said: “This study, which leverages data generated at TGen as part of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Initiative, shows how mutations acquired by multiple myeloma tumors can make a tumor resistant to specific therapies and highlights the importance of TGen’s precision medicine approaches.”

Dr. Tiedemann says: “If you think of multiple myeloma as a weed, then proteasome inhibitors are like a goat that eats the mature foliage above ground, producing a remission, but doesn’t eat the roots, so that one day the weed returns.”

The study — Xbp1s-Negative Tumor B Cells and Pre-Plasmablasts Mediate Therapeutic Proteasome Inhibitor Resistance in Multiple Myeloma — was funded by the National Cancer Institute, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, Leukemla and Lymphoma Society and Canadian Cancer Society, the Arthur Macaulay Cushing Estate and The Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation.

Dr. Tiedemann is the Molly and David Bloom Chair in Multiple Myeloma Research, at the University of Toronto, Dr. Stewart is the Anna Maria and Vasek Pollack Professor of Cancer Research at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Keats is an Assistant Professor in TGen’s Integrated Cancer Genomics Division.

banner alzheimers foundation - brain research

Ivy Foundation Grants $1.2 Million for Brain Cancer Study

The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation (Ivy Foundation) announced a gift of nearly $1.2 million to study brain tumor vaccines that combine a patient’s immune stimulators with tumor cultures from other patients.

The Ivy Foundation selected the study led by Allan B. Dietz, Ph.D., head of Mayo Clinic’s Human Cellular Therapy Laboratory, and Ian Parney, M.D. Ph.D., a neurosurgeon and immunobiologist, because of Dr. Dietz’s track record in brain cancer research, among other things.

“Mayo Clinic was selected as one of our brain cancer research partners because of the merit of the historical research done by Dr. Dietz and their ability to execute the project,” said Catherine Ivy, founder and president of the Ivy Foundation. “We believe this creative project will contribute important information to brain cancer research.”

The study will combine a patient’s optimized dendritic cells, known to be potent immune stimulators, with pooled and well-characterized cellular debris – known as lysates – from other patients’ brain tumor cultures to generate a tumor vaccine.

“We are combining this new approach with new methods for monitoring and tracking changes in the immune system,” said Dr. Dietz. “Together, we believe that this approach will allow us to identify and treat those patients most likely to benefit from this therapy.”

The Ivy Foundation has a research funding focus on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and deadliest of malignant primary brain tumors in adults, and is the largest privately funded brain cancer research foundation in North America.

“We are extremely grateful for the Ivy Foundation’s support for our brain tumor vaccine clinical trial,” said Dr. Parney. “Their help has been crucial to bringing this promising new experimental treatment to patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. With their assistance, we hope to improve the outlook for patients with this highly aggressive brain cancer.”

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Pearl Named Program Director at Midwestern

Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, Midwestern University, announced the appointment of Jeffrey M. Pearl, M.D., as Program Director and Professor for the College of Health Sciences’ Physician Assistant Program.

Dr. Pearl comes to Midwestern with a distinguished academic career with a commitment to research and education. He served as a Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeon for Phoenix Children’s Hospital and specializes in congenital heart surgery and transplantation.  Dr. Pearl is also a Professor of Surgery at Mayo Clinic and a Clinical Professor for the University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix.  He earned his B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and his M.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles Medical School.

WPCarey-School-Sign

Mayo Clinic and W. P. Carey School Team Up

Mayo Clinic is known as a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education. Now, a select number of students from the Mayo Medical School are going through a cutting-edge program that allows them to get both their M.D. degree from Mayo Medical School and an MBA from the highly ranked W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

“This program is helping to educate some of the brightest medical minds of our future in such a way that they will be more aware of the business side of medicine, the patient experience and the costs for us, the taxpayers,” explains W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman.

Dr. Michele Halyard, vice dean of the Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus, adds, “The collaboration between Mayo Medical School and the W. P. Carey School of Business brings valuable synergies to the education of both future physicians and business leaders. The dual-degree program provides Mayo Clinic physicians in training with complementary competencies in business management, payer systems and accounting practices. This, along with a superb clinical education at Mayo Medical School, will prepare them to be leaders in the complex world of medicine in the 21st century.”

ASU began a strong collaborative relationship with Mayo Clinic in 2002. This particular joint degree program was launched in 2009 and has turned into a highly desirable choice for just a handful of select students from the Mayo Medical School.

Yingying Kumar was one of the first to graduate from the joint M.D./MBA program. She was looking for a way to supplement her strong medical education with a business background to help her stand out in the job market.

“I realized that the business and leadership skills I would learn in the MBA program could help me advance to a higher position in a clinic or even run my own practice in the future,” says Kumar. “I got a better understanding of roles and how hospitals run. I also got the perspective of non-medical students from my business classmates. I think the MBA will help me keep the patients’ voice in consideration at all times.”

Students who take the dual-degree program spend two years at the Mayo Medical School. Then they spend one or two years in the W. P. Carey School’s MBA program, currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. They return to medical school afterward to finish up their studies. The whole experience is facilitated by both schools to be virtually seamless for the Mayo students who qualify.

“I first began considering this program after volunteering in Honduras on a medical service trip and learning that the villagers we helped had little or no access to health care,” says Mayo M.D./W. P. Carey MBA student Jack Jeng. “We visited an empty rural medical clinic abandoned by its staff because it did not have a sustainable business model. That helped me realize that a successful health care organization needs more than a great medical facility, dedicated professionals and good intentions. Proper planning and smart business principles are also required to ensure patients continue to benefit from high-quality care, something I personally experienced at the Mayo Clinic.”

Jeng, who has already completed the MBA portion of the joint program, adds, “I was blown away by the opportunities and support at the W. P. Carey School of Business. They offered me valuable knowledge and experience I hope to use throughout my career. As a future physician with business understanding, I aspire not only to help people directly, but also to make meaningful contributions to improve the lives of countless patients who aren’t actually sitting in front of me.”

medical.research

Plans advance for Arizona Biomedical Corridor

Plans to establish a biomedical and advanced technology research and development campus in northeast Phoenix advanced this week as KUD International, a subsidiary of one of the world’s largest development, design and construction companies, announced its plans and submitted an application to acquire 225 acres for the project from the Arizona State Land Department.

The proposed campus is the cornerstone of the Arizona Biomedical Corridor, a collaboration between the City of Phoenix, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic announced in 2012 to expand the state’s bioscience industry by clustering compatible organizations in the corridor, located in northeast Phoenix at 56th Street and Mayo Boulevard, just south of the Loop 101 freeway. The development lies adjacent to the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic.

Acquiring the land could take up to a year, KUD officials anticipate. In the meantime, KUD is moving forward on plans for the first building at the more than $1 billion research park, which upon completion could generate thousands of jobs in the region.

Wyatt Decker, Vice President, Mayo Clinic and CEO Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the project aligns well with Mayo Clinic’s plans in Phoenix and will play an integral part in its vision to continue to provide innovative, patient-centered medical care, supported by robust programs in research and education.

“The Arizona Biomedical Corridor will further strengthen the region’s growth as a national and international destination for healthcare-related research, education and private sector interests,” Decker said. “Our work with the City of Phoenix and ASU led to our relationship with KUD, a firm we believe will successfully complement and support our vision.”

Arizona State University President Michael Crow agreed, saying, “The development of the area adjacent to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, with its focus on biomedical and advanced technology research and manufacturing, is well aligned with ASU’s partnership with Mayo Clinic to create new health education and research facilities. We are encouraged that KUD shares our collective vision.”

KUD International LLC specializes in developing public-private projects around the world. It has extensive experience with large-scale developments that are founded on research and education and supported with a complementary mix of uses. The company is constructing a research park in Israel in conjunction with Ben-Gurion University that is similar to the one proposed in northeast Phoenix.

KUD International President and CEO Marvin Suomi said the collaboration with Mayo Clinic presented KUD with a sound basis to make a significant investment in establishing a major biomedical research and healthcare complex in north Phoenix. “We consider this a mission-driven project in alliance with Mayo Clinic, and procuring the land is the first step in realizing its vision set long ago,” Suomi said.

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer added, “I’m pleased the Arizona Land Department has accepted and advanced an application for this proposal, paving the way for the development of a premier medical and research facility in north Phoenix. Not only will this project create thousands of high-quality jobs, it will strengthen and secure our position as a global leader in providing world-class medical care. With the involvement of partners like the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, I know this project will be a point of pride for the entire state.”

Others involved with the project identify KUD’s relationship with Mayo Clinic, its expertise and its initiative in acquiring the state land as important factors that will help the Arizona Biomedical Corridor become a reality.

“I think this is another example of Arizona’s economic recovery and an indication of the growing strength of the Arizona real estate market,” said Arizona State Land Commissioner Vanessa Hickman. “This is a big win for State Trust Land beneficiaries and the result of careful negotiations between the Arizona State Land Department and the other collaborators.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton said, “In January 2012, I announced a vision to grow more high-wage jobs in Phoenix by creating a second bioscience campus on a 1,000-acre corridor in Desert Ridge in Northeast Phoenix. Because we already have great partners like Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, KUD’s investment plans are the key private interest we need to unlock the potential at this location for education and research and create a greater magnet to attract high-wage jobs to Phoenix.”

District 2 Councilman Jim Waring adds, “In February 2013, the City Council adopted a formal strategy to focus on high-wage, bioscience and technology uses within this corridor. I am very pleased to see that the private sector agrees and validates the City’s concept. The City of Phoenix will be a great partner in the project, focused on helping KUD start their development projects as quickly as possible.  Our business community tells us time and again that five-day site plan reviews and one-day construction permitting provides great value and we look forward to delivering this same great service to KUD.”

Mayo Medical Schools Expands to Arizona

New vice dean named for Mayo Medical School

Michele Y. Halyard, M.D, a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, has been named vice dean, Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus. Dr. Halyard will be responsible for undergraduate medical education activities on the Arizona campus and will coordinate Mayo Medical School academic, curricular, and administrative activities and programs in Arizona.

Dr. Halyard’s primary focus will be providing Arizona leadership with the support necessary to establish a branch of Mayo Medical School on the Scottsdale campus.

Dr. Halyard earned her M.D. degree from Howard University, where she also completed her residency in radiation oncology. Dr. Halyard completed her fellowship in radiation oncology at Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. She became a consultant in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, in 1989 and went on to chair the department.  Dr. Halyard is an associate professor of radiation oncology in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and is board certified in therapeutic radiology. Dr. Halyard has had significant Mayo Clinic leadership experience, including membership on the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors in Arizona and the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees.

Most recently, Dr. Halyard was appointed as an associate medical director for Development in Arizona and she will continue to serve in that role. Dr. Halyard is an accomplished course director in the Mayo School for Continuous Professional Development, a mentor to many residents, medical students and medical professionals and a notable researcher and author.

Mayo Medical School, based on Rochester, Minn., is working with Arizona State University to expand Mayo’s medical school to the Phoenix metropolitan area. Students at all Mayo locations will have the option of completing an ASU master’s degree in the science of health care delivery as they earn Mayo medical degrees. The master’s degrees components include social and behavioral determinants of health, health care policy, health economics, management science, biomedical informatics, systems engineering and value principles of health care.

Mayo Medical School enrolls 50 medical students each year. It received 4,327 applications for those spots last year. The Arizona expansion will allow additional students to enroll. The medical school is integrated with medical practice and research at Mayo Clinic.

Health Insurance

AZ Isotopes bringing jobs to Goodyear

AZ Isotopes has selected the city of Goodyear as the site for a state-of-the-art facility which will improve the diagnosis and treatment of serious diseases. By producing several  medical isotopes that are either not currently available or difficult to obtain in Arizona, the Goodyear facility will support health care by giving physicians and their patients the most modern tools for diagnoses and treatments as well as research towards  improving medical outcomes.

Construction and operation of the facility also will result in high-quality jobs.  Initially, about 50 technical and managerial professionals will be employed.  As demand for the isotopes and the research program expands, additional high-quality positions will be added.  Substantial growth can be expected as industry analysts estimate the projected market for medical isotopes at about $6 billion by the year 2018.

Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord is highly supportive.  She stated: “We are excited to bring this new high-tech life sciences enterprise to Goodyear, along with highly skilled professionals and high-paying jobs.  Goodyear has everything companies like AZ Isotopes need to operate and grow their businesses.  We are growing and ready to help accommodate companies like AZ Isotopes to provide jobs and expand our work base.”

The Goodyear-based Western Regional Center for The Cancer Treatment Centers of America is also supporting the city’s efforts to help ensure that the new research and production facility is located nearby. It stated: “Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center (Western) in Goodyear applauds the city’s economic development efforts in healthcare initiatives which lower the nation’s reliance on foreign products.”  Edgar D. Staren, MD, PhD, President and CEO of Western added, “We look forward to a readily available local isotope supply that could support our patient needs.”  Additionally, several major universities (including the University of Arizona) have already expressed interest in taking advantage of the facility’s research capabilities.

The Goodyear location will contain the full spectrum of operations necessary for providing the highest quality support for medical care and research.  Included will be manufacturing, engineering, administrative, sales and executive positions.  AZ Isotopes has assembled an internationally-renowned team of top scientists and physicians to begin site preparation and facility design and construction.

The site for the Goodyear plant is a 10-acre tract along Litchfield Road, north of Maricopa 85 and close to the Phoenix-Goodyear airport.  Because delivery time is critical to the users of medical isotopes, the facility’s proximity to the airport is very fortuitous. AZ Isotopes President and COO David Barshis stated, “Goodyear offers an ideal location for our planned operations, and local government has been extremely helpful in the process expected to provide a key competitive advantage over other isotope manufacturers.”

The heart of the facility is a unique, variable-energy medical cyclotron accelerator capable of producing medical diagnostic imaging and therapeutic isotopes which are not currently available, or have limited availability, from other commercial sources in the U.S.  This facility will join other local cyclotrons supporting various related types of medical treatments in the area. Locally, the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic has already announced plans to construct a facility to house a cyclotron designed specifically to be used for fixed-beam proton therapy at its new $130 million cancer center.  And the Phoenix-based Banner Alzheimer’s Institute is currently replacing its smaller cyclotron with a new unit for production of isotopes that enable detailed brain imaging.

Mayor Elaine Scruggs

Mayo reports strong 2012 performance

Mayo Clinic reports a strong financial performance in 2012 as the Minnesota-based health care provider added more employees and patients.

Mayo reported Wednesday it took in annual revenue of $8.8 billion last year, with expenses of $8.4 billion.

Mayo Clinic has a large presence in three U.S. metropolitan — Rochester, Minn., Jacksonville, Fla., and Scottsdale.

According to the clinic’s annual report, Mayo maintained an operating margin of 4.5 percent which “aligns with the clinic’s long-term objectives” of 4 percent to 6 percent.

The report also aid donations to Mayo dropped for the second year in a row. In 2010, Mayo received nearly $400 million in donations. That dropped to about $320 million in 2011 and about $250 million in 2012.

pharmaceuticals

Arizona bioscience job growth outpaces nation

Arizona’s bioscience sector added jobs at nearly four times the national rate over the past decade and experienced double-digit job growth during the economic recovery, a new report shows.

Since Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was launched in 2002, Arizona’s bioscience jobs have increased by 45 percent to 99,018 in 2011. Nationally, the growth rate during this time was 12 percent. While hospitals dominate Arizona’s bioscience jobs, the state’s non-hospital subsectors grew 14 percent in 2011 alone.  During the economic recovery years of 2009-11, the state’s bioscience jobs increased 11 percent while there was no gain across the state’s private sector.

The new performance analysis of Arizona’s bioscience sector, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, also found that the number of bioscience establishments in Arizona continues to grow faster than the national average and bioscience wages in the state are outpacing those in other private-sector industries.

The 10th-annual study, released Feb. 5 by the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice, did reveal funding challenges for the state.  In 2012, Arizona fell to its lowest venture capital investment level since 2009 and suffered a drop in National Institutes of Health funding while the top-10 funded states advanced.

“Arizona’s bioscience sector continues to significantly outperform the nation in terms of job and establishment growth and has made impressive gains in building a more concentrated industry base,” said Walter Plosila, senior advisor to the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice.  “However, more attention must be paid to academic research performance and venture capital investment to continue the trend in years to come.”

Plosila added that progress has been made over the past decade on all 19 actions recommended by Battelle in 2002, including substantial progress on nine.

The Roadmap was launched in 2002 as a long-range plan to make the state’s bioscience sector globally competitive. The Roadmap was commissioned by the Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation, which committed to 10 years of major funding of Arizona biosciences and formed a network of committees involving statewide experts to implement its recommendations.

There was also a major increase in bioscience establishments, rising 31 percent since 2002 to 892 firms, which is above the national growth rate of 23 percent.

Bioscience jobs in Arizona pay an average salary of $56,328, or 28 percent higher than the $44,098 for all private-sector industries. Since 2002, bioscience salaries have increased 44 percent.

“After 10 years, Arizona has carved a niche in the highly lucrative and competitive biosciences field,” said Martin Shultz, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “We’re one of the nation’s top emerging bioscience states, and our growth in high-wage jobs continued during both good economic times and bad.”

In terms of research dollars, NIH funding in 2012 was $174 million, or 19 percent greater, than the 2002 figure. This is a decrease from $184 million in 2011. While NIH funding, the gold standard for biomedical research funding, did increase slightly faster than the national average of 18 percent over the past decade, Arizona is no longer meeting its goal of obtaining funding at a growth rate higher than the top-10 funded states. In addition, its share of the funding pool remains nearly the same as it was in 2002.

The latest data also shows:
•    The largest non-hospital bioscience subsector continues to be research, testing and medical laboratories. This group now boasts about 8,900 workers across 466 establishments, roughly a 60 percent increase in both employees and firms since 2002. The other subsectors are drugs, pharmaceuticals and diagnostics; hospitals; medical devices and equipment; and agricultural feedstock and chemicals.
•    Venture capital investment was $22 million in 2012, which is the lowest figure since 2009. This was a drop of 68 percent from 2011, compared with a national decline of 49 percent.
•    Bioscience-related academic research and development expenditures at Arizona’s universities reached a record $452 million in 2011, a 55 percent increase since 2002. Arizona’s growth had outpaced the nation until 2009, but now trails the overall U.S. growth rate of 74 percent.
•    Arizona universities spun out seven bioscience companies in 2012. University discoveries have now led to 67 new bioscience startups since 2002 as well as 180 bioscience patents.

There were a number of major developments in 2012 that showed the collaborative nature of Arizona biosciences, including the completion of major projects, the approval of future pursuits, and an emphasis on education.

The University of Arizona opened its new Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus that enabled the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix to increase enrollment and for Northern Arizona University to begin Phoenix-based physician assistant and physical therapy programs. In addition, final approval was granted by the Arizona Board of Regents for the UA Cancer Center-Phoenix to be built on the same campus in partnership with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

A number of incubators and accelerators opened or expanded with more in the planning stages. BioInspire, an incubator for medical-device startups, opened in Peoria; GateWay Community College in Phoenix opened the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation; the Arizona Center for Innovation at the UA Science and Technology Park in Tucson opened upgraded facilities and launched new programming; Flagstaff received funding for a planned accelerator; and the statewide Arizona Furnace accelerator began awarding seed money and access to incubation space.

Among other major developments, the inaugural Arizona SciTech Festival attracted 200,000 participants from across the state during February and March 2012, making it one of the largest in the nation; Banner Alzheimer’s Institute launched a $100 million trial to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease; a new skin-cancer drug first tested by Translational Genomics Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare received expedited approval from the Food and Drug Administration; Arizona State University began leading the first national algae biofuel testbed; Mayo Clinic announced plans for a new cancer center on its north Phoenix campus; and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert announced a $63 million expansion.

On Dec. 4, 2012, the Flinn Foundation and bioscience leaders from across Arizona came together at the Arizona Biltmore to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the launching of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap. The Foundation announced it has committed to continue funding Arizona biosciences and coordinating the Roadmap as it enters its next chapter.

“We recognize this is a long-term pursuit,” said Jack Jewett, president and CEO of the Flinn Foundation. “We will continue to strive to improve the lives of Arizonans today and tomorrow through new medical discoveries, access to clinical trials and the recruitment of top researchers, while also attracting high-wage jobs that will strengthen Arizona’s economy.”

The Flinn Foundation is a Phoenix-based, private, nonprofit philanthropic endowment. It was established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Flinn in 1965 with the mission of improving the quality of life in Arizona to benefit future generations. The nonprofit philanthropy supports the advancement of Arizona’s bioscience sector, the Flinn Scholars program, arts and culture, and the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.

rsz_ec

Main Event Entertainment Buys 6.4 Acres at Tempe's Emerald Center

 

Main Event Entertainment purchased a 6.4-acre retail site in Tempe for $2.05M and will build a new 57,000 SF indoor entertainment venue.

The property is located in Emerald Center near Interstate 10 and Warner Road in Tempe adjacent to IKEA and Dick’s Sporting Goods. Headquartered in Plano, Texas, this will be Main Event’s first building outside of Texas where it has 12 locations.

Construction is expected to start in 2Q 2013. The freestanding building will be located at the NEC of Emerald and Commerce drives and will have more than 400 parking spaces. It lies directly south of a future 74,000 SF retail showroom called Furniture Row that is being planned for 2014. Furniture Row purchased the site in 2011 and the two new buildings will share common parking and easements.

Main Event Entertainment will attract indoor corporate and family events and offers bowling, billiards, laser tag, glow golf, rock climbing, gravity ropes, arcade games along with food and beverage services.

Dan Gardiner and Greg Laing of Phoenix Commercial Advisors represented Main Event Entertainment in the site selection process. Rick Robertson and Chris McClurg of Lee and Associates Arizona represented the seller, First National Bank of Hutchinson, Kan., in the acquisition.

The new building was approved for a use permit by the City of Tempe in June 2012 and is being designed by Hunter Engineering.

customer.service

ASU Center becomes a resource to teach service

Customer service was once viewed as the cost of doing business.

“Across almost every industry, leaders are focusing on service as a way to compete in today’s competitive marketplace,” says Mary Jo Bitner, academic director for the Center for Services Leadership at Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business.

But times have changed. Companies that are in search of new revenue streams are finding that in addition to providing great customer service, offering value-added services to their product lines are helping their bottom lines. And the help them make the most of the opportunities, many are seeking help from the ASU Center, which focuses on research and executive education in managing and marketing services.

“Customer demand and the competitive challenges posed by the commoditization of many products has pushed many goods-based companies to take another look at services as a source of revenue and profit,” says Stephen Brown, director of the Center for Services Leadership, who has spent the past 20 years tracking the growing importance of services as a product. “Many are following market leaders to become goods-and-services companies.”

For example, Boeing has broadened its offerings by adding the lucrative market of services to its aircraft manufacturing. The Hewlett Packard and Compaq merger created a new company whose major product is services. IBM’s impressive financials over the past decade — in shining contrast to its competitors — were largely the result of its service businesses.

“In 2001, we were launching our first fee-based service business,” says Steve Church, president of Avnet Integrated and chief corporate business development and planning officer. “We wanted to offer more services and solutions. We knew a lot, but there was a lot we didn’t know.”

Church says Avnet’s membership in the center — which concentrates on expanding service innovation by combining the latest scientific insights from the academic world with the best of business strategy in the real world — allowed the company to “build a culture of service excellence that focuses on the customer and gives each a great customer experience.”

The Center, which was created in 1985, remains the only one of its kind in the United States, devoted to research and education in the services field.  Its research findings form the foundation of the Center’s executive education program, attended by managers and executives of leading firms.  Member companies include AT&T, Charles Schwab and Co., Ford Motor Company, IBM, Mayo Clinic and others, who sponsor research, fund scholarships, host MBA student teams and participate in executive education.

Many member companies sponsor research that is published in academic journals, and shared at the Center’s executive education forums. Bitner, for example, has been studying the effects of self-service technologies (SST), working with Ford and a major pharmaceutical benefits management company.

“The Center is really a tremendous resource for any company that has a strategy to to improve customer serve or add services to augment its products,” Church says. “We learned that by getting our employees engaged in customer service, we built customer loyalty, it helped us compete, and it enhanced our financial performance.”

customer.service

Help to ease Holiday Shopping Customer-Service Worries

As we approach holiday shopping time, many of us start thinking about long lines, frayed nerves and dealing with frazzled customer-service representatives. However, some companies are now taking the time to turn customer-service interactions into a strong point of competitive difference that makes consumers want to come back for more, especially when price and other considerations are basically equal.

A new program from the Center for Services Leadership at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is designed to help make your service experiences better. It’s also meant to help improve relationships between participating companies and the firms they work with, such as suppliers, distributors and retailers.

“We worked with Honeywell to create a groundbreaking, totally online program aimed at making every single customer-service representative and field service representative completely focused on excellent service,” says Associate Professor Nancy Stephens of the W. P. Carey School of Business, faculty director of the program. “Honeywell Aerospace is the first company to decide to send every one of its customer-oriented representatives – 1,400 people — through the program. They want to make a very visible commitment to customer service, and other companies are looking at the program, too.”

“The partnership that’s come together between the W. P. Carey School’s Center for Services Leadership at ASU and Honeywell has really allowed us to put together a fantastic program that develops the customer-service skills for Honeywell Aerospace employees,” says Adrian Paull, Honeywell vice president for customer and product support.

Honeywell’s first class just graduated from the academy in late October, but the program can be customized by other firms. Some units are already being taken online by employees at other big-name companies.

“All companies have business-to-business relationships they want to nurture,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This new program creates an opportunity for them to really polish their customer-service skills, not only for the general public, but also for those B2B customers.”

The Center for Services Leadership helps well-known firms respond to the challenges faced as services have become a driving force in economies around the world, with less growth happening in products and manufacturing. The center’s member companies include household names like Boeing, FedEx, Honeywell Aerospace, IBM Global Services, Mayo Clinic, PetSmart, Siemens Industries, Southwest Airlines and State Farm Insurance Company.

“The companies looking at this program understand that it offers expertise from the center, including faculty instructors from the Top 30-ranked W. P. Carey School of Business,” says Professor Mary Jo Bitner, executive director of the center. “At the same time, the program is also extremely flexible, since it’s offered online. It allows for standardized training across all of a company’s worldwide locations and the chance for employees anywhere from Dallas to Shanghai to Berlin, to get out of their everyday mindsets and interact with each other and make things better for their customers.”

“Wherever we are in the world, we need to operate within the cultural boundaries of that area and provide customer service that is needed and expected by the people in that area,” says Eileen Barry, a customer support project manager at Honeywell. “The major change that the W. P. Carey School training has provided to me personally and at work each day is to always think of things through the customer’s eyes.”

Some courses in the program include “Listening to the Voice of the Customer,” “Designing Customer-Focused Service Processes,” and “Recovering from Service Failures.” The idea is to make customers happy and to address any customer disappointments with great recovery. Those who complete the program receive a certificate and are eligible for Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from Arizona State University. These units are widely used as a measure of participation in non-credit, professional development courses.

For more information about the Center for Services Leadership or the new program, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu/csl or call (480) 965-6201.

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

MS Society

Corks And Chords To Raise Money For Multiple Sclerosis Society

Cooks and Chords brings community together to celebrate with food and spirits while raising money for the Arizona Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.


Tickets are available for the Arizona Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Cooks and Chords – A Taste for a World Free of MS presented by Mayo Clinic and Express Scripts. The event will be held Saturday, September 15, 2012 at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale.

Chef-prepared dishes paired with delicious spirits and wonderfully-appointed acoustic music will be available for guests to enjoy — as will as a raffle and silent auction. Guests will also enjoy a cooking demonstration from Gabriele Bertaccini of Il Tocco.

Restaurants and sponsors include Mayo Clinic, Barefoot Wine, Aiello’s Salumeria, Sierra Bonita Grill, Charr Burger, Isa’s Pizza and Brio.

Last year, the 5th annual Corks and Chords event raised more than $30,000 to provide programs for people living with multiple sclerosis and fund research toward the cure and treatment of this chronic disease of the central nervous system.

About Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis interrupts the flow of information from the brain to the body and stops people from moving. Every hour in the United States, someone is newly diagnosed with MS, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with more than twice as many women as men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 400,000 people in the U.S., and 2.5 million worldwide.

About the National Multiple Sclerosis Society
The National Multiple Sclerosis Society helps each person address the challenges of living with MS through its 50 state network of chapters. It funds more MS research, provides more services to people with MS, offers more professional education and further more advocacy efforts than any other MS organization in the world. For more information about the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, visit nationalmssociety.org.

Sponsorships and tickets for the event are available for purchase, a portion of which is tax-deductible.

To buy tickets or for more information about the MS Society or the Corks and Chords event, visit ArizonaMS.org or visit the event page, respectively. You can also call the Arizona Chapter at (480) 455-3958.

ms

Cooks and Chords raises money for MS

Tickets are available for the Arizona Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Cooks and Chords –A Taste for a World Free of MS presented by Mayo Clinic and Express Scripts. The event will be held Saturday, September 15, 2012 at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale. Guests will enjoy stations of chef-prepared dishes paired with delicious spirits and wonderfully-appointed acoustic music will tantalize guests as they browse packages in our raffle and silent auction.

Restaurants and sponsors include Mayo Clinic, Barefoot Wine, Aiello’s Salumeria, Sierra Bonita Grill, Charr Burger, Isa’s Pizza and Brio. Guests will also enjoy a cooking demonstration from Gabriele Bertaccini of Il Tocco.

Last year the 5th annual Corks and Chords event raised more than $30,000 to provide programs for people living with MS and fund research towards the cure and treatment of this chronic disease of the central nervous system.

Sponsorships and tickets for the event are available for purchase, a portion of which is tax-deductible. To buy tickets or for more information, visit www.ArizonaMS.org  or call the Arizona Chapter at (480) 455-3958.

Multiple sclerosis interrupts the flow of information from the brain to the body and stops people from moving.  Every hour in the United States, someone is newly diagnosed with MS, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with more than twice as many women as men being diagnosed with the disease.  MS affects more than 400,000 people in the U.S., and 2.5 million worldwide.

john wayne cancer foundation give grant

Valley Group Gets John Wayne Cancer Foundation Grant

The John Wayne Cancer Foundation (JWCF) has awarded a major grant to the Arizona Myeloma Network (AzMN) to support the organization’s 5th Annual Navajo Nation Cancer Awareness and Advocacy Conference. This is the fifth year the JWCF has awarded a grant to AZMN. This free conference will be held at the Navajo Nation Museum in Window Rock, AZ on Saturday, June 23, 2012 from 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided, and 6 CME/CEU credits will be available for healthcare professionals who are attending this outstanding cancer education event.

“The John Wayne Cancer Foundation has been committed to our cancer conference from the beginning,” states AzMN President Barbara Kavanagh. “Support from JWCF, in addition to other key sponsors, is what allows us to present programs for cancer education and awareness to the Navajo Nation each year. Our work is helping to change the way cancer is perceived on the Navajo Nation. People are now openly discussing cancer, and learning that early detection and treatment is available and effective.” Many hundreds of cancer survivors, families, caregivers and healthcare providers have traveled from all 4 Corners of the Navajo Nation – Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado, to learn and to share their cancer journey.

A grant from the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Phoenix Chapter, in 2008 made it possible for AzMN to start the Diné Women Helping Women (DWHW) program, which has trained over 50 women and men to give presentations about cancer prevention, early detection, screening and mammograms on the Navajo Nation. The DWHW program is coordinated by Jacquelyn Arviso, a Navajo woman who first volunteered for DWHW after her grandmother passed away from breast cancer.

“I came to a meeting, listened to the possibilities of what an outreach program would do for the community, and immediately decided that this was something we needed for our people. There was nothing like Diné Women Helping Women on the Navajo Reservation, and to get support, training and to be able to educate our people was something that I had to be a part of,” she states.

Jacquelyn works closely with AzMN, as well as local resources: Davina Segay, Navajo Health Educator, and Dr. Patricia Lowery, Surgeon, and Gail Oglesbee, RN and Cancer Case Manager, both with the Fort Defiance Indian Hospital, among others. “The DWHW volunteers set up information booths at community health fairs, rodeos, Chapter houses and also do presentations in work settings,” says Arviso.

The Conference faculty includes cancer researchers and leaders from the Mayo Clinic, AZ Cancer Center, NAU, and Fort Defiance Indian Hospital, as well as traditional healers, and health educators. Key sponsors include: Fry’s Food Stores, Delta Dental of Arizona Foundation, Millennium Pharmaceutical, Sanofi-Aventis, Chevron Mining, the Leukemia Lymphoma Society (LLS), and the John C. Lincoln Hospital/Young Cancer Survivors program, among others.

For more information on the John Wayne Cancer Foundation, visit John Wayne Cancer Foundation’s website at teamduke.org. For information on Arizona Myeloma Network, go to azmyelomanetwork.org

ASU Students

ASU Students: Large Enrollment, Campuses And Dreams

Attending a school with four campuses, 250 undergraduate programs and nearly 72,000 students enrolled, Arizona State University students aren’t finding it difficult to stick out from the crowd. In fact, they are proving countless ways to be innovative, distinct and professionally developed.

ASU has provided its student body with opportunities to take their education to a different level: to their careers, bringing their future dream jobs to the present.

Take ASU student Frank Kyle Robertson, for example. He’s a third-year law student, looking to graduate with a Juris Doctorate (J.D). Earlier this year, however, on January 24, he went from being a student of law to arguing a case before Arizona’s highest court.

He represented the Homeowner Advocacy Unit at ASU’s law school, Southern Arizona Legal Aid and Jean Braucher, a law professor at the University of Arizona.

Robertson was extremely interested in this case and spent much time and effort during winter break towards research of the case. And his professors appreciated his interest and, in turn, invested in him and his professional development.

Robert says that the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law “offers a large number of real-world opportunities that are very helpful in preparing to practice law.” The law school also offers 10 clinical programs, moot court competitions and litigation-focused classes.

The Biomedical Engineering Department also offers opportunities for ASU students. Through its undergraduate program, students must undergo the design process of medical technologies in its entirety: designing, testing, customer research, FDA regulations and, finally, production.

In fact, the current undergraduate senior class is working on projects that have great potential. Edgar Sanchez, a senior graduating in May of this year, is working on an electrode-based device that he will code to make readings of antibodies and antigens. This device is innovative in its portability and size. Currently, electrodes are used to input to a much larger reading device; however, Sanchez’s project will allow for the electrodes to do the readings themselves.

His colleague, Madeline Grade, has also been recognized by Mayo Clinic and other research centers for her work on epilepsy. She, along with her professor Leon Jassemidis, has worked on the development of seizure predictions. Eventually, a device will be created that will warn an epileptic of a seizure hours before it actually occurs.

Dr. Vincent Pizziconi, the instructor of the senior capstone design course, says that ASU students at the biomedical engineering department are pushed to “realize their potential in the world of global health. Students are being trained to develop medical devices…” and provide them to those who live in places lacking resources.

As he works with students at the multimillion-dollar design facility at the Tempe campus, journalism professors and professionals at the Downtown Phoenix campus are working with their students to produce news pieces of national and international impact.

ASU student journalists have been awarded some of the nation’s most prestigious awards and recognized by the Associated Press TV-Radio Association, the Broadcast Education Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

Be it in the fields of law, biotechnologies, journalism or otherwise, ASU students are finding it accessible to further both their education and their careers.

For more information about ASU and ASU students, visit asu.edu.