Tag Archives: mba

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Ranks No. 2 in the Nation

Online degree programs are skyrocketing in popularity, and if you’re looking for an online MBA or other graduate degree, then the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is an excellent choice. For the second year in a row, U.S. News & World Report ranks the school No. 2 nationwide on its list of “Best Online Graduate Business Programs.”

“Increasingly, people want the convenience of an online degree, but they don’t want to sacrifice the high quality of a recognized, top university,” explains Amy Hillman, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “With the W. P. Carey School, you get the best of both worlds: the flexibility of an online format and the same stellar faculty members who teach in our other highly ranked graduate programs. The W. P. Carey School was one of the first highly respected business schools to launch online degrees more than a decade ago, and we use in-house course designers specializing solely in business classes.”

U.S. News & World Report already ranks the W. P. Carey School’s undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs among the Top 30 in the nation in their categories. This new ranking covers both the W. P. Carey School’s popular online MBA program and its online Master of Science in Information Management (MSIM) program. The list is based on student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology.

“Students serving in the military, starting their own businesses, and traveling extensively for their jobs are among those who have chosen our online graduate business programs,” says Stacey Whitecotton, senior associate dean for W. P. Carey School graduate programs. “Participants have a dedicated financial aid specialist and a career center for those who want help with job searches.”

Again, the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program garnered a No. 2 ranking last year, too. Among those who have completed the program: NFL Pro Bowl kicker Billy Cundiff and Lt. Col. Scott Coulson — a recipient of the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and a Combat Action Badge for his service in Iraq — who completed his degree while serving in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

The 21-month MBA program allows students to meet at a face-to-face orientation just once at the ASU campus, then complete the rest of the courses online. Students work in small, personalized teams with peers from other industries, focusing on one course at a time. This is also one of the few online MBA programs in which students can earn their degrees with an area of emphasis, such as finance, international business, marketing or supply chain management.

The 16-month online MSIM program just launched in 2012 and is already drawing praise from those in the fast-growing information technology (IT) field. The degree is designed to provide professionals in any career area with a well-rounded education in IT and explain how they can apply that knowledge to their companies overall. American Express, Intel Corporation, Mayo Clinic and US Airways are among the companies that send students to the school’s MSIM programs. The W. P. Carey School’s MSIM programs have an exceptionally high retention rate, thanks to efforts by the world-class faculty and collaborative-learning training for students during orientation.

The W. P. Carey School also offers a weekend/online hybrid MBA and will launch an online version of its master’s program in business analytics (“big data”) this fall. All of the school’s online programs include small class sizes and comprehensive online-learning technologies that are easy to use. For more information, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.

Amy Hillman - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Amy Hillman – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Amy Hillman – Dean, W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University

Hillman, a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher, took over as dean of the W. P. Carey School on March 1. Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report.

Surprising fact: “One of my earliest executive education experiences was helping give tools to Czech professors to train managers in their country after the Berlin Wall came down.”

Biggest challenge: “Managing dual careers, since my husband is also an academic. We commuted long distance and traded off ideal positions. We both couldn’t be happier at ASU.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Lynne Herndon - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Lynne Herndon – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Lynne Herndon – Phoenix city president, BBVA Compass Bank

Herndon, who has worked in the banking industry for roughly 25 years, oversees the business lending activities in Phoenix for commercial lending and commercial real estate lending, including treasury management and deposits. Total loans outstanding under management are $950 million. Herndon also serves as the 2012-2013 chairman of the board of directors for the Arizona Bankers Association (AzBA). She earned her bachelor’s degree and MBA from the University of Alabama.

Surprising fact: “I love rock ’n’ roll music and I go to about 20 concerts a year.”

Biggest challenge: “Keeping the sales team motivated during the 2008 downturn was challenging. Frequent communication as well as positive feedback for good work was critical.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Mara Aspinal - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Mara Aspinal – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Mara AspinalPresident and CEO, Ventana Medical Systems

Aspinal, who holds an MBA from Harvard, joined Ventana as president and CEO in 2011. She founded the European Personalized Medicine Association and advised the Obama and Bush administrations on diagnostics and genomics.

Surprising fact: “I will attend any live sporting event – from baseball to rodeo – any chance I get.”

Biggest challenge: “My approach to my first leadership role in manufacturing was that I asked lots of questions, studied our business vs. competitors and put a strong team in place. In three years, we turned the business around and had the industry’s best profit margins. The lesson for me is not to be afraid of new challenges, take the time to learn and then trust the data alongside your gut.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Kitty_Plumbing_02

Maloney-Langmade becomes leader of men

There are not many people in the world who can say they are a licensed plumber, have an MBA in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, and are a mother to three daughters, ages 7, 11 and 12.

Kathryn “Kitty” Maloney-Langmade can make those claims.

The president of W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling leads a vibrant plumbing contracting company in a male-dominated industry. Some of her company’s recent projects include the new Chicago Cubs spring training complex in Mesa, the Veteran’s Administration Southeast Healthcare Clinic in Gilbert, Phase IV of CityScape Phoenix, a major solar thermal project at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and the Sky Train Project at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Az Business magazine caught up with Maloney-Langmade — whose company won consecutive Best of the Best Awards for safety from SCF Arizona — for a Q&A.

How did you get into the plumbing business?
My father and mother started W.J. Maloney Plumbing in 1964.  I grew up in and around the business. My dad was always working in the field and my mother performed the bookkeeping. Upon returning from my honeymoon, I learned my mother’s secretary had left the company.  My mother asked me to come to the plumbing shop to help her out with payroll and I never left.

Are there any aspects of the industry that are made more difficult because you are a woman?
Growing up, I always heard and learned about construction but I was not in the field with my father.  Often times, I wish I had the mechanical, hands-on expertise and years of experience that my father had.  To carry on his tradition of quality workmanship, I have had to surround myself with key people who have the same mechanical skill that he possessed.

Are there any benefits to being a woman in a male-dominated industry?
My experience is that both men and women in construction go out of their way to be supportive, kind, courteous and helpful.  People want me to succeed.  They know construction is a tough road.  I am lucky to have received good advice and help.

What has been your biggest challenge?
Turning the company around during difficult times.  We were in a pattern of winning work and doing jobs, but were losing money. Meeting and listening to my key foremen who have been with the company for years, I was able to learn and understand changes that needed to happen. I was able to get the company moving in the right direction when I put together a solid leadership team.  We are now able to estimate, win and perform good work.  We have a great team in place now and the momentum continues to build and grow.

Amy-Hillman

New Carey School Dean Takes Over

One of the top business schools in the nation will have a new dean at the helm, starting tomorrow. Current Executive Dean Amy Hillman — a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher — will take over as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, effective March 1.

Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report. She is outlining a clear vision for the future.

“We’re going to keep advancing what we do to help our students achieve career and life successes,” says Hillman, who has played a key role in the growth of the school in her four years as second-in-command/executive dean. “Our world-class faculty is full of researchers who teach cutting-edge skills. We want to use this knowledge and our excellent position in a major metropolitan area (the Phoenix area) to help support the business world. We plan to broaden and deepen our business partnerships to become a ‘go-to’ place for firms to come to advance their work force and get help with real-life projects. We’re also going to focus on providing even more value and connections throughout the world for our vast 80,000-plus alumni network.”

Hillman never had dreams of academia when she was younger. She actually got her MBA on evenings and weekends, while striving to improve as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business. However, several of her professors had such a profound influence on her that she realized she’d rather teach others about business than stay in her current job.

“As both an undergraduate and graduate student, I had individual faculty members who had a huge influence on my life,” says Hillman, who has been recognized with outstanding teaching awards every place she has worked. “I felt a sense that if I could make a difference for one student, like these faculty members did for me, then I would personally feel more accomplished than I did in the corporate world.”

Hillman has already made a clear mark on the W. P. Carey School in her decade-plus on the faculty as a management professor. She has championed entrepreneurship projects through the Spirit of Enterprise Center and helped to expand the school’s degree offerings to allow access to more students. (The school’s current total is more than 10,000 students). Recently, she was instrumental in the school introducing several new specialized master’s degrees to help undergraduates from other fields combine their passions with a solid business foundation. These include nine-month master’s programs in management and business analytics.

“I love ASU, and this opportunity to be a leader here, at a place that I love, is a real privilege,” says Hillman. “This is especially significant, since this year is the 10th anniversary of the gift from businessman/philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey that gave the school its name. We’ve come so far, thanks to this transformative gift, and we plan to go even further over the next 10 years.”

Hillman will preside over the opening of the new 129,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art McCord Hall this summer. The building will complement the two existing business-school structures, providing more classrooms for graduate and undergraduate honors students, technologically advanced team study rooms, a new career center, world-class conference facilities and outdoor assembly areas.

“This is a chance for us to really advance the science and culture of learning business,” says Hillman. “The way the building is set up, it will actually help our students to develop teamwork, communication and critical thinking skills.”

Hillman is also a strong supporter of the school’s research efforts. She is a renowned researcher in management, focusing on boards of directors, corporate political strategies, and how links between firms and their external contingencies improve financial performance. Her work has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report, among other venues. The journal Technovation recently ranked the W. P. Carey School No. 1 among all business schools worldwide for authoring research in the Top 45 academic business journals with the most global impact.

“What makes this school special, though, is the people,” says Hillman. “The faculty, staff and students are so amazing, supportive and encouraging of each other. At some older, established schools, there is a sense of complacency. The W. P. Carey School is like a nimble entrepreneur, seeking to constantly improve. That feeling permeates our culture, helping us to transform and advance lives, the school and the business world.”

Hillman takes over for current dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who is semi-retiring after 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the prestigious Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an experienced business co-founder, a board member of three public companies and author of two business books. He will continue to serve at ASU as an adviser to the president and provost, as well as work on a project focused on the business and technical issues facing electric utilities in the future.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business and its programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

education.business

W. P. Carey School Offers New Scholarship Program

If you’ve ever thought about going back to school to try to advance your career and make more money, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University offers some of the best values in education. In particular, its full-time MBA program has consistently been recognized as one of the best in the nation for “return on investment.” Recently, the school announced it’s adding a new scholarship program to make it even easier for some of the best students in the country to get an MBA through that program.

“We recently introduced the Wm. Polk Carey Memorial Scholarship Fund to help successful applicants for the full-time MBA program cover the costs of education,” says Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Last year, Bloomberg Businessweek ranked our full-time MBA program among the Top 20 in the world and the Top 10 in the U. S. for ‘return on investment,’ indicating superb value. However, we still wanted to push even further to help more deserving students access a highly ranked MBA program.”

The Bloomberg Businessweek article pointed out that students completing the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program could see an annual pay increase of about $40,000. It also indicated that it would likely take less than five years for a W. P. Carey full-time MBA student to recoup all the costs of getting an MBA, including the salary the student gives up to go back to school full-time.

The school’s full-time MBA program is known for high quality. It is currently ranked among the Top 30 “Best Graduate Schools” for business in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. It was one of the two least expensive programs in the entire Top 30 this year. In addition, it’s recognized for its personalized feel, with small class sizes. Students can specialize in multiple areas of emphasis, including finance and supply chain management, a field in which the W. P. Carey School consistently ranks Top 10 in the nation. This year, 89 percent of the school’s full-time MBA students were employed within 90 days of graduation.

The new scholarship fund is named after the school’s benefactor, real estate investor and acclaimed philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey, who donated $50 million to the school in 2002/2003. Carey passed away in January, but his generosity continues to be felt by students. Now, every applicant to the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program will be considered for the scholarship money, which could completely cover the program’s costs for the very best students. No additional application is required.

For more information on W. P. Carey MBA programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu/mba.

carollo engineering young engineer honor

Valley Woman From Carollo Engineers Earns ‘Young Engineer’ Honor

Jessica Dresang, project manager at Carollo Engineers, has been named the 2012 Outstanding Young Engineer, an honor that acknowledges Arizona engineers who are 35 years of age or younger and have already made outstanding contributions to the profession, society and their communities. The award was presented during the National Engineers Week in Phoenix on February 23.

Dresang earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Arizona and an MBA in Business Administration at Arizona State University. She began her career at Malcolm Pirnie, Inc. in 2002, where she worked for nine years as a Senior Project Engineer/Project Manager before moving to Carollo.

Dresang has been with Carollo Engineers since January 2012, where she is involved with projects including the Pascua Yaqui Tribe Water Reclamation Facility, a greenfield 0.5 MGD facility expandable to 3.0 MGD, which will serve the community and provide reclaimed water to the new Sewailo Golf Course. She also recently completed several water and wastewater-related projects for the City of Goodyear.

“I was extremely surprised to be nominated,” says Dresang. “I am passionate about my work in protecting public health, involving young people in science and engineering education and fighting hunger and homelessness. I feel very honored to be recognized for these things in front of my peers.”

Dresang’s longtime involvement with key industry organizations has also contributed to her recent award. Since 1998, she has belonged to the Society of Women Engineers, holding leadership positions for six terms and, most recently, the title of president of the Phoenix Section. Jessica is also a participating author for three publications.

In addition to Dresang’s professional accolades, she is also highly engaged in civic and humanitarian efforts, including Canstruction, Habitat for Humanity, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer and Race for the Cure. She has also made important societal contributions while employed as an environmental engineer, all of which helped provide the public with clean drinking water and safe treatment of wastewater.

For more information on Carollo Engineers, visit Carollo’s website at carollo.com.

carey school - graduate

More Than 2,000 Will Graduate From W. P. Carey School

More than 2,000 students will graduate from Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business next week. This is one of the biggest graduation classes ever for the school, known as one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the country. The president of the Phoenix Suns, a group of executives flying in from China, and a student who already started a nonprofit to help foster teens will be part of the ceremonies.

“We have another fantastic graduating class this year,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “These students exemplify why our undergraduate, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs are all ranked Top 30 by U.S. News & World Report. It’s another batch of high achievers.”

The school’s graduate-level convocation will include more than 900 students, most of them receiving MBAs, but others getting master’s degrees in accountancy, tax, information management, real estate development and health systems management. The event will be held Friday, May 4 at 5 p.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe. The featured speaker will be Brad Casper, president of the Phoenix Suns basketball team, who is known for his community involvement and heavy focus on area schools.

In addition, about 20 of the 120 executives graduating from the school’s executive MBA program in Shanghai are traveling to Phoenix to participate in the Tempe ceremony. The Shanghai program educates some of the highest-level business and government leaders in China and is currently ranked among the Top 20 executive MBA programs in the world by the Financial Times, Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. Past students have included the CEOs of Baosteel and Shanghai Electric, three vice governors of China’s major provinces, six city mayors, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange, several bank chairmen and the chairman of Shanghai Airlines.

At the undergraduate level, more than 1,100 students are eligible to walk the stage, and more than a dozen different types of business degrees will be awarded. The undergraduate convocation is set for Thursday, May 3 at 8 a.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena. The main speaker will be Chris Spinella, chief executive officer of Apriva, which develops and advances smart-card technology and wireless applications for payment processing and secure mobile communications.

The graduates at this ceremony will include the winner of the spring 2012 Turken Family Outstanding Graduating Senior Award, Christos Makridis. He co-founded the Quanta Foundation LLC, an educational services company that connects high school students with high-profile university projects to produce research and multimedia materials. Makridis is also a McCord Scholar, an economics teaching assistant, chairman of the business school’s Dean’s Advisory Council and editor in chief of an international undergraduate-research journal on science policy at ASU.

Another finalist for the Turken Family award, Priya Nathan, co-founded a nonprofit to benefit young people. Partnered for Success helps foster and orphan youth successfully transition out of the foster care system in the Phoenix area. The program has been recognized by Fast Company magazine and was selected as an ASU Innovation Challenge grant winner twice.

“Many of these graduates are already making their mark well beyond the classroom,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Executive Dean Amy Hillman. “We have students who are small-business owners, working moms, members of the military and lots of others already making us proud. We look forward to their continued success.”

For more information on W. P. Carey School of Business, visit W. P. Carey School of Business’ website at wpcarey.asu.edu.