Tag Archives: medical

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MJ Insurance reports record revenue

MJ Insurance, one of the nation’s largest privately-held insurance agencies, has reported double digit year-over-year growth with an 11 percent increase across all business lines. The agency also reported record all-time high revenues of $25 million.

MJ’s fiscal year runs from September to September and for fiscal 2013, MJ saw solid growth in both employee benefits and in property and casualty revenues. Even as the economy has struggled, MJ has recorded strong revenue gains over the past five years.

Michael H. Bill, CEO of MJ Insurance, attributes the growth and record revenue to continued investment through the economic downturn in both employees and value-added services for clients.

“Our approach is to align our efforts with clients that emphasize value and this has proven beneficial as the economy has improved,” said Bill. “Challenges brought forth with health care reform have also allowed us to help guide businesses through this historic change.”

MJ Insurance, with offices in Indiana and Arizona, is a property-casualty and employee benefits agency that, since 1964, has grown from a two-person start-up to an agency with more than 125 employees. In 2014, MJ will celebrate its 50th ‘golden’ anniversary.

MJ Insurance specializes in a diverse selection of unique service lines including construction, energy, transportation, real estate, manufacturing, sororities and mining. MJ also offers complete employee benefits programs including major medical, group disability, group life and onsite employer clinics. MJ Insurance currently has clients in 16 countries and in every U.S. state.

The Crowne Plaza San Marcos Resort

Colliers International Leasing Historic Speakeasy Space at Crowne Plaza San Marcos

The Crowne Plaza San Marcos Resort is bringing forward a portion of its historic property for commercial lease for the first time in more than 15 years.

The San Marcos Resort opened in 1913 to much fanfare and served as a playground for the rich and famous. With Arizona’s first grass golf course, it played host to the likes of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eerol Flynn and other luminaries. In the 1970s, the San Marcos transformed into a hip destination that attracted Hollywood elite.

“This is a rare opportunity for businesses looking to enter this market,” said Teri Killgore, downtown redevelopment manager at City of Chandler. “It doesn’t get much more unique than an historic speakeasy, or 7,000 square feet on the first floor, so I can’t wait to see what comes to fruition.”

The resort is currently undergoing a multi-million dollar renovation to its hotel and meeting space to create a modern property with nods to its historic roots. The work is expected to be completed this fall in time for the resort’s 100th anniversary.

The owner is open to subdivision of the space and is leasing 7,068 square feet of first floor space, as well as the 2,800 square foot historic speakeasy space located in the basement. The location is near the popular San Tan Brewery and surrounded by free parking and steady walk-by traffic.

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National Bank of Arizona adds medical banking services

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announces the addition of premium, specialized banking services specifically for physicians, to accommodate the bank’s growing niche of medical banking clients. This specialty and expansion will be led by seasoned NB|AZ banker, Suzy Powell, and recent hire, Paula Wichterman.

The new specialty provides an opportunity for local medical professionals to access banking services and benefits, offered exclusively at NB|AZ. The elite program includes premium pricing on interest-bearing accounts, convenient one-on-one personalized service at home or at the office, expedited responses to all banking and loan requests, and a unique home financing program.

“At National Bank of Arizona, we believe that our specialized loan program for physicians is a great opportunity for doctors to purchase or refinance their primary residence and take advantage of these record low interest rates,” said Paula Wichterman, vice president of National Bank of Arizona’s Medical Private Banking Division. “An added benefit is that NB|AZ provides physicians with concierge style banking by a dedicated relationship manager who can work around their busy schedules to ensure their loan and banking needs are met.”

As a vice president in the private banking sector, Wichterman is responsible for increasing NB|AZ’s focus on the physician banking market, in addition to contributing to NB|AZ’s overall strategy, growth and performance. With the goal of generating awareness of the bank’s new offering, NB|AZ has made an effort to partner with local medical associations and groups in several philanthropic endeavors. Prior to joining NB|AZ, Paula spent nine years in various advisor roles for two national banks.

“The medical professionals in our state are tasked with the important job of keeping our friends and families healthy, and shouldn’t be burdened with the strain of navigating financial services that are not tailored to their individual needs,” said Suzy Powell, vice president of National Bank of Arizona’s Medical Executive Banking Division. “We have specialized the integrated, personal approach to banking at NB|AZ to fit with the unique needs of these clients. We’re proud to support their long-term wealth management goals, guiding financial success from behind the scenes.”

banner health verrado - AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Medical: Banner Health Verrado

Banner Health Verrado

Developer: Banner Health
General Contractor: McCarthy Building Companies
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Location: NWC of I-10 and Verrado Way, Buckeye
Size: 12,566 SF
The $4.5M freestanding outpatient clinic is the first project of a master plan for an acute care campus on the Greenfield site in Buckeye. Subcontractors include Midstate Mechanical, S&H Steel, Echo Canyon Electrical, Iron Tree Plumbing and Brothers Masonry. Expected completion is 3Q 2012.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Kitchell, Orcutt | Winslow Picked to Design and Build New Patient Tower

Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow have been selected to design and construct a new patient tower at Chandler Regional Medical Center, a member of Catholic Healthcare West (CHW). This project will expand capacity, enhance key service lines, and drive new office and medical development in the East Valley.

The five-story inpatient tower is anticipated to remove capacity constraints with the addition of 96 in-patient beds. Site work on the $125 million project begins this month with vertical construction of the tower scheduled to begin in November 2012. At the peak of construction it is estimated that the project will have a workforce of more than 200. It is expected to be complete by fall 2014.

 “We are confident that this expansion will help meet the needs of the community by allowing us to develop new healthcare services and expand existing ones,” said Patty White, president and CEO, Chandler Regional Medical Center.

The expansion will accommodate the hospital’s emergency and medical-surgical services, with 32 intensive care and private cardiovascular intensive care rooms, 64 telemetry and medical-surgical beds, six additional operating suites, ancillary support and infrastructure including a second helipad, chapel, kitchen and dining area, central plant and 275 parking spaces. The addition of 96 in-patient care beds will bring the hospital’s total bed count to 339.

The hospital leadership team hopes to add incremental capacity in order to continue providing for the healthcare needs of this growing community. The patient tower follows a recently completed $10 million cardiovascular department expansion, also built by the team of Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow, including two cardiac catheterization laboratories, an additional nine-bed pre/post cardiac short stay unit and ancillary support infrastructure.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship with Chandler Regional, further expanding our portfolio of Catholic Healthcare West projects,” said Kitchell Healthcare Division Manager Steve Whitworth. “With our vast healthcare experience, hospital clients benefit from the innovations and efficiencies we’ve created on other projects.”

To learn more about Chandler Regional, please visit ChandlerRegional.org.

 

UA Cancer Center

Medical: University of Arizona Cancer Center


UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA CANCER CENTER

Developer: City of Phoenix
General contractor: Hensel Phelps
Architect: ZGF Architects
Location: NWC of Seventh and Fillmore streets, Phoenix
Size: 250,000 SF

The $135M, 6-story UA Cancer Center will be the latest addition to Downtown Phoenix’s Biomedical Campus. UA will partner with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and provide inpatient care and clinical operations. Expected start and completion dates: 4Q 2011 to 1Q 2014.

AZRE Magazine, September/October 2011
Banner Health Center Maricopa, AZRE July/August 2011

Medical: Banner Health Center – Maricopa


BANNER HEALTH CENTER – MARICOPA

Developer: Banner Health
General contractor: DPR
Architect: SmithGroup
Location: SWC of Alan Stephens Parkway and Porter Rd., Maricopa
Size: 40,000 SF (Phase I)

The $17.2M Banner Health Center will be located at The Wells retail center. It will be built in phases that will allow the center to expand to more than 80,000 SF. Phase I will build-out more than 40,000 SF with space for 18 physicians and ancillary services such as X-rays and lab services. Completion is expected by 2Q 2012.


AZRE Magazine July/August 2011
St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center - Best of the Best Awards 2009 presented by Ranking Arizona

Best of the Best Awards 2009: Healthcare

Healthcare Honoree: Acute Care Hospitals: 325 beds or more

St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center - Best of the Best Awards 2009 presented by Ranking Arizona

Photograph by Duane Darling

The largest hospital in Arizona, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is known for excellent patient care, medical education and research. The hospital offers a wide range of services to treat the most severely ill and injured in the community. St. Joseph’s is home to the Barrow Neurological Institute, which is annually recognized as one of the top 10 neuroscience centers in the nation; St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center, the state’s second-largest provider of pediatric specialty services; the Heart & Lung Institute, which focuses on the prevention, treatment and research of cardiac and pulmonary disease; and St. Joseph’s Trauma Center, the only Level 1 trauma center in Arizona that is verified by the American College of Surgeons..

The Sisters of Mercy established St. Joseph’s, the Valley’s first hospital, in 1895 to serve the needs of the community. More than a century later, St. Joseph’s remains dedicated to meeting those needs and to continuing tthe sisters’ mission to help the underserved.

350 W. Thomas Road, Phoenix
602-406-3000
www.stjosephs-phx.com

Year Est: 1895 Beds: 743
Principal(s): Linda Hunt
Physicians: 1,500


Healthcare Finalist: Acute Care Hospitals: 200-324 beds

Chandler Regional Medical Center

Chandler Regional Medical Center has grown by leaps and bounds, establishing itself as a new type of community hospital, one that provides a unique balance of personal care and advanced medicine for fastgrowing communities with various needs. With 225 beds and a medical staff of 768 in all major specialties, its Centers of Excellence include a heart and vascular center, a maternal/child department, emergency services, a cancer center, and several urgent care centers that are located throughout most major East Valley cities.

475 S. Dobson Road, Chandler
480-728-3000
www.chandlerregional.org


Healthcare Finalist: Health & Fitness

Gainey Village Health Club & Spa

In 1999, DMB Sports Clubs added Gainey Village Health Club and Spa to its portfolio of exclusive health clubs. This 77,000-squarefoot, state-of-the-art private club is an exceptional facility that provides endless amenities. Gainey’s success is attributed not only to its unique amenities and customer service, but also to its warm, caring employees who strive to build lasting relationships with their members. With a world-class, 25-room day spa, two outdoor pools and a full-service cafe, members can come to the club to spend a day relaxing with friends or participating in the many fitness programs.

7477 E. Doubletree Ranch Road, Scottsdale
480-609-6979
www.villageclubs.com


Best of the Best Awards 2009 presented by Ranking Arizona

At your service 2008

At Your Service

By Kerry Duff

When Margret Thomas of Tucson was suffering from an agonizing headache in the middle of the night, her husband, Harold, called their primary care physician on his cell phone. The doctor met them at the hospital and an hour later she was in surgery having a brain aneurysm removed. Without the surgery, Margret would have died.

The Thomases were able to reach their doctor after hours because they contract directly with Dr. Steven D. Knope, an internist and sports medicine expert in Tucson, for concierge medical care. The couple pays him an annual out-of-pocket fee in exchange for personalized medical services such as 24/7 accessibility by beeper or cell phone and house calls.

“My wife and I can’t live without Dr. Knope,” says 76-year-old Harold. “Whether we’re at home in Tucson, Cincinnati or somewhere else, we can call him day or night and he gets back to us in 10 minutes or less. That’s worth a lot to us. A concierge doctor is like having insurance.”

your_service 2008

Knope has been a concierge physician in the Tucson area for eight years. He has 125 patients that pay $6,000, or $10,000 per couple for concierge care. The fee includes a two-hour comprehensive physical, stress test, full cancer screening, health and fitness consultation and a personalized exercise and nutrition program. The doctor also accompanies patients to see specialists, and if they are hospitalized, he is the attending physician at the hospital — not a hospitalist who is unfamiliar with their health care, he says.

“Concierge medicine is very much patient driven,” Knope says. “Patients want a different model of care today and they’re willing to pay for it. The difference between concierge medicine and fast-food medicine is that the concierge doctor has time to perform correctly. If a doctor only has seven minutes to deal with a complex patient, he can only do so much. Doctors need time with their patients to do a good job.”

Scottsdale internist and geriatric physician, Scott Bernstein, converted his 2,000-patient practice to concierge medicine in July. What pushed him in that direction, he says, were Medicare constraints and the rising costs of running his practice.

“I was being squeezed from both ends,” Bernstein admits. “Now my patients and I contract directly without the constraints of the Medicare program. I can see patients the same day they call and I have time to provide the type of care they need and I want to provide. I can also do house calls and telephone appointments, which are not covered by Medicare.”

Bernstein sent a letter to his patients in April to let them know he was converting to concierge medicine. Since then, more than 200 people have joined the practice and agreed to pay his $2,000 annual fee.

“It was very bold to make this kind of change after working so hard for 12 years to build my practice,” he says. “I had to say goodbye to 80 percent of my patients and that was scary. But now I couldn’t be more thrilled. I give my patients the time and care they need, and most nights I have dinner with my family, which never happened before.”

Douglas Liebman of Scottsdale, a longtime patient of Dr. Bernstein’s, says he fully supports this type of care, but had to carefully weigh the costs before making a decision.

“I had to think about this carefully because I already have a $2,500 annual payout to Blue Cross Blue Shield,” Liebman says. “But then I realized that staying with Dr. Bernstein was a quality decision at any cost because it concerns my health care. He is genuinely concerned about my well-being and that’s really important to me. I also like being able to reach him after hours and weekends. But what I like most is the house calls. In the world of medicine today, it’s amazing that a doctor will come to your house if you can’t make it to the office.”

Bernstein transitioned to concierge care with the help of Dr. Helene Wechsler, a family physician in Scottsdale, who after 15 years of being in private practice with four other doctors started her own concierge practice in 2004. Wechsler’s practice is limited to 300 patients who pay $2,000 ayear.Patients with children under 18 pay $1,000 annually per child.

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“When I first started practicing 19 years ago, I scheduled patients for 30-minute appointments,” Wechsler says. “But when the healthcare system moved to managed care, I could only see each person 15 minutes or less. In that amount of time you can only treat part of a person and I like to treat the whole person. As a traditional family physician, I also had mountains of paperwork and stress. But I eliminated both when I reduced my patient load and stopped accepting insurance and Medicare. “My concierge practice is peaceful and happy, and when patients walk in the door it’s a pleasant experience,” she adds.

Calling the shots 2008

Calling the Shots

Many Americans are no longer satisfied with the U.S. health care system and want to exert significant control over their own medical care. They are no longer patients in the traditional sense, but consumers who are adopting a new, more active approach to making decisions about health care treatments, services and products. They demand greater access to information, online tools and services from their physicians. They want to explore alternatives to conventional treatments. And they want to share decision-making with their doctors.

calling_shots 2008

These changing dynamics are confirmed in the 2008 Survey of Health Care Consumers conducted through the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. The survey reveals an increased desire to use technology to communicate with health care providers regarding records, appointments and answers to questions, and to gather health-related information. Findings in Arizona showed that 14 percent are willing to pay more for Internet access in order to make same-day appointments, and 22 percent want e-mail capability to ask their doctors health-related questions or treatment options. In all, consumers are interested in using in-home monitoring devices to allow them to be more active in their care; are open to new treatment approaches; and are increasingly comfortable with alternative therapies, retail health care clinics, and even traveling abroad for elective procedures.

The American health care market is far more complicated than previously thought, and is best interpreted through six consumer segments. These distinct consumer segments present opportunities — and risks — for all stakeholders in the U.S. health care industry.

The first consumer group is Content & Compliant, which accounts for 29 percent of the U.S. health care consumer market. These consumers report annual household incomes of $100,000 or higher and prefer traditional approaches to care. For this group, what the doctor says usually goes.

This is not the same for the Sick & Savvy, which make up 24 percent of the consumer market. Proportionally more consumers in this group, compared to others, report having one or more chronic conditions (52 percent). They also take greater charge of their care, are more self-reliant decision-makers and less dependent on their physicians.

Online & Onboard (8 percent) are frequent users of the system and prefer traditional approaches, but are receptive to care provided in non-conventional settings. They tend to rely more on themselves in making decisions, and use online tools and value-added services more than any other segment. They seek information and are sensitive to quality differences.

The smallest contingent — Shop & Save (2 percent) — tends to switch doctors, treatment and health plans, and make changes to their insurance more frequently than others. They are the most sensitive to the cost of health care services. They tend to prefer doctors who use traditional approaches, but are amenable to alternative and unconventional treatments. They’re more likely than others to purchase prescription drugs by mail order or online, use a retail clinic, and travel beyond their community and the United States for care.

Out & About (9 percent) are independent, preferring to make their own decisions. They use alternative approaches, consult alternative health care practitioners and substitute alternative or natural therapies for prescription medicines more than any other segment. They are sensitive to quality, seek information, use some value-added services and want to shop for and customize their insurance.

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Casual & Cautious (28 percent) is the healthiest group — only 19 percent report having one or more chronic conditions. Younger than most segments, they are also the least-insured.

In broad strokes, consumers are seeking change in three main ways:

  • Mass personalization — Consumers want their health care and insurance customized to meet their needs.
  • Evidence-based care — Consumers believe payments to doctors should be linked to evidence-based practices.
  • Disruptive innovation — Disruptive health care innovations such as medical tourism and retail clinics are giving rise to new players, new delivery models, new ways of partnering and new value propositions.

The doctor’s role and the status quo are changing, and hospitals, physicians and health plans will need to quickly adapt to capture market success. Consumers are taking greater control of decision-making and they demand better value, better service, increased transparency and personalization of services. For these reasons, the players who take the unique attitudes and preferences of consumers into account as they make strategic decisions will have a huge opportunity to win the consumer market.

Paul Keckley, Ph.D., is executive director of the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions. Kevin Wijayawickrama is a principal at Deloitte & Touche’s Arizona practice.