Tag Archives: medical school

Incoming Midwestern University students receive their white coats at a special ceremony just after the beginning of the fall semester. The University’s total enrollment in 14 graduate-level healthcare programs offered at its Glendale campus has surpassed 3,000 students for the first time this year.

Midwestern Glendale Enrollment Tops 3,000 for 1st time

Midwestern University, home to Arizona’s largest medical school and the state’s first College of Veterinary Medicine, announced the achievement of another milestone in the University’s history.

For the first time since the University’s Glendale campus was established in 1995, total enrollment in Midwestern’s 14 graduate degree programs exceeds 3,000 students. For comparison’s sake, only 136 students – 103 osteopathic medical students and 33 physician assistant students – were on campus during Midwestern’s first year of classes in the Fall of 1996.

“The mission of Midwestern University is to meet the healthcare needs of society by educating professionals who are committed to caring for others,” said Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwestern University.  “We have achieved and sustained our growth by offering quality healthcare education and by developing new academic programs for professions that are in demand, and through the clinical institutes that serve the health needs of our neighbors.”

More than 6,200 medical professionals have graduated from Midwestern University’s Glendale campus since its inception, with over 40% remaining in-state to practice.

Mayo Medical Schools Expands to Arizona

New vice dean named for Mayo Medical School

Michele Y. Halyard, M.D, a radiation oncologist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona, has been named vice dean, Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus. Dr. Halyard will be responsible for undergraduate medical education activities on the Arizona campus and will coordinate Mayo Medical School academic, curricular, and administrative activities and programs in Arizona.

Dr. Halyard’s primary focus will be providing Arizona leadership with the support necessary to establish a branch of Mayo Medical School on the Scottsdale campus.

Dr. Halyard earned her M.D. degree from Howard University, where she also completed her residency in radiation oncology. Dr. Halyard completed her fellowship in radiation oncology at Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education. She became a consultant in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, in 1989 and went on to chair the department.  Dr. Halyard is an associate professor of radiation oncology in the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and is board certified in therapeutic radiology. Dr. Halyard has had significant Mayo Clinic leadership experience, including membership on the Mayo Clinic Board of Governors in Arizona and the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees.

Most recently, Dr. Halyard was appointed as an associate medical director for Development in Arizona and she will continue to serve in that role. Dr. Halyard is an accomplished course director in the Mayo School for Continuous Professional Development, a mentor to many residents, medical students and medical professionals and a notable researcher and author.

Mayo Medical School, based on Rochester, Minn., is working with Arizona State University to expand Mayo’s medical school to the Phoenix metropolitan area. Students at all Mayo locations will have the option of completing an ASU master’s degree in the science of health care delivery as they earn Mayo medical degrees. The master’s degrees components include social and behavioral determinants of health, health care policy, health economics, management science, biomedical informatics, systems engineering and value principles of health care.

Mayo Medical School enrolls 50 medical students each year. It received 4,327 applications for those spots last year. The Arizona expansion will allow additional students to enroll. The medical school is integrated with medical practice and research at Mayo Clinic.

Bioscience helix

Ivy Foundation Renews Support for TGen Program

The Arizona-based Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation will fund a second year of the Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The internship program offers hands-on biomedical research experience for high school, undergraduate and aspiring medical school students pursuing careers in brain tumor research, neuroscience and neurogenomics.

Through the program, world-class scientific investigators at TGen guide interns in the translational process of moving laboratory discoveries along the pipeline into new treatments for patients in clinical trials.

“Based upon the success of the 2012 pilot year, we believe the Ivy Neurological Science Internship Program at TGen will inspire a new generation of leaders in this field,” said Catherine Ivy, President of The Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation. “There is an urgent and continuing need to encourage research into the intricate workings of brain cancer.”

TGen will select seven students for the program this year. Starting in June, two high-school students will participate in a 10-week summer program. Four undergraduate students will spend the fall semester at TGen, and one student planning to attend medical school will participate for a full academic year, beginning in the fall.

“Development of a local, knowledge-based workforce depends on educating and training talented students in the latest aspects of biomedical research and medicine,” said TGen President Dr. Jeffrey Trent. “The continued support from the Ivy program greatly enhances our efforts to provide hands-on experience in the area of translational research.”

In addition to brain tumor and neurological sciences research experience, Ivy interns will participate in a clinical training module that will engage them with the ultimate focus of these studies – the patient.

“TGen recognizes that we must invest in the development of the next generation of researchers and physicians; we need to prepare today’s students for the complex and challenging work awaiting them in the areas of brain tumor and neurological sciences research,” said Brandy Wells, Manager of TGen’s Education and Outreach.

For more information, please contact Brandy Wells at bwells@tgen.org or 602-343-8655.

Medical School

Medical School In Phoenix Has Its Largest Class

Eighty students will arrive this week for classes at the University of Arizona’s medical school in Phoenix.

Those students represent the largest class since the university’s College of Medicine established a downtown Phoenix campus five years ago.

The students soon will share the newly opened health sciences education building with Northern Arizona University students studying to become physical therapists and physician assistants.

The campus is scheduled to expand later this year with the groundbreakings of a 250,000-square-foot University of Arizona Cancer Center and a privately funded biotech lab next to the building anchored by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and International Genomics Consortium.

The Arizona Cancer Center is slated to become the campus’ first clinical presence with a scheduled groundbreaking later this year.

For more information on University of Arizona’s medical school, visit their website medicine.arizona.edu.