Tag Archives: Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health

health.education

UA College of Public Health adds Halpern

image003The University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health welcomes new faculty member Michael Halpern, MD, PhD, MPH, an associate professor and chair of the public health policy and management section.

Dr. Halpern has more than 20 years of experience in health services research and policy analysis, including evaluating patterns of medical care, quality of care, comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, access to care, and disparities. His research includes analyses of patient outcomes, medical treatment patterns and costs, using Medicare, Medicaid and other claims databases and national health-care surveys; assessments of patient symptoms, satisfaction and quality of life; examinations of health-care provider shortages and policies to facilitate team-based care; and program evaluations for interventions to improve preventive services, access to care and quality of care.

“I am delighted to welcome Dr. Halpern to our college. His academic portfolio will certainly strengthen our health services research program and develop the health outcomes research program. His leadership will guide the expansion of both the health outcomes and public health policy curricula to better meet the needs of both our undergraduate and graduate students,” said Iman Hakim, MD, PhD, MPH, dean of the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health.

Dr. Halpern said, “This exciting position will provide opportunities to collaborate with other researchers at the University of Arizona, work more closely with underserved populations, have greater involvement in teaching and student mentoring and assist in developing health policies for Arizona.”

Dr. Halpern received his MD and PhD in the Medical Scientist Training Program and his MPH in epidemiology at the University of Michigan. He previously worked at the University of Michigan School of Public Health, Battelle Memorial Institute, American Cancer Society, and Research Triangle Institute. Dr. Halpern serves on the Cancer Survivorship Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the Scientific Review Committee of the American College of Preventive Medicine. He has more than 130 publications and is section editor for disparities for the journal Cancer.

121277693

UA Offers Master’s Program in Health Administration

To help meet the growing demand for health care administrators, the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona in Phoenix will begin offering a new accredited Master of Public Health (MPH) in Health Services Administration program in fall 2014.

“In the rapidly changing healthcare environment, administrative positions are one of the targeted areas for growth,” said Dr. Iman Hakim, dean and professor of the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health. “The passage of the Affordable Care Act and roll-out of the health insurance marketplace only magnifies the urgency to fill the pipeline with highly trained health care professionals.”

The southwest and border communities face unique issues including high rates of uninsured, unemployment, and low education attainment.

“All of these issues affect health and well-being,” said Cecilia Rosales, MD, MS, associate professor and director of the college’s Phoenix programs. “They impact our agencies and health-care systems every day. Arizona needs a well-trained workforce that understands these issues and is prepared to manage the human and fiscal resources needed to deliver effective public health services.”

The health services administration program will provide students with the knowledge of how health care services function and the business and leadership skills needed to manage them effectively in health care services organizations. The curriculum is comprised of both public health and health administration courses, with a goal to graduate highly qualified health care administrators. Courses will be offered through a hybrid of online and classroom teaching at both the Phoenix and Tucson campuses.

Rosales said the accredited program will help state and local health agencies and health-care systems by providing a workforce with skills in leadership, financial management, health informatics, marketing and human resources.

“If you go into health services administration, whether a public or private entity, you can specialize in planning, organization, policy formulation and analysis finance, economics and marketing. Expertise in dealing with these issues can be exported to other states and applied to other constituencies throughout the U.S,” said Rosales.

Rosales added, “The array of administrative requirements necessary to successfully run a complex health care organization is broad, and the significance of providing training in this complex area simply cannot be overstated. The unique combination of public health and health care administration classes in this accredited curriculum will provide students with the tools they need to understand the multifaceted administrative and business aspects of health care.”

The master’s degree in Health Services Administration is a two-year accredited program for full-time students, and offers a part-time track for students who need the flexibility. The curriculum is tailored towards working professionals in health systems, health agencies, third- party payers and health-care supply chain organizations.

Students will have the added benefit of learning from local and nationally recognized faculty members who understand Arizona’s health care issues. “Our faculty are available to meet with students in person and provide timely and meaningful mentoring,” added Rosales.

For more information about the new degree program please contact Kim Barnes at the UA Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health-Phoenix: (602) 827-2070, coph-phoenix@email.arizona.edu.

bioscience

17th U.S. Surgeon General joins TGen advisory panel

The 17th Surgeon General of the United States and President of Canyon Ranch Institute Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, today joined the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) advisory committee on rare childhood disorders.

Dr. Carmona’s role on the National Advisory Committee for TGen’s Center for Rare Childhood Disorders (the Center) will be to help incorporate genomic technologies into the standard of care.

The Center uses rapid genomic tests to discover the genetic source of childhood ailments. Many of these rare disorders have no name, and often are just a collection of symptoms with no apparent cause.

Dr. Carmona is the keynote speaker today (Oct. 15) as TGen celebrates the opening of its clinic for the Center at 3330 N. 2nd Street, Suite 402, Phoenix, Ariz.

“Modern scientific advances are uncovering the nature and causes of disease like no other point in history,” said Dr. Carmona. “I am honored to be invited to help guide TGen’s development of this unique Center — focused on children — that uses the latest DNA technology to understand and diagnose rare disorders at the molecular level and to develop treatments for patients who previously had few, if any, options for care.

“Throughout my career, I’ve had the privilege of studying and applying genetic advances to improve the lives of my patients, and as Surgeon General of the United States, my team and I developed the successful ‘Surgeon General’s Family History Initiative’ with colleagues throughout the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help more people connect the concept of family health history and genetics to their own lives.”

The Center’s National Advisory Committee (NAC) is a core group of advisors and supporters with a passion for helping children and families affected by rare and neglected pediatric diseases and disorders.

Dr. Carmona will serve on the NAC’s Scientific-Medical Advisory Sub-Committee, which focuses on helping geneticists and health care professionals to collaborate in order to incorporate genomic technologies into the standard of care.

“Dr. Carmona brings to TGen a wealth of experience, forged through first-hand treatment of patients and by driving innovative public health programming at the individual, national, and global levels,” said NAC Co-Chair David Harbour.

“We welcome Dr. Carmona as an internationally recognized physician and health policy expert, whose knowledge and experience will help the Center bring hope and answers to our young patients and their families,” said NAC Co-Chair Jacquie Dorrance.

Born to a poor Hispanic family in New York City, Dr. Carmona experienced homelessness, hunger, and health disparities during his youth. The experiences greatly sensitized him to the relationships among culture, health, education and economic status and shaped his future.

After dropping out of high school, Dr. Carmona enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1967. While serving, he earned his General Equivalency Diploma and went on to become a combat-decorated Special Forces Vietnam veteran. After leaving active duty, he attended Bronx Community College of the City University of New York through an open enrollment program for veterans. He received an associate of arts degree. He then attended the University of California, San Francisco, where he received a bachelor of science degree (1977) and medical degree (1979). At the University of California Medical School, Dr. Carmona was awarded the prestigious gold-headed cane as the top graduate.

Trained in general and vascular surgery, Dr. Carmona also completed a National Institutes of Health-sponsored fellowship in trauma, burns, and critical care. A Fellow of the American College of Surgeons, Dr. Carmona was recruited jointly by the Tucson Medical Center and the University of Arizona to start and direct Southern Arizona’s first regional trauma care system. Dr. Carmona would later become chairman of the State of Arizona Southern Regional Emergency Medical System, a professor of surgery, public health, and family and community medicine at the University of Arizona, and the Pima County Sheriff’s Department Surgeon.

In 2002, Dr. Carmona was nominated by the president and unanimously confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the nation’s 17th Surgeon General. Dr. Carmona was selected because of his extensive experience in public health, clinical sciences, health care management, preparedness, and his commitment to prevention as an effective means to improve public health and reduce health care costs while improving the quality and quantity of life.

As Surgeon General, Dr. Carmona focused on prevention, preparedness, health disparities, health literacy, and global health to include health diplomacy. He also issued many landmark Surgeon General communications during his tenure, including the definitive Surgeon General’s Report about the dangers of second-hand smoke.

Dr. Carmona has published extensively and received numerous awards, decorations, and local and national recognitions for his achievements. A strong supporter of community service, he has served on community and national boards and provided leadership to many diverse organizations.

In 2006, Dr. Carmona became Vice Chairman of Tucson-based Canyon Ranch, a leader in the health and wellness field and President of Canyon Ranch Institute, a 501(c)3 non-profit public charity dedicated to catalyzing the possibility of optimal health for all people by translating the best practices of Canyon Ranch and its partners to help educate, inspire, and empower every person to prevent disease and embrace a life of wellness.

Dr. Carmona is also the first Distinguished Professor of Public Health at the University of Arizona’s Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and the first Dean’s Distinguished Professor of Health Promotion and Entrepreneurship at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

medical.research

UA Seeking People for Breast Cancer-Vegetable Study

University of Arizona Cancer Center researchers are seeking participants in Maricopa County for a study designed to determine if a compound found in broccoli can enhance the health-promoting effects of the breast cancer drug Tamoxifen in women at risk of developing breast cancer or those previously treated for early-stage breast cancer.

Since receiving a $3 million grant from the National Cancer Institute in 2011, UACC researcher Cynthia Thomson, PhD, RD, and her team have recruited 106 women who are taking Tamoxifen for the DIME study. Enrollment will continue both in Tucson and Phoenix, through the early part of 2014 with a goal of 170 participants.

Tamoxifen is an accepted treatment for breast cancer. Dr. Thomson, a professor of Health Promotion Sciences in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health at the University of Arizona, notes that data from diet studies of people who have a higher intake of cruciferous vegetables – cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and broccoli – suggest that intake may reduce the risk of certain cancers, including breast, colorectal, bladder and possibly prostate.

“We have previously shown that women taking Tamoxifen who eat more vegetables may decrease cancer recurrence risk. This study will test the potential health-promoting effects using one isolated bioactive compound found in cruciferous vegetables, diindolylmethane (DIM), and compare it to a placebo intervention in favorably changing hormone levels and breast characteristics like breast density,” Dr. Thomson says.

Alison Stopeck, MD, a co-investigator in the study and the director of the Clinical Breast Cancer Program at the UA Cancer Center, sees this research as a unique opportunity to determine the potential of non-invasive imaging to be a reliable biomarker for breast cancer risk. Women in the study will complete periodic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures for measuring breast characteristics.

Study participants will be asked to take the supplement or placebo for 18 months and complete periodic clinical evaluation visits. The supplement is a patented, absorption enhancing formulation of diindolylmethane known as BioResponse DIM® (also known under the tradenames Indolplex® or BR-Dim®) supplied by BioResponse, LLC, of  Boulder, Colo.

For more information about the DIME study in Maricopa County, call Dianne Parish, RN, at 602-264-4461 for Central Phoenix or Patti Blair, RN, at 480-461-3772 for Mesa. More information is also available at azcc.arizona.edu/node/3628.

The DIME Study is supported by grant number CA149417 from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

disaster

UA Receives $600,000 CDC Grant

The Mountain West Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (MWPERLC) at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health is the sole awardee of a three-year $600,000 cooperative agreement to work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help communities prepare for public health emergencies and mass casualty events.  The research is a collaborative effort between federal, state, tribal, and local partners.

Emergencies can happen at any time for any reason. Being prepared can mean the difference between a quick, easy recovery or a slow and difficult one.  Since 2005, MWPERLC has trained more than 4,500 public health professionals throughout the U.S. in emergency preparedness.

The grant will be administered by lead researcher Jeff Burgess, MD, MPH, professor and director of the Community, Environment and Policy Division at the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health and Brenda Granillo, MS, MEP, project director of the MWPERLC.

“We have seen time and time again the devastation our communities face in the aftermath of disasters; whether it is caused by natural events such as the flooding in Colorado, wildfires and hurricanes, terrorism like the Boston Marathon bombings, or unthinkable acts like the Sandy Hook Elementary shootings.  The recovery process can be slow, tedious and often overwhelming,” said Granillo.

The team will work to reduce injury related morbidity and mortality in public health emergencies by improving community preparedness and response activities though sharing lessons learned, identifying and documenting best practices, and fostering national collaboration to strengthen community resiliency.

“The support necessary to rebuild our communities requires fostering relationships and partnerships at all levels of government. This grant will provide the Center with the opportunity to advance and expand our existing work on building community resiliency,” said Granillo.

The first year will focus on identifying key issues in planning for and responding to disasters by gathering input from national and federal partners followed by engagement of the community, public health, emergency management and health systems leadership to document lessons learned using robust qualitative methods. Ralph Renger, PhD, a former faculty member of the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health who now works for the University of North Dakota, will lead the evaluation performance and measurement plan.

The Mountain West Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health has an eight year history of successfully developing, implementing and evaluating sustainable and collaborative preparedness activities at the state, local and tribal level.  Since 2005, the center has trained more than 4,500 public health professional throughout the U.S. in emergency preparedness.

native.american

UA Part of $6M research of American Indian Health

Public health researchers at the University of Arizona, along with researchers at two other higher education institutions in the state, have earned a $6 million grant to investigate health issues in American Indian communities.

The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities awarded the five-year grant to a statewide team of researchers from the UA, Northern Arizona University and Diné College to establish the Center for American Indian Resilience, also known as CAIR.

The collaborative team will study why some American Indian communities facing high rates of chronic disease and poverty seem to thrive despite adversity.

“The basic practice of public health is about understanding ways to support healthy behaviors, and we know programs that are culturally relevant are more effective,” said Nicolette Teufel-Shone, professor of health promotion sciences at the UA’s Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health.

“We will take a look at existing health behaviors and programs that target the prevention of chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease, to determine what is working and why,” Teufel-Shone said.

Teufel-Shone and Priscilla Sanderson, assistant professor of health sciences and applied indigenous studies at NAU, have been named CAIR’s co-directors. Diné College faculty on the project are Mark Bauer and Donald Robinson, both of the department of science education.
The UA public health college received $2 million of the CAIR grant, which includes collaborations with tribal communities and research projects.

“CAIR research will deepen our scientific knowledge of existing positive health outcomes in tribal communities, and then we will translate this knowledge to practice through public health education and policy,” said Sanderson, a member of the Navajo Nation.

Also under the grant, the UA public health college will collaborate with NAU and Diné College to support Diné College’s ongoing summer program to teach undergraduate students to consider and incorporate community strengths in their work as emerging public health professionals. The program combines classroom learning with hands-on experience through an internship in tribal communities.

The research project, directed by the UA, also involves a partnership with the Tucson Indian Center to interview elders about their concept of resilience and their perceptions of key factors that contribute to success in life.

Through this initiative, members of the Southwestern American Indian community will record video diaries to share their experiences of well-being.

“The goal of the video diaries project is to use existing information about which factors contribute to Native American resilience and spread this knowledge to other Native American communities,” Teufel-Shone said. “This way, researchers can learn lessons of how resilience is already effective in these communities, share experiences and allow community members to create new paths based on other people’s stories.”

Other UA College of Public Health participants include John Ehiri, director and professor; Division of Health Promotion Sciences; Agnes Attakai, director, Health Disparities Outreach and Prevention Education; Kerstin Reinschmidt, assistant professor, Health Promotion Sciences; and Rebecca Drummond, program director for Family Wellness.

NAU faculty and staff contributing to CAIR include Olivia Trujillo, professor of applied indigenous studies; Robert Trotter, Regents’ professor and chair of anthropology; Chad Hamill, assistant professor of music; Roger Bounds, associate professor and chair of health sciences; Lisa Hardy, assistant professor of anthropology; R. Cruz Begay, professor of health sciences; and Kelly Laurila, coordinator in anthropology. Paul Dutton, director of NAU’s Interdisciplinary Health Policy Institute, will facilitate the executive advisory board.

Diné College faculty on the project are Mark Bauer, PhD and Donald Robinson, PhD of the Department of Science Education.

Sun Health

UA hosts Rural Health Conference Aug. 20-21

The Center for Rural Health at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, will hold the 40th Annual Arizona Rural Health Conference Aug. 20 and 21 at the Prescott Resort & Conference Center, in Prescott.

Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, administrator of the federal Health Resources and Services Administration, will deliver the Andrew W. Nichols Rural and Border Health Policy Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, Aug. 21 at 8 a.m. Wakefield will discuss the Federally Facilitated Health Insurance Marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act.

“We are delighted and honored to have Dr. Wakefield join our annual meeting,” said Dr. Dan Derksen, the Walter H. Pearce Endowed Chair and newly appointed director of the Center for Rural Health at the UA Zuckerman College of Public Health. “Between Medicaid restoration and expansion, and the implementation of the Marketplaces in Arizona, the state could see more than half of its uninsured covered by ACA provisions by 2015.”

The Rural Health Conference attracts a statewide audience of health care providers, academic, county and community health professionals, administrators, policy makers, and state and local leaders. This year’s gathering is notable for the 40th anniversary milestone and the focus on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act in Arizona.

For registration information, admission, directions to the conference and the agenda, please visit www.crh.arizona.edu or contact Center for Rural Health: Rebecca Ruiz, raruiz@email.arizona.edu, (520) 626-2243.

The Center for Rural Health at the UA Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health was named 2013 Outstanding Rural Health Organization in the United States by the National Rural Health Association. Home to the Arizona State Office of Rural Health, the CRH partners with other state agencies and organizations to improve the health and wellness of rural underserved populations through service, research and education.

University of Arizona College of Medicine

UA College Of Medicine Health Sciences Education Building Celebrates “Topping Out”

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of MedicineA major Downtown Phoenix development project hit a big milestone October 5, 2011 with the “topping out” of construction of the Health Sciences Education Building on the campus of the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

The final beam of the building was ceremoniously lifted and secured at its highest point with workers and college staff and faculty celebrating midday Wednesday.

The $129M, 264,000 SF building – being built in a joint venture by DPR Construction and Sundt Construction, Inc. – will allow the state to take the next step in expanding its medical education facilities.

The new six-story building will house administrative offices, lecture halls, classrooms, class laboratories and a learning resource center. CO Architects is the design and executive architect; Ayers Saint Gross is associate architect and master planner.

The College of Medicine-Phoenix plans to expand its class size and add instruction as Northern Arizona University will also bring a physician’s assistant and physical therapy programs to the Health Sciences Education Building. 


In its fifth year in Downtown Phoenix, the College of Medicine currently anchors the campus with 192 medical students, admitting 48 per year. After the completion of the Health Sciences Education Building in 3Q 2012, the university plans to admit up to 80 students per class and eventually reach a capacity of 120 per class to address the critical need for physicians in Arizona.

Also on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus are the UA College of Pharmacy and the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute and International Genomics Consortium, and Arizona Biomedical Collaborative building.

For more information about the Health Sciences Education Building, visit ahsc.arizona.edu.

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of Medicine